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Miriam Moran looks to be alone, with a half dozen other units in the distance, but

she’s converging with a pack.

Minutes later, Kirby takes the stern of the ULCV, and

James D. emerges from the far side, where she landed a docking pilot.

Then, Miriam and Kimberly

like choreography

assume their positions and paths

 

 

and assist Monaco Bridge into the terminal.

All photos, WVD, who can’t get enough of this.

Back to historical Barge Canal photos tomorrow, but today I’m back in the boros, where the birds are singing in the sunny low   

60s!  Because I’ve been inland, all photos come from very recent archives, like Balsa 85, a small general cargo carrying a bulk cargo of sugar in the holds of her petite 348′ x 62′ hull.

Navig8 Perseverance could not be more different:  a crude oil tanker 817′ x 144′, carrying oil from somewhere on one planet earther.

STI Brooklyn is a Panamax oil/chemical tanker, 600′ x105′.  Want more STI (Scorpion Tankers Inc.) names?  Click here.

Stena Impulse has exactly the same dimensions as STI Brooklyn, but a very different superstructure. 

Here and here are other Stena Imp…. tankers.

Steam Atlantic, nice name, is smaller:  482′ x 79′.  Her sister vessel Stream Pacific can be found here.

Suddenly ships and containers marked Wan Hai are appearing.

Wan Hai 301, 984′ x 105′, follow the nomenclature pattern this blog does.  Numbers in lists may not be elegant, but they are effective.

And among the largest container ships in the boro, it’s

CMA CGM Argentina, measuring in at 1200′ x 167′ and some change. 

All photos, WVD, from my oceanic archives and on the first real day of winterspring.

 

I’ve mentioned before that I’m always looking for novelty.  Here’s one, new to me at least,

the 4400 hp Chincoteague with Double Skin 802.  I’d love to get closer-up pics one of these days.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer, a 7200 hp beauty twenty years almost senior, passes Chincoteague on her way to

rejoin her barge, RTC 135.

Meanwhile Miriam Moran follows in a ship as one of the assists.

Moments earlier, the 1979 3000 hp Miriam had accompanied 1982 4610 hp  Doris Moran to meet the ship.

The 2021 4000 hp Jordan Rose, ex-Evening Star and now in Rose Cay colors, is high and dry alongside Sorenson (?) Miller on the hard at Bayonne Drydock.

The 2008 4200 hp Pocomoke passes the KV buoy, which made soothing noises as it rose and settled in the chop.

The 1999 4500 hp Patrice heads out to meet a ship.

 

And finally, 1999 3600 hp Stephen Dann looked particularly good as she headed out to her next job.

All photos, this week, WVD.

 

Let’s go back to winter in the sixth boro today, with photos I’ve taken in the past two weeks.  As of the other day, this was the last Bouchard, unless I’ve missed some others somewhere.

Do you recognize this McAllister tugboat?

And this one has been here the past few weeks as well.  Rowan is about 30′ longer than Gregg with a few hundred more horsepower as well.

Miriam here has a hold on one of the lower chocks.

 

 

 

Without magnification, I couldn’t tell how many people were descending the gangway from the ship, but it seemed to be a crowd.

 

 

I love the morning light.

All photos, WVD.

 

We alternate back to Albert Gayer (1897-1976) tomorrow, but to maintain connection with the contemporary sixth boro, especially in the cold, crisp January light, enjoy these five varied boats from this past week.  Name the one below?

Pelham, of course.  The mighty Pelham was launched in 1960, loa is 80.4′, and has 3000 hp.

Who was rotating Marjorie K?

On the bow was Miriam Moran, 1979, 99′ loa, and also 3000 hp.

Name that boat?

Harry Mcneal is a busy boat launched in 1965, 53.3 loa, and 800 hp.

Which boat is this crewman on the bow of?

It’s the robust Rae, launched 1952, 46′ loa, and packing 450 hp.

And this one?

It’s the unmistakable Charles James, which started as a GLDD tug in 1985, 77′ loa, and 2400 hp.

All photos and any errors, WVD;  numbers from tugboatinformation.com

More Albert Gayer tomorrow.

Someone asked a question about nomenclature the other day and it may have been on FB.  The name I know is “shipside door,” and it appears to be used in cases that the pilot’s ladder would exceed 9 meters (29.5′). 

In that case the pilot would enter/depart the ship via the shipside door.

Sometimes a combo of companionway and pilot’s ladder is used.

Other times it’s the shipside door and a ladder as below and

below.

Here’s one more batch.

Note the ladder above and the winch reel below.

 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who hopes this adds some nomenclature. 

Happy 31st, aka Halloween, World Savings Day, Day of Seven Billion, National Candy Apple Day, Annual visit a cemetery or graveyard day . . . and more.  If you need suggestions for a graveyard, consider this one.  And just yesterday, I learned of this one and this one.  Who knew?!!?  Want to revisit a tugster ghost post?

For this post, there’s a quiz.  The first part is … name the oldest and newest boat here.  The second part … identify the only two boats here NOT built in Louisiana.  Of course, building is one thing, and designing is another.

All photos taken this October.  Susan Miller,

Miriam Moran and Pegasus,

Andrea,

Gregg McAllister,

Robert IV,

Buchanan 12,

Navigator,

Robert Burton,

Shawn Miller,

Pearl Coast,

Miss Ila,

Mary Turecamo,

and the always seasonal Kimberly Turecamo.

There you have it . . . And I’ll give the answers tomorrow.

And my question is . . .  who is Miss Ila‘s namesake and what do you call that shade of red?

1997.  Taken from QE2 as it overtakes a Moran tug  . . .

 

 

taken some days later as the QE2 returns, passing the Towers at dawn…

while possibly the same Moran tug meets it again.

May 1998.  Bounty arrives.

May 2000.  Morgan Reinauer passes lower Manhattan in the fog.

January 11, 2001.  Peggy Sheridan, now Apex’s  Brooklyn, passes on a cold winter day.

Places, as with people, you never know when you’ll see them the last time.  Steve wrote me once that he passed the Towers on September 2, 2001 on the way to the tugboat race starting line.  He looked at the Towers, but didn’t take out his camera …   because he’d taken so many photos of the Towers before.  I fully understand.  

I can’t say I remember my breakfast that morning or getting onto my LIRR at 05:17 that morning in Seaford, as I always did, with folks I always saw then  . . .

but I’d never see them again, because they worked in that building.

I know it’s the same for folks who’d come on watch a few hours earlier that morning with one set of orders, and then before 0900 were faced with this.

Hat tip to Joel Milton for this account of his day just about 20 years ago.  Workboat has republished in November 2001 account.   From ProfessionalMariner, here are some links.

RIP.

All photos supplied by Steve Munoz.

 

These photos I took back in September 2011.

This boat became Bouchard Boys and is now in Red Hook waiting to be repainted as Stasinos Boys.  She’s 100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp.

North Sea has had many owners;  currently she’s Sause Brothers North Sea out of Portland OR.   She’s 120′ x 34′ vessel with 4200 hp moving her.

Growler used to be one of my favorites during the years I went to the Hudson River tugboat races.  She’s changed hands several times recently and last I saw her she was in the Arthur Kill.  She’s a 1962 Jacksonville-built WYTL, as the others, 64′ x 19′ powered by a 300 single Cat D-375 V8, or once was.

How about another shot of another attempt . . .  with Maurania III and Ross Sea looking on.

Since coming off the ways in 1979, Miriam Moran has worked in the sixth boro of New York under that name.  From my outsider’s perspective, she has paid off handsomely.  At 99′ x 32′ and with 3000 hp, she has just assisted Seabourn Sojourn into the passenger terminal.

Sassafras then was three years old;  she’s since been sold out of the Vane fleet and now wears colors of Norfolk Tug as George Holland, at 90′ x 32′ and 3000 hp.

Thornton Bros. here was just a few years away from the scrapper;  she began life as John E. Matton at the shipyard in Cohoes in 1958.  Her long run is profiled in a tugster post  here. The “shipyard” link is a couple hours’ good history reading, including a surprise about a well-known naval architect who once worked for Matton.

As part of the 10-year commemoration of 9/11, USS New York came back to the sixth boro after having made her inaugural visit here two years before.  The yellow/brown water reveals the aftermath of Hurricane Irene that gorged all the streams upriver.   USS New York has a FB page here.  Escorting her here is Ellen McAllister.

Yacht Black Knight made an appearance passing the tip of Manhattan while passing from the Sound to the North River in mid-month after theb hurricane. She’s a 1968 product of Goudy & Stevens, an East Boothbay ME yard that has done a wide variety of vessels.

I’ve got a few dozen pics from this month in the archives, but let’s call this the end of this post;  all photos, WVD.

 

 

Way more tankers come to the sixth boro than you might conclude from tugster.  Here’s a sampling from the past month . . .

Front Clipper, launched in 2017, is a 157351 dwt crude tanker.   She’s currently on her way to Pemex’s Yuum Kak Naab, in Mexican waters, and said to be the world’s largest FPSO.  I’m always skeptical of superlatives.

Chem Singapore (2015) is an oil products tanker, 19996 dwt.   She’s currently in Houston via Altamira MX.

SCF Irtysh, 2009, is a 49,999 dwt oil products tanker, currently in Iceland.

Aitolos is a 2020 114,000 dwt crude carrier.  She’s currently in Corpus Christi by way of Whiffen Head, NL . . . that’s Newfoundland.

Tenacity Venture is 2017 114,439 dwt crude tanker, currently heading for the huge refinery at Pointe a Pierre, Trinidad & Tobago.

NS Laguna is a 2007 crude tanker with a dwt of 1115,831, and currently heading for Point Tupper,  where Jack Ronalds does his work.  I hope to get up there once the border opens again.

Bastille Street is a crude tanker dating from 2011, with carrying capacity of 47,906 dwt.

She’s currently Amsterdam bound.

She looked newer than 10 years old.

All photos, WVD. 

 

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