You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Brian Nicholas’ tag.

By now, many of you have read about the governor’s April 17 decision to use “33 barges of Tappan Zee Bridge recycled materials and 30 vessels” to build reefs at six locations north and south of Long Island.    Well, an expeditious eight days later, the first two vessels were already on the Hudson headed south.  Glenn Raymo and I positioned ourselves to document this first shipment.

Glenn positioned himself at the Walkway, where the tugs/barges were soon after daybreak.

Brian Nicholas led the procession with Witte 1405.  The Canal tender–aka T6–seemed like a toy on the barge.  For photos of some off the tenders, including T6 from four years ago, click here.

Here’s a great shot of the stripped, decapitated, and “environmentally clean”  tender.

Rebecca Ann followed pushing a dump scow.  A source says that T6 dates from the 1920s, and I’d guess that the dump scow vintage is similar.  To put this in context, check out this video of a 1928 Mack dump truck.

If you’ve never been on the Walkway, it’s a repurposed rail bridge with a “walk way.”   To catch the tow on the south side of the walkway, Glenn just stepped about 20 feet and got the next two shots.

 

Four and a half hours later, the day was bright, sun having burnt off the fog, and the tow was approaching Bear Mountain Bridge.  Walkways exist on either side of the Bridge, but one needs to cross three lanes of traffic to get from one side to the other, so I opted to take photos from the upstream side only.

Given the size of Witte 1405 relative to the single tender, I’m wondering why the urgency.  More fodder for the reef could have fit.

 

 

Note the chains used to

open the dump doors.

Many thanks to Glenn for use of his photos.  All other by Will Van Dorp, who’s thinking that if the governor holds to his word, 28 more Erie/Barge Canal vessels will descend the Hudson as part of the Reef Express.

If there exists a need for someone to document the final journey–ie, sixth boro to an actual reef location, I’d gladly step forward.

For interior shots–and more–of T6 not that long ago, click here, thanks to Tug44.

Today’s photos and text by my friend Lew, whose annotations I adapted.

“Crews with lots of blue equipment have been dredging Old Saybrook North Cove off the CT River.  Though they’ve has been here since mid-November, this is about the first chance I got to take some pictures.  I was out for a late afternoon bicycle ride and had only my phone and “beater” pocket camera.”
Off Old Saybrook,  which tug?

Here’s dredge Michigan with Brian Nicholas and Paul Andrew….

 

 

“Though the sun doesn’t cooperate for those us shore-bound by an early haul-out this time of year, they take the loaded scows out to Long Island Sound where approx 1/2 mile offshore, dredge Delaware Bay (spudded down off the Knollwood section of Old Saybrook) transloads to a larger barge that

Atlantic Enterprise takes to the New Haven dumpsite.”

Many thanks to Lew for these photos, especially this good profile of Atlantic Enterprise.

And here’s something quite unrelated . . . want reclaimed barn lumber for the finest of projects, check here.

Know this New York NY boat?

rtrl

How about this one?

rtrl3

Know this background?

rtl1

The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

rtr1

I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

rtl2

It’s Pegasus and

rtr2

Charles A and

rtl3

Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

rtr3

OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

rtrl2

And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

rtrl4

Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

rtrl5

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Please read the El Faro Relief event notice at the end of this post.  TODAY is the deadline to sign up.

It’s rained most of this week and last . . . and the forecast is the same for next week, but that just means sheltering (and wiping) the lens of the camera, as needed.    I wonder if John Huibers knows something we need to pay attention to . . .  but that’s another story.

For now, I noticed a lot of Reinauer boats the other day, like  . . . the 1971 Matton-built Zachery Reinauer,

rn

interrupted by the 1960 Blount-built Eric R. Thornton with the best logo in the sixth boro,

rn1a

the 1984 Rayco Ship and Main Ironworks Franklin Reinauer,

rn2

the 1983 Cenac Shipyard-built Stephen B,

rn3

the 1967 Main Iron Works Jill Reinauer,

rn4

the 1966 Allied Shipyard Brian Nicholas,

rn5

1973 Jakobson Lucy Reinauer,

rn6

the 2010 G and S Marine Incorporated Crystal Cutler,

rn7

the 2011 Senesco Reinauer Twins.

rn9

and the 1978 Eastern Dawn, though I know not the builder.  And it appears to the the 1947 Harbor II alongside, though I noticed that almost too late.

rn10

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been evading raindrops.

Anyone have more info on the previous Lucy Reinauer, the 1943 Odenbach Shipbuilding M/T?  Birk has this photo, but I’d love to see some more and to know what became of her.

And here’s a note from the organizers of the El Faro fundraiser event:  “On Sunday,  May 15th from 12-2 at Club Macanudo we will be holding a fundraiser for the families affected by the loss of the El Faro. All proceeds will go to the Seamen’s Church Institute El Faro Relief Fund. Pricing is $75.00 per person with Beer and Wine being served. Email me at Goodwindmaritime@hotmail.com. Please see the attached flier (the link in the first sentence above).
Please send your checks as soon as possible.   Make the checks out to Good Wind Maritime Services and mail to Good Wind Maritime Services 14451 25th Drive, Flushing, NY 11354″

First, my take on the identification of the tug from the film in yesterday’s post, it’s a model and filmed in New Deal Studios in LA.    That would explain the logistics.

So, for today, let’s start with Miss Katie . . . outbound last Thursday.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Miss Katie, 1998

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mister T, 2001

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ruth M. Reinauer, 2008, pushing RTC 102

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Discovery Coast, 2012

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kirby Moran, 2015, assisting STI Fulham

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

JRT Moran, 2015

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

McAllister Girls, 1968, moving B. No. 231

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Amy C McAllister, 1975, also assisting B. No. 231

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Brian Nicholas, 1966.   Sturgeon Bay, 1987

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Eric McAllister, 2014, passing NYK Nebula

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Irish Sea, 1969

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

James D. Moran, 2015, assisting NYK Nebula

And finally, we return to Miss Katie because two days later, she caught some unwanted attention.  Details here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This might be the “newest-named” boat in the harbor, although you’ve seen Genesis Victory here before as Huron Service both with blue trim and orange.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Laura K Moran first appeared on this blog back in 2008 here, as the sixth boro’s newbie.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m not sure the story here, but Laura K holds station off the stern of MSC Sariska, who still has the hook down.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Brian Nicholas and Evening Mist head out on assignment.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s an entire post I devoted to Brian Nicholas over four years ago.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For a frontal view of Evening Mist, click here and scroll.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here Miriam Moran escorts Hoegh Inchon.  ROROs’ cargo is quantified not in teus, but ceus, and Inchon is a 21-year-old floating parking lot with 4300-car equivalent capacity.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maryland and Franklin Reinauer meet, with missions taking them in opposite directions.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And with Red Hook we end.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Happy springtime, like it was in the photo below, showing Huron Service about seven LONG years ago.

0aaaahs

All photos taken in the real maricentric sixth boro by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  The post about the documentary Graves of Arthur Kill seems to be getting a lot of attention the past few days.  Gary Kane and I can always figure out a time when one or both of us could do a screening for a group you put together.

 

Bergen Point, a 1958 Blount product,  coming through the Narrows last weekend.  Click here for many interesting vessels from Blount that have appeared on this blog.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And a first timer on this blog . . . John Parrish.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Penn No. 4 all painted white . . . click here and scroll through to see her in PennMaritime gray.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bluefin . .  still in PennMaritime gray . . . or is that primer?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maryland . . . with reflections.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If my search window serves me right, then this is the first appearance of Katie G. McAllister on this blog.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is definitely the first appearance of Pelican State here.  The photo of this Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat is here thanks to Mike and Michele Mcmorrow.

0aaart5

And thanks to Mage, here’s Esti and

0aaaart6

Cerro Jefe.

0aaaart7

A previous view here  of Emily Ann had her as Solomon Sea.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Brian Nicholas at work in Great Kills.  Click here (scroll through) to see her as both Banda Sea and Brian Nicholas.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And finally . . . it’s the mystery tug Elbe when it was Maryland Pilot boat Maryland.  At its stern is its predecessor, Baltimore.  I haven’t found out much about Baltimore.  Any help?  About Maryland, Capt. Brian Hope–who shared this photo, said this, “In 1985 and MARYLAND was donated to Greenpeace.  She was a great boat, but too expensive to operate. She had a crew of 18, plus a chief steward.  The crew worked two weeks on and two weeks off, so that, counting the steward, we had a total of 37 crew.   When we went ashore that was reduced to about 21 and our fuel, repair and food costs dropped dramatically as well.   I am very glad to see that she has been preserved (in Maassluis).  She’s a great boat!”  Thanks to a generous reader, here’s an article about her sea trials.

0aaaart11

When next I post, I hope to share photos Elbe in her restored glory.

Sorry to miss NYC’s fleet week again.

About a month ago, I posted on Brian Nicholas doing night work, a heavy metal job here.

Yesterday the tug had a different type of metal job.  Notice how the crewman in the red jacket keeps busy enroute.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s a scrap metal tow;  one scow carries the equivalent of ?? a dozen trailers?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When a tractor trailer is enroute, there’s no way to wash the windows, all the

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

windows.   Bravo, Brian Nicholas.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

All hype . . . like Camping and others . . . just to mention recent hoaxes.

Nevertheless, I made my rounds.  High winds chill to the bone but no doomsday out here . . . Brian Nicholas pushed recycling into the Kills,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Catherine Miller moved semis beyond the end of the bridge,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Nomad and Alpine Alaska waited inside the Narrows,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

as did Mount Karavawhich first appeared here almost brand-new over five years ago.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Padre Island anchored off the BAT, taking time off from vacuuming the channels south of the Narrows.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Michigan Service headed for the Kills.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OOCL Kuala Lumpur shifted  containers.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Given the hype about the apocalypse, I kept eyes wide open for debris and found some, although this is long-planned and controlled demolition.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

USCG made their own rounds.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Six years ago, I put up this winter solstice post, led off by this fine foto  . . . compliments of Richard Wonder . . .  of an elegant John B. Caddell, recently lifted off a place where floating things should never go.  And speaking of vessels finding themselves in places that should remain off limits, check out this and this article about a tanker bottomed out on the upper Hudson.   “Bakken crude”    . . . that’s a term I’ve not heard before.    If anyone upriver has fotos to share, please get in touch.

Two and half weeks ago, the big segments of the WTC antenna came to town via the roundabout called Gulf of St Lawrence and riding Witte 1407 towed by the dauntless Atlantic Salvor.  I was fortunate to capture “blue friday”  . .  on “black friday” here.   Well, today, there was a quite visible move of these segments to Pier 25, from which they’ll be trucked to the base of the WTC.

0aaaabm1

Meagan Ann arrives with Witte 1407.

0aaaabm2

Brian Nicholas here stands by with the preliminary lifting equipment.   See what Brian Nicholas was up to a few days ago here (sixth fot0).

0aaaabm3

Many thanks to l’amica dalla torre  for these “jilly-on-the-spot” fotos.    Somehow,  seattlepi.com scooped the story here with great pics.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,252 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2018
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031