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On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

Katanni and

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Sawyer I, these photos I took in September along the Saint Lawrence.

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I took the next photos in October.  Evans McKeil was built in Panama in 1936!   The cement barge she’s paired with–Metis— was built as a ship in 1956 and converted to a barge in 1991.

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Wilf Seymour was built in 1961 in Port Arthur TX.  I’ve always only seen her paired with Alouette Spirit.  Here she’s heading upbound into the Beauharnois Lock.   The digital readout (-0.5) indicates she’s using the Cavotec automated mooring system instead of lines and line handlers.

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Moving forward to Troy NY, I don’t think the name of this tug is D. A. Collins,   

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but I know these are Benjamin Elliot, Lucy H, and 8th Sea.

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Miss Gill waited alongside some scows at the booming port of Coeymans.

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And the big sibling Vane 5000 hp Chesapeake heads upriver with Doubleskin 509A.

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And one more autumnal shot with yellows, browns, grays, and various shades of red, and a busy Doris Moran and Adelaide.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

In the drizzle, BBC Alabama awaits cargo in Port of Albany.

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Pocomoke transfers cargo,

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Brooklyn heads south,

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Hudson Valley sentinels keep vigil no matter

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how much rain falls,

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Doris hangs with Adelaide,

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as does Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300,

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Strider rests from striding,

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Union Dede docks at a port that 10 years ago was sleepy,

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HR Pike (?) rests on rolling spuds,

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Saugerties Light houses B&B guests,

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not far from Clermont, home of the father-in-law of the father of steam boating on the Hudson and then the Mississippi,

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Comet pushes Eva Leigh Cutler to the north,

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Spooky‘s colors look subdued in the fall colors, and

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two shipyard relatives meet.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos in a 12-hour period.

See the decorated Dutch bar?  That’s not something you see every day.

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but July 4 is not an ordinary day.  Just look at all those people at the land’s edge:  “water-gazers” Melville called them, as you can read here with the last sentence of the second paragraph and go through the next two paragraphs.   All wanting to see the decorated Dutch bar?

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Brendan Turecamo, showing the Turecamo flag!

Marie J Turecamo brought a barge of pyrotechnics too.

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Marion Moran–like Brendan Turecamo–brought a barge full to midtown, I believe.

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. . . as did Doris Moran. Again, see the water-gazers fill the esplanade.

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Other tugboats brought other gazers . . . sky-gazers soon.

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like Kimberly Poling and .

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Yemitzis, launched as a PRR tug in 1954.   Click here and scroll to see her original look.

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My goal at the fireworks on Pier 16 had been to get shots of Ambrose bathed in pyrotechnical light, but alas . . . without the right orientation of camera to boat to flashes . . . this is the best I got.

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This photo from July 2012 was what I had imagined I could get.  Well . . . it’s all about a lot of things, including location.   See the different version of this shot of the left of this page and please let’s continue the discussion on the future of Pegasus.

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Speaking of sky-gazers . . . from the back of the crowd on Pier 16, this is what I got.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you didn’t see this article in the NYTimes about digital photography and ethics, check it out, even if you just look at the before and after photos.

 

 

Since the first in this series was in 2009, let me go through my archives starting from the present.   I seem to have taken no photos of James so far in 2015, but here are two from 2014.

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Here are a few from 2013, the day the new Caddell Dry Dock came to town.

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I don’t know where 2012 went, but here was 2011, passing Stena Stealth.

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I especially like this one with James‘ house down to fit under the flare of Silver Express.

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For a few weeks when the NYC DEP Red Hook came to town, James followed . . . like a fly on  . . .

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well, a DEP boat.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp. For some shots of the vessel in Turecamo woodgrain, click here.

 

Note:  I wrote this a year ago for a print publication, but they’ve not used it.  It’s timely, so here it is in its entirety.  The style is different because of its history and intention.  Here was my post #1 with this title from January 2010.  And HERE was 2.

Line crosses the ice fields covering a chokepoint in the Hudson River like an army tank traversing boulders. The vessel—more than a half century old—pitches and tosses erratically. And the steel hull polishing itself on brash ice—jagged floating ice clumps– is loud, arrhythmic, and almost alarming as the small ice breaker advances through the ice or attempts to, sometimes halting.

“It’s counterintuitive,” said Bosun Mate Chief Bradford Long. “My initial sense was that I was harming the vessel. But it was built for ice up to a foot thick. When it stops, you take care that the rudder position is centered, then power astern before attempting a new track. Having the rudder anywhere but centered could damage it.”

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During an average ice season, some 300 vessels from tug/barge units to ocean-going tankers and bulk carriers navigate the Hudson. During the 2012-13 season, Coast Guard crews broke ice and facilitated movement of 7.96 million barrels of petroleum products and 297,000 tons of dry bulk products in the Northeast, with a combined total value of nearly $2 billion. They also answered 17 official requests for assistance and assisted 37 vessels in need.

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During “ice season” Line is one of three 65’ ice breaking tugs working in conjunction with 140’ Bay-class ice breakers whose missions include keeping key portions of the Hudson River open. The larger ice breakers like Penobscot Bay can handle ice up to 36” thick and work the chokepoints such as Esopus Meadows and Silver Point, while Line breaks ice at facilities such as petroleum terminals and pilot stations. “Commercial operators notify us about 24 hours in advance of their arrival at a terminal. We break up the ice and –if necessary—a 140-footer comes in and sweeps the ice away just before the tug and barge arrives,” says Long.

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WYTL 65611 Line, is homeported in Bayonne, New Jersey, as is its sister vessel WYTL 65610 Hawser. A third sibling WYTL 65612 Wire is based in Saugerties, New York. All three were launched from Barbour Boat Works in New Bern, North Carolina, within two months of each other in 1963, now 52 years ago.

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Barbour also made some classy runabouts, like this one seen in their old boat works, now operating as the North Carolina History Center.

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Jet Lowe took the photo below of the Barbour work tug Sam.  Click here for more pics of Sam by Jet Lowe.  Can’t you look at wooden Sam and see hints of the WYTL design?  And these 65′ icebreakers . . . what will replace them?

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The three WYTLs break ice on a “1 in 3” schedule: one week of Hudson River ice breaking operations, then a second week of patrols and breakouts closer to their homeport, and then a third week of maintenance in port.  Line, currently with a crew of eight, operates during daylight hours only, unless emergency search-and rescue operations dictate otherwise, said Long. At night, the vessel might dock on shore power available only at either West Point or Saugerties, 45 and 90 miles respectively north of the Battery.

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The current season is the first breaking Hudson River ice for BMC Long, whose 14-year career has provided prior Coast Guard ice experience on Lake Champlain and the Bering Sea. Line’s current ice breaking duties include maintenance of the “track” followed by commercial vessels, as well as facilities “break-outs,” meaning the WYTL breaks ice in circular patterns or noses up to a dock and uses prop wash to clear out a possible channel. Line has a single four-blade 56” prop turned by a 500 horsepower Caterpillar 34-12.

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WYTL crew also communicate with passing commercial vessels gathering data on their vessels, cargoes, and encountered ice conditions. That information is shared with the Coast Guard Sector New York’s “ice officer,” Chief Warrant Officer Kary Moss.   According to Moss, “domestic icebreaking operations are intended to … minimize waterways closures during the winter, enabling commercial vessels to transit through ice-covered critical channels.” Moss manages the information generated by the WYTLS, the 140-footers, and Coast Guard Auxiliary Air, or AuxAir “ice patrols.” These latter are observation flights—daily if weather permits—by civilian aircraft from Sandy Hook to Albany to report on and photograph ice conditions and river traffic.   During the 2012-13 ice season, AuxAir made 37 reconnaissance flights. Moss then issues the daily ice report both broadcast on VHF channel 22 and electronically.

Since their 1963 arrival the WYTLs in the Hudson Valley have had a variety of missions, which did not include breaking ice on the Hudson for the first two decades. Line and the other two New York area WYTLs—Wire and Hawser—have unique extended cabins used to accommodate additional crew, including doctors, who would board passenger vessels for inspection/quarantine in greater New York harbor. The WYTLs also moved empty sanitation scows during instances like the tugboat strike of 1979, as evidenced below in the letter of citation from the commandant of the Coast Guard . . ..

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As the winter and ice season of 2013-14 establishes a place in the cold and ice record books, BMC Long and crew feel a sense of accomplishment about their role on this half-century-old boat assisting commercial vessels in getting the heating oil through.

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So here we are 12 months later, and it’s deja vu all over again . . . or something.

Here’s Tatiana Schlossberg’s article from today’s NYTimes on the 2015 icebreaking effort.

 

 

 

 

This photo of Doris Joan Moran that has been circulating on FB this morning.  Sorry . . . I wish I knew who gets the credit for this unusual shot.  Anyhow, it reminded me of a post I did five years ago here.

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Here’s a Doris photo I took last week . . . uncoated.

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So one reaction to the cold is to bundle up, grit your teeth, plod on, complain a little more . . .

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But you have to admit, winter in the northern latitudes gives us new senses of hulls on snow bases, or

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levitating above it.

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Here’s roughly the same angle . . . as I took it in September 2012.

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Thanks to Bob Stopper for the photo of tug Syracuse and to Erich Amberger for the winter photo of Wendy B.  The others I took, except for the top photo, and I’d still like to know who took that.

Uh . . . I just mis-read the FB info on the frosted over tugboat above.  It was spelled j-o-a-n, and I transferred that as d-o-r-i-s.  I’m sloppy sometimes.  Maybe I need an editor.

For the misfortune of all us 25 million sixth boro shore dwellers, it’s cool like below.  Here’s what the the river banks like look for us when Mardi Gras gets scheduled.

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Tugs and buoys carry glaze like this or

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this . . . .

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Even local wrecks (that’s two side by side there) have a glaze that mimics the gleaming white paint they once wore . . . .  And one local water guy whose blog I usually read conveys experiences like these.  Hawsepiper, . . . this goes out to you.

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At these times it’s good to remember we have our own deferred (defurred?) mardi gras parade when we ditch our winter burqas and enjoy the summer solstice warmth . . .

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sometimes even without parasols

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in fewer than 125 days from now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Loosely related, click here for a bulk carrier named Mardi Gras and a whole youtube channel devoted for Asian tugs, jetfoils, fireboats, and other workboats.

 

 

Here was 1.  And for reasons I’ll explain at the end of this post, this title might not be the best one.  Maybe by that time, you’ll figure out a better one as well.    The idea came from here–Nord Snow Queen I took in March 2012 in Panama, and then a friend’s photo from Cappadocia, which I’ll add at the end of this post.

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So a better name might be ovens and freezers, or heat & ice, given that photos 2, 4, and 6  . . . as well as 1 were taken in temperatures close to 100 F (Bonneville Desert) whereas photos 3, 5, and 7 were Hudson River in this winter I now wish would subside into history.  Here’s the photo from Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) in Turkey.

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The Turkish photo by Lauren Tivey;  all others by Will Van Dorp.   And one place I’d like to get to is here.

Newburgh-Beacon Bridge, late October 2013.

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Same bridge February 4 2014.

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WYTL 65611 Line and Doris Moran passing under that same bridge  February 4 2014.

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Looking south toward Bannerman’s Castle late October 2013.

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From not as close . . . but that’s Bannerman’s slightly off to the left.

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Northside of Bear Mountain Bridge in October 2013 and

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yesterday with Stephen Reinauer with RTC 80  north bound and

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and Stephen-Scott with light barge RTC 20.

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Doris meets the train.

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Here’s looking south from Newburgh dock mid November a few years ago, and

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here’s the same view from earlier this week.

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All fotos of two of the faces of the Hudson River by Will Van Dorp.

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