You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Don Jon Marine’ category.

Janet D, product of 2015, comes in a 67′ x 26′.

 

Ellen McAllister, the oldest here launched in 1967, measures 102′ x 29′.

Marjorie B McAllister, from 1974, is bigger than I imagined . . .   112′ x 30′.

The two McAllister tugs were heading to assist tanker Sakura Belle, 26960 dwt contained within 558′ x 88′, launched in 2011.

Janice Ann Reinauer, the newest tugboat here, came off the ways in 2020.  She measures 113′ x 35′.

 

And finally, doing dredge spoils runs, we have Douglas J, 2004, 110′ x 38′ and

 

Atlantic Enterprise, 1976, and the largest tugboat in this post, measuring 136′ x 40′.

 

All photos, this week, WVD.

Another TBR is in the books.  Where else can you see very upclose and personal some much-loved boats. I can and might do a post on each of these boats, but for now, just a survey.

Shoofly . . .  complete name is Shoofly Pie. If you want actual detail, click here and scroll;  you’ll see some profile of each of these boats (and others).  All I’ll say about Shoofly is that she’s a WW2 naval vessel evolved into a rat rod (We need a new term for this category.) vessel.  It has also likely sailed the greatest number of places, freshwater and salt.  I’ve photographed this boat before, but somehow, it’s never made it onto this blog.  Some explanation follows.

I frame this as a comparison of push knees on Edna A and J. Arnold Witte.  

How about this as a frame– l to r, Nathan G, Margot, Benjamin Elliot, and Edna A. — involving two-thirds of the NYS Marine Highway boats participating in the event. Then another set of NYS Marine was not present  . . . working . . . .

CMT Otter . . . represented Coeymans.  I learned some modification history of this boat last weekend.  It was once Delta Ram and looked like this.

This vessel is the fourth in the series of Atlantic Hunter boats.  I had photos of Atlantic Hunter IV (under a different name last year) but those photos like those of Shoofly  . . . disappeared.

My Pal Sal is not the latest government boat purchased by NYS Canals, although you might suspect otherwise.  To stray down a tangent though;  Sal has a song named for her;  we really need a popular ditty about canal tugboats . . . any or all of them. Lobby your favorite songwriter or channel your own inner songwriter muse.

W. O. Decker looked spectacular!  Last time I saw her some details were not the same.

Joncaire is several years into her new livery;  she used to be the red of NYPA Niagara River boom maintenance fleet, as seen here (scroll).

Here’s the view from the 4th Street Bridge, and

here from the 2nd Street Bridge.

All photos yesterday, WVD, who got out there before many people were crowding the bulkhead.

I missed a lot of folks who were there because I stayed in the welcome center most of the time, listening to the talks.

I’m always so grateful when folks send me photos, especially like all of these.  Tony A catches all kinds of boats I miss, like

Anne-Sofie earlier this month in Albany.  I’m not sure what the cargo in and/or out was, but these SAL vessels get around.   Does anyone know if that “float” center just under the crane hook serves as an outrigger for loading/unloading crane movement?  As of this posting, she’s already in Genoa.

Here’s more from Tony . . . Dimuro Clark had been Turecamo Girls for over half a century and appeared on this blog many times. 

 

I like their logo.

And finally, long-time reader and sometimes contributor, Tommy Bryceland sends these photos of a local boat–which appeared in yesterday’s post–far from homewaters,

with guided missile frigate and ex USS Boone on the hip in Campbeltown Loch in Scotland last week.  Atlantic Salvor towed it there from the Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The ship is expected to be used as a target in an upcoming live fire exercise out in the Atlantic Ocean.  Would the frigate be anchored during such an exercise?  I’m imagining it’s expected to sink upon termination of the firing.

Many thanks to Tony A and Tommy for sharing these photos.

It’s been over 12 years that this boat has had this appearance;  before then, it was orange.

Ten years ago, this one was green.

I must admit I’ve gotten used to seeing them both in Donjon blue, and they look great.

A year ago, this boat had not yet entered the state of New York, but when she did, I caught her here and here about to enter the NYS Canal system from the Great Lakes.

Since then, she’s been quite busy.

As have all the Donjon blue boats.

Have a look at Meagan Ann in the 2013 tugboat races here.  And speaking of those races, here and here are photos/videos of Meagan Ann and other from 2009. 

Has anyone heard specifics about a 2022 tugboat race in the sixth boro?  Here are some photos of boats that participated in the 1952 (!!!!) race on the Hudson.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

While I’m at it, let me throw in a photo from the tugboat race in 2010.

 

 

 

Other than ice water or a cold shower on a hot day, what’s more refreshing than than looking at some tugboat photos taken at dawn?

Can’t you just feel the cool morning air?  In winter, we might bemoan the temperatures  usually lowest at sunrise;  in high summer, it’s the most peaceful and comfortable time. 

Let’s just follow these two tugboats as they pass . . .

You’ve seen them both before.

 

J. Arnold Witte seems to be keeping very busy since she got here not even a full year ago.

Rhea I. maintained her name although now operated and owned by Centerline, the lion logo line. 

J. Arnold‘s scow is running low in the water.

All photos, WVD, who might be out of touch for a few days and will likely not post this on FB because of the absence of WiFi in the southern wild.  He will, however, be taking lots of photos.

I’ve compartmentalized my photos from the Pioneer sail the other night, in part because in a short two-hour sail there was so much to see.  For starters, Stephanie Dann had earlier just rushed eastward and came back with Cornucopia Destiny, a dance partner on her starboard side.  I can speculate about this, but I don’t know the details.

As we headed into the Buttermilk, we met Susan Rose AND

Jordan Rose, ex- Evening Breeze and Evening Star, respectively.

This sweet downeaster passed.

I suspect Jordan came along to assist 

Susan into the notch.

Meanwhile, a ways down the piers, Stasinos Jimmy and currently still Evening Tide were rafted up for the moment.

Whatever brought Jordan to the Red Hook piers, by the time we had sailed passed the gantries, she was overtaking us.

On the return, as night began to fall, we met Thomas D. Witte and

then her fleetmate Douglas J.

At this point, my photos were pixelating, but I still managed to get Eastern Dawn, heading back to the “barn” at dusk.

All photos, WVD, who has handed the keys to the tower over to the robots again for a while.

 

Here are previous iterations of this title.  Currently there’s a dredging project going on just NW of the St George ferry terminal.  Donjon’s Delaware Bay does the dredging, and Stephanie Dann shuttles the scows away toward the VZ Bridge. 

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think this is maintenance dredging.

The other day Douglas J was making the run to HARS to dump and returning the light scows back to Delaware Bay.

 

Once Douglas J returns a scow at the dredge and makes it fast,

 

Douglas J goes off and takes the loaded scow from Stephanie Dann,

Delaware Bay gets to digging,

 

 

and Stephanie Dann returns to stand by as the next scow is loaded.  And so on until the “excess” is removed.  different days, different tugboats are involved.

Any errors, all photos, WVD.

OK. Ready or not, it is July. Here was the first for this.  Dawn, with all its promise, is my favorite time of day.  I’m not so much nocturnal or diurnal . . . call me interurnal, familiar with that time between night and day …

 

when for a short time, the light paints everything slightly different color.

Cosmic glory is what does it, whether the light falls on a vessel called Cosmic Glory or JRT Moran or any name else and a variety of horizons.

Isn’t Mary Alice or

its dump scow just glorious here?

Daybreak!  It was so bright I heard the drums and trumpets and felt water shudder!

All photos in June 2022 by WVD.

 

Ten years ago, the WTC was incomplete, no supertalls/superskinnies were up, and Taurus was not yet Joker.

Miriam and the archway at Sailors Snug Harbor are all the same, although that dock is gone from there.

The 1969 Barbara McAllister is now Patsy K, operating out of the Gulf coast of Florida.

The 2003 Jane is now Anna Rose, and I’ve seen her in the boro a few times.

Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Crow was in her last days here, and has been scrapped more than a half decade already.

Charles D. McAllister has now been five and a half decades in service and still working in the sixth boro. 

Gage Paul was lost in transit after being sold overseas.   Note the seaplane on the East River.  

Last I knew, Buchanan 10 was laid up upriver.

In June 2012, I had the opportunity to tour USNS Apache near Norfolk.  A few years later, Apache was the vessel credited with locating the black box of El Faro, after its tragic sinking.

Sharing the dock with Apache that day was USNS Grapple.

All photos, ten years ago, WVD, who is currently traveling again, out of tugster tower for an indefinite period of time, getting more indefinite every day.  I have re-activated the robots, but we’ll see how reliable they are this time.

 

Adeline Marie was at anchor off the Coney Island Light.

Douglas J and a dump scow were shuttling to and from HARS.

 

Mary Emma was arriving from sea.

 

Joyce Brown passed a big unstuck green ship,

 

Stuff is always happening, and all photos, WVD.

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