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Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday morning two container ships with length (loa) of 366 meters or more occupied dock space in Port Newark.  To my knowledge, no longer cargo ship has yet called here, and since they’d each been in port more than a day, I figured I’d get some photos of them outbound under the Bayonne Bridge.  One was 366 m x 48 m (144,131 dwt), and the other was possibly 367 m x 42 (116,100).  Either would be great, both would be superb.

And remember last month I had the photos of JRT Moran underway moving astern?  Well, check out the photo of James D Moran below, on a towline with the 367 m Gunhilde.

I’ll identify these tugs (l to r) so that you can trace their evolution in this turn.  James, Brendan, JRT, and Kirby tethered to the stern.

 

Translating that 42 m breadth, I count 17 containers across.

James D efficiently drops the line and pivots to starboard.

 

Here I assume Brendan is still on the portside.  Was Miriam (farthest left) involved all along or simply passing through?

In that clutch of three Moran tugs, 18,000 horsepower labors.

Kirby Moran is still on the towline.

 

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Ringkøbing sounds like a pleasant place to visit in summer, not really a port.

So here’s a puzzle:  Gunhilde left port around noon yesterday, but by evening she was back after merely traveling to the outside of the Ambrose Channel , making a wide turn to port, and then re-entering the Channel to anchor overnight in Gravesend Bay.  As of this writing, she appears to have set out for Norfolk once again.  Any stories?

Also interesting, if the AIS info was correct, Gunhilde arrived in NYC after a nearly 19-day voyage from Salalah, the old spice and incense port.  Look it up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what Gunhilde‘s air draft is.

And as it turned out, the 144, 131 dwt vessel left port  . . . after dark.

 

. . . in this case, Moran ship-assist tugs in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C leaves the waving lady to port,

James D waits with Brooklyn to port,

Margaret waits over closer to Red Hook,

Miriam treads water over along Bay Ridge,

JRT prepares to head dockside,

Kirby goes to the next job

Jonathan C and Kirby heading out to meet a ship,

Jonathan C prepared to exert counterforce,

And we’ll end with Margaret and James D following a box boat into the Kills.  All this you can see repeatedly every day of the year in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you all a happy, safe, healthy, and thriving 2018.

 

I first used this title seven years ago, and a comparison shows how much things have changed:  some box ships “dead”, tugs modified and moved around, and the Bayonne Bridge clearance now above 151′.

Two of the three tugs waiting for Tage were James D and JRT, both 6000 hp tugs probably not even on the drawing board back in 2010 when the first post by this title was published.

Although CMA CGM Tage has the same midships bridge design as CMA CGM Roosevelt, she is considerably smaller, large though she is.  Tage has 9365 teu capacity compared to Roosevelt‘s 14000+.  Roosevelt first called here in September, and is currently back on the East Coast.  I missed that event because of a Great Lakes gallivant.   Note the next box ship a few miles behind her in the Ambrose Channel. In fact, five in a row lined up.

Here she passes Norton’s Point Light before

the docking pilot

comes aboard.

Compared with CMA CGM Roosevelt, Tage is 200 feet shorter.

The third tug on this arrival is Miriam Moran. 

Comparing the photos above and below–same shot wth different cropping–you can see some of what else was in proximity.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders when the Roosevelt will return (she was here again in November)  or the next even-bigger ship comes in and eclipses Roosevelt‘s record.  Actually last night a 14,000-teu Cosco Glory –same size as Roosevelt–was escorted into Port Elizabeth.

Anyone know CMA CGM Tage‘s namesake?

 

I’d put Orsula down as saltie, an ocean-going vessel of dimensions that allow her to travel deep freshwater inland, here a few days after the longest day of 2017 as far inland as Duluth; that’s 2000 miles from the Ocean.  In fact, here she’s headed for Europe, likely with a cargo of grain.  Last year, I caught her upbound just above Montreal.

Calling Atlantic Olive a saltie might be disputed, since here she’s departing the saltwater of NYC for the saltwater of the sea.  Olives can be salty, and maybe there needs to be a term for vessels that never leave saltwater . . .  other than ocean-going.

Ditto Onxy Arrow.  But since part of the goal of this post is to illustrate the variety of ocean-going vessels, behold a RORO. As cargo, there might be cars, trucks, army tanks, construction equipment, or anything else that can get itself aboard of its own power.  You might remember this previous post involving Onyx Arrow.

Marc Levinson’s The Box provides a good introduction to this relatively new shipping concept.

The sixth boro sees a lot of tankers and

container ships.

ACL offers the latest design in CONRO vessels, accommodating both containerized and RORO cargo.

Some bulk carriers have self-unloading gear.

Some otherwise obsolete break bulk cargo ships are adaptively repurposed as training vessels. 

Size is key to true salties being able transport far into the interior of North America via the Saint Lawrence Seaway locks.

This is not a cargo vessel, or as Magritte might have said, “Ceci n’est pas un cargo.”

Some CONRO vessels have the bridge forward, almost as an adaptation of a classic laker design.

And to operate in cold seas, hulls have special design and material modifications.

And at risk of making this a baker’s dozen, I have to add Orange Ocean, great name for a transporter of my favorite fluid.  Of course, this blogger cherishes other fluids as well, such as those once transported by the likes of Angelo Petri, as seen here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this as just 12 of many  more types.

 

Given the location of the sixth boro, it’s not surprising how often “atlantic” appears in post titles.

It’s not quite an oxymoron, but those two words juxtaposed certainly seem odd unless you look at the context . . .    more on this at the end of the post.  But olive?  And I’m thinking the branch may be more needed now than the fruit . . .  Atlantic Olive Branch . . . on AIS?

For now, in this bright and rich morning light, let’s arc around the MR tanker and her escort . . .  Note the ship’s crew checking out the gangway . . .

as the ship passes what could be the village of St. George . . . and that link tells me I need to visit Fort Hill in the background there.

Escorting the tanker into the dock more or less straight ahead are Miriam Moran and Brendan Turecamo.

For all the apparent “non-sixth boro ness” of the tanker, the contact info for Diamond S is Connecticut . . .

Here’s looking back toward the POV of the first photo.

Happy Friday . .  .  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 53.

So many large ships pass through the sixth boro that unlimited time and a large staff of passionate observers could make ship watching (and learning from the experience) a tourist attraction.  Some of the names intrigue . . . like Stove Friend . . . recently built in the home of a quarter of all seafarers, the Philippines.

Axel Maersk may be one of the “longest” container ships that have called in the sixth boro, loa 1155′ x 140,’  assisted here by JRT, Jonathan C, and Miriam Moran.

Ibrahim Dede, here with escort Amy C McAllister, has been calling in NYC for almost as long as I’ve been doing this blog.

Eternal Ace . . . one of the 6400-car capacity PT, looks quite streamlined for a PCC or PCTC, but a newer design is coming . ..

Navios Venus is another fairly new bulk carrier.

I’ve seen CMA CGM Maupassant before, but this is the first time featured on this blog.  Kirby Moran, along the starboard side, seems to have a swell approaching from astern.

Liberty . . . last time I saw her she was Topeka, one of the T-class, and yet I can find no reference to a name change.  Hmmm.

Tanker MTM New Orleans . . . barely over a year old, is assisted here by Eric McAllister.

SCT Matterhorn leaving the Narrows bound for sea here has Basel as her homeport.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who just found out about this related event . . . related in that it focuses on the wet 2/3s of the planet.

 

Here are previous weather posts, and although today the sixth boro and surrounding land masses are experiencing the first serious snowfall this season, this post is not about that.  Rather, it’s about something I saw and felt yesterday, when it was 65 degrees F for a few midday hours.  65!!

So here was the weather phenomenon photo taken at 0834.  I take it that’s a squall line, but it seemed so isolated.

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Here was the scene at 0826.  CMA CGM Amber headed into Port Elizabeth with JRT on the stern quarter.  Tomorrow I’ll have more Moran photos.  Notice how clear and calm it was right at the bridge, although Elizabethport seems enveloped in some mist.

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0827 . . . shows HMS Justice in that mist.

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So here I repeat the 0834 photo of that line moving rapidly in my direction.

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Here’s 0840 and

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below,  0841, as Jonathan C escorted CMA CGM Georgia around Bergen Point to Port Eliz.  Notice the dull finish on the Bayonne Bridge, since that squall line has obscured the morning sun at my back.  The temperature also dropped noticeably.

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At 0846, besides Jonathan C, we can now see (l to r) Jennifer Turecamo with barge Portland, James D., and Miriam.

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By 0922 my back was nicely warmed by the sun again, with the temperatures heading to a blue sky 65 in February, although Elizabeth seemed still misted in.

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All photos taken on February 8 by Will Van Dorp.  Did anyone else see and feel this front move through?

 

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

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0846 hr . . .

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0904

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Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

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at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

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lots of other vessels, although

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something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

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Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

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It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

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It’s USS DDG 96,

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HMCS D 282,

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WMEC 911,

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HMCS MM 700,

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HMCS MM 708,

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LHD 5,

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DDG 99,

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and LSD 43.

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At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

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WLM 552.

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An E-2 flew by too.

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The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

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