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Marjorie B. McAllister is one of those tugs that confused me when I first started paying attention.  Below the house is down, and

and here the hydraulics have raised it up to look over Bulkmaster.

Ava M. McAllister‘s elegant lines are shown off as she assists a tanker to the Arthur Kill.

Cohoes on the Hudson River was the launch site of Mary Turecamo, the last tugboat to be built there.

Thomas D. Witte originally had a telescoping wheelhouse to fit under bridges on the Erie Canal and elsewhere, but I’ve never seen photos of that superstructure.

Ever sharp-looking 2006 Pegasus goes to a job.

The veteran Ellen McAllister escorts in a tanker.  I’ll do a tanker post here one of these days soon, maybe later this week.

Capt. Brian heads eastbound on the KVK to a job.

Pathfinder is rarely seen light, but here she heads over to pick up the TUP at the trash transfer station.

Twins . . .  at the 10-year mark . . . looks to need some TLC.

Here was Twins a minute earlier, coming out of a busy but typical traffic pattern on the KVK.  I count five tugboats besides Twins.

The mighty Patrice powers her way east to pick up a job.  Note the crew aboard Chem Singapore.

And to end this post, which of course could go on and on, the 4610 hp Doris powers along a container barge from one NY/NJ container port to another, a local example of short sea shipping.

All photos, WVD.

 

James William was slinging along a slew of barges.

Galveston (I think) was coming in the other morning with Chemical Transporter.  Usually Freeport pushes Chemical Transporter, so maybe I’m just misremembering.

With the slash of safety yellow across the barge bow, I was initially confused…

until the green with red trim told me it was definitely . . . Pinuccia

Two Vane 3000s separated by five years of work . . .  team up on getting the barge gently into her berth.

Paul Andrew Brian Nicholas gets watched very closely by the Lady of the sixth boro.

And, Matthew Tibbetts exits the east end of the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who is finally back in the sixth boro . . . for a bit.  I will be doing a lot of inland/coastal traveling the next few months.  All photos of workboats wherever you are are greatly appreciated.

 

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

Jeremy Whitman took this photo of the big blue Konecranes #38 crane.  Tail boat is Candace Elise, prior to 2015 known as Stephen Dann, as hereOXBO is managing the transport.

They departed Manitowoc a week or so ago and are now in a very wide portion of the Saint Lawrence, downstream from Gaspé Peninsula.  Manitowoc, among other things, is the western terminus of SS Badger. 

Jake Van Reenen took this photo as they passed Clayton.  Molly M I has replaced Candace Elise.  The barge supporting the barge is Cashman Equipment Corp.’s JMC 253, with dimensions of 250′ x72′ x16′ deck barge.

René Beauchamp got this shot –and more on FB Seaway News-Voie maritime Infos–of the tow.  His vantage point over the South Shore Canal portion of the Saint Lawrewnce Seaway  was the Cartier Bridge.  ETA for the tow at the mouth of the Piscataqua and Kittery ME is June 17.  I look forward to photos from there.

Harry McNeal moved deck barge 1962 with crane away from the IMTT docks the other day, 

Face on, the crane appeared to be straight up.

Allan Seymour caught this Denali with tank barge DBL 104 upbound on Penobscot Bay yesterday.  If I have the right number, DBL 104 has a capacity is just over 105,000 barrels.

I spotted Paul Andrew with the recycling scow DS 171 heading for the Arthur Kill.

The destination for this is PS&S/Visy Paper.

Erich A. caught Emery Zidell up the Hudson in the notch of 83,000 bbl tank barge Dr. Robert J. Beall.

James Turecamo meets the Centerline unit up in the scenic Hudson River below Albany.

And I saw Eastern Dawn aka Toula pushing two

mini-barges.

The minis, one at a time, carry dredge spoils from the depths of Gowanus Canal.  Prior to this project, I’d never seen mini barges, or scows.

All photos, as credited: Jeremy, Jake, René , Erich, and WVD.

Unrelated, the highest bid for tug Grouper as of this morning is $26.00.

 

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Not many Bouchard boats are moving these days;  the 2016 Frederick, 125′ x 38 and 6140 hp, is an exception.

I took this just after sunrise for the backlit effect.

The 1961 Caitlin Ann stays busy;  her 2400 hp moves the 79′ x 24′ hull and whatever the load is.

Note equipment of at least three towing companies here.

Cape Henry, 2018, is one of the newer boats in the boro.  Her 109 x 36′ hull is powered with 5000 hp.

 

Matthew Tibbetts was launched the year I finished high school, 1969.  She’s 92′ x 27′ and powered by 2000 hp.

 

Fells Point, 2014, 90′ x 32′, and one of Vane’s many 3000 hp.

 

All photos, WVD.

Mackenzie Rose and Paul Andrew are eastbound, and Mary Turecamo, westbound.

 

A light Haggerty Girls westbound,

passing Laurie Ann Reinauer.

Kimberly Poling moves a barge out of the Kills.

 

A bulker in the anchorage gets bunkered by

Kings Point.  Katya Atk needs to repaint the name on the starboard bow.

And Helen Laraway makes her way east.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here were the first two installments of this series.  And what prompts this post is the news yesterday about a $200 million structure in the assembly stages just four years ago.  Click on the image below to see the post I did just four years ago.

It will be scrapped as announced yesterday here.  The physical disassembled parts will be sold as will portions of it non-fungible tokens (NFTs), whatever they are;  I can’t quite understand them even after reading this.  Doesn’t that sound like eating your cake and still having it?

You can’t save everything . . . as the next two photos from Tony A show . . . relative to the 1907 Pegasus. For comparison, check out Paul Strubeck’s thorough cataloging of the many lives of Pegasus through the many years. 

Here’s the engine that powered Pegasus for many years, originally from Landing Ship Tank, LST 121 , which itself lived only three years before being scrapped and the engine transplanted into Pegasus.

The next two photos come thanks to Steve Munoz.  The 1945 USS Sanctuary (AH-17) looked shabby here in Baltimore harbor in 1997;  it last until 2011, when it was scrapped in Brownsville, TX, then ESCO and now SteelCoast. 

Another photo from Steve shows SS Stonewall Jackson, a Waterman LASH vessel in the Upper Bay;  note the Staten Island ferries off the stern.    Scroll through and see Jackson on the beach in Alang in 2002.  Tug Rachel will arrive in Brownsville with Lihue, a very smiliar LASH vessel within a week;  she’s currently approashing the strait between Mexico and western Cuba.

Here’s a photo I took of the beautiful NS Savannah;  a recent MARAD public comment period on what should be done with her ended less than a month ago;  I’m not sure when the results will be publicly commented on.   

Sometimes preserved vessels change hands, as is the case with the 1936 Eagle, another photo from Steve Munoz taken in 1992.  

More on this tomorrow.  Many thanks to Tony and Steve for use of these photos.

Ship preservation is tough and costly.  Turning an almost-new metal structure into NFTs . . . just mind boggling.

 

 

 

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

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