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Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s that time again . . .  a glance back at exactly a decade ago.  Back in June 2009, the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon going up the Hudson kicked off with a 20th century version of the Half Moon going up the Hudson.  Note the banner hung to the old TZ Bridge along the right side of the photo.   That replica is now in the Netherlands, looking for a new home, and that bridge–parts of it–have become fish structure somewhere off Long Island.

A newish boat in town was Peter F. Gellatly, now Vane’s Long Island.

Bounty–alas her fate–was still an irregular visitor to the sixth boro.  Here she’s made up to Harvey just outboard of Frying Pan.

Brian Nicholas moves a scrap barge out of the East River.

Paul T. Moran made one of her really rare visits to the sixth boro.

Container vessels calling in the ports of NY and NJ had not yet become UL . . .  ultra large versions

Harvey follows Half Moon northbound on the Hudson.

Michigan Service and Erie Service gather near IMTT.

Sisters assists with a tanker, and

here’s more of the River Day procession marking the year of Half Moon the first.

All photos taken in June 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a different perspective on the sixth boro, different from my more usual ones.  And in this morning light, Sarah Ann looks like a beauty as she heads somewhere past Robbins Reef Light and

well . . . along that island.

Let’s continue trying to get some different POVs.  Patricia has some fine lines here accentuated by the low light of dawn.

Elk River and Hunting Creek pass, with missions in opposite directions.

Evelyn Cutler moves product for somewhere up the North River.

Paula Atwell moves garbage containers past an incoming green new shipment, and

Julie Anne, a new one for me in the sixth boro although I have posted a “down south” photo of her here, moves a scow up toward the Passaic River.  Notice that until I got to the Norfolk tugs, there were no tugs with even a drip of red paint on them in this post?

And finally, Brian Nicholas is neither a huge nor a small tug, 72′ loa, but as she passes the stern of CMA CGM Nabucco, she

looks almost like a toy.  My first reaction was excitement  . ..  erroneously thinking I’d see either the elusive  Susan E. or Elizabeth Anna.  But don’t get me wrong, greetings to Brian Nicholas!

All photos and sentiments here the product of and/or the opinion of Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Previous installments can be found here.

Thomas and Ellen,

Thomas and Meagan Ann,

Meagan Ann and DS 71

Meagan Ann solo

Emily Ann and SMM 157, and

Brian Nicholas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

By now, many of you have read about the governor’s April 17 decision to use “33 barges of Tappan Zee Bridge recycled materials and 30 vessels” to build reefs at six locations north and south of Long Island.    Well, an expeditious eight days later, the first two vessels were already on the Hudson headed south.  Glenn Raymo and I positioned ourselves to document this first shipment.

Glenn positioned himself at the Walkway, where the tugs/barges were soon after daybreak.

Brian Nicholas led the procession with Witte 1405.  The Canal tender–aka T6–seemed like a toy on the barge.  For photos of some off the tenders, including T6 from four years ago, click here.

Here’s a great shot of the stripped, decapitated, and “environmentally clean”  tender.

Rebecca Ann followed pushing a dump scow.  A source says that T6 dates from the 1920s, and I’d guess that the dump scow vintage is similar.  To put this in context, check out this video of a 1928 Mack dump truck.

If you’ve never been on the Walkway, it’s a repurposed rail bridge with a “walk way.”   To catch the tow on the south side of the walkway, Glenn just stepped about 20 feet and got the next two shots.

 

Four and a half hours later, the day was bright, sun having burnt off the fog, and the tow was approaching Bear Mountain Bridge.  Walkways exist on either side of the Bridge, but one needs to cross three lanes of traffic to get from one side to the other, so I opted to take photos from the upstream side only.

Given the size of Witte 1405 relative to the single tender, I’m wondering why the urgency.  More fodder for the reef could have fit.

 

 

Note the chains used to

open the dump doors.

Many thanks to Glenn for use of his photos.  All other by Will Van Dorp, who’s thinking that if the governor holds to his word, 28 more Erie/Barge Canal vessels will descend the Hudson as part of the Reef Express.

If there exists a need for someone to document the final journey–ie, sixth boro to an actual reef location, I’d gladly step forward.

For interior shots–and more–of T6 not that long ago, click here, thanks to Tug44.

Today’s photos and text by my friend Lew, whose annotations I adapted.

“Crews with lots of blue equipment have been dredging Old Saybrook North Cove off the CT River.  Though they’ve has been here since mid-November, this is about the first chance I got to take some pictures.  I was out for a late afternoon bicycle ride and had only my phone and “beater” pocket camera.”
Off Old Saybrook,  which tug?

Here’s dredge Michigan with Brian Nicholas and Paul Andrew….

 

 

“Though the sun doesn’t cooperate for those us shore-bound by an early haul-out this time of year, they take the loaded scows out to Long Island Sound where approx 1/2 mile offshore, dredge Delaware Bay (spudded down off the Knollwood section of Old Saybrook) transloads to a larger barge that

Atlantic Enterprise takes to the New Haven dumpsite.”

Many thanks to Lew for these photos, especially this good profile of Atlantic Enterprise.

And here’s something quite unrelated . . . want reclaimed barn lumber for the finest of projects, check here.

Know this New York NY boat?

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How about this one?

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Know this background?

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The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

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I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

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It’s Pegasus and

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Charles A and

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Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

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OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

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And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

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Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Please read the El Faro Relief event notice at the end of this post.  TODAY is the deadline to sign up.

It’s rained most of this week and last . . . and the forecast is the same for next week, but that just means sheltering (and wiping) the lens of the camera, as needed.    I wonder if John Huibers knows something we need to pay attention to . . .  but that’s another story.

For now, I noticed a lot of Reinauer boats the other day, like  . . . the 1971 Matton-built Zachery Reinauer,

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interrupted by the 1960 Blount-built Eric R. Thornton with the best logo in the sixth boro,

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the 1984 Rayco Ship and Main Ironworks Franklin Reinauer,

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the 1983 Cenac Shipyard-built Stephen B,

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the 1967 Main Iron Works Jill Reinauer,

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the 1966 Allied Shipyard Brian Nicholas,

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1973 Jakobson Lucy Reinauer,

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the 2010 G and S Marine Incorporated Crystal Cutler,

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the 2011 Senesco Reinauer Twins.

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and the 1978 Eastern Dawn, though I know not the builder.  And it appears to the the 1947 Harbor II alongside, though I noticed that almost too late.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been evading raindrops.

Anyone have more info on the previous Lucy Reinauer, the 1943 Odenbach Shipbuilding M/T?  Birk has this photo, but I’d love to see some more and to know what became of her.

And here’s a note from the organizers of the El Faro fundraiser event:  “On Sunday,  May 15th from 12-2 at Club Macanudo we will be holding a fundraiser for the families affected by the loss of the El Faro. All proceeds will go to the Seamen’s Church Institute El Faro Relief Fund. Pricing is $75.00 per person with Beer and Wine being served. Email me at Goodwindmaritime@hotmail.com. Please see the attached flier (the link in the first sentence above).
Please send your checks as soon as possible.   Make the checks out to Good Wind Maritime Services and mail to Good Wind Maritime Services 14451 25th Drive, Flushing, NY 11354″

First, my take on the identification of the tug from the film in yesterday’s post, it’s a model and filmed in New Deal Studios in LA.    That would explain the logistics.

So, for today, let’s start with Miss Katie . . . outbound last Thursday.

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Miss Katie, 1998

 

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Mister T, 2001

 

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Ruth M. Reinauer, 2008, pushing RTC 102

 

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Discovery Coast, 2012

 

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Kirby Moran, 2015, assisting STI Fulham

 

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JRT Moran, 2015

 

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McAllister Girls, 1968, moving B. No. 231

 

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Amy C McAllister, 1975, also assisting B. No. 231

 

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Brian Nicholas, 1966.   Sturgeon Bay, 1987

 

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Eric McAllister, 2014, passing NYK Nebula

 

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Irish Sea, 1969

 

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James D. Moran, 2015, assisting NYK Nebula

And finally, we return to Miss Katie because two days later, she caught some unwanted attention.  Details here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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