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Sometimes I’m conflicted about what to post, like today with too many competing stories, and we’ll start with news, and Cisne Branco, which translates as “white swan.”  The photo below shows Cisne Branco, a Brazilian Navy training vessel,  in the sixth boro in May 2012 for a sixth boro OpSail event.  Earlier this week, the 1998 vessel got swept downstream the Rio Guayas in Guayaquil, Ecuador and came to rest against a pedestrian bridge.  See it and hear about it here.

Here’s another shot of Cisne Branco in Gravesend Bay.

In other news, the 1967 83′ steel schooner Mystic Whaler, a regular in the sixth boro, has been sold to a party on the West Coast.  The Egintons have owned it since 1995. 

A few weeks ago now, the 1943 laker Mississagi was towed to the scrapyard in Sault Ste Marie.  I caught these two photos of her in summer 2016 in Lake Michigan below and

along the Saint Lawrence River below.  Other photos can be seen here.

While looking up my May 2012 photos of Cisne Branco, I saw this photo of Taurus in the North River.  She’s now Joker, featured here several times recently.  In May 2012, the K-Sea fleet had just been sold to Kirby, and in the photo below, the red K-Sea visor was painted blue, the K-Sea logo was removed from the stack, but the Kirby logo had not yet replaced it.  Also, in the background, it’s Harvey and Frying Pan at Pier 66.

This photo also from May 2012 shows Ellen McAllister coming alongside Dewarucci, an Indonesian training ship.  Between the two, it’s Scotty Sky, the small bunker tanker now sold somewhere in the Cabibbean.

Since there’s a lot of media attention on the congestion in SOME US ports, have a look at what’s off Savannah.  This was a screen grab from VesselFinder almost a week ago, and it’s not much different today.  A personal frustration is the outermost vessel shown, CMA CGM Marco Polo.  I missed getting a photo of her in the sixth boro on Saturday, October 9 because I was out of town;  in the wee hours of Monday, she departed for Norfolk and then Savannah.  She’s now been anchored, about 60 miles out from Savannah’s container terminals since the 15th.  Earlier this year she was setting a new record in US/Canada ports, and now she’s stuck in a jam.

And finally, two photos from April 2018 showing Mon Lei getting towed to a marina just north of the GW Bridge, where it stayed for some time.  Question:  Where is Mon Lei today . . .  asking for a friend.

This red/white junk was once quite the fixture in the sixth boro, and although I was never aboard, I’m told the interior was sumptuous!  Click here for posts I’ve done on the boat.  I talked with one of the owners once on the phone. 

That’s some news from my desk in Queens.  All photos, WVD.

I’d really like to know what became of Mon Lei.

 

Enjoy this set of photos, taken on a random path across the harbor with the NY Media Boat.  More Gene Chaser soon. 

Ruby M above is the oldster of the set, launched in 1967.  She’s 95′ loa and turns out just under 2000 hp.  Below, Colonel dates from 1978, turns out 3000 hp and is the longest in the set . . . at just about 107′.

 

Sea Lion was launched in 1980, is 65′ loa and powered by 1400 horses.  Below, Margaret Moran (I believe) has been in the sixth boro long before I called it that;  she arrived in 1979 bringing 3000 hp and a loa of just a foot under 100′.

Julie Ann has arrived in the harbor the most recently of this set, just a couple months ago.  She was launched in 2006 and brings 4200 hp packed into 75′.

And finally, Ava M. McAllister is likely the first boat to carry that name.  She was christened in 2018.  She’s a 100′ boat with 6770 hp.

Thanks for Bjoern at NY Media Boat for a tour of the boro.  All photos, WVD.

The red upper wheelhouse is no more, although I’m not certain what new paint scheme will evolve, or when Evening Star will become Jordan Rose, as Evening Breeze became Susan Rose.  Follow this transformation we will.

Ellen transformed from Navy gray to McAllister colors 20 years ago.

Atlantic Salvor has worn Donjon blue–almost the same as warehouse blue–for over 20 years.

In a different way, Marjorie B profile varies from a lower to higher wheelhouse depending on the job.

Jill Reinauer has worn Reinauer colors for over 20 years also, although she has seen some modifications of profile more recently.

Brendan is currently in dry dock, but when I took this photo, she was standing by with a large barge. I’ll post a photo of her high and dry soon.

This post began with a Bouchard tug in transition.  It’s fitting to end with one that already looks quite different . . .  Evening Light is now Mary Emma. currently on Narragansett Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

The bridge photo at the end of part A was of Kristin Poling, right after she’d been taken out of service.  In her long life from 1934 until 2011, she carried the nameplates of Poughkeepsie Socony, Mobil New York, and Captain Sam, before taking on her last name. 

Here’s a shot from the bow, and

here from near the stern looking forward along the catwalk.

This is one of my all-time favorite photos.  I wonder where this Coastie is today.

A decade ago, Maurania III worked in the harbor, here alongside the venerable Chemical Pioneer and

here muscling Suez Canal Bridge around Bergen Point.

APL Coral was scrapped in 2017, I believe.  Anyone know what those bolts of green fabric are?  By their location, I’d guess an anti-piracy measure.  Nicole Leigh continues to work.

DEP’s Newtown Creek was in her last days;  currently she’s a dive destination in Pompano Beach, FL known as Lady Luck.

Lygra (1979) went to Alang in 2018, after carrying that name as well as Centro America, Nornews Service, and Transfjord. 

Does anyone know where Captain Zeke has gone to?  I don’t.   If I ever did, I’ve forgotten.

Catherine Turecamo assists SN Azzurra away from a dock. The tanker seems still to be working as Augusta;  she’s also carried the names Blue Dolphin and Stena Commander.  In 2014, Catherine T. went to fresh water and, the last I knew,  became a Chicago area based John Marshall.

If you click on no links in this post except this one, you will be pleased;  it’s the legendary 1937 commuter yacht AphroditeHERE is the link.  Those all-caps are intentional.

Note the raked forward portion of Maersk Murotsu, getting an assist from Kimberly Turecamo. The tanker is currently known as Ardmore Seafarer, which I have seen but not photographed in the boro.  It’s impossible to keep up . . .  hang on to that thought until the end of the post.

And let’s close out  with some busy photos, here Barbara McAllister moves a barge, East Coast follows light, and Gramma Lee T Moran assists a tanker.  Barbara is now Patsy K.

And finally, the waters here are churned up by James Turecamo, Resolute, and Laura K Moran, as well as a few tankers off to the left.

All photos, WVD, who’s astonished how much changes if not daily or monthly but surely by decade.

And about that thought I asked you hang onto:  I’m considering taking a break, a sabbatical, or as Chapter 17 of Moby Dick explains . . .  a ramadan, a term used with respect. I say this as a solicitation of advice.

 

1997.  Taken from QE2 as it overtakes a Moran tug  . . .

 

 

taken some days later as the QE2 returns, passing the Towers at dawn…

while possibly the same Moran tug meets it again.

May 1998.  Bounty arrives.

May 2000.  Morgan Reinauer passes lower Manhattan in the fog.

January 11, 2001.  Peggy Sheridan, now Apex’s  Brooklyn, passes on a cold winter day.

Places, as with people, you never know when you’ll see them the last time.  Steve wrote me once that he passed the Towers on September 2, 2001 on the way to the tugboat race starting line.  He looked at the Towers, but didn’t take out his camera …   because he’d taken so many photos of the Towers before.  I fully understand.  

I can’t say I remember my breakfast that morning or getting onto my LIRR at 05:17 that morning in Seaford, as I always did, with folks I always saw then  . . .

but I’d never see them again, because they worked in that building.

I know it’s the same for folks who’d come on watch a few hours earlier that morning with one set of orders, and then before 0900 were faced with this.

Hat tip to Joel Milton for this account of his day just about 20 years ago.  Workboat has republished in November 2001 account.   From ProfessionalMariner, here are some links.

RIP.

All photos supplied by Steve Munoz.

 

August 2021.  Samatha Miller follows the channel just north of the Staten Island Yankees stadium.  Note today’s skyline.

1970.  The rest of these photos I share thanks to Steve Munoz. Note the early night skyline here shows the Towers under construction.

1970 Dalzelleagle in the Buttermilk Channel passing USCG cutters tied up alongside Governors Island.  Dalzelleagle, a 1958 Jakobson product, later became McAllister Bros, which was scrapped earlier this year.   In a comment in an earlier post, Tony A identifies one of the cutters as the storied USCG Dallas (WHEC-716), now BRP Ramon Alcaraz (PS-16),  pride of the Philippines Navy.

1971.  McAllister Bros southbound in the Upper Bay.

1971.  The aircraft looks to be amphibious.  Anyone help?  I’d say that’s a Kennedy-class ferry,  And at the foot of the Tower, note the fireboats tied up at Pier A, occupied by FDNY from 1960 until 1992.

1973.  SS Olympia headed for sea.  Her career spanned 1953 until 2009, when she was beached in Alang.

1973.  McAllister Bros. northbound off Hoboken.

1973.  Dalzellera.  That makes her 58 years old at this point.

1973. Concordia Gulf bound for sea. 

1985.  Statue scaffolded for repairs.

1992.  As seen from a ship on Newark Bay at dawn.

1992.  Kerry Moran seven years before her wheelhouse and propulsion were reconfigured.

Many thanks to Steve for sharing these photos, pre-dating my time here.  I moved to the area and started working in Brooklyn in 2000.

It should go without saying what the focus here is.  More to come. Here‘s what I posted exactly 10 years ago, when it seems to me, we were still a united people sharing common losses and goals.

Here’s a sampling of boats working I saw in the sixth boro the past week; the variety of boats, though, is greater than these would suggest.

Frances . . . was launched on Long Island in 1957.  Scroll through here and see photos of Frances I took in 2010 when she still had the Turecamo wood-grain paint.

Emily Ann was built in Louisiana in 1964.  She’s been a DonJon boat for eight years;  to see her in K-Sea colors, scroll here. I’ve no photos of her in previous liveries.

Potomac, 2007 in Louisiana, and Fort McHenry, 2016 and Maryland.  They were built as Vane equipment.

Paula Lee is not a tugboat, nor is

Trojan, the anchor tender, but this equipment is currently in the sixth boro, but owned by a company based in California.  I don’t know the history of any of these pieces of Dutra equipment.

Ellen McAllister, Wisconsin in 1967.  Ellen may very well be the most frequently-appearing boat on this blog.  Here she is passing the southern tip of Manhattan just entering the East River.

Meagan Ann, Washington state in 1975.  See Birk’s encyclopedia-like site for photos of Meagan Ann as a Foss boat.  I have more photos of her wrestling in this DonJon crane.

And Joker, 1979, Louisiana.  Eight years ago, I caught these photos of the boat when she was called Taurus, a Kirby boat, and looking rough. Here, from 2007, is Taurus in K-Sea colors.

All photos, WVD.

Friday I hit the road going pretty far west, and maybe even finding a vessel called Far West.

These photos I took back in September 2011.

This boat became Bouchard Boys and is now in Red Hook waiting to be repainted as Stasinos Boys.  She’s 100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp.

North Sea has had many owners;  currently she’s Sause Brothers North Sea out of Portland OR.   She’s 120′ x 34′ vessel with 4200 hp moving her.

Growler used to be one of my favorites during the years I went to the Hudson River tugboat races.  She’s changed hands several times recently and last I saw her she was in the Arthur Kill.  She’s a 1962 Jacksonville-built WYTL, as the others, 64′ x 19′ powered by a 300 single Cat D-375 V8, or once was.

How about another shot of another attempt . . .  with Maurania III and Ross Sea looking on.

Since coming off the ways in 1979, Miriam Moran has worked in the sixth boro of New York under that name.  From my outsider’s perspective, she has paid off handsomely.  At 99′ x 32′ and with 3000 hp, she has just assisted Seabourn Sojourn into the passenger terminal.

Sassafras then was three years old;  she’s since been sold out of the Vane fleet and now wears colors of Norfolk Tug as George Holland, at 90′ x 32′ and 3000 hp.

Thornton Bros. here was just a few years away from the scrapper;  she began life as John E. Matton at the shipyard in Cohoes in 1958.  Her long run is profiled in a tugster post  here. The “shipyard” link is a couple hours’ good history reading, including a surprise about a well-known naval architect who once worked for Matton.

As part of the 10-year commemoration of 9/11, USS New York came back to the sixth boro after having made her inaugural visit here two years before.  The yellow/brown water reveals the aftermath of Hurricane Irene that gorged all the streams upriver.   USS New York has a FB page here.  Escorting her here is Ellen McAllister.

Yacht Black Knight made an appearance passing the tip of Manhattan while passing from the Sound to the North River in mid-month after theb hurricane. She’s a 1968 product of Goudy & Stevens, an East Boothbay ME yard that has done a wide variety of vessels.

I’ve got a few dozen pics from this month in the archives, but let’s call this the end of this post;  all photos, WVD.

 

 

It’s hard to believe, but I’ve not been to the Great North River Tugboat Race since 2014, but in normal times, September 5 would see the next race.  But we’ve dispensed with the “normal times” concept for the time being.

In selecting the batch for this post, I wanted splash, froth, bubbles, and the effervescence the river can react with when tons of steel and thousands of horsepower push through the ever changing water.   The next two photos are from that 2014 race. 

It was overcast during the race, but an hour or so later, when pushing contests were happening and

the wakes flattened out and we sized up USAV MGen. Anthony Wayne, patches of blue appeared.  I should leave you in suspense about how this push went.  Let me put it this way;  they left town not long after the push-off.

2013 was an equally overcast day, and again, not to identify every tugboat in that lineup, it appears that W. O. Decker has either jumped the gun or activated its jet drive and will soon rise up out of the Hudson on her hydrofoil assists. I’d guess the latter.

See what I told you . . . Decker has gone so far ahead that it’s already over the horizon.

Second lap maybe for Decker?

It’s starting to appear that in 2012, as in ’13 and ’14, it was overcast.

It was great to see Buchanan 12, usually burdened with a half dozen stone barges, disencumbered and frothing up the river.  That’s the 1907 Pegasus back there too.

In 2011, I was able to get a photo of the racing craft along with sky spray by one of the fireboats present, likely 343.  What’s remarkable comparing the photo above with the one below is the color of the water;  hurricane Irene had dropped a lot of rain upstate and all the tributaries sent that into the Hudson with tribute in the form of silt.

Quantico Creek and Maurania III did an excellent job of stirring up the water.

But again, it was overcast and hazy over silty water.

However, in 2010, we had blue skies that really accentuated the DonJon boats like Cheyenne and

the harbor colossus, Atlantic Salvor.

In 2009, there were wispy clouds, allowing the “queen of the day” to be Ellen McAllister. But look who else showed up!!!!

Urger.   Urger would EASILY have won the race, but she was doing what she does best . . .  urging all the other boats and crews to be fleeter than she, holding herself back, allowed herself to be that day.

All photos and commentary, WVD. See you at the races in 2022.

 

 

These two boats have a lot in common:  built a year apart in the same shipyard and more.

Without being aboard, I’d say they were products of the same designed and may appear to be twins, 

A surprising feature they share is the telescoping upper wheelhouse that

allows visibility when needed.  

I say they appear to be twins, but if the tale of the tape is correct, Marjorie is about five feet longer, two feet skinnier, and a hundred horses more powerful.  

Both were originally Exxon tugboats until the Exxon brand was removed from the boats after a certain large tanker had an unfortunate encounter with Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound. 

That flexibility was no doubt a selling point for the design.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD. 

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