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Eric McAllister went out the Narrows to

meet her ship out beyond Swinburne.

 

It seems the gulls are excited by whatever chum follows in the wake, chum made from all those shad.

The shine on the hull suggested a fairly new ship, and

in fact, I’d never seen this one before,

Grande New York.

How grand.  She was completed at CSC Jinling Shipyard in late October 2017.  I don’t know if this was her first arrival in New York.  Sister ships are Grande Baltimora, already in service, and Grande Halifax . . . yet to be completed.

Here are previously posted other “Grande” Grimaldi vessels:  G Senegal,  G Marocco, and G Guinea, which came into the sixth boro early Monday and departed yesterday.

And here’s the rest of the title . . . as a way to show the varying weather.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Jack Ronalds took this photo of Ontario (Jeffrey K. McAllister) and Erie (Missy McAllister) in Canso back in August 2016.

John Jedrlinic took this in the sixth boro in December 2008.

I took the photo below a few months earlier in 2008, as the transfer from Normandy to Ross Sea was happening.

Grouper has been featured here many, many times over the years, but you’ve never seen this much of her out of the water;  it’s “draw-down” time on the Erie Canal near lock E-28A.  These photos come from Bob Stopper a few weeks ago.

 

From Bangkok, Ashley Hutto sends along photos of a decidedly pastel Thai tug

with two barges

on a hawser.

Thanks to Jack, Jed, Bob, and Ashley for these photos.

 

Here’s a stranger in the harbor . . . OSG Courageous.  Winter does seem like the time to see the larger units moving oil products. Crowley’s 16,000 hp Legend is in the AK as of this writing.  If anyone snaps a photo, I’d love to see it.   Back in winter 2012, I posted photos of Legend here still on the hard as a new build.

OSG Courageous, 8000 hp,  is married to this 200,000 barrel barge OSG-244.   Click here for my first view of an even larger OSG tug, Vision, 12,000 hp.

Lincoln Sea was the largest tug I’d ever seen back 10 years when we crossed paths near Mariner’s Harbor.

This was her arrival from somewhere in New England yesterday.

At the same moment, Dylan Cooper was lightering a tanker I’d seen before as

Navig8 Stealth II, now intriguingly renamed Aquadisiac.

Eric McAllister assisted Glorious Leader . . .,

which these days sounds like it refers to a dictator.

To close, the venerable Frances moves cold stone through cold water,

but it’s winter.  Crank up the heat and put on some extra layers.  Click here and scroll to see photos of Frances I took in 2010 when she still had the Turecamo wood grained colors.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous weather posts.  Below . . . that’s easy:  it’s a local shower;  Evening Tide and Evening Light were in the rain, and I was not, yet.

But a half hour later at the opposite end of the KVK, the clouds were truly wild.  Is there a word for these conditions?  Again, it wasn’t raining at my location.

Air currents swirled beyond the busy waterway, l to r, Stolt Loyalty, Stone 1, Phoenix Dream, Kimberly Turecamo, and Hoegh Seoul assisted by Bruce A. McAllister.

The Stolt tanker passes Graecia Aeterna before meeting the wild swirl head-on.

Add one more tug to the mix.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d like to know what you call this type of fast-moving dispersal of fog.

 

 

That’s twelve hundred feet of France heading into Bergen Point.  Note the scale of 108′ McAllister Sisters near the bow.  Of course, this group of ships set a record back last summer and that was then eclipsed by early September with the arrival of CMA CGM T. Roosevelt.  But it is my first time to photograph a ULCV;  previous arrivals and departures were at night, or I was distracted or traveling.  Does ULCV apply to vessels of this size?

And if OOCL France looks a drab shade of grey, well, she left China on Christmas day and this is her first port since then.

Tailing straight back is Capt. Brian A. McAllister . . .  until

she gets the signal to

initiate the rotation, assisting the twin bow thrusters on the ship and

the other tugs:

Sisters, Marjorie B., and

 

and Alex.

That makes over 19,000 hp of ship-assist spinning OOCL France clockwise in front of Shooters Island.  For the record, this is my first time to catch one of the largest box ships in the Kills.  Details:  1200′ x 157′ and 144,044 summer dwt;  launched 2013 as NYK Hercules and 13,208 teu, i.e., over 1000 teu fewer than CMA CGM T. Roosevelt, photos of which I’ll post soon.

 

All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who keeps watching the names and numbers in hopes of catching a larger vessel or an autonomous one.

 

YM Express backs into the Rose Bowl after leaving Howland Hook, with some assistance seen at the starboard stern quarter.

Once rotated toward the east, she passes Eric McAllister.

Note that whereas English is a strictly left to right writing system, Chinese is not.

Ellen assists  . . .

 

 

This is my first time to notice the “beware of the propeller” sign in Chinese.  I take it the rightmost character means propeller, but I could be wrong about that.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose computer translates English to Chinese characters as below, speaks and writes/reads no Chinese, Mandarin or otherwise.

.

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

I’m working on some tougher posts, but here’s an easy one.  Let’s flip the calendar back approximately 10 years, give or take a month.  Then it was Barents Sea, not Atlantic Enterprise.  Rowan M. McAllister is still around, although in Charleston SC.  And the container ship under the “un-raised” Bayonne Bridge is Zim Qingdao, currently eastbound across the Atlantic.  The other McAllister tug I don’t know.

Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, now Evelyn Cutler, eastbound toward the Brooklyn Bridge  . . . well, all’s quite changed about all this.

Maryland –I’ve yet to see her as  Liz Vinik–was bunkering the brand new Queen Victoria.

Peking was then–as now–out of the water, although currently her dry dock is in Germany.

Penn No. 4 still goes by the same name, but it’s now a Kirby boat.

George Burrows was never a regular here, and I’ve no idea of her current disposition.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you enjoyed this backward glance.

 

Here was a related post, Yano, watched by John Watson and me simultaeously and from different vantage points, each of us unbeknownst to the other.

Before the snow and cold hit this past week, actually Wednesday Jan 4, I was tipped off about an impending BDD dry dock exit in Bayonne.  And when James E. Brown grasps the door–think of it as a plug–that confirms something will be floating out.

To the extreme left,  see the plug, and Capt. Brian A. McAllister positions itself on the stern of USNS Soderman.

Ellen has the starboard stern quarter, and

Eric has a line on the bow.  For a point-by-point comparison of Eric and the Moran 6000s, click here.

 

Note how the ship dwarfs the lighthouse, and

the harbor dwarfs the ship,

almost entirely obscuring Alex standing by.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whom wonders if anyone’s going to get photos of Millville and 1964 in the anchorage today.  I’m tied up.

You can read  Ice 5 or 3 or 2.  But freezing temperatures in salt water look different than in fresh water, salt ice not like lake ice, which is a topic for tomorrow. The sixth boro low temperature in the first two days of January was well above 0 F, Maine and Minnesota well into the double digits negative F, and Anchorage, a balmy 46 ABOVE, warmer than places in Florida!

But I digress, cold is cold and uncomfortable.  Polar bear plunge notwithstanding, a strong swimmer won’t last a minute in this water.

 

But work goes on . . .

with extra layers

and precautions.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who really postponed admitting the new year had arrived because–dangerously– it was more comfortable thinking otherwise.

 

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