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I’m back near the sixth boro now and have photos for at least through early October, at which time I leave on another gallivant.

So here’s step one in catching up.  Up the meandering Cuyahoga, here are Iowa (1915) and Oklahoma (1913);  these boats were built to work and last.

 

The vintage GL tugs may just be replaced for the next century by this design:  Cleveland, launched less than six months ago . . . 2017.

Click here for a recent article on Cleveland.

Cleveland in this series was doing assist for 610′ x 78′ sand barge Ashtabula powered by 142′ tug Defiance

Here’s Elizabeth Anna in the Lake Erie port on Erie PA.

Elizabeth Anna (ex-Bear) last appeared on this blog here.

In the entrance to the old Buffalo River, here’s Daniel Joncaire II, a NYPA tug

launched in late 2015 by Great Lakes Shipyard in Cleveland. NYPA uses the tug for ice boom installations near its hydropower units on the Niagara River. I’m curious now about Niagara Queen II and William H. Latham

I’ve always had misgivings about my series title “freshwater tugs” and here’s a good illustration why:  Calusa Coast–here with Kirby barge Delaware–was until a few years ago a regular in the saltwater and brackish , in and out of the sixth boro.   Here she is in the Niagara River headed for Black Rock.

Beyond her stern here is the combination Buffalo Intake Crib Lighthouse. 

And to close out today’s post, it’s Sarah Andrie, another tug that’s made the transition from saltwater to fresh . . . the former Caribe Service.

She’s making her way here upstream into Lake Erie from the Welland Canal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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You saw Lauren Foss in yesterday’s post here.  Here’s a followup, from sixth boro interiors I don’t get to much.  Richie Ryden writes:  “Look who showed up on the Hackensack River in Kearny NJ:   Lauren Foss with the barge American Trader in tow with the new deck for the Wittpenn Bridge. The bridge deck was built in  Vancouver, Washington  shipped through the Panama Canal to NJ.”

If I read the AIS info correctly when I first saw Lauren off Sandy Hook, that voyage took about a month and a week.

 

And thanks to Joseph Chomicz, here’s more of that area, photo taken just upstream of the others.  Joseph writes:  “Lauren Foss was destined for the Hackensack River.  She brought in the lift span of the new Route 7 lift bridge they are building.  Also Donjon is [nearby] in the process of moving coal out of the power plant on the Hackensack River as well.   [I could count] four Donjon tugs in the photo below:  Meagan Anne, Thomas D, Emily Ann, and Sarah Ann.”

From a decade ago, here’s a post I did about the Hackensack River, including a photo of a barge delivering that coal to the plant.  The deliveries used to be made by ExpressMarine equipment. 

Thanks to Richie and Joe for these photos.

For you not familiar with the area, the green line below represents rough approximation of the track Lauren Foss followed in and

the red circle, the location of the Wittpenn Bridge.

For more of the story–on four more bridge section deliveries–click here.

 

 

 

Patricia was built in 1963 and works in the sixth boro here and here, and last I knew worked for C.H. Phoenix LLC of Green Cove Springs, Fl. . . .   I like the racing stripes.

Caitlin Ann was built in 1961 and has worked for DonJon since 2011.   Here, she and

Sarah Ann appear to be moving coal.  Sarah Ann is from 2003, working for DonJon since 2009.

Marion Moran has worked by that name since 1982.  I think that’s Katherine Weeks on the far side of the barge.

Bruce A. McAllister, 

Eric McAllister, and

Alex McAllister were all working from the Narrows the

other morning.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enterprise seems a great title for a post on National Maritime Day, but here’s a question answered at the end of this post:  Why–other than the 1933 proclamation by Congress–is May 22 chosen for this day?  Answer at the end of this post.

Jake van Reenen took these photos yesterday in Clayton, NY.  The title evokes my Salvor post from eight plus years ago.

Atlantic Enterprise and crane barge are headed to the sixth boro, still many sea miles ahead.

Jarrett M assists with the tow, a role it played about a month upstream through the same waters here.

 

 

I’m eager to see this Salvor twin back in the sixth boro.

This post from nearly 10 years ago features my first view of this vessel–then called Barents Sea–under way.

Many thanks to Jake for these photos.  If all goes as planned, Enterprise will arrive here in less than two weeks.  Eyes peeled?

So, May 22 . . . it’s National Maritime Day because of Savannah, that’s SS Savannah, she who began the first Atlantic crossing on this date under steam power 199 years ago . . . well, at least steam powered her wheels for a little over 10% of the trip, but you need to start somewhere, eh?  And this fact is alluded to in the 1933 proclamation, as well as in the 2017 proclamation.

 

Click on the photo to get the source of the photo and the story of her short life.  And the 199 years ago, that just begs for some sort of memorializing in 2018…

Did Hurricane Sandy unearth SS Savannah wreckage?  Read here.

 

Thanks to Tony A, whose previous contributions can be found here, here’s an insider’s view of a scrap ferrous metal run, starting with a view across the deep “hold” of the scow as it exits the Buttermilk heading for whichever of the sixth boro’s creeks has the product.

Once loaded, the scow is brought ship side.

Note the multiple load marks . . .

As the crane transfers the scrap into the hold of the ship, the tug may move to a safe distance or do another run.  By tomorrow, bulker Nichirin will be arriving in Iskenderun, Turkey, 15 miles from the Syrian border and less than 30 from Aleppo.

Photos I’ve taken over the years of scrap metals runs include these of Crow, in blue and

in red.

And here I think it’s Sarah Ann doing a really efficient run.

Thanks to Tony for the top four photos.  The bottom three are by Will Van Dorp.

And come to think of it, I wonder if the late great Crow has ended up in Iskenderun also….

 

I’ve posted photos like this one of Thomas D. Witte moving recycling, but I’ve never

been inside Pratt Industries plant on the Arthur Kill.  Recently, William Hyman has though, and he’s shared his photos here.  It looks –and probably smells–like any waste handling facility, but

giant claws move the scrap around and

caldrons do their magic and

cardboard stock comes out.

Photos I’ve taken of the recycling barges back almost 10 years ago are below.

 

Unless otherwise identified, all photos by Will Van Dorp. William Hyman’s previous photos can be found here.  Thank you, sir.

x

 

Thanks to a friend, I learned this morning what this is.  But I’ll give you an opportunity until the end of this post to ponder it as I did.

I’m guessing that since I’ve been paying attention to other soon-to-happen non-routine events in the harbor like the loading of Peking (more on that at the end of this post too) and the raising of the NYWheel legs, I completely missed this one until yesterday afternoon when I just happened to be walking to an appointment near Richmond Terrace.  Yes, I ALWAYS carry my camera, because in NYC, you never know what you are going to see in any of the six boros.

When I saw that it was DonJon equipment, I thought these might be additional structural members to be lifted into Rockefeller University’s River Campus.  After all, it was only about a year ago that preliminary structures were lifted into place over there, here and here.

Notice the curves and the staircases?

And the tow moved up toward the North–not the East–River.

So thanks to my friend Hank Beatty, those ARE structural members for something called “The Vessel,” unveiled months ago, a large assemblage of public art to be erected over at the Hudson Yards area of Midtown.  Click here for the speeches on the event of the unveiling back in September 2016:  2500 steps mounting 16 stories . . . billed as the Hudson’s Eiffel!  And the Hudsonside Midtown already has a pyramid!!

So here’s the update of Peking.  Now plans are for it to be loaded in early June onto Combi Dock III, not the identical Combi Dock I as I had been led to believe earlier.  So, put that on your calendars . . .  Thanks to T. V. for that update.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Carl Sandburg said:  “The fog comes  . ..  on little cat feet.

It sits looking  . . . over harbor and city . . . on silent haunches

And then moves on.”

 

My unrehearsed version is :  “The old cat once . .  . patrolled the wharf
Now it sits over the sunlight . . . and sheds on the riverbanks
masking the distances.”

What I really mean is that taking photos on limited visibility day like yesterday benefits from heightened foreground details in comparison.
Jennifer Turecamo heads out to Gravesend Bay along with the USCG patrol vessel.

A tanker arrives with a name

that’s ironic on a few levels .  .

Meagan Ann hauls Witte 4002 out to dump and

Mary Alice returns Witte 4004 from HARS before Meagan Ann  returns.

And Barney Turecamo comes into port a bit while the barge is monitored by Jennifer.

To finish, here’s another shot of Combi Dock 1 arriving from China with lots of sea miles logged….

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Kirby Moran here seems to have some symbiosis going on with the gulls,

and Jonathan C comes in for a closer look.

Zachery Reinauer repositions light under the parking lot forming on the lower deck of the Bayonne Bridge.

Diana B moves another load of product, likely to the creeks.

 

Thomas D. Witte is on the paper recycling run, I think.

Does anyone have a photo of her working up in the canals?

I’ve not yet seen Sapphire Coast light.

And finally, the unique paint scheme on Balisco 100 

moved into the Kills by Navigator.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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