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Adeline Marie was at anchor off the Coney Island Light.

Douglas J and a dump scow were shuttling to and from HARS.

 

Mary Emma was arriving from sea.

 

Joyce Brown passed a big unstuck green ship,

 

Stuff is always happening, and all photos, WVD.

I was alarmed when the steam and flare caught my eye, but when I saw that silhouette to the left, I knew it might be a good morning to take some photos.

I was [finally] going to see Douglas J close up, Douglas J, ex-Mediterranean Sea for two companies and Donald C before that.

She looks impressive in that new Donjon blue paint.   Twice before I’d just missed seeing her, but “thems the breaks” when a person has limited time to come out and photograph while sitting on the dock of  . . .  somewhere.

As I said, the 110′ x 38′ 4800 hp Douglas J looks good in this livery.

Long may she work.

All photos yesterday, WVD, who has no explanation for all the flaring in Linden yesterday.   

I’m on the road again, so today I’ll share some recent photos on the boro.  Of course, winter is still fishing time in the harbor, as Viking is doing here.

Others are feeding in the boro, like

this guy below . . . closeup of the photo above.

I’m always looking for intriguing things, like this ladder that appears to extend over board from the Miller crewboat.  I couldn’t get a closer shot.

Details always attract me, like these color-coded connection on a tanker, or just

colorful deck machinery maybe for its own sake.

Conversely, this 2008 barge needs some rustbusting and fresh paint.

Now and then a boat I’ve not previously seen in the boro shows up . . . like the 125′ fishing party boat out of Brielle NJ.

How about a tanker with a local name  . . .

or a busy lineup scene?

Of course, the down side of observing is sometimes discovering that you are yourself being observed, folks wondering who would be sitting in the 20-degree weather on a dock of the bay wasting time . . . .  Thx for checking up on me, folks.

All photos, WVD, who comes here to relax.  And speaking of, my travel schedule the next few days may preclude posting.

 

Tony A sent this along labeled as “m-o-a-t,” mother of all tugs, and Pacific Reliance is truly a large tugboat at 121′ x 42′

with 9280 hp turning two 12′ diameter propeller and pushing around a 560′ tank barge that carries 155k barrels of liquid product.  But there are larger tugboats.  Justine McAllister gets called in to assist the Crowley unit into the dock.

CMT Pike heads north about to be obscured by an incoming MSC ship.

 

Seeley pushes along a block of four scows.

 

JRT and Kirby prepare to sail a Minerva tanker.  Minerva, Roman goddess of war and other things, seems appropriate these days.

The indefatigable Ellen McAllister passes Barney Turecamo on her way to a job.

Catherine C. Miller moves Weeks crane 577 to a lift site.

Emily Ann returns from a job. 

Nicolas Vinik gallops off to a job,

following Liz Vinik, herself

follwing Gregg McAllister.

And the beat goes on . . . all photos, WVD, except of course the one from Tony A, to whom I am grateful.

Here was part 1, all taken in Lake Erie port of Erie PA.

The next four photos were taken in the Lake Ontario port of Oswego, partway through the delivery of the newbuild to the sixth boro.  I share these photos now because my most recent article in ProfessionalMariner has just come out.  Enjoy it here.

 

Appropriate for today, I took these photos using ambient shoreside light before the rain that was supposed to happen the day the crew was going to enter the NYS Canals system at lock O8 on the Oswego Canal.

Fortunately there’s a bridge just before the entrance to O8, which protected my lens from the rain as I got this shot.   That bridge is the same one from which the top 1950s photo was taken in this recent post featuring Albert Gayer photos.

Here the boat is exiting O8 headed up the Oswego Canal to O7.  The clocktower in the distance is atop City Hall, an Oswego landmark.

A few days later I caught the next photos in Little Falls NY, as the boat approached the top of E17, the big lock.  Notice on the cliff just above the leading edge of the wheelhouse . . .

a climber about to rappel down a cliff on Moss Island.   A few years ago I waited atop the same cliff to get photos of Rebecca Ann pushing the new dredge Oyster Bay.

Lock 17 is worth a visit during the season;  the lift is the greatest in the Canal, 40.5′.

Here the boat was exiting the bottom of the lock, under the raised “guillotine” door.

 

All photos, WVD, who mentions both Oswego and Little Falls in various trips in these virtual tours.

It’s time for a February installment of “retro sixth boro,” a glance back at some of the boats working in New York harbor exactly a decade ago.  Cheyenne was still here, pushing a scow out the east end of the KVK.

I’m not sure the 61′ x 22′  1970 Salvage Master is still in the harbor.  Even back a decade ago, I only saw it once or twice.

The 1962 Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015.  The 2000 Tokyo Express is still around;  in fact, I believe I saw it just recently. 

The 1980 Independence was pushing 1982 tank barge OSG 243Independence was scrapped in 2020, and the barge laid up.

The 1981 Huron Service is now Genesis Victory.  The 1976 Atlantic Salvor has carried that name since 1998.

Na’hoku (Na Hoku) is a 1981 tugboat that spent a short time in the boro a decade ago;  later in 2012, Na’hoku (meaning stars, as used for navigation in Hawaiian) was sold to a South Carolina company that kept the name.  As of this writing, she’s in Fernandina Beach FL.  As for DBL 85, a tank barge by that name was built in 2009 and is likely still in use.

The 1976 Barents Sea switched over to Kirby and then in 2016, re-emerged as Donjon’s Atlantic Enterprise.  Along the left side of the photo, Casablanca is a 1987 barge.

All photos, WVD, from February 2012.

Here are previous iterations of this title.  Sometimes it’s energizing to return to places you’ve not visited in a while. We followed North River for a bit and then turned into

the Brooklyn Navy yard, a quite busy place.  Sugar Express was there along with Carolina Coast.  The barge shuttles less-refined sugar from Florida to Yonkers, where the sugar is further refined at a riverside facility.

 

Atlantic Salvor was in one of the graving docks.

Once under way again, we followed Genesis Eagle heading for the Sound.

North River was docked at DEP Ward’s Island Central (actually WPCP) by the time we passed by.

NYC Department of Correction Vernon C. Bain Maritime Facility was still where I last saw it, the only traffic being who goes in and out. 

Ditto this wreck, which deserves a name or a series of ex-names, where the only traffic is the ingress and egress of tidal current water.

All photos this week, WVD.

Two separate parties sent me this article from the LA Times.  With a title including the phrase “humble tugboat,”  I was interested but not prepared for the fantastic photos.  Thx John and George.  Enjoy.  Meanwhile, here are some more of my recent photos.

James D. Moran assisting on a towline above and Robert Weeks leaving the fuel dock below,

 

Andrea walled off from her barge above and Sarah Ann light below, 

 

Gregg McAllister returning to base and Pegasus heading to work,

 

A light William Brewster and an equally light Daisy Mae,

 

Mackenzie Rose and Philadelphia, and

to close out this installment . . . Kimberly Turecamo assisting a ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who never associated the adjective “humble” with tugboats or their operators, and that’s not a bad thing.

If you’re new to this blog (or even if you are not), I’m always looking for photos from other people and places, especially, tugboats seen in South America, Asia, Oceania, and Australia.

Why does time pass so quickly?!  As if it were just a few years ago, I recall this Wilmington NC stop on the road trip return from family in Georgia.   I was surprised by the amount of traffic in this Cape Fear River port, like Margaret McAllister here passing Corpus Christi with Petrochem Supplier. Margaret McAllister is one of McAllister’s ex-USN Natick-class tugs, in Margaret‘s case previously known as Tonkawa (YTB-786)

Kathryne E. McAllister (the 1980 one) followed the Margaret to sail a tanker. 

Kathryne E. is currently laid up, but Moran’s Cape Henry (That’s a popular name for tugboats;  I know of at least two others, one Kirby and one Vane.) below is still working, although currently in the Caribbean.

The first few days of January 2012 were as mild as those in 2022.  Here Ellen S. Bouchard heads west in the KVK pushing B. No. 282.  Ellen S. now wears Centerline’s lion logo.

Iron Mike might still wear Wittich Brothers black, blue and white, although I’ve not seen her out in the boro in a while. 

Atlantic Salvor passes in front of a quite changed Manhattan skyline, as seen from St. George.

Gramma Lee T. Moran has departed the sixth boro for Baltimore.  Southern Spirit is an active crude tanker  but she goes by Celsius Esbjerg, currently departing the Bohai Sea for the Yellow Sea.

A light Mckinley Sea heads west in the Kills.  She’s currently painted in Kirby colors, but laid up in Louisiana. Beyond her, Laura K Moran–now based in Savannah–assists tanker Mount Hope.

Marion Moran is out of the Moran fleet, and is likely wearing Dann Ocean livery, although I can’t confirm that.

The 1983 Sand Master was always a favorite of mine;  she was sold into the southern Caribbean, but she may be scrapped by now. 

Capt. Fred Bouchard was sold to a southern California construction company.

And we hold it up here, midmonth, with a vessel type I’ve not seen in a while . . . a livestock ship, Shorthorn Express, which had come into the Upper Bay for services, not to transfer cargo. The 1998 Luxembourg-flagged  Shorthorn Express is active, currently traveling between Israel and Portugal.  I used to see these regularly coming into the Kuwaiti port of Shuwaikh.  I also recall a horrendous sinking of a livestock ship heading for China back in 2020.

All photos, WVD, in January 2012.

Over in Stapleton only one Bouchard tugboat remains.

That was true when last I looked, which was last week.  Jane A. is no longer where I saw it, outside the dry dock in Bayonne.  

Evelyn Cutler was hauled out on the MOTBY peninsula. 

 

Barry Silverton was headed south past the CNJRR Terminal. 

Atlantic Enterprise crawled slowly across the Upper Bay.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD, who hopes to return to the boro at some point this week. 

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