You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Miriam Moran’ tag.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

Thanks to Skip Mildrum, here are some photos most appropriate for this day. 

It’s dark and overcast, but lights in the port and on the boats brighten up the night.  Winter began, I’m told, at 0502 this morning.

Early sunset or late sunrise, it doesn’t really matter . . . since the daylight will be getting longer again after today.

Many thanks to Skip for use of these photos.

Last year’s winter solstice post was here. Before that several years I did lighthouses  and before that . . . here.  See how other places do it here.

 

 

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

Remember Laura Maersk, the unusual tow from back in mid-June?  An engine room explosion disabled her, and she had to be towed in for repairs.  Well . . .  below are her tracks from yesterday . . .  first sea trials . . . aka a “test drive” and then

she made a beeline for Panama, an excellent place to load. I forgot to mention it, but the two ULCVs in a recent post, Hyundai Drive was arriving from Cartagena CO and Cosco Shipping Rose, from Limon Bay Panama.

Before leaving, she was very light,  like this.

Remember Mendonca came into port about two weeks ago?

Her portside stern half of the vessel has been stripped of coating.  In a blown up version of the photo below, i count at least 10 yard workers.

One might conclude, correctly, that Maersk has the largest container fleet in the world by the number of Maersk vessels calling here.  Below the Gunhilde, 1200′ loa, gets escorted in by Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

CPO Bremen, previously called Vancouver Express,  heads out, as

does

Northern Magnum, previously called Los Angeles Express.

CMA CGM T. Jefferson winds her way through the KVK.

Johanna C loads scrap.

Spinel arrives,

as does MSC Elodie.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

There’s something unusual about the vessel coming in with the assistance of Miriam Moran. See what it is?

Maybe I should say this vessel is a veritable unicorn.  Thai script is unusual.

I read the Thai writing system is based on Old Khmer.

She draws a little over 20′ if I read this right.

The PSL expands to Precious Shipping Line, based in Bangkok.  They operate 40 vessels, including 31 handysize, which includes Nalinee Naree. I don’t recall seeing another PSL vessel in the sixth boro.

Now you wouldn’t expect a Thai vessel to be registered in Majuro or Valetta or Monrovia, although . . . .

 

It’s the cargo stanchions that make this bulk carrier unusual.  See above and below the rectangular structures around the outboard side of the deck.  I’m quite sure she didn’t head into Port Newark to load logs, so they must be permanently installed.  To see what can go wrong with the stanchions in rough weather, click here. According to this article, Nalinee Naree would therefore be called a logger.

All photos, WVD, who wrote about loggers once before here, albeit from the other side of the continent.

Happy August.

 

Coming in past the obsolete and almost-development-obscured Coney Island parachute jump, it’s a science ship.

R & R . . . that stands for “research and recreation.”  Ocean Researcher has worked in the area for over a year, but she’s still an unusual vessel for the sixth boro.  And the small craft below . . . that IS my dream boat, a Grover 26.  Believe it or not, a version of that crossed the Atlantic back in the 1980s, with crew and builder from Freeport NY.

Ocean Researcher has been mapping the sea bed over in the area where the Atlantic City wind farm will be planted.

The Grover towing a tender.  Last year around this time I was contemplating getting a Grover 26.  My reservation . .   you can’t have too many toys.

I’m not sure why OR gets escorted in each time, given that it likely has some fine maneuvering tools and skills.

Ah . . . the Grover, it calls to me.  Maybe I can lease one for a summer and make a long trip.  I’m baring my soul here.

Gardline operates this vessel.  I saw one person on deck;  I wonder how many work aboard.

sigh . . .

With all the exotic bathymetric vessels calling in the sixth boro, I wonder how long it’ll be before pre-assembled modules will begin appearing.

All photos . . . WVD, who invites you to e-join me on Tuesday, for a synchronous or asynchronous Erie Canal tour.

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

I won’t ask which tug that is, featureless though it is, given the title.  I’m actually astonished that after some 4450 posts I’ve not yet dedicated a post to this tugboat.

That’s Brendan Turecamo on starboard bow and Miriam Moran on port.  Brendan is four years older than Miriam, which was christened in November 1979 and has worked in the sixth boro ever since.

 

She’s named for the  . . . Miriam Moran, wife of the Moran President from 1964 until 1987, if I read the archives correctly.

 

She has appeared on this blog hundreds of times;  one of the earliest was in Random Tugs 001,  back in 2007 when I still located relevant text below photos, unlike above them, as I do now, since one reads from the top . . .

Hat tip to this hard working tug, and her sister Margaret, two of the five tugs of the Dorothy Moran class. Spot differences?

I see at least one, but no doubt there are more both inside and out but visible only to the connoisseur.

All photos, WVD.

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

Name the shipping line?

Ships are color-coded after all . . .  all ships of this line are the same color as this one being escorted in by Jonathan C and Miriam Moran.

More and

more clues are here.

Lenient is surely not the first vessels of Evergreen that I’ve watched transit the port waterways., although

it’s the first I’ve seen loaded–or unloaded–in this zoned manner.

 

 

All photos today by WVD, who took these photos a few weeks ago.

More “thanks to” posts already planned, but if you have some relevant photos to share, I’d love to receive them.

 

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