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So the difference that makes the “really” is that several folks have contributed these photos.

Starting in Toronto with Jan van der Doe, here’s M. R. Kane, which has appeared here and here previously on this blog.  In the first link, you’ll see Kane towing the hull that would become tall ship Oliver Hazard Perry.

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Next three photos came from Allan Seymour, who took them as he traversed the Cape Cod Canal recently.  This Independence is rated at 5400 hp.

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Bohemia and barge wait to pass.

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And Buckley McAllister shares escort work on the Canal with Independence.

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The rest of these photos I’ve caught recently, all of tugs I’d not previously seen.  Miss Ila came through the sixth bork Saturday,

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Miss Lizzy I saw Friday, and

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Performance I saw in Massena earlier this month, and

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Robinson Bay.  These last two are operated by DOT’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC), which is looking to replace these aging tugs.  Robinson Bay (103′ loa and built in Wisconsin in 1957) and Performance (50′ and Indiana, 1997) do maintenance work on the US portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

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Thanks to Jan and Allan for the first photos here.  All the others are by Will Van Dorp.

Given the glorious sunshine, the transition from summer to fall begs another series.  Let’s start with Maule, 

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2/3s of her escort, and

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a fraction of her crew.

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Following in Maule‘s wake, Helsinki Bridge arrives, here with half its escort.

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McKinley Sea traverses the Upper Bay and passes

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UBC Mobile.

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In the harbor was Cordula Jacob and Seastar, as seen from two angles.

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with some ferries and a Miller’s Launch crew boat.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Miss Lizzy work the AK and in the

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KVK, for the last day, there are two glorious ships with bright futures . . .

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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I have more Saint Lawrence posts, but with a chrononautical weekend behind us, let me digress and report.  The mood for the first ship was set by the weather;  see what the mist did to my favorite downtown building–70 Pine.  Click here and be treated to a slideshow of views through time of boro Manhattan’s  tall observation cliffs, past present and future.

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Looking eastbound up the East River, I saw her waiting, as

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first one of her entourage arrived and

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and then another.

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The term “haze gray” was certainly demonstrated yesterday,

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as was the vintage of this Liberty ship headed to sea, for a cruise.

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Even the Higgins T-boat in the distance is a whole decade closer to the present–in inception– than Brown, although  yesterday all crowded into 2016.

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It was a moving sight,

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which I beheld,

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only slightly regretting I was not aboard.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Over half a year ago, I did a series of posts on Atlantic Star, the first of the new ACL c-ships arriving in the sixth boro for the first time.  The other day was my first time to spot the next of the set of five.

And given the location of Wavertree, a 130-year-old  veteran of Atlantic (and all its adjoining waters)  sailing,

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juxtaposing the two seemed an opportunity not to pass up.  imagine this as cover art for a book called Atlantic Sail, Then and Now.   And no, I haven’t written it.

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Here’s a shot.  Now if only I’d had a drone….  I suppose in a few weeks if Peking is docked here, a shot with that barque and this Zim vessel (IMO 9289544) would be the one to get.

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See in the middle distance a Nukahevan craft passing Atlantic Sail?

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No matter.  Let’s study the novel shapes and angles on the CONRO, assisted out here by Eric McAllister.

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That’s the stack offset to port.

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Steel curves like this in superstructure are unusual.

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Sail on,

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Atlantic Sail.  Here’s the report for the week Atlantic Compass went to scrap.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You’d have thought I use this title more often, but it’s been almost three years since it last appeared. I’m starting with this photo of the lightship WLV-612, because this is where I’ll be this evening for a FREE and open-to-the-public 6 pm showing of our documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.  Seats for those who arrive first.

Over the years I’ve done many posts about the WLV-612, but my favorite is this one.

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Here’s a very recent arrival in the sixth boro’s pool of workboats . . . Fort McHenry, just off the ways, although just yesterday an even-more recent arrival.  more on that one soon, I hope.  I don’t know how new Double Skin 315 is.

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Ships in the anchorage and waterways must think they are in a tropical clime, given the temperatures of August 2016.

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NS Parade, Iron Point, MTM St Jean …  have all been here recently.

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Robert E. McAllister returned from a job, possibly having assisted Robert E. Peary.

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MSC Lucy headed out past

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Larry J. Hebert, standing by at a maintenance dredging job.

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MOL Bellwether, all 1105′ loa of her, leave into the humid haze, existing here along with

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some wind to propel this sloop.

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Finally, just the name, sir;  No need for the entire genealogy. This photo comes compliments of Bob Dahringer.

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Thanks to Bob for the photo above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are the previous posts in this series.  This is the SUNY training ship’s return this past week from a “sea term” that began this way on May 10. This first set of photos comes from Roger Munoz, who took them from high above 74th Street.

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That’s Roosevelt Island just to her far side, and the Queens and the Bronx farther beyond.

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Later that morning, Thomas Steinruck took these during the assist back into the dock

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friends and family welcomed TS Empire State VI home.   Now it’s back to classes, study, and tests in this part of the Bronx.

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Many thanks to Roger and Thomas for use of these photos.

Type the word training into the search window to the left on this page and you’ll get a variety of posts, as here.  And truth be told, many other options exist for summer training and sea time for ocean academy students;  I met cadets from at least three on my “go west” trip.  Yesterday David Silver got me advance notice of when this training ship would leave port;  thanks to him, I got these photos.

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Kimberly Turecamo assisted, as did Julia Miller and Amy C McAllister.

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By 1230 Friday, she was west of the Brooklyn Bridge and headed for sea,

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for Maine, and by

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this posting, she’s already east of Cape Cod.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to watch David Silver’s 20-minute video of her departure from pier side.

 

By 1330 Tuesday, we docked at West Point, the first non-red pushpin in yesterday’s map.   Working backward, we saw Tappan Zee II at the TZ, as we did

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the Left Coast Lifter.

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Off the Palisades, we saw Sarah D;

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in Wallabout Bay, C. Angelo;

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at the southern end of Narragansett Bay, Dace Reinauer; and

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and Suomigracht with Cape Wind turbine blades,

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and soon after departing Warren, we saw Buckley McAllister.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is posting these without any alterations.  We saw much more as well.  Cheers.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

Oleander has to be the most regular ship coming into the sixth born.  Put it this way:  if it’s Thursday, Oleander will arrive from Bermuda, the B in BCL.

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Ever Diamond seems basically to shuttle between eastern Asia and eastern US.

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Some day I should see how many of the 10 Ever Dainty-class of Evergreen Marine container ships I have photos of in the sixth boro.

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IMHO, vessels like Anthem of the Seas are most interesting under some unusual light, like dawn here last week.

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I lamented the fact there were no dancers in the glass ball.

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MV Loujiane is part of GBX, serving, I gather, as both bulk storage of cementitious material and movie set.

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Has anyone ever seen photos of Loujiane, ex-Abu-Louijiane, ex-Bahma . . . arriving in the sixth born?  She must have arrived here at some point in the 1990s, by the photo comments here.

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Over in Walkabout Bay in the spot where Alice often discharges, Pagona was working the other day.

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Rounding out the post, it’s the vessel everyone in NYC should be familiar with, especially her being in proximity to the bridge she nearly brought down.  Recognize her?

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It’s Chemical Pioneer.   During the decade I’ve been watching she’s been a hardworking vessel, but

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here’s the NTSB report.  Click here for one of her ITB fleet mates, now scrapped.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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