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Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

The Kill Van Kull is a relatively narrow strait, but skill and experience allows passing like this to occur routinely.   Zim Tarragona (856′ x 106′) and CMA CGM Tosca (1096′ x 140′) need to mind the physics in this passage.

MSC Toronto (1065′ x 140′) heads into Port Elizabeth with another container ship not far behind.

MOL Courage (1036′ x 150′) heads for sea.  She seems to have shed the false AIS signal that accompanied her last trip.

Chacabuco (905′ x 31′)  heads toward the container port.  Years ago, I met this vessel in Brazil.  The name comes from a region in Argentina.

 

Ever Lasting (1098′ x 160′)  heads for the next port.

YM Evolution (849′ x 122′) comes in.

The past few years, she’s been a regular here.

Ever Front, (1095′ x 157′) and the newest vessel in this post, heads for the next port.

 

Taipei Trader (485′ x 76′) does a regular shuttle run.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

From the east  . . .   and

from the west . . .

launched in 2010 and carrying up to 8500 teu, and

to the left, launched in 2011 and  . .   4520 teu…

they meet near midpoint in the Kill van Kull.

xx

They seem much closer than they are.

Charles D. is exactly where she needs to be.

 

Another sail completed from his perspective, the docking pilot returns to the tugboat.

All photos, WVD.

It’s the end of another month, and maybe because everything’s been so bleak of late, let’s just admire and enjoy the complexity of the sixth boro.

Diverse people work here on diverse missions.

Places like NY Harbor School and M.A. S. T. as well as SUNY Maritime College and King’s Point MMA are here.

On foggy days a narrow navigation channel gives the illusion of being as expansive as the ocean.

Keeping it as ideal a place as possible is the mission of many people and much infrastructure, seen and unseen.

Professionals pass through the sixth boro without ever technically entering the space, both a boon and a bane to all involved,

and their safe passage is ensured by the named and the nameless.

Work and recreation can happen in the same space because of

professionalism.  If you have a lot of time, you can binge watch these videos by a pro who works the sixth boro and beyond.  Now, when I hear his voice on VHF, it’s familiar.  There are books as well.

The universal language of gesture is powerdful.

The sixth boro has at least as much specialized equipment as the other five boros combined;  another way to put it, the specialized equipment of the sixth boro enable the other boros to perform.

And if the land boros have spirit, don’t imagine the sixth boro  lacks anything.

Photos and sentiments, WVD.

Alongside Pilot No. 1 New York, the current one, it’s the newest-in-name vessel in the sixth boro . . .

Meaghan Marie, exKathleen Turecamo, has become part of the same green & buff fleet as Joseph John.

Here’s a photo I took of her in port of Albany, September 2013.

A different use of green . . . Vane’s Philadelphia, a 4200 hp tug launched in 2017.

A slightly darker buff, it’s Matthew Tibbetts.  What I didn’t realize until I looked it up just now, Tibbetts was launched as Dann Ocean’s first boat to carry the name Ocean Tower.  More on that later.

It’s always a good day when I catch two Reinauer tugboats together, Haggerty Girls (4000 hp) and Ruth M. Reinauer (4720 hp), with a deeply loaded RTC

Alex puts its 4300 hp to bear on Viktor Bakaev.

I mentioned Ocean Tower earlier . . .  here’s the current tugboat by that name. It’s about a decade newer, one-third more horsepower, and 15′ longer, and 5′ broader than the earlier boat, now Tibbetts.

Kristin Poling began life as Chesapeake, an early version of Patapsco but longer, broader,and with a full 5000 hp.

And to conclude, examples of the classes of the two largest tractor tugs in the sixth boro . . . Capt. Brian A. and

JRT, each approaching their next job.

All photos very recently, WVD, who has more tugboat race photos from previous years . . .

 

 

Remember Laura Maersk, the unusual tow from back in mid-June?  An engine room explosion disabled her, and she had to be towed in for repairs.  Well . . .  below are her tracks from yesterday . . .  first sea trials . . . aka a “test drive” and then

she made a beeline for Panama, an excellent place to load. I forgot to mention it, but the two ULCVs in a recent post, Hyundai Drive was arriving from Cartagena CO and Cosco Shipping Rose, from Limon Bay Panama.

Before leaving, she was very light,  like this.

Remember Mendonca came into port about two weeks ago?

Her portside stern half of the vessel has been stripped of coating.  In a blown up version of the photo below, i count at least 10 yard workers.

One might conclude, correctly, that Maersk has the largest container fleet in the world by the number of Maersk vessels calling here.  Below the Gunhilde, 1200′ loa, gets escorted in by Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

CPO Bremen, previously called Vancouver Express,  heads out, as

does

Northern Magnum, previously called Los Angeles Express.

CMA CGM T. Jefferson winds her way through the KVK.

Johanna C loads scrap.

Spinel arrives,

as does MSC Elodie.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

0545 at the Narrows . . . in the hazy days of summer . . . nothing beats it.

I had not come here just to beat the heat.

Surprisingly, Turecamo Girls (I believe) delivered the docking pilot.

Then she dropped back, to where one of the 6000s took the stern and

another the bow.

Only a couple hours into the day, another ULCV appeared in the offing . . .

Hyundai Drive, which sounds almost like a car ad framed as an order if you reverse the words . . . .

In the clearer light, you can clearly see Drive‘s crew asisting the docking pilot, boarding from Capt. Brian A.

 

For scale, notice the deckhand on the bow waiting . . .

. . .

for the messenger line.

To digress a bit, in July 2018 Hyundai Jupiter was in the sixth boro, and the company was still called Hyundai.  On March 31, 2020, it rebranded itself as HMM.  Jupiter, 1059′ loa,  had a capacity of 10,000 teu.

In March 2013, Hyundai Grace, a 2007 build, had a capacity of 4571 teu on her 964′ hull.

In April 2009, Hyundai Voyager was in town . . . built in 2008 with the same dimensions as Grace.

So in a decade, typical Hyundai (HMM) vessels calling here have increasing carrying capacity by nearly 300%. If you consider HMM calling elsewhere, the increase has been greater than 500%.

All photos, WVD.

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