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Rt Hon Paul E. Martin called here before a month over three years ago, that time carrying the same type of cargo.

I took these photos yesterday, and believe it or not, I felt only a few drops of rain.

The Martin is the second self-unloader to call in the sixth boro in three days, which must be some sort of a record.

Eric and Bruce did a magnificent job of spinning the bulker around.

Once spun around, foot by foot she was moved with precision to the dock.

 

To get this cargo here, Martin traveled three weeks and transited the Panama Canal.

 

Can anyone tell me the meaning of the “10H VOID” marking just below the name and CSL class of the freighter and the “VOID7” marking just above the water line?

And where is Morro Redondo, you ask?  It’s on the island of Cedros, a bit over 300 miles SSE of San Diego, CA.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Until an hour before posting, there were two Canadian self-unloaders in our harbor, which is truly remarkable.  Algoma Integrity, as of posting, is not even 10 nm outside the Narrows.

 

All photos today I took in May and early June of 2008.  Odin, configured this was in 1982, is now known as Jutte Cenac, after considerable reconfiguration.  You’d no longer look twice at her now, as you would back then.

Scotty Sky, the Blount-built tanker launched in 1960, was rendered obsolete on January 1, 2015  by OPA 90, and now calls the Caribbean home.

When I took this photo along the South Brooklyn docks, I had no idea that it was to become the Brookfield Place ferry terminal. 

I had no idea until looking this up that Joan McAllister is the current Nathan G.

Juliet Reinauer now works as Big Jake.

For Lettie G Howard, another decade is somewhat insignificant, given that it’s been afloat since 1893.  Currently she’s sailing up the St. Lawrence bound for Lake Erie. The NJ shoreline there has changed quite a bit, beginning with the removal of the Hess tanks there around 2014.

Crow was scrapped in 2015.  I caught her last ride powered by Emily Ann here (and scroll)  in May 2014.

And finally, back in 2008, this living fossil was still hard at work,

gainfully plying the Hudson. This Kristin was scrapped sometime in 2012.

All photos taken in late spring 2008 by Will Van Dorp.

 

As we leave the cold of the past months, we see more crew of all vessels out on deck just to enjoy the balmy weather and sun, like these crew taking photos of the northern side of Staten Island.  I’ve often wondered what they say about this port of the US;  of course they see the skyline of Manhattan as they enter and depart the port, but I wonder what they say about the borders of the KVK.

I’m not “developing” it, however, maybe just taking advantage the “educational” opportunity it offers, to create a space as they have designated in Port Huron as the Great Lakes Maritime Center.  The assemblage of containers there is attractive and functional. Click here and scroll for a post I did back in 2012 about this Center on a brownfield.  NYC is failing to recognize the KVK for the tourist destination it could be.

Pilots boarding in windy frigid months must find this part of spring part of the joy of the profession.

Crew heading back out to sea . . . do they compare ports?

The deckhand needs to stay on station, a much easier task from temperature perspective.

Another crewman headed for sea . . . is this the last port departure of his hitch or his first?

Ditto the crew indicted by the red arrow, what do they talk about?

 

These boom boats, they work all year round on these utilitarian vessels.

This was a coup, I thought.  The USCG had come aboard during cargo transfer to take the crew through a life boat drill.

Again . . . crew entering the port from sea . . .

 

And finally, nobody has time to enjoy these seats right now, but when work is done, I’m guessing they are enjoyed.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is currently headed west again.

 

Cosco Prince Rupert came into town recently 27 days out of Pusan, Korea.

She was launched in South Korea in 2011, has dimensions of 1095′ x 141′, and has container capacity of 8208.  By current standards, she’s upper medium-sized calling in the sixth boro of NYC.

Prince Rupert’s namesake?  He was the first governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

JPO Capricornus, 2005, 865′ x 106,’ teu capacity of 4132 . . .  makes her a smaller size calling these days.  She was a week out of Cartagena upon her arrival in NYC.  She was built in South Korea.

 

Atlantic Sky, a CONRO vessel with capacity of 3800 tea and 1300 vehicles, was launched in 2017 in China.  The tape has her at 970′ x 121′.

 

 

 

Ever Leading launched in 2012 in South Korea.  She has 8452-teu capacity and has dimensions of 1099′ x 151′.

 

Zim Ukrayina  was launched in 2009 in the Philippines.  Her dimensions are 849′ x 105′ and her teu capacity is 4360.

She made the voyage from just north of  Hong Kong (Da Chang Bay) to NYC in 40 days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

Who knew so many types of fog exist?  I believe this is advection fog, and it’s patchy, forming only in places where warm air lays over cold moist areas, like ocean water in May, a common occurrence in the Upper Bay in springtime.

0849 hours:  I watched this ship come through the Narrows.  Around that hour, traffic was intense.  At one point less than half an hour earlier, I feared two MSC container ships were going to collide, but it was only my eyes playing tricks on me, with limited visibility.

0852  That’s Oleander overtaking the bulk carrier.

0852.23   At this point, I decided to see what conditions existed on the other side of the island.

0949  And here we are, less than an hour later.

0952  Jumeirah Beach is a white sandy waterfront area in Dubai.  I chuckled when the VTS folks announced her a “jeremiah beach,”  recalling when Hammurabi was announced as “ham berry.”

0955  No hint of fog existed here, about five miles away.

1000

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has lots more foggy and not-so-foggy photos to post.

Click here for the Pacific Basin homepage.

 

CMA CGM T. Roosevelt is not the only 1200′ ship calling here these days.  CMA CGM J. Adams has recently visited the harbor, as has NYK Wren, ninth of the NYK “bird” series, which arrived and departed in the hours too dark for photos.   There are several 1200′ OOCL vessels, including recently OOCL Chongqing.

If you need an image to show why assist tugs look triangular from this angle, this might be it.

 

 

Ten years ago, it would take two ships to move this number of containers.

It’s hard to keep up with new ULCS entering service.  OOCL Chongqing is rated at 13,208 teus; the newest vessels are already up to 21,000!

 

 

She recently departed Charleston and is headed for Suez and back to Asia through the Indian Ocean.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Joyce D. Brown with a resplendent paint job on a bright spring morning.

A new boat entering the Narrows in springtime.  Know it?

Sea Oak, which I last saw in Southport, NC.

Crystal Cutler, also looking great in the spring sunshine.

The extraordinary Bosco, passing the boscage of Shooters Island.

The vertically oriented Genesis Vision, previously known as Superior Service.

Paul Andrew, once sported a respectable Christmas tree here (scroll).

Another great name .  . Sea Fox.

Marjorie B McAllister, perfectly positioned with the arrow on CMA CGM Almaviva,

Rebecca Ann, with a great origin story that maybe someone who reads this knows better than I do.  All I remember is that it was locally built . . . with spare steel . . . I hope I’m right about that.  And she’s currently involved in a project that might place her in tomorrow’s post.  I believe she first appeared in this blog in 2010 here (scroll).

Any guesses?

Answer below.

Yes, Seeley, which was once a Vane Brothers boat called Vane Brothers.

All photos taken in april 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

Eric McAllister went out the Narrows to

meet her ship out beyond Swinburne.

 

It seems the gulls are excited by whatever chum follows in the wake, chum made from all those shad.

The shine on the hull suggested a fairly new ship, and

in fact, I’d never seen this one before,

Grande New York.

How grand.  She was completed at CSC Jinling Shipyard in late October 2017.  I don’t know if this was her first arrival in New York.  Sister ships are Grande Baltimora, already in service, and Grande Halifax . . . yet to be completed.

Here are previously posted other “Grande” Grimaldi vessels:  G Senegal,  G Marocco, and G Guinea, which came into the sixth boro early Monday and departed yesterday.

And here’s the rest of the title . . . as a way to show the varying weather.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Jack Ronalds took this photo of Ontario (Jeffrey K. McAllister) and Erie (Missy McAllister) in Canso back in August 2016.

John Jedrlinic took this in the sixth boro in December 2008.

I took the photo below a few months earlier in 2008, as the transfer from Normandy to Ross Sea was happening.

Grouper has been featured here many, many times over the years, but you’ve never seen this much of her out of the water;  it’s “draw-down” time on the Erie Canal near lock E-28A.  These photos come from Bob Stopper a few weeks ago.

 

From Bangkok, Ashley Hutto sends along photos of a decidedly pastel Thai tug

with two barges

on a hawser.

Thanks to Jack, Jed, Bob, and Ashley for these photos.

 

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