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I could also call this “other peoples photos” but here is yesterday’s arrival of the hospital ship as seen from three friends’ perspectives.

Phil Little took this, and referred to it as his Normandy landing shot, an appropriate name given that this asset, arriving with a large support group, marks a surge, a counteroffensive against the invisible foe.  Note that the top of WTC1 is obscured, as is most of the VZ Bridge, center right.

To reiterate, Comfort‘s 1000 beds and 12 operating rooms will take overflow from other hospitals, overflow of NON-covid-19 patients.  Click here for much more info on the ship, medical facilities and operating life.  Click here for video of the hospital ship arriving.

The flotilla is almost to her berth, here passing Hudson Yards.

Renee Lutz Stanley took this one from a pier south of Intrepid while trying very hard to practice social distancing.

Phil calls this the “turn-in.”

This last two come from David Silver, taken looking south.

Cruise ships and hospital ship are roughly the same color, but that color gives a profoundly different impression in each.  Comfort with its relatively few “port holes” and glass is a place of intensive inward examination, a place apart, one hopes, for healing.

Many thanks to Phil, Renee, and David for use of these photos.  Please do continue social distancing and hand-washing.

At 0900 and a few minutes, USNS Comfort arrived at the Narrows.  Ava M was one of six McAllister units meeting her there to assist.

USACE, NYPD, and other agencies saw her in as well.

She passed the USCG station and

 

and the old hospital complex.

Another USNS vessel in the port was Watkins.

From this point off Bayonne, we’ll pick up the story tomorrow.

All photos, WVD.

Following on yesterday’s comparison . . . two more tugboats, both active but with entirely different missions . . . I offer for your perusal, key word . . . perusal.

Thomas J. Brown, built 1962 and 60’x 19′ with hull depth of 8′, has a single CAT generating 1000 hp.

Ava M McAllister, christened in 2019 and 100′ x 40′ with a hull depth of 22′, has twin CAT mains generating 6770 hp.

The comparison is ludicrous from a performance perspective;  as I said before, they have entirely different missions.  Some comparisons here would make as little sense as pitting a pro stock race car against a top fuel machine . . .  but those are both drag strip cars.  Here’s another . . . compare a Grand National hydroplane with a Jersey Speed Skiff; they’re both race boats and not landing craft, both well-maintained and precision built for speed within defined parameters.  Likewise, above you’re looking at two tugboats, both of which are working boats in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD, who’s learned the joys of hand washing.

Here’s another interesting comparison and why I said perusal:  Peru, South America with Peru, Indiana, North America with all the other Perus in the US.

 

 

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

This series goes way back to 2007, when I erroneously thought a song existed called “Paris in springtime.”  My deciding it must be a faux memory did not prevent me from doing a bunch more posts, with variations like “pairs in winter,” like today’s posts.  It still is winter.  And there is a movie with a somewhat similar name;  a fun trailer can be seen here.

Let’s start with Sarah Ann and Thomas E. pairing up to get a crane off to Sims.

 

Ellen and Ava team up to see a small container vessel into the kills.

 

Meagan Ann and Emily Ann each bring a scow for the filling, likely with scrap?

 

And for a variation, a mixed triad of Margaret, Alex, and Ava return from assists.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you happy springish late winter and successful social separations.

 

 

Here’s the photo I considered using on the March calendar page and taken about five seconds before the one I did use.  On March 9, 2019 at 0726 . . . I love the light here, but the tug seemed too small to be the subject on a calendar page.  I do love the purple skyline against the orange sky.  Color aficionados might describe the outline of buildings with words like mauve and carrot with traces of grapefruit and squash fading into hints of cyan.  I like the glint of sunrise on the port side of Alex, likely returning from an assist.

In July 2019, I caught the next two of Alex, assisting CMA CGM Otello outbound for sea.  Note the design differences between Alex and Capt. Brian A. off her stern.  The 4300 hp Alex was launched in 1985 and spent her first five years assisting submarines for Electric Boat.  She then was sold and worked in Puerto Rico and Florida until 2008, when she was sold to a Maine company. McAllister bought her in 2012, and I believe I first saw her in the sixth boro in 2017.  Capt. Brian A. McAllister arrived here in 2017 and brings 6770 hp to the job.

 

In these November 2019 photos,

Alex and Ava M assist Arthur Maersk in rounding Bergen Point.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated here, but followup to the No.11Asomaru post of a few days ago, it has happened again.  Sunday evening AIS showed a Tiong Woon Ocean 17 signal coming into the sixth boro, escorted by two Moran 6000s and

following or coinciding with MOL Paradise heading here into Global in Bayonne.   Lucien’s comment the other day seems to explain this .  . a glitch . . . but since this is the third tme I’ve seen this, I wonder how common it really is and whether others have noticed it.  As of 0500 this morning, Tiong and Paradise left for Savannah, and as of posting, she was off Ocean City NJ, appearing as a gray signal.   Tiong Woon Corporation (TWC) is a Sri Lankan holding company with tugboats, but no #17.

Here’s the one I saw last year;  anyone who knows Port Elizabeth, shown, knows that Oat, IMO 9291630, a tanker 800′ x 137′ , would not be at that berth and atop the container ship there.

Is this corrupted signal a frequent occurrence?  Is this evidence of colliding or commingling parallel universes?

March 2020 has arrived, and when I brushed the cobwebs away from the March 2010 archives, I discovered I took a lot of interesting photos that month, enough to do two posts from the 2010 March set.

Let’s start with the quirky Capt. Log, captained by the friendliest person I know in the sixth boro.  I rode along on the 63′ tanker for this story.

A fleetmate of Stena Perros , Stena Primorsk, is currently anchored off Long Beach NY.  Perros is off Santos Brasil today, 2020.  Ships are designed to travel the largest part of the planet.

Firefighter was still in service 10 years ago;  now it’s a museum in Greenport NY.  After the hauling out in this post, she was repainted in her original white/black colors.

MOL Innovation is escorted in by the indefatigable Ellen McAllister.  At 961′ loa, Innovation is more than 300′ shorter than the largest container ships calling in the sixth boro these days, and I suspect the 1996 build has been scrapped.

Back in 2010, I was not using AIS, but as I drove my car over the VZ Bridge on my way to work one morning, I noticed it entering the boro;  I was very happy that I was driving to work early that day;  I got the photos and still made it to work on time.  THAT is the logic of going to work earlier than necessary, and (almost) always carrying a camera.   Now I’m sorry to report the 1995 Jumbo Spirit is aground in a scrapping yard in Aliağa.

Maersk Wisconsin, a 2000 build, has also been scrapped.   Note the Humvees being transported.

McAllister Brothers is a 1958 Jakobson product;  I believe she’s laid up in the McAllister Staten Island yard.

Eagle Service is now Genesis EagleHorizon Discovery … in the distance, she’s also been scrapped in Texas. Note the different Manhattan skyline, only a decade ago.

More soon.  All photos in March 2010 by WVD, who now needs to wash the cobwebs off.  And since learning that Jumbo Spirit has been scrapped, I decided I need one more glance.

Interesting name . . . I thought it was the number “3” in Arabic, but I was wrong.  Anyone know the reference?

Clever logo . . .

Feel like Wheel of Fortune yet?

I can tell you that’s Capt. Brian . . . and you can probably tell me the location, by the tall tapered building off Capt. Brian‘s stern.

 

Figure it out yet?

Thalatta’s a HERO  . . . a High-efficiency RORO, capable of carrying 8000 cars.  Parked end to end and bumper to bumper, that’s over 20 miles of cars.

She’s a post-Panamax ROROHere‘s the explanation for that.

 

And the reference is Greek . . .

All photos, WVD, whose previous versions of this post were here.

Unrelated but certainly worth a look, Paul Strubeck has come into some vintage photos on a South American river assisting bauxite ore boats in the narrow waterways . . .

Count the tugboats in this one shot . . .  six! And a seventh is obscured right behind the nearest.  And no, it was not part of the annual tugboat race.  From (l) to (r), it’s JRT Moran, Amy Moran, Stephen B, (and Ellen McAllister is obscured) then Genesis Eagle, Magothy with Double Skin 57, and Elk River doing assist.

In case you suspect I’m making up the seventh tugboat, here’s a closeup of Ellen assisting Eagle just nine seconds earlier.

A bit later, I noticed a similar density over in the anchorage.  Just naming ships, (l) to (r), there’s Advance II, White Horse, Sten Odin, and Cielo di Londra.

Then among then, there are two more tug/barge units with tugs Barry Silverton and Helen Laraway.  Interesting how Barry Silverton is shrunk when beside a tanker.

And a bit later I zoomed down, around, and in to see the service vessels clustered around White Horse:  HMS* Liberty (I think), a Miller Launch boat, and on the far side Lesney Byrd.

All photos, WVD, who’s now outa town for a while.  Thx to everyone who’s sent in or pledged relief posts.

Also, a certain exotic ship is coming into the harbor, and I’d be very grateful if someone stepped forward to get photos of it as it arrives.  Email me, please, if you might be able to get the shot.

*HMS . . . Harley Marine Services is no more; out of its ashes rises Centerline Logistics.

Coastline Girls and many other names including Gage Paul Thornton and  ST-497, the 1944-build now sleeps deep in Davy Jones locker,  and was not an intentional reefing.

It’s been a while since I last saw Mcallister Sisters, shown here passing the Esopus Meadows light.  If I’m not mistaken, she’s currently based in Baltimore.

Ten years ago, this boat had already been painted blue over orange, but she still carried the June K name board.

Socrates, classic lines and a classic name, has since gone off to Nigeria, riding over in mid-2012 on a heavy lift ship called Swan.

Urger on blocks in Lyons . . . one would have thought then that she’d run forever.  These days she’s back on blocks at the eastern end of the Canal.

And February 2010 was the time of prime iceboating, and that’s Bonnie of frogma.

James Turecamo, with its wheelhouse down as I rarely saw it, works these days upriver as far north as Albany.  Photo by Allen Baker.

Brandywine and Odin these days spend most of their time on Gulf of Mexico waters.

Gramma Lee T Moran straining here as she pulled the tanker off the dock.  She now works in Baltimore.

In the foreground, East Coast departs the Kills;  I can’t say I recall seeing her recently,but AIS says she’s currently northbound north of the GW.    In the distance and approaching, June K, now Sarah Ann, and she regularly works in the sixth boro.

All photos, except Allen’s, WVD, from February 2010.

I have to share back story about getting that top photo.  I was on foot on Richmond Terrace walking east toward Jersey Street when I saw the Coastline tug and Hughes barge.  I didn’t recognize the profile and realized I could get the photo ONLY if I ran.  At the same time, I noticed an NYPD car had pulled over another car, and you know, it’s never a good idea to run for no apparent reason when the police are nearby.  But . . . you understand my dilemma:  walk and miss the shot, or run and maybe attract the curiosity of the police officer.  I ran, got the shot, and sure enough, the police called me over and wanted to know what I was doing.  Since I knew I’d done nothing wrong except appear suspicious, I gave him my business card and launched full tilt into my “new yorkers are so lucky because they are witness to so much marine business traffic, and why didn’t he too have a camera and join me watching and taking photos of the variety of vessels . . . .”  You can imagine the stare I got.  My enthusiasm failed to move him.  No handcuffs, no taser, not even a ticket, but an impassive gaze from a weary officer of the law possibly wondering  if I’d escaped from an institution or a time warp.  He wrote up a report and left me with this advice:  don’t run when you see a police officer nearby.  “Yessir,” I said, thinking . . . well sure, but I’d likely do it again if I again noticed something unusual transiting the waterway.  Since then, though, I’ve not had any further encounters with the LEOs, at least not on the banks of the sixth boro.

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