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A friend once took this photo of a wall in San Francisco.  And Manhattan has this street called Wall that was quite ineffective in keeping the originals of Mannahatta out.

But as you can see from the photo below, Manhattan today is a walled city, with a wall made of lego-colored boxes.

[And this is just a space digression so that

 

you can’t see the next photo

 

on your screen.

 

There are more photos below.

 

I wouldn’t want you to make sense of the first photo

 

right away.

OK, enough, with

 

the digression.]

 

Here’s the rest of that shot, two Maersk ships passing just north of the VZ Bridge.

All these photos were taken within a total of less than two minutes

Alex sees Maersk Shenzhen out, then will likely do a 180 and assist Capt. Brian seeing Gunhilde Maersk into the KVK.

And now I have a question:  NYMaritime defines ULCVs and SULCVs (super ultralarge container vessel) basically as follows:  anything larger than 997′ and 140′ beam is considered a ULCV, and anything with beam in excess of 159′ is a SULCV.  Vessel traffic describes ships of Gunhilde‘s class as SULCV but does not do so for Shenzhen.  But now guess the relative dimensions of these two vessels.

Maersk Shenzhen  1062′ x 157’*  10,000 teu.  Previously she was Hyundai Pluto. 

Gunhilde Maersk  1204′ x 138′ *   7000 teu.

Is there some mistake here?

*These numbers come from shipspotting.com.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Navigator looks great in the yellow trim.  For some quantifiable info, she dates from 1981 and reports 1200 hp.

Ellen always strikes me as a brawler, more so than identical YTBs.  Maybe it’s the ships’ hull paint she’s rubbed off with the bow rendering. For numbers and facts, she dates from 1967, built in Marinette WI, and currently has z-drives putting out 4000 hp. Click here for photos I took in Marinette this past summer.

Dory looks great, having added an upper wheelhouse.  Click here and scroll for photos of Dory over the years, pre-upper wheelhouse.  Who operates her now?

Amy Moran and Atlantic Salvor meet under the bridge.  As an indication of winds, notice the bridge “curtains” movement.   Numbers:  AM 1973 and 3000 hp.  AS 1976 and 6480.  For previous Atlantic Salvor posts, click here.

If Buchanan 5 looks like she has new paint, she does.  It used to work around here as Taft Beach.  Numbers:  1983 and 2600 hp.

Normandy benefits from a simple and classical paint scheme.    2007 and about 1900 but with triple screw.  As I understand it, she used to work in Colombia.  Anyone have info on her propulsion plant?

Kimberly Poling got a makeover almost 10 years ago and she is just a beauty.   1994 and 3000 hp.

I’ve long heard Thomas D. Witte once worked the Erie Canal as Valoil, but I’ve never seen photos of her superstructure from that time.  Anyone help?   1961 and 1500 hp.

And finally, Matthew Tibbetts once won the most attractive tug at a North River Tugboat Race, and she truly looks good.   1969 and 2000.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Nineteen boxes wide!

And stacked higher behind the bridge than in front of it.

It was a windy day, and Alex did her part to ensure she rounded the bend.

Eric on the starboard bow was there if needed to thrust the bow within the channel.

And at the opposite stern, Capt. Brian A.  could do what was needed

to make this rounding of Bergen Point

just routine, as Maersk Shenzhen made a few more turns before setting a course across the Atlantic directly for Suez and points beyond.  I caught her in port earlier as Hyundai Pluto, sister of Jupiter.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous installments of this title all involved McAllister boats as well.

 

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m rushing December, but I’m eager to get through winter and back to spring.  All photos here date from December 2008.

Bowsprite took this from one of her cliff niches:  June K (2003) here is moving the Floating Hospital  (1974, Blount) up to the Rondout, where she remains. Is she really now called Industria at Sea.

The geography is unchanged, but McAllister Responder (1967) is no longer in the sixth boro, and Sea Venture (1972) is dead and likely scrapped . . . .

Maryland (1962) has become Liz Vinik, after operating with Maryland in the name for more than a handful of companies.

Choptank (2006) is back in the sixth boro and environs.  My autocorrect always wants to call this tug Shoptalk.  Puzzling.  NYK Daedalus (2007) is still at work, just not here.  TEN Andromeda is still on the oceans as well, still transporting crude.

Now called Charly and working the Gulf of Guinea, Janice Ann Reinauer (1967) used to be a personal icon in the sixth boro. Note that 1 World Trade does not appear in this photo, as it would today.

Closing this out . . .  Margaret Moran (1979 and the 4th boat by that name) passes APL Jade (1995 and likely scrapped by now) in the KVK.

I’m hoping you’re enjoying this glances back a decade as much as I am.

With the exception of the first photo, all these by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for research errors.

Unrelated:  Win a trip on a Great Lakes freighter/laker here.

One satisfying thing to me about these retro posts is noticing how much the local fleet has changed.  All these photos I took in November 2008.  Coral Queen was scrapped at least eight or nine years ago.  Maersk Donegal has had two name changes since 2008, now know as Santa Priscila, and no longer calls in the sixth boro.

SPT Guardian, still under the same name, is currently operating out of Lome, Togo.  Note the NJ State Police boat alongside.  I don’t know if they are still using that boat.

ITB Groton is gone as well.

The huge K-Sea fleet in the boro has dispersed.  Solomon Sea is now Emily Ann,

Falcon, I believe, is still Falcon but wears Vane livery,

Davis Sea still has the same name but Kirby colors and operates in the Gulf,

and Aegean Sea carries the same name but works for Burnham Associates in my old stomping grounds north of Boston.  NYK Diana has moved to the Pacific to the US West Coast.

This Rosemary McAllister has been replaced by another Rosemary McAllister, and has spent only part of one day in the sixth boro.

Stapleton Service takes the prize for the greatest number of name changes, three since 2008.  She’s now Michael Miller.

Buchanan 15 has become Dory, although I’ve not seen her in a while.

Coral Queen‘s smaller fleet mate was John B. Caddell, which became a hurricane Sandy victim:  grounded, sheriff auctioned, and scrapped.

I made a jaunt upriver aboard the only and only Half Moon–now sold abroad– in November 2008, and saw

Champion Polar but she’s now

–ice bow and all- dead and likely scrapped,  as well as

a more intact Bannerman’s Castle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp in November 2008.

 

 

Evergreen Marine ships have a unique profile.  Ten of the 30 vessels in this L class have been built in Taiwan, including the one below, Ever Lovely. 

 

Meeting Ever Lovely were Alex and Eric McAllister.

 

 

Inside the Narrows, the docking pilot

came aboard from Alex.

 

As Lovely arrived, Legacy departed.

Only a few years ago, vessels of these dimensions would be the largest container ships calling in NYC.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s late afternoon when Bruce A McAllister with Double Skin 40 passes my spot, followed

by Marjorie B McAllister, with B. No. 262 behind.

From the south with a motley set of barges . . . .

 

 

it’s Frances. Afternoon light is starting to highlight Mr. Bannerman’s place.

 

That IS a short wire, a necessity given that Marjorie has no upper wheelhouse.

 

 

These low hanging clouds have never left today.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the Canal Conference in Staten Island coming up in two weeks.

. . . and beyond.  Let’s start with August 7, 2008 . . . up by the Iroquois lock of the Seaway.  And Canadian Provider . . .  well . . . in 2013 she was towed to Aliaga as OVI, and scrapped. Note that she’s a straight-decker . . . no self-unloading gear.

August 14 . . . reef-making consisted of sinking subway cars.  These went off Atlantic City.  To see their condition now, click here.

August 16 in the Arthur Kill, Volunteer was off to remake the tow.  Built in 1982, she met the scrappers earlier this year.

August 20 . . . Laura K and Margaret–I believe –have just helped Glasgow Express to Howland Hook terminal.  Glasgow (2002) is still at work, and so are Laura K (in Savannah) and Margaret in the sixth boro.

August 23 . . . Colleen McAllister and Dean Reinauer bring a barge through the Gate, reading for the Sound.  Colleen is now owned by for Port City Tug Company of Grosse Point.  Has anyone seen her in operation?  Dean went to Nigeria aboard Blue Marlin. 

Christine M McAllister stands by in Erie Basin on August 24.  This 6000hp tug is currently working down south of here.

August 27 . .  . the reclusive Susan E. Witte eastbound and Adriatic Sea westbound.  Beyond Adriatic, that might be Aegean.  Adriatic is currently on a tow on the 2000+ stretch of Ocean between Honolulu and Kwajalein!  Can someone confirm this?  Nine years ago, I caught Adriatic near the Bear Mountain Bridge here (scroll).

August 29 . . . Coral Sea westbound, while later in the same day,

the scarcely-seen up here Paul T Moran heads for the Bridge while Maryland approaches from that direction.  Coral Sea has gone to West Africa, Maryland has become Liz Vinik, and Paul T stays mostly around the Gulf.

The Tugboat Races and other contests were on the 31st that year.  Here Justin shows good style hitting that bollard.

HMS Liberty mixes it up with some real history.  Edith went down to Trinidad and the venerable Dorothy Elizabeth (1951) was scrapped the next year. Liberty is still in the sixth boro.

And to close it out . . . the 1907 Pegasus made a showing at the races that year.  She’s laid up on the morris Canal so far as I know.

  

I hope you enjoyed these walks through waters no longer here.

Now my big announcement:  as this posts, I’m on board Grande Mariner for the next seven weeks, Chicago bound.  I will post when I can with what photos I can.  But I’ve done that before.  GWA (Going west again) was my series title last year.  You have to read this one about my role on the vessel.   GW was the title I used in 2016.

Maybe this year it should TGWYA . . . thank god i’m going west again . . .  Anyhow . . . this is my version of a “gone fishing’ sign.

 

 

Since W. O. Decker may soon be seen albeit briefly in the sixth boro, let’s start with this photo from July 2008, as she chugs past the waterfall under the Brooklyn Bridge, thanks to an Icelandic-Danish artist named Olafur Eliasson.

Reinauer had some of the same names as now assigned to different boats here a decade ago but now no more on this side of the Atlantic, like Dean.

Some names have not (yet) been reassigned like John.

Now for some that are still here, though some have different paint and names:  Juliet is now Big Jake.  Matthew Tibbetts is still all the same, externally at least.

Stena Poseidon–a great name– is now Espada Desgagnes, and Donald C may still be laid up as Mediterranean Sea.

The long-lived, many-named Dorothy Elizabeth has been scrapped.

Rowan M. McAllister is still around, but the Jones Act tanker S/R Wilmington has succumbed to scrappers’ tools in Brownsville TX.

Falcon has left the sixth boro for Philly and Vane, and Grand Orion, as of today, is headed for Belgium.

And finally . . . June K here assisting with Bouchard B. No. 295 . . .    she’s still around and hard  at work as Sarah Ann.

All photos by Will Van Dorp in July 2008.

 

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