You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Capt. Brian A. McAllister’ tag.

This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

Here’s the previous post of this focus.  I had others ready to go at one point, but  . ..  ships sail, horses leave barns, and ideas slip away.  Yesterday I spent one hour on the Upper Bay and concluded that it’s a diverse place, starting with this water rising up and obscuring whatever lay beyond it.  Of course, I knew what it was, but I recall the first time I saw such a misting–in the Gulf off Kuwait–and my brain could not process what my eyes were sending it.

Regular and irregular cargoes juxtaposed, boxes and rocks.

Framing a shot puts together what is actually quite far apart.

I’ve done a number of posts on winter fishing, but fall fishing must be super right now, with some fisherman torn between landing that next fish and

 

staying out of the path of YM World and all those tugs assisting it into Global terminal.

 

I know foreshortening plays a role in giving a sense of crowding, but there IS undeniably some crowding going on here.  The ship DID sound a warning at one point.

And that mist in the top photo . . . it came from Firefighter II.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who still has lots of photos from the trip from Montreal.

 

 

Sarah D makes for Global Terminal,

Helen Laraway passes an inbound container vessel,

Ava M. guides a ULCV in beside a cruise ship,

Rebecca Ann moves a light scrap barge,

Capt. Brian A. tails a box ship into her berth,

Genesis Glory passes GM 11105,

Eric McAllister assists a tanker into its berth,

Rhea I. Bouchard heads westbound light in the KVK,

and Frances pushes a scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves that the sixth boro never sleeps.

And now one more, taken this morning in San Juan PR by Capt. Neftali Padilla, it’s the arrival of the cranes towed by Capt. Latham after not quite an 18-day run. See the tow departing NYC here.  Thx much, Tali.

Triton is a fitting name* for the current record-holding largest ULCV to call in the sixth boro.  If the Panamanians call it that after CMA CGM T. Roosevelt-also in the sixth boro this week–call it that, that passes muster as true for me, since they charge fees by this criterion.

The photos above and below come from Marcin Kocoj, who caught it departing Port Elizabeth and then passing Caddell’s in the KVK.

*Triton was built by Samsung in Geoje South Korea in 2016 has already had a handful of names. She’s moved along by 85705 hp.

The photo above and another version of it below come from Capt. Tom Ferrie, Sandy Hook pilot who took it out to sea late Friday afternoon.

Now I imagine someone in an airplane a half dozen miles over the Atlantic Ocean looking out the window and spotting it, a tiny sliver of multi-colored boxes followed by a wake, a massive ship in a much-more immense ocean.

I suppose 10 years from now, we’ll look back at Triton in the context of even larger vessels. 

Here’s more.

Many thanks to Marcin and Tom for use of these photos.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

By now you’ve seen a trend in several posts . . . my showing you what my eyes want to misperceive.  Does this not look like a tug with a heaping deckload on a barge?   I took the shot Sunday in the rain, camera protected by an umbrella.   Precipitation diffuses the subject.

A minute later, what is approaching has become more apparent.

It’s Gargano, which I’ve watched for a spell now on AIS. Built in 2002, she’s been transformed from an OSV to a wind farm construction support vessel.   Read more here.

Her crew was catching some photos from the underside of the VZ Bridge here.

 

For relative size, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister, 

at the Narrows to meet what was not a barge at all.   The “barge” in the top photo was Maersk Kowloon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who just learned that Gargano is the location of a wind farm off the east coast of Italy.

Alternate classification for this post could be under “specialized” or “whatzit“.

 

Quick post today . . . with a followup tomorrow.  I became somewhat obsessed with the name of this ULCV;  I’d expected it to arrive a day earlier and it anchored a dozen leagues out, so you can understand my obsession when my brain told me I was waiting in vain for the “world.”  For now, this may be among the largest box boats to arrive in the harbor . . .  1200′  x 167′  x 47′  with an air draft of 177′, if my ears caught the numbers correctly.

Maybe you can participate in my tangent, though.  Here’s how.  Given the name of this vessel,  what comes to mind?   What song titles?  And,  if you worked for YM and needed to come up with a name for a sister vessel, what would you suggest?  I don’t believe there is a sister vessel.  And I believe this is YM World’s first visit to the sixth boro.  If there’s any humor in this post, I intend it to be on me and on the crazy places my brain goes when I consider the (YM) World to be arriving in NYC . . . because hasn’t it always….

Some of my thoughts, in no particular order, would be these:  stop the world I wanna get off, world on a string, I’m sitting on top of the world . . .  .  As to a sister ship, I come up with “other world” and then this one being worldly and the sister being otherworldly . . .

 

Anyhow, as I said earlier, more of this actual vessel tomorrow.  By the way, she’s currently at Global Terminal in Bayonee, arriving here Saturday (4/27) as its first port call after departing singapore on 4/1.

All photos and reactions by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a repository of song titles--most of which I don’y know–with “world” in the title.  And book titles . . . around the world in 80 days has [comic] possibilities.  This “world” song comes with its own NYC images in its music video. For many years I was a fan of what record stores (what are they??!) classified as “world music, stuff like this . . . or this.

And hat’s off to the fine machines and skilled crews who guide these behemoths into and out of ports as if the feats were just play.

New in town but probably only in as a transient . . .

It’s Michael L. Daigle, fleet mate of some Hebert boats that have also passed through the sixth boro and likely working on a dredging project in the region.  Note the white horizontal supports above the wheelhouse door on either side.  I’m guessing they’re for quick egress lines   . .  as seen here if you scroll through the 2010 post to Gulf Dawn.

Unrelated . . .  two Vane units approach the Narrows;  the forward unit below has already evolved from wire towing to alongside towing.

As a heavy squall approached, Potomac enters port allowed by

Patuxent, still with the wire out.

A few years back, HMS Justice was a regular in NYC.  These days not so much, but she called here recently.

Fleet mate HMS Liberty follows along behind.

CMT Otter heads outbound, likely towards Queens and Inwood.

And let’s end today’s post with another transient . . .  Captain Sam, here meeting Capt. Brian.  Captain Sam is a triple screw Rodriguez Shipyard boat from 2002.

All photos taken within the general confines of the sixth boro by Will Van Dorp.

 

Stephen B heads light westbound about to pass under the Bayonne Bridge, as

Mary H, especially busy during the cold times of the year, pushes some petroleum product in the opposite direction.  Soon leaves will decorate Shooters out beyond her. There’s a pool hall in Queens by the name Shooters, so to clarify, here are some Shooters history posts from way back.

Mr Jim moves some aggregates, also eastbound out of Newark Bay.

James D. nudges Dublin Express as needed into Howland Hook.

Eric and Capt. Brian A. assist a CMA CGM box ship.

Evelyn Cutler moves some petroleum along the supply chain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s burning high octane himself these days.

Related:  Let me reiterate Lee Rust’s question of a day or so ago:  What is the current working estimate of operating tugs in NY’s sixth boro?  For starters, I think it’s hard to count because of the dynamic, transient nature of traffic.  Just ballparking it without breaking it down by company and enumerating, I’d say 75 at least.  For consistency, let’s say we can count a tugboat as present if it shows up on AIS/VHF/traffic control at least once a month.  I’d love to hear you estimates.

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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