You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Don Jon Marine’ category.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

Although some companies do most of the ship assist work in the sixth boro, others do some as well, as in here.

Still I was mildly surprised when I saw Mary Alice assisting Silver Ray the other day. 

Note the docking pilot on the starboard bridge wing of the tanker, radio communicating with the tug.

The near winter sunrise made a doppelgänger for the tug.

Job complete, Mary Alice heads for the next job, shrunk by the bow of the id outbound containership.

Is it just me, but has “silver” become a popular name in the harbor?

Happy December, stay healthy, and . . all photos, WVD.

ROROS of various sorts you can find here.  But let’s take three that have called in the sixth boro during this month.  These are three of many more.  See if you can rank them by age and size.    It should be fairly easy.  The three are Polaris Highway,

Paganella (which I erroneously thought was Pagan Ella),

and Grande Halifax.  In the photo below, see the three tugboats, of which only one was assisting.  Grande New York first arrived here in spring 2018, where the christening occurred.

So again . . . size and age, age and size.   A ”  Highway” sister vessel arrived here in fog a few years back.

 

 

Here are some details, like cooling water from the bow thruster,

port of registry,

and bow. 

And the results, by size, small to large, it’s Paganella, Grande Halifax, Polaris Highway.  By age, old to new, it’s Paganella, Polaris Highway, Grande Halifax. Paganella dates from 2009, Polaris, 2017, and Grande, 2018. 

Polaris Highway, a K Line pure car truck carrier,  encloses parking for 7500 CEUs (car equivalent units).    Think this way, a standard car has dimensions, but if the vessel is transporting trucks, the actual number will be different.

Grande Halifax, a Grimaldi vessel, has capacity of 6700 CEUs.

Paganella, named for an Italian mountain, is the oldest of the F. Laeicz line, and is rated at 5000 CEUs, still quite the number of cars. 

All photos and data interpretation, WVD.

A year and a half ago, I saw a small craft that I’d first misidentified.   No, of course it was not Atlantic Enterprise or 

Witte 4004, shown here

returning from the dump on a rainy morning.

But right outside the Staten Island side of the VZ Bridge, this small craft, the RIB, showed up, and again I wondered if it was the NY Media Boat Defender, which led me to wonder why

they moved in so close to the wire trailing from 

Atlantic Enterprise.

By now, even with naked eye,  I’d spotted the blue logo on the sliding door of the RIB.  It was a crew 

addition on the fly.

It’s a maneuver that used to make me queasy, just because I never got that good at it.

Well done.  Transfer complete, Enterprise throttles up.

They spin around, take the stern of 4004, and head back to the base.

All photos, WVD.

Here are previous iterations, just to change things up.  Non-random here means I took these over a few weeks, which should be obvious as you look through the photos.

Atlantic Enterprise . .  . she’s big at 136′ x 40′.  Over the past few years, she has appeared here.  Before that, she was in the sixth boro but much less active as Barents Sea. She had different names before Barents going back to 1976.

Although slightly older than Atlantic Salvor, the two boats appear to be mostly similar. An Atlantic Salvor tow I’ll always remember relates to the WTC antenna here.

Some companies have a crew boat.  Behold Matthew Scott, a 1968 Gulf Craft 65′ x 16′.

When I first saw Caitlin Ann, she was called Vivian L. Roehrig.

The 79′ x 24′ tug keeps busy.

Hidden behind this barge,

it’s Sarah Ann, who i first knew as June K

I did a post on Brian Nicholas some years back.  I don’t recall ever seeing her as Banda Sea, but in this post from June 2009, that name was still showing . . . .

My favorite photo of Paul Andrew over the years

is this one, showing the 64′ x 23′ tugboat getting transferred, so to speak.

Mary Alice is one of the larger DonJon boats, at 92′ x 27′.

We’ll end with another shot of Atlantic Enterprise, distinguishable from Salvor   (my photo during the tugboat race September 5, 2010)

by that fire monitor.

Other DonJon boats– Meagan Ann, Emily Ann, Rebecca Ann, Thomas D., who else  did I miss–I’ve not seen so far in fall 2020.

All photos, WVD.

I took this photo in Waterford eastern terminus of the Erie Canal on November 1, 2010, and the canal had not yet closed.  I had just returned from part of a transit, and we had met lots of boats.  Although we had been bound for the Great Lakes, most, like the intriguing Baidarka, was bound for sea.  As of this writing, Baidarka is back on the Canadian Pacific coast.

A week later, in the sixth boro, docked in front of USNS Sisler, it’s the “love it or hate it” Sea Raven, now turned into new steel.

Sea Bear was engaged in the deepening of the sixth boro, and here a crew on the sheerleg was repositioning the anchor.

Lots of dredges including GLDD New York were involved.  More later.  Captain D, currently in the sixth boro on other duties, was dredge tender.

Then, as now Atlantic Salvor, was active.   I particularly like this shot with the 0730 “golden hour” light.  A very different set of buildings then largely defined the Manhattan skyline.

Wanderbird swooped through the harbor on their way south.

Padre Island and Terrapin Island were regulars recontouring the sixth boro bed.

Beaufort Sea, 1971, is no more. 

The brilliant colored Little Bear, built 1952, became a DonJon vessel, but I’ve not seen her since the Disch auction.

Susan Witte . . . I can’t tell you anything about her either.

Back then I would spend my Thanksgivings in Philly, and the high point of that holiday was not the excellent food and drink and company, but rather seeing the big barge for the first time.

Pilot towed in La Princesa, here assisted up the Delaware by Grace and Valentine Moran.   Pilot has been sold Panamanian, and La Princesa–577′ x 105′–I’ve neither seen nor heard from.  I believe Valentine is still active, but I don’t know about Grace.

All photos, WVD, who looks at these and wonders how a decade has so quickly passed.

 

It’s the end of another month, and maybe because everything’s been so bleak of late, let’s just admire and enjoy the complexity of the sixth boro.

Diverse people work here on diverse missions.

Places like NY Harbor School and M.A. S. T. as well as SUNY Maritime College and King’s Point MMA are here.

On foggy days a narrow navigation channel gives the illusion of being as expansive as the ocean.

Keeping it as ideal a place as possible is the mission of many people and much infrastructure, seen and unseen.

Professionals pass through the sixth boro without ever technically entering the space, both a boon and a bane to all involved,

and their safe passage is ensured by the named and the nameless.

Work and recreation can happen in the same space because of

professionalism.  If you have a lot of time, you can binge watch these videos by a pro who works the sixth boro and beyond.  Now, when I hear his voice on VHF, it’s familiar.  There are books as well.

The universal language of gesture is powerdful.

The sixth boro has at least as much specialized equipment as the other five boros combined;  another way to put it, the specialized equipment of the sixth boro enable the other boros to perform.

And if the land boros have spirit, don’t imagine the sixth boro  lacks anything.

Photos and sentiments, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,440 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2021
M T W T F S S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031