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Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Most of you know that dawn is my favorite time. Yesterday dawn–between 0545 and 0645–was quite busy;  two of the five vessels that transited the KVK were among the largest–so far–that call in the sixth boro.

Pink sky with gradations, faded purple Brooklyn, huge but silent shapes, and spots of artificial lights.

Birds silhouetted and reflections in the still water make the scene as one point over by central western Brooklyn turns a deeper shade of red.

When the ship blocks the blinding rising sun, its name becomes legible.

Once CS Rose passes my vantage point, all that light illuminates the details.  Three tugboats along her starboard, one on stern, and one on the far side, the port side.

Not much later–another smaller container ship has passed–the next hulking shape appears, and the light has already turned gradations of yellow.

When CMA CGM Mexico blocks the rising sun, details become available  . . .

 

By now, 0645, the light suggests the sun has created daylight.

 

Tugboats on Rose include  James D, Mary Turecamo, Kimberly Turecamo, and Kirby.  Tugboats on Mexico include Marie J Turecamo, JRT, Kimberly Turecamo, and Miriam.

All photos, WVD.

 

This photo is out out order in this sequence, just to show scale.

Before a tanker leaves, the boom gets removed by these small boats, which

also help handle the lines.

Miriam came in to deliver the pilot(s).  She then gets a line toward the stern to pull the tanker off the dock.

Marie J. gets a line on the bow to pull it away from the dock for the turning.

The top photo would come here; once the bow has moved off the dock sufficiently for Marie J to get behind the bulb, she does so . .  and pushes the bow around while Miriam holds the stern.

 

 

She’s now more than 90 degrees off the starting point, and turning into a flood tide, if I remember correctly.

 

Once the tanker’s turned 180 and pointed into her desired course, Marie J. speeds ahead to get onto the port side of the tanker.

All photos, WVD.

It’s March 1, and that invites a look back to March 2011.

Vinalines Queen  is where I need to start.  Less than two years after I took this photo, the 2005 bulk carrier was lost on a run between Morowali, Indonesia and China with a cargo of nickel ore, with the loss of all hands (22) except one. 

Morowali has 19 nickel smelters.  Nickel ore is considered the most dangerous bulk commodityTwo other nickel ships were lost in December 2010. Here‘s info about the single survivor of the sinking. 

Assist here is provided by Miriam Moran.

Kongo Star was just off the ways when I took this photo;  and the small tanker (13011 dwt) is still working and currently near Rotterdam, in fact, in the town where my father was born.

Entering the KVK, it’s Ross Sea and Houma, each with a barge. Houma was scrapped a few years ago already.  Ross Sea is currently in Philly.

Heron, here passing CMA CGM Puget, was sold to a Nigerian company in 2012.  The 4404 teu ship dates from 2002 and is currently traveling between Korea and Mexico.

 

Greenland Sea shows her Candies origins.  She may currently be laid up.  Torm Kristina just passed Cape Town, on a run between Asia and South America.  She’s a large handysize crude tanker launched in 1999.

Ron G, now Captain Mark, is docked in Jacksonville.

It was in March 2011 that I first visited Puerto Rico.  In Fajardo, I saw Isla Grande and Cayo Norte.  Both are Blount boats, launched in 1976 and 1995, respectively.   Cayo Norte is still working in Puerto Rico, although I’m not so sure about Isla Grande. 

The 1973 Harvey Gamage is currently near Charleston SC.    Can you recognize the tall ship off her stern?

Of course, it’s Bounty, launched in 1960 and lost over 100 miles SE of Cape Hatteras during Hurricane Sandy.

March 2011 was a busy month.  I’ll post more photos of the month later.

All photos, WVD.

 

This photo of aframax BW Thalassa I took on Friday.  Note the green BW slash about a third of the shiplength back from the bow. 

Here’s a photo from Saturday, 24 hours later, after rain and fog have moved in.  Note the green BW slash on the tanker beyond the Evergreen ship?

Ever Focus appears to have a maximum load aboard as she speeds toward Colon PA.  A bit beyond Ambrose, AIS showed her at 19.2 kts, 22 mph.

See the Manhattan skyline?  Not much.  A few outlines appears along the shore of Manhattan, but nothing more shows.  The new Janice Ann Reinauer is among the tug/barge units anchored there.

Bruce A. heads for a job,

as do Miriam and Helen.

CL Christina was inbound for Claremont, but again, fog obscured the bright shiny detail.  Of course, the scrap loaded in Claremont has no bright shiny detail either.

All photos, WVD, who finds the fog frustrating even though it was around 50 degrees F, but this is how the harbor looks sometimes.

Unrelated:  I just finished Shadow Divers, an account of the discovery of a U-boat wreck 60 miles off Point Pleasant.  It’s a compelling read.  It turns out there’s a counter-narrative also, Shadow Divers Exposed by Gary Gentile. 

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

Thanks to Skip Mildrum, here are some photos most appropriate for this day. 

It’s dark and overcast, but lights in the port and on the boats brighten up the night.  Winter began, I’m told, at 0502 this morning.

Early sunset or late sunrise, it doesn’t really matter . . . since the daylight will be getting longer again after today.

Many thanks to Skip for use of these photos.

Last year’s winter solstice post was here. Before that several years I did lighthouses  and before that . . . here.  See how other places do it here.

 

 

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

Remember Laura Maersk, the unusual tow from back in mid-June?  An engine room explosion disabled her, and she had to be towed in for repairs.  Well . . .  below are her tracks from yesterday . . .  first sea trials . . . aka a “test drive” and then

she made a beeline for Panama, an excellent place to load. I forgot to mention it, but the two ULCVs in a recent post, Hyundai Drive was arriving from Cartagena CO and Cosco Shipping Rose, from Limon Bay Panama.

Before leaving, she was very light,  like this.

Remember Mendonca came into port about two weeks ago?

Her portside stern half of the vessel has been stripped of coating.  In a blown up version of the photo below, i count at least 10 yard workers.

One might conclude, correctly, that Maersk has the largest container fleet in the world by the number of Maersk vessels calling here.  Below the Gunhilde, 1200′ loa, gets escorted in by Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

CPO Bremen, previously called Vancouver Express,  heads out, as

does

Northern Magnum, previously called Los Angeles Express.

CMA CGM T. Jefferson winds her way through the KVK.

Johanna C loads scrap.

Spinel arrives,

as does MSC Elodie.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

There’s something unusual about the vessel coming in with the assistance of Miriam Moran. See what it is?

Maybe I should say this vessel is a veritable unicorn.  Thai script is unusual.

I read the Thai writing system is based on Old Khmer.

She draws a little over 20′ if I read this right.

The PSL expands to Precious Shipping Line, based in Bangkok.  They operate 40 vessels, including 31 handysize, which includes Nalinee Naree. I don’t recall seeing another PSL vessel in the sixth boro.

Now you wouldn’t expect a Thai vessel to be registered in Majuro or Valetta or Monrovia, although . . . .

 

It’s the cargo stanchions that make this bulk carrier unusual.  See above and below the rectangular structures around the outboard side of the deck.  I’m quite sure she didn’t head into Port Newark to load logs, so they must be permanently installed.  To see what can go wrong with the stanchions in rough weather, click here. According to this article, Nalinee Naree would therefore be called a logger.

All photos, WVD, who wrote about loggers once before here, albeit from the other side of the continent.

Happy August.

 

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