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This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

Here’s the previous post of this focus.  I had others ready to go at one point, but  . ..  ships sail, horses leave barns, and ideas slip away.  Yesterday I spent one hour on the Upper Bay and concluded that it’s a diverse place, starting with this water rising up and obscuring whatever lay beyond it.  Of course, I knew what it was, but I recall the first time I saw such a misting–in the Gulf off Kuwait–and my brain could not process what my eyes were sending it.

Regular and irregular cargoes juxtaposed, boxes and rocks.

Framing a shot puts together what is actually quite far apart.

I’ve done a number of posts on winter fishing, but fall fishing must be super right now, with some fisherman torn between landing that next fish and

 

staying out of the path of YM World and all those tugs assisting it into Global terminal.

 

I know foreshortening plays a role in giving a sense of crowding, but there IS undeniably some crowding going on here.  The ship DID sound a warning at one point.

And that mist in the top photo . . . it came from Firefighter II.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who still has lots of photos from the trip from Montreal.

 

 

I’ve seen lots of the L-class, but this was my first view of Ever Lotus.   I’m not sure what’s in the boxes, but she’s carrying a lot of boxes.

Ava escorted her out.

 

Bow watch was performed by this relaxed-appearing seaman, while

stern watch was controlled by this hitchhiking but discerning raven.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Triton is a fitting name* for the current record-holding largest ULCV to call in the sixth boro.  If the Panamanians call it that after CMA CGM T. Roosevelt-also in the sixth boro this week–call it that, that passes muster as true for me, since they charge fees by this criterion.

The photos above and below come from Marcin Kocoj, who caught it departing Port Elizabeth and then passing Caddell’s in the KVK.

*Triton was built by Samsung in Geoje South Korea in 2016 has already had a handful of names. She’s moved along by 85705 hp.

The photo above and another version of it below come from Capt. Tom Ferrie, Sandy Hook pilot who took it out to sea late Friday afternoon.

Now I imagine someone in an airplane a half dozen miles over the Atlantic Ocean looking out the window and spotting it, a tiny sliver of multi-colored boxes followed by a wake, a massive ship in a much-more immense ocean.

I suppose 10 years from now, we’ll look back at Triton in the context of even larger vessels. 

Here’s more.

Many thanks to Marcin and Tom for use of these photos.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

It’s that time of year.

Some small commercial fishing boats do stay around in winter, but

I don’t recall seeing Never Enuff in frigid weather.

Catamarans like Good Karma might sail all winter, but down south ….

 

Jackie C . . . a dive boat?

 

I didn’t catch a name on this trap boat.

 

Nor here . . . .

Twisted Sisters has a load of traps.

 

I caught the name here . . . Renegade.

But not here . . .. although I know it’s a Florida Bay Coaster,

which is roomy inside but insignificant when juxtaposed with a 1200′ ULCV.

And then there are the jet skis . . .

….

This process of assembling this post has suggested a new

series, a summer series

called Mixed Craft, mixed use of the waterways.  Be safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was the first in this series.  Let’s go to a different location on the East River, and I know I’m late coming to this story, but it’s an exciting one.  Hunts Point is now receiving regular cement shipments, by ship via the East River.  Shipments originate at Port Daniel Gascons, QC.

Here under the 59th Street Bridge a cement ship heads for the terminal  . . ..

 

Above and below, the ship and tugs pass the soon-to-open new campus of Rockefeller University.

I took the next two photos at a McInnis facility just upstream from Montreal, along the Beauharnois Canal.

Here’s more on the company.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As of this writing, another cement ship is at the terminal.

 

Quick post today . . . with a followup tomorrow.  I became somewhat obsessed with the name of this ULCV;  I’d expected it to arrive a day earlier and it anchored a dozen leagues out, so you can understand my obsession when my brain told me I was waiting in vain for the “world.”  For now, this may be among the largest box boats to arrive in the harbor . . .  1200′  x 167′  x 47′  with an air draft of 177′, if my ears caught the numbers correctly.

Maybe you can participate in my tangent, though.  Here’s how.  Given the name of this vessel,  what comes to mind?   What song titles?  And,  if you worked for YM and needed to come up with a name for a sister vessel, what would you suggest?  I don’t believe there is a sister vessel.  And I believe this is YM World’s first visit to the sixth boro.  If there’s any humor in this post, I intend it to be on me and on the crazy places my brain goes when I consider the (YM) World to be arriving in NYC . . . because hasn’t it always….

Some of my thoughts, in no particular order, would be these:  stop the world I wanna get off, world on a string, I’m sitting on top of the world . . .  .  As to a sister ship, I come up with “other world” and then this one being worldly and the sister being otherworldly . . .

 

Anyhow, as I said earlier, more of this actual vessel tomorrow.  By the way, she’s currently at Global Terminal in Bayonee, arriving here Saturday (4/27) as its first port call after departing singapore on 4/1.

All photos and reactions by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a repository of song titles--most of which I don’y know–with “world” in the title.  And book titles . . . around the world in 80 days has [comic] possibilities.  This “world” song comes with its own NYC images in its music video. For many years I was a fan of what record stores (what are they??!) classified as “world music, stuff like this . . . or this.

And hat’s off to the fine machines and skilled crews who guide these behemoths into and out of ports as if the feats were just play.

Many thanks to Robert Simko and Lee Gruzen for sending me some photos and lots of questions yesterday morning.

This large gray vessel–SS Cape Avinoff (AK-5013)–arrived under tow

from, I believe, National Defense Reserve Fleet on the James River, where it has been used for training.

As SS Cape Avinoff is moved stern first closer to GMD Shipyard in Brooklyn, Chris Kunzmann got this photo.

Many thanks to Robert, Lee, and Chris for use of these photos.  Can anyone confirm why she was moved to a NYC shipyard?

Robert publishes The Broadsheet.  Click here and here for info on GMD Shipyard.

Previous posts involving “dead ships” can be found here.

 

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