You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Capt. Brian A. McAllister’ tag.

Where’s there’s a “1”, a “2” must follow, right?  Let’s start with Brendan Turecamo on the starboard side of APL Dublin.

Enter a Maersk ship with Bruce tendering the port side.

APL Dublin has Kirby on the stern.

Gerda has Capt. Brian A. on her stern, and

Patrice and

Ava.  That makes a total of four tugboats on Gerda Maersk.

Note the rust stains on Maersk Columbus, a US-flagged ship.

Yet, no tugboats work the port side of Columbus,

 

but on her starboard side, Margaret has been all along, and Kirby has left APL Dublin to assist Columbus as they head for the bridge and Bergen Point.

All photos and interpretation by WVD, who’ll never see this identical concatenation repeated.  Hat tip to all the crews who make this happen.

Can anyone explain the story of the rust stains on Maersk Columbus?

Looking back a year, here‘s where April 11, 2020 found us.

 

Installment 1 was here.  Guess the loa, breadth, and teu?

So far, I’ve seen Ever Focus and Ever Forward . . . although it appears I’ve not posted my Ever Forward photos.  I do that sometimes by chance.

So Ever Fortune . . . entered service in November 2020. 

It’s one of the newest vessels on the seas, with many superlatives in features. 

Patrice sidled alongside to land the docking pilot and

Capt. Brian and Ava M. joined in the effort.

All photos, WVD, who offers proof for earlier statements hereScrubbers remove the nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide. . .  acid rain.

Loa, breadth, and teu?  1096′ x 158′ and capacity of 12118 teu.  Not the biggest, but much bigger than anything here a decade ago, and she moves at max 23 kts!  (26.5 mph).

 

 

Justine has been back in the sixth boro awhile now after quite some time away.

She’s a 1982 product of Jakobson, one of the last half dozen built there.  From this angle she reminds me of Siberian Sea, now Mike Azzolino.  She works with 4000 hp.

Recent days have seen a convergence of the Cape-class,

Cape Lookout,

Cape Henry,

and Cape Canaveral, here pushing DBL 101.

They are attractive 5000 hp boats.

Also pushing an oil barge, Patriot, in fact, was Robert IV.

Usually that barge has Mary H as power.

Nicole Leigh finished fueling, brought down the red flag, and spun around to rejoin her barge.

Her Caterpillars deliver a total of 7200 hp to her wheels.

And closing, it’s the 6770 hp Capt. Brian A. escorting Zim Tarragona out to sea.

All photos, WVD.

 

Talos.  Know the reference?  I didn’t but will share the response at the end of this post.  It’s entirely appropriate for the very automated  and largest in physical size class of container ships to call in the sixth boro, 1211′ loa.  In fact, another ship of the class is recognized as being (in 2019) as the largest vessel to pass through the new Panama Canal locks.  That ULCV, Triton, has been in the sixth boro several times, once just recently, and I’ve managed to miss it each time. The diminutive tug off the port quarter is Vane’s 95′ Susquehanna with a barge on the wire.

Entering the boro means passing the lighthouse on Norton’s Point, aka Seagate.

Another clue to the length of Talos comes by comparing it to the VZ Bridge tower, which rise up nearly 700′.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of Triton, and it has the same blotchy paint.  Anyone know why?

She headed west on the ConHook Range with four McAllister tugs, although none of a tether.

I chose not to follow her through the KVK, so maybe Capt. Brian A. got on the tether here.

Note the size of ferry JFK alongside Talos. JFK has a loa of 277′.

Talos here heads for Port Elizabeth;  over beynd her is Al Qibla, another ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who offers this link on the five Triton-class boats.

Engine here is the AN Diesel & Turbo B&W 11S90ME-C9&10.

Talos, a robot, . .  . has quite the legacy, which you can learn here.  He was finally defeated by the guiles of MedeaHere‘s the contemporary, non-marine Talos.

Also arriving in port before dawn this morning is the CMA CGM 15000 ULCV I’ve not yet seen, CMA CGM Panama.

 

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

The Kill Van Kull is a relatively narrow strait, but skill and experience allows passing like this to occur routinely.   Zim Tarragona (856′ x 106′) and CMA CGM Tosca (1096′ x 140′) need to mind the physics in this passage.

MSC Toronto (1065′ x 140′) heads into Port Elizabeth with another container ship not far behind.

MOL Courage (1036′ x 150′) heads for sea.  She seems to have shed the false AIS signal that accompanied her last trip.

Chacabuco (905′ x 31′)  heads toward the container port.  Years ago, I met this vessel in Brazil.  The name comes from a region in Argentina.

 

Ever Lasting (1098′ x 160′)  heads for the next port.

YM Evolution (849′ x 122′) comes in.

The past few years, she’s been a regular here.

Ever Front, (1095′ x 157′) and the newest vessel in this post, heads for the next port.

 

Taipei Trader (485′ x 76′) does a regular shuttle run.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

From the east  . . .   and

from the west . . .

launched in 2010 and carrying up to 8500 teu, and

to the left, launched in 2011 and  . .   4520 teu…

they meet near midpoint in the Kill van Kull.

xx

They seem much closer than they are.

Charles D. is exactly where she needs to be.

 

Another sail completed from his perspective, the docking pilot returns to the tugboat.

All photos, WVD.

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