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I did not forget in the beginning of April about the 2020 calendar enhancement;  there were just too any things going on! So today I both catch up, and get ahead.  And according to my accounting robot, today I post for the 4,500th time.  Champagne is spilling all over my editor’s floor, but he’s not sharing.

YM World came in last April as Anthem of the Seas was departing.  If one keeps records with the goal of tracking change, few industries have changed as profoundly as the cruise industry has in the past year, and all that in the past two months.

Truly YM World, an ULCV,is huge.  But earlier this week, MSC Anna sailed under the Golden Gate, over 100′ longer, almost 40′ wider, giving her a total teu capacity of over 19k, compared with around 14k here.  That 5000 teu difference equals the total capacity of an average container ship serving the sixth boro 10 years ago.

 

The May calendar page features James D Moran nosing up against a pink magenta wall.

Here she comes in to meet off the starboard side.

Then she matches speed

and comes alongside to drop off the docking pilot.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

This series goes way back to 2007, when I erroneously thought a song existed called “Paris in springtime.”  My deciding it must be a faux memory did not prevent me from doing a bunch more posts, with variations like “pairs in winter,” like today’s posts.  It still is winter.  And there is a movie with a somewhat similar name;  a fun trailer can be seen here.

Let’s start with Sarah Ann and Thomas E. pairing up to get a crane off to Sims.

 

Ellen and Ava team up to see a small container vessel into the kills.

 

Meagan Ann and Emily Ann each bring a scow for the filling, likely with scrap?

 

And for a variation, a mixed triad of Margaret, Alex, and Ava return from assists.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you happy springish late winter and successful social separations.

 

 

Here’s the photo I considered using on the March calendar page and taken about five seconds before the one I did use.  On March 9, 2019 at 0726 . . . I love the light here, but the tug seemed too small to be the subject on a calendar page.  I do love the purple skyline against the orange sky.  Color aficionados might describe the outline of buildings with words like mauve and carrot with traces of grapefruit and squash fading into hints of cyan.  I like the glint of sunrise on the port side of Alex, likely returning from an assist.

In July 2019, I caught the next two of Alex, assisting CMA CGM Otello outbound for sea.  Note the design differences between Alex and Capt. Brian A. off her stern.  The 4300 hp Alex was launched in 1985 and spent her first five years assisting submarines for Electric Boat.  She then was sold and worked in Puerto Rico and Florida until 2008, when she was sold to a Maine company. McAllister bought her in 2012, and I believe I first saw her in the sixth boro in 2017.  Capt. Brian A. McAllister arrived here in 2017 and brings 6770 hp to the job.

 

In these November 2019 photos,

Alex and Ava M assist Arthur Maersk in rounding Bergen Point.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated here, but followup to the No.11Asomaru post of a few days ago, it has happened again.  Sunday evening AIS showed a Tiong Woon Ocean 17 signal coming into the sixth boro, escorted by two Moran 6000s and

following or coinciding with MOL Paradise heading here into Global in Bayonne.   Lucien’s comment the other day seems to explain this .  . a glitch . . . but since this is the third tme I’ve seen this, I wonder how common it really is and whether others have noticed it.  As of 0500 this morning, Tiong and Paradise left for Savannah, and as of posting, she was off Ocean City NJ, appearing as a gray signal.   Tiong Woon Corporation (TWC) is a Sri Lankan holding company with tugboats, but no #17.

Here’s the one I saw last year;  anyone who knows Port Elizabeth, shown, knows that Oat, IMO 9291630, a tanker 800′ x 137′ , would not be at that berth and atop the container ship there.

Is this corrupted signal a frequent occurrence?  Is this evidence of colliding or commingling parallel universes?

Whenever I’ve seen this vessel, I had associations with a huge river in a big country.

These blue-white designs, though, didn’t conjure up that tropical river, yet they were strangely familiar.

The “upside-down V” didn’t initially strike me a Greek letter lambda either.

Later I started looking differently to try to figure out why that Greek frieze design looked familiar.  I’ve only been in Greece once and that was almost half a lifetime ago. Now it strikes me as strange that I didn’t think of the huge multinational e-commerce and tech company, the one who created a zillionaire.

Amazon Beauty was once Greek-flagged, but it’s not any more.  Now it appears to be shuttling some product between Point Tupper NS and Linden NJ.

Have you figured out the blue/white pattern and why it might be familiar?

Click here for the New York coffee cup, the ubiquitous vessel for coffee at one time, and now eclipsed by DD and Starbucks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who send greetings to the photographer up in Point Tupper, who will get photos when she arrives.

 

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

Here are the previous posts in the series.

The bow of the ship, the park, and Newark International tower could establish the location, as could

the stern of the ship and the signage on the bridge lower right.

How many tugboats do you spot?  What do you now about them and the ship from colors and livery?

How near are the tugboats one from the other?

Here’s a digression . . . two models of shipping in 2019.

Here’s exactly the same shot.  Here‘s the info on Arthur Maersk.

Alex here appears to be mirroring the forward motion of Arthur, while simultaneously pulling her to starboard and in the channel.  I’m sure the folks who do this might have other words and other descriptions of what is happening here.

Meanwhile, Ava (rhymes with Java) pushes on the stern, and

compared with photos 3 and 4 above, notice how far apart along the starboard side of Arthur the two tugboats are.  And the fishing boat, just to the left of the red buoy, is several hundred feet off.

Alex continues force along the same vector.

All photos and words by Will Van Dorp, whose admiration for this oft-repeated maneuver around Bergen Point hasn’t diminished.

 

This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

Here’s the previous post of this focus.  I had others ready to go at one point, but  . ..  ships sail, horses leave barns, and ideas slip away.  Yesterday I spent one hour on the Upper Bay and concluded that it’s a diverse place, starting with this water rising up and obscuring whatever lay beyond it.  Of course, I knew what it was, but I recall the first time I saw such a misting–in the Gulf off Kuwait–and my brain could not process what my eyes were sending it.

Regular and irregular cargoes juxtaposed, boxes and rocks.

Framing a shot puts together what is actually quite far apart.

I’ve done a number of posts on winter fishing, but fall fishing must be super right now, with some fisherman torn between landing that next fish and

 

staying out of the path of YM World and all those tugs assisting it into Global terminal.

 

I know foreshortening plays a role in giving a sense of crowding, but there IS undeniably some crowding going on here.  The ship DID sound a warning at one point.

And that mist in the top photo . . . it came from Firefighter II.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who still has lots of photos from the trip from Montreal.

 

 

I’ve seen lots of the L-class, but this was my first view of Ever Lotus.   I’m not sure what’s in the boxes, but she’s carrying a lot of boxes.

Ava escorted her out.

 

Bow watch was performed by this relaxed-appearing seaman, while

stern watch was controlled by this hitchhiking but discerning raven.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Triton is a fitting name* for the current record-holding largest ULCV to call in the sixth boro.  If the Panamanians call it that after CMA CGM T. Roosevelt-also in the sixth boro this week–call it that, that passes muster as true for me, since they charge fees by this criterion.

The photos above and below come from Marcin Kocoj, who caught it departing Port Elizabeth and then passing Caddell’s in the KVK.

*Triton was built by Samsung in Geoje South Korea in 2016 has already had a handful of names. She’s moved along by 85705 hp.

The photo above and another version of it below come from Capt. Tom Ferrie, Sandy Hook pilot who took it out to sea late Friday afternoon.

Now I imagine someone in an airplane a half dozen miles over the Atlantic Ocean looking out the window and spotting it, a tiny sliver of multi-colored boxes followed by a wake, a massive ship in a much-more immense ocean.

I suppose 10 years from now, we’ll look back at Triton in the context of even larger vessels. 

Here’s more.

Many thanks to Marcin and Tom for use of these photos.

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