You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Capt. Brian A. McAllister’ tag.

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

Here’s the photo I considered using on the March calendar page and taken about five seconds before the one I did use.  On March 9, 2019 at 0726 . . . I love the light here, but the tug seemed too small to be the subject on a calendar page.  I do love the purple skyline against the orange sky.  Color aficionados might describe the outline of buildings with words like mauve and carrot with traces of grapefruit and squash fading into hints of cyan.  I like the glint of sunrise on the port side of Alex, likely returning from an assist.

In July 2019, I caught the next two of Alex, assisting CMA CGM Otello outbound for sea.  Note the design differences between Alex and Capt. Brian A. off her stern.  The 4300 hp Alex was launched in 1985 and spent her first five years assisting submarines for Electric Boat.  She then was sold and worked in Puerto Rico and Florida until 2008, when she was sold to a Maine company. McAllister bought her in 2012, and I believe I first saw her in the sixth boro in 2017.  Capt. Brian A. McAllister arrived here in 2017 and brings 6770 hp to the job.

 

In these November 2019 photos,

Alex and Ava M assist Arthur Maersk in rounding Bergen Point.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated here, but followup to the No.11Asomaru post of a few days ago, it has happened again.  Sunday evening AIS showed a Tiong Woon Ocean 17 signal coming into the sixth boro, escorted by two Moran 6000s and

following or coinciding with MOL Paradise heading here into Global in Bayonne.   Lucien’s comment the other day seems to explain this .  . a glitch . . . but since this is the third tme I’ve seen this, I wonder how common it really is and whether others have noticed it.  As of 0500 this morning, Tiong and Paradise left for Savannah, and as of posting, she was off Ocean City NJ, appearing as a gray signal.   Tiong Woon Corporation (TWC) is a Sri Lankan holding company with tugboats, but no #17.

Here’s the one I saw last year;  anyone who knows Port Elizabeth, shown, knows that Oat, IMO 9291630, a tanker 800′ x 137′ , would not be at that berth and atop the container ship there.

Is this corrupted signal a frequent occurrence?  Is this evidence of colliding or commingling parallel universes?

Interesting name . . . I thought it was the number “3” in Arabic, but I was wrong.  Anyone know the reference?

Clever logo . . .

Feel like Wheel of Fortune yet?

I can tell you that’s Capt. Brian . . . and you can probably tell me the location, by the tall tapered building off Capt. Brian‘s stern.

 

Figure it out yet?

Thalatta’s a HERO  . . . a High-efficiency RORO, capable of carrying 8000 cars.  Parked end to end and bumper to bumper, that’s over 20 miles of cars.

She’s a post-Panamax ROROHere‘s the explanation for that.

 

And the reference is Greek . . .

All photos, WVD, whose previous versions of this post were here.

Unrelated but certainly worth a look, Paul Strubeck has come into some vintage photos on a South American river assisting bauxite ore boats in the narrow waterways . . .

Atlantic Star first arrived here four years ago, although that hardly seems possible.

Five identical vessels transport containers and anything “rolled on.”  See a partial cutaway here.

I’ve not yet made photos of Atlantic Sky and Sun, although I have noticed them either coming or going.

But I just learned they also carry passengers . . . it’s two weeks and three days from Hamburg to here.  More info here.

 

Has anyone reading this done it or know of someone who has?  I’d love to hear.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Whenever I’ve seen this vessel, I had associations with a huge river in a big country.

These blue-white designs, though, didn’t conjure up that tropical river, yet they were strangely familiar.

The “upside-down V” didn’t initially strike me a Greek letter lambda either.

Later I started looking differently to try to figure out why that Greek frieze design looked familiar.  I’ve only been in Greece once and that was almost half a lifetime ago. Now it strikes me as strange that I didn’t think of the huge multinational e-commerce and tech company, the one who created a zillionaire.

Amazon Beauty was once Greek-flagged, but it’s not any more.  Now it appears to be shuttling some product between Point Tupper NS and Linden NJ.

Have you figured out the blue/white pattern and why it might be familiar?

Click here for the New York coffee cup, the ubiquitous vessel for coffee at one time, and now eclipsed by DD and Starbucks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who send greetings to the photographer up in Point Tupper, who will get photos when she arrives.

 

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

A harbor, different parts of it, can be a crowded place.  Here are some previous posts called “congestion.”

Kyoto Express left first, after my arrival, passing some icons during her exit.

Ever Legion departed next, leaving the US-flagged Overseas Key West at the dock.

 

Seroja Enam, ex-APL Poland, was arriving but being followed.

Meeting them was Stolt Sea, escorted by Margaret Moran.

 

 

Grande New York followed closely behind.

Note all the docked vessels out beyond the Bayonne Bridge.

Grande New York, a relatively new vessel, was launched the same year as the ill-fated Golden Ray, now being scrapped down south.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s another calendar’s worth . . . starting with Josephine.  I have many more of this bot coming up soon.

Capt. Brian heads out through the Narrows to meet a tow.

Cape Lookout returns for her anchored barge.

Nathan G delivers a brace of scows.

Ava M heads out for a job.

The “new” Kristin Poling returns to her barge as well.

Ellen and Bruce A follow a job.

St Andrews heads east and

Ernest Campbell, west.

Challenger, some weeks ago, brings a Weeks crane up for a lift.

Stephen B has some additions to her paint job since last I saw her.

CMT Pike heads back across the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who can’t believe it’s already mid-November 2019!!

 

 

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