You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Capt. Brian A. McAllister’ tag.

Alongside Pilot No. 1 New York, the current one, it’s the newest-in-name vessel in the sixth boro . . .

Meaghan Marie, exKathleen Turecamo, has become part of the same green & buff fleet as Joseph John.

Here’s a photo I took of her in port of Albany, September 2013.

A different use of green . . . Vane’s Philadelphia, a 4200 hp tug launched in 2017.

A slightly darker buff, it’s Matthew Tibbetts.  What I didn’t realize until I looked it up just now, Tibbetts was launched as Dann Ocean’s first boat to carry the name Ocean Tower.  More on that later.

It’s always a good day when I catch two Reinauer tugboats together, Haggerty Girls (4000 hp) and Ruth M. Reinauer (4720 hp), with a deeply loaded RTC

Alex puts its 4300 hp to bear on Viktor Bakaev.

I mentioned Ocean Tower earlier . . .  here’s the current tugboat by that name. It’s about a decade newer, one-third more horsepower, and 15′ longer, and 5′ broader than the earlier boat, now Tibbetts.

Kristin Poling began life as Chesapeake, an early version of Patapsco but longer, broader,and with a full 5000 hp.

And to conclude, examples of the classes of the two largest tractor tugs in the sixth boro . . . Capt. Brian A. and

JRT, each approaching their next job.

All photos very recently, WVD, who has more tugboat race photos from previous years . . .

 

 

Remember Laura Maersk, the unusual tow from back in mid-June?  An engine room explosion disabled her, and she had to be towed in for repairs.  Well . . .  below are her tracks from yesterday . . .  first sea trials . . . aka a “test drive” and then

she made a beeline for Panama, an excellent place to load. I forgot to mention it, but the two ULCVs in a recent post, Hyundai Drive was arriving from Cartagena CO and Cosco Shipping Rose, from Limon Bay Panama.

Before leaving, she was very light,  like this.

Remember Mendonca came into port about two weeks ago?

Her portside stern half of the vessel has been stripped of coating.  In a blown up version of the photo below, i count at least 10 yard workers.

One might conclude, correctly, that Maersk has the largest container fleet in the world by the number of Maersk vessels calling here.  Below the Gunhilde, 1200′ loa, gets escorted in by Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

CPO Bremen, previously called Vancouver Express,  heads out, as

does

Northern Magnum, previously called Los Angeles Express.

CMA CGM T. Jefferson winds her way through the KVK.

Johanna C loads scrap.

Spinel arrives,

as does MSC Elodie.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

0545 at the Narrows . . . in the hazy days of summer . . . nothing beats it.

I had not come here just to beat the heat.

Surprisingly, Turecamo Girls (I believe) delivered the docking pilot.

Then she dropped back, to where one of the 6000s took the stern and

another the bow.

Only a couple hours into the day, another ULCV appeared in the offing . . .

Hyundai Drive, which sounds almost like a car ad framed as an order if you reverse the words . . . .

In the clearer light, you can clearly see Drive‘s crew asisting the docking pilot, boarding from Capt. Brian A.

 

For scale, notice the deckhand on the bow waiting . . .

. . .

for the messenger line.

To digress a bit, in July 2018 Hyundai Jupiter was in the sixth boro, and the company was still called Hyundai.  On March 31, 2020, it rebranded itself as HMM.  Jupiter, 1059′ loa,  had a capacity of 10,000 teu.

In March 2013, Hyundai Grace, a 2007 build, had a capacity of 4571 teu on her 964′ hull.

In April 2009, Hyundai Voyager was in town . . . built in 2008 with the same dimensions as Grace.

So in a decade, typical Hyundai (HMM) vessels calling here have increasing carrying capacity by nearly 300%. If you consider HMM calling elsewhere, the increase has been greater than 500%.

All photos, WVD.

Installment 1 was a long time ago.  But the hazy days of summer bring the inspiration back.  Any idea what this is?  Answers follow below.

Or this?  I took all the photos in this post a few days ago–Sunday–afternoon from near the VZ Bridge.

Here’s an easier one maybe.

This one is a bit weird.

This one’s truly unusual.

Below . . . in the foreground that’s the same vessel as seen directly above in profile.

I liked this shot in the camera, but when I put it on the computer, I noticed that bow and stern are bookended by recreational boats.  Have you identified the hazy profiles above?

Here’s the same Capt.Brian A. McAllister following a ship in and the deckhand on the bow prepares to capture the messenger line and tie it to the big line lead from the forward winch.

Answers:  1)  Ram VII     2)  USNS Supply (T-AOE-6) departing Naval Weapons Station Earle   3)  Ellen McAllister  bow first  4)  two large container ships passing in Ambrose Channel, a Maersk ULCV and a Hyundai one  5 and 6) USNS Mendonca (T-AKR-303) with dredger RN Weeks bound for sea in 6)

All photos, WVD, who’s making the best of hazy summer light and air conditions.  Snow-reduced visibility can be seen here, fog here and rain does the same here.

Yesterday I mentioned two reasons for early morning photos:  temperature and light.

Ava M looks different too, with its spots illuminating the curved hull.

As I post this, he’s already completely her east coast US run, and is racing eastward across the Atlantic, at 18+ kts.

 

Patrice tagged along until completing the turn at Bergen Point.

 

Again, once west of my vantage point, light washed her anew.

All photos, WVD.

Gunhilde appeared on this blog two months ago here.

Shooting into the sun never works.

On the other hand, what got highlighted was the spray both hawse rinse and  . . . cooling from bow thruster (?).

But what caught my attention later was all the print on forward side of the superstructure.  Going clockwise from lower left, we read no smoking, overfill alarm, high level alarm, wind hi, wind hi hi, overfill alarm, fo overfill alarm, safety first.  Most of those labels are accompanied by a light.  The consumer of this info would be anyone on the deck, either at sea or at docks.

 

 

I’m aware of the many light patterns and what they mean, and so I suppose you need this number to be prepared.  Regular checks are needed.

 

I was also curious about this break in the walkway between the superstructure and the stack area.

Stern design has variety.  For more photos of this 2017 tanker, see my friend Jack’s neck of the woods.

All photos, WVD, who’s letting you know I won’t be re-posting on FB the next few because I’m either on the road or up a river or creek . . . away from wifi.

Today is the 100th anniversary of the Jones Act.  I hope folks who believe the Jones Act should be repealed read this and inform themselves.  A good place to start is here, a well-written editorial from gCaptain from a few years ago.

Sunshine State, one of five tankers managed by Crowley, is an example of a Jones Act tanker.  That means it was built in the US, and crewed by US mariners.

Atlantic Sea, 2016 launched in Hudong Zhonghua Shipbuilding, is a non-Jones Act vessel.

Maersk Tukang was built in Korea in 2008, and registered in Singapore.

ONE Minato and Constellation arrive together via the Ambrose Channel.  The 2018 ONE vessel was both built and registered in Japan. Constellation, 2006, was built in China and registered in Marshall Islands.

Mandalay, 2019, carries Singapore registry.  I’ve been unable to find where she was built, but my guess is China.

Zim Vancouver, 2007 built in Dalian CN, and registered in Haifa.

Torm Sublime, registered in Copenhagen, was built in Nansha, CN 2019.

Maersk Kleven, built in Denmark in 1996,  registered in Liberia. Assisting are Ava and Capt. Brian, both Jones Act.

All photos, WVD, who is the first to admit that as important as the Jones Act is, the decisions of flagging are complex.

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

Many thanks to Phil Little, who took these from his socially-distanced perch high atop the Weehawken cliff . . .  I had thought to go out, but I didn’t want to get swarmed by “social-approachers.”  An alternative title here could be “Comfort Departs.”  I like the blue/white sign on the building off the starboard side of the ship:  “Thank you essential and health-care workers . . . .”

If I see accurately,  it’s Ava, Capt. Brian, and Marjorie that see her out.  As Phil writes, “Conditions: slack tide, wind 10-15 ESE, temp 53 deg.F. Looked like they had to nudge her around a bit into the wind, before she got underway!”

And so she got underway, exactly a month after arriving.

The closest I could find to an accounting is here from Mike Schuler at gCaptain: “While in New York, medical personnel treated 182 patients of which 70% were COVID-19 positive. More than 110 surgical procedures, 540 x-rays and CT-scans, and 1,300 intravenous and oral medications were performed, according the U.S. Navy. ”

Many thanks, Phil. Many thanks to crew of USNS Comfort.

And tomorrow, we begin our virtual canal tour of the western portion the NYS Canal system.  And thanks to a friend who pointed this out on a NYS blog a short time ago, a fascinating and profusely illustrated article about the impact of the 1872 horse epidemic on the economy and the Erie Canal.

 

I did not forget in the beginning of April about the 2020 calendar enhancement;  there were just too any things going on! So today I both catch up, and get ahead.  And according to my accounting robot, today I post for the 4,500th time.  Champagne is spilling all over my editor’s floor, but he’s not sharing.

YM World came in last April as Anthem of the Seas was departing.  If one keeps records with the goal of tracking change, few industries have changed as profoundly as the cruise industry has in the past year, and all that in the past two months.

Truly YM World, an ULCV,is huge.  But earlier this week, MSC Anna sailed under the Golden Gate, over 100′ longer, almost 40′ wider, giving her a total teu capacity of over 19k, compared with around 14k here.  That 5000 teu difference equals the total capacity of an average container ship serving the sixth boro 10 years ago.

 

The May calendar page features James D Moran nosing up against a pink magenta wall.

Here she comes in to meet off the starboard side.

Then she matches speed

and comes alongside to drop off the docking pilot.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,408 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031