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Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

Find a great diagram here, as well as this quote:  “container carrying capacity has increased 1200% since 1968.”  This increased size drives developments in escort tugs.

As of 2021, the sixth boro has accommodated vessels no larger than 15,000 teu, like CMA CGM Argentina.  These can be called mother ships, since they can call in only a limited number of ports in the US for reasons of draft, air draft, and crane size. Vying for position as the largest, Liebherr appears to have a 25-row crane design, while ZPMC has a 26-row product.

Count them, it looks like Argentina has 20 rows across.  Imagine each of these row, each of these containers, as towed by a truck on the highway lane beside you.

YM Wellhead, an odd name in my opinion, is one of 20 W-class 14,000 teu ships.   World was the first of this class that I caught. 

 

She departed the sixth boro yesterday, sans the container that crossed the VZ as she made her way out.

Back in spring 2017, Cosco Development was the largest container ship to transit the new locks in Panama.  Her capacity is just over 13,000 teu.

 

At least half dozen Hyundai vessels have called in the sixth boro of late, all around 13000 teu.

I was surprised when the docking pilot boarded up the companionway.

 

Cosco Shipping Camellia is one of more than half dozen Cosco Shipping “flower-class” vessels to call hewre, all around 13,500 teu.

 

Orchid is a sister vessel, and in the next day or so, Sakura will arrive.

The most powerful escort tugboats in the sixth boro shrink in size alongside these behemoths.

All photos and interpretation of info, WVD, who wonders what the next milestone of any sort the sixth boro will see.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

The Kill Van Kull is a relatively narrow strait, but skill and experience allows passing like this to occur routinely.   Zim Tarragona (856′ x 106′) and CMA CGM Tosca (1096′ x 140′) need to mind the physics in this passage.

MSC Toronto (1065′ x 140′) heads into Port Elizabeth with another container ship not far behind.

MOL Courage (1036′ x 150′) heads for sea.  She seems to have shed the false AIS signal that accompanied her last trip.

Chacabuco (905′ x 31′)  heads toward the container port.  Years ago, I met this vessel in Brazil.  The name comes from a region in Argentina.

 

Ever Lasting (1098′ x 160′)  heads for the next port.

YM Evolution (849′ x 122′) comes in.

The past few years, she’s been a regular here.

Ever Front, (1095′ x 157′) and the newest vessel in this post, heads for the next port.

 

Taipei Trader (485′ x 76′) does a regular shuttle run.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

More Gowanus soon, but for now, this follows a post from a few years back called “boxes on ships,” but what begs for attention here is the number of less common containers, these by a company called Agmark

Maersk Vallvik actually has two centers of liquid bulk containers, Agmark toward the stern and Bertschi farther forward.

Bertschi is a Swiss company that transports, among many other things, cocoa butter, i.e., their self-described “heaven.”

All this brings me to what appears to be the biggest concentration of tanks . . . . Agmark’s.  According to their site, they transport the following:  “Dairy products, concentrated and single strength fruit juices, vegetable oils, spirits, wine, chocolate, alcohol, beverage preparations, essences, hot or cold bulk liquids, food products, chemicals, and fuels.”

So, this could have cold fruit juice, just like these, but in parcels rather than “shipfulls.”  Others carry “rock juice” either by the shipfull or in parcels.

But i digress.  I don’t know what Vallvik carried in those tanks;  my point here is simply that she carried a lot of those tanks.

Back in 2013 this same vessel called attention for another type of container as here.

All photos, WVD.   And that small craft in the photo above, maybe that’s in tomorrow’s post.

Another unusual container type, CATS, was featured here 10 years ago.

With the end of the year coming, it’s strangely difficult to put these posts together.  I’ve chased down several ideas the past few days, and abandoned them.   All these photos were taken in recent days, except one about a month ago.  They strike me as showing the different skies and waters of the unacknowledged boro. 

So, photos . . . like this of Christine M. McAllister, 125.5′ x 38′ and 6000 hp.  She’s returning to town after a rough encounter on Christmas day . . . .  Maybe someone else can tell the story of SS Denebola (T-AKR 289) first hand.  It’s been a while that Christine M. has appeared on this blog.

Soon to be ex-Eastern Dawn, 52′ x 22 and 1200 hp,  crosses the Upper Bay looking all resplendent in the new paint job.

Two Bouchard tugs are stacked up on the far side of Cape Henry, 109′ x 36′ and 5000 hp,  and her DBL 103, 102,000 barrel capacity barge. 

Dylan Cooper, 112′ x 35′ and 4720 hp, waits in the anchorage with RTC 108, around 108,000 barrels.

Genesis Vigilant, 98.5 x 34 and 3000 hp, also at anchor with GM 6508,  80,000 barrels capacity.

And finally . . .  misclassified on purpose, notice several things this windy morning  on the starboard side of OceanXplorer:  a tender, a helicopter, and areas marked ROV and CTD.  ROV I knew, but CTD I had to look up.  Check out this blog post by New York Media Boat.

All photos and any errors of fact or interpretation, WVD, who wishes you all a happy new year, or as my parents would say . . . gelukkig nieuwjaar.

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

AIS said an MSC vessel was arriving, but when I saw it, I was surprised.  I’d never seen an MSC RORO.  MSC is the world’s second largest container line, and besides a cruise line, which I saw in Havana  and which I believe does not call at US ports, container transport is all MSC does.  This is quite unlike the largest container line, Maersk, which has over 900 subsidiaries, including tugboats and offshore work vessels.

By the way, any guesses on the others in the top ten by teu moved and how they’re ranked?  Answer below.

It seems that MSC has been in the scheduled deepsea RORO trade for only a short time, and although it’s likely that MSC Cristiana has called here before, this is my first time to see her.  I think of ROROS, like this PCTC, as boxy, but this photo with MSC Chritiana juxtaposed with a real trash container barge shows what boxy looks like.

Guess how many cars she carries?

Ellen has a hold on that recessed shell bit.

 

The paint scheme reduces the boxy look of this vessel, but

   

I didn’t know when she was last painted.  I’d say this 2011 RORO is due for a repaint. 

All photos, WVD.

She carries 6,700 ceu [car equivalent units].

Top ten are:  1. Maersk, 2. MSC, 3. Cosco, 4. CMA CGM, 5. Hapag-Lloyd, 6. ONE, 7. Evergreen, 8. OOCL, 9.  HMM, 10. Yang Ming.  More on each of those here.  If you’re a regular here, you’ve seen at least one of all of these lines’ vessels.

It also means that you can be on a highway or at a rail crossing anywhere in the US–or other country–and you’ll see containers of these lines.

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