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All these photos were taken in the second half of January 2013.  This 1973 livestock carrier Falconia was in the Brooklyn Navy Yard getting some work done.  I’d love to see a cargo layout for the vessel.  Also, just back from the foremast, those are large bales of either hay or straw for the livestock.   What would you guess her disposition in second half of January 2023?  Answer follows at the end of this post.

The tanker here is today in the Gulf of Guinea on a run between Gabon and Netherlands.  Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015. 

The green tug Mary Gellatly was transformed into the very busy CMT Mackenzie Rose. 

The behemoth Rebel has become Ken Vinik, awaiting a makeover in the Arthur Kill. 

The name of the hull–we’d spell it “Sovkomflot“–is one you will not see in the sixth boro these days, and it seems the icebreaking tanker is currently

anchored  where it has been for at least the past six months in Murmansk. 

The Penn Maritime Coho has become the Kirby Coho, currently in Savannah. 

Note the ice and snow on the boats above and below;  January a decade ago was frosty!  Barbara McAllister has become Patsy K, which I’ve never seen.  She’s in Panama City FL right now. 

It’s clamming time in the boro, and many of these clam/fish boats come out of this creek in NJ.  More Dutch Girl tomorrow. 

Grey Shark may be a dead ship or even a scrapped one by now, last recorded in the DR. 

And finally, Megan McAllister is alive and well, busy as Charles James.  

All photos from January 2013, WVD.  

And the answer to the question about the current disposition of Falconia:   she’s renamed Dragon and in Midia, Romania on the Black Sea, flying the Togolese flag, and still working, having just arrived in from Libya. For a tour of a much newer and sophisticated purpose-built livestock carrier, click here. More on this category of vessel here, and Dragon specifically on page 49.

For a disturbing report–if you choose to followup here–google Queen Hind livestock carrier, which capsized in Midia in 2019  and resulted in the “lost cargo,” i.e., death 14,000 sheep. 

 

 

 

Here was installment 1.  Right over beyond Race Rock Light, that’s the entrance to 

New London, where Rowan M. McAllister lighters a salt ship named Feng Ze Hai.

A Reinauer unit heads for the sixth boro, and not taking refraction into account, 

I figured I could just read the name here.  Can you make it out?  My guess is Ruth E. but there are others similar to her. 

Cape Canaveral passed Bridgeport  bathed in morning light. 

Later, Sapphire Coast 

with Cement Transporter 1802 

overtook William F. Fallon Jr. and her barge at

Orient Point Light. 

As the early winter’s night approached,  Reinauer Twins

and RTC 104 passed close enough to read her name, refraction notwithstanding. 

All photos, WVD, who has many more and closer up lighthouse photos from the Sound.

I haven’t always noticed all the right details, 

and you might be wondering if this title sounds a bit like one of those professional firms . . .

but possibly by the time you get to the photo below you’ve figured out the title.

Certainly while shooting these photos, it occurred to me that this tug/barge combination is somewhat unusual . . . Chesapeake Coast pushing liquid tank barge Chesapeake.  Maybe it’s not unusual.  Sister tug Discovery Coast has been in the boro a fair amount but it’s been a while since I recall seeing Chesapeake Coast here.

Anyhow, I thought it was unusual.  

Can you recall seeing this barge in the boro?  Going back in my archives, it’s been a few years that I’ve posted photos of Chesapeake Coast, other than it “retro” posts. Good to see you. 

All photos, any lapses of memory and inattention, WVD. 

I like reader-submitted photos, especially when they show something I’ve not seen before, like this black low-profile unit, which may or may not have the name Elizabeth II,  in front of this Kirby inland barge.  Photo was taken somewhere west of Atchafalaya Bay by eastriver. 

See the unit at the bow of that barge?

Prime mover here is Louisa Frances.  So what is that forward unit? 

It’s a “bow boat,” as in here.  Scroll through and you’ll see a version called Chuck Norris and a Steermaster here

Next topic . . . after a reference and comments here, Jan vander Doe sent along this photo of an opduwer on a Dutch waterway below.  Literally the Dutch “opduwer” translates as “up pusher,” once again proving that tow boats can push, and push boats can tow . . . as long as they have the right deck fittings. 

Third . . .  the mobile boat lift that’s been at Bayonne Dry dock for a year and a half now was christened yesterday as Christopher Edward.  Read this story here

I’m happy to read this, although I’ve not heard of a travel lift or mobile boat hauler bearing a name.  On the other hand, the floating dry docks at Caddells have numbers and names

Finally, I caught an “exotic” heading out of the sixth boro the other day.  She’s been in and out before, but…. like I said… I finally got a photo of 

Miss Emma McCall.  A fleetmate–Brooks McCall –has been operating in the LI Sound and Narragansett Bay, but I’m not up there much.  To digress, would anyone up on Sound and N Bay send me photos of unusual vessels now and again?  I know the wind farm work is bringing in lots of exotics to southern New England ports. 

More on TDI Brooks and this vessel can be found by clicking on those links. 

Thanks to eastriver and Jan for their photos;  all others and any errors . . . WVD. 

 

This monthly practice of looking back a decade gives me an opportunity to dust off a specific part of the archive in tugster tower.  Besides sneezing sometimes because of the dust, I also feel amazed about the amount of change, small changes maybe but significant it seems. 

Evening Mist has become Everly Mist, and is in a new endeavor.  Palva is now Laurentia DesGagnes operating on and out of the Saint Lawrence River where I saw her a few years back.  Only Eastern Welder in the background remains.

I made a few trips out to Greenport a decade ago, and walking through a shipyard saw this vessel from Suffolk Count Department of Health and its unusual top deck exhaust.  Is that still around?  I’m guessing it might check water quality on shellfishing areas . . .

Bebedouro (1974) and Atlantic Conveyor (1985), now both dead and scrapped.  Brendan Turecamo still works here all day every day.

Rebel (138′ x 46′) is still on the NJ side of the sixth boro, waiting for an opportunity to get back to work.

Viking (132′ x 34′) has been cut up.

Annabelle Dorothy Moran was on her delivery run, making her way to the Chesapeake/Delaware Bay area, where she still works. Those range markers are no longer in place on the Brooklyn Heights bank of the sixth boro.

John B Caddell was nearing the end of this shore leave, heading for her final one.  Note Sarah Ann tending the crane barge and WTC in the distance not yet completed. 

Commander, a WW1 USN vet as SP-1247, was still showing its rotondity.

Joan Turecamo, a late Matton product, was still in the boro.  Now she winds her way around the curves of the Lower Mississippi. 

Sarah Ann and others of the Donjon fleet kept me up most of the night in December 2012, as she stood by a barge carrying WTC antenna sections that  were lifted onto Manhattan . . .

across a blocked west side highway . . . lowered onto a vehicle with dozens of axles . . .

and trucked inland

In other night photos, quite rare on this blog . . .  it’s Clearwater lifted onto Black Diamond barge with Cornell standing by.

I hope you enjoyed this backward glance as much as I have.  I might have to get out and do some documenting of nighttime events on the sixth boro this December. 

All photos, December 2012, WVD. 

If you’re still wanting a tugster calendar 2023 version, click here for info. You can even order a few or a dozen . . .

Marjorie  moves her train cars.

Nathan G goes for fuel.

Crystal Cutler pushes her barge.

Paula Atwell travels light for a change. 

CMT Pike does her harbor rounds. 

Mister Jim here looks brighter than usual in the morning sun; in cloudy weather, that gray livery

obscures details. 

Robert IV assists at the stone anchorage.

Cape Henry leaves her barge to take care of some business. 

Captain Willie Landers makes a pass through the boro. 

And a rare sighting, Sea Crescent transits the boro on her return from Port Hawkesbury NS to Fort Eustis VA.  It’s likely that Sea Crescent originated this voyage from a port on the Saint Lawrence or even the Great Lakes.

All photos, any errors, WVD, whose 380 in this series was posted here.

Here are previous posts in the series.

Look closely at the image of William F. Fallon Jr. below;  something is unusual there.

Note that Bluefin below is juxtaposed with the Whale on shore. The Whale might be an interesting location to visit someday.

Bayonne Drydock has Schuylkill high and dry and Go Discovery along the bulkhead.

Hull design and bridge configuration are unusual.  Who designed this vessel?

Big rocks

await some jetty project, I suppose.  Anyone know where?

See the difference in ladder configuration between Charleston and

Jacksonville?  Both boats are Elizabeth Anne class boats, so why the difference in ladders?

Since 2014, October has been breast cancer awareness month, a tradition begun by Moran. 

Other companies like Kirby and Bouchard joined in previous years as well. 

 

This year so far, Stasinos is the only other company I’ve seen mark awareness of the disease this year.  Have I missed anyone?

Finally, getting back to the Fallon photo that led off this post.  Fallon is a pin boat, and yet, she’s attached to the barge Long Island with push gear.  Does this combination really operate this way?  I’m just curious.

All photos and questions, any errors, WVD.

 

I’ve not added sugar to my hot drinks for many decades, but if you do, you need to know about Jonathan, or sweet Jon.

If you think I’ve flipped out, here the sugar barge was passing the Statue a few days ago towed by East Coast.

Here are the numbers of Jonathan

Safe travels.

All photos, WVD, who used to look forward to visits of Sugar Express, which I’ve not seen recently. 

Click here to see partly refined sugar being lifted out of the sugar barges. 

The Hudson treats the traveler with magical sights like these.  The castle atop the lush riverbank is still there, but that tug–Viking–is no more.  I’m not sure the disposition of DBL 134.

One morning soon after sunrise that summer 2017 I followed Delaware a ways up the Hudson before overtaking her.

Ernest Campbell had started working in the sixth boro by 2018, but its livery has changed since then.

On the last day of June, I took a ride on the Rondout and saw (l to r) Johannsen Girls, Fells Point, and SevernSevern now works in the Pacific Northwest although still for Vane.

Tarpon was working in the boro, but since that time has been sold to interests on the West Coast, although I’m not sure she’s made it there.

In June 2019, I caught Stephen Reinauer heading out the Narrows to rejoin its barge;

North of the border, SLS aka Sheri Lynn S was tied up at a Picton ON dock.

June 2020 one morning, I spotted Kirby Moran meeting ONE Minato, and

Janet D returning to her Elizabethport base.

In June 2021, it’s Charles D passing Adventurer while standing by for an incoming ship.

And finally, Sarah D was eastbound here in the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who may have made some errors here with dates, having had his brain baked in the Louisiana heat.

 

Ten years ago, the WTC was incomplete, no supertalls/superskinnies were up, and Taurus was not yet Joker.

Miriam and the archway at Sailors Snug Harbor are all the same, although that dock is gone from there.

The 1969 Barbara McAllister is now Patsy K, operating out of the Gulf coast of Florida.

The 2003 Jane is now Anna Rose, and I’ve seen her in the boro a few times.

Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Crow was in her last days here, and has been scrapped more than a half decade already.

Charles D. McAllister has now been five and a half decades in service and still working in the sixth boro. 

Gage Paul was lost in transit after being sold overseas.   Note the seaplane on the East River.  

Last I knew, Buchanan 10 was laid up upriver.

In June 2012, I had the opportunity to tour USNS Apache near Norfolk.  A few years later, Apache was the vessel credited with locating the black box of El Faro, after its tragic sinking.

Sharing the dock with Apache that day was USNS Grapple.

All photos, ten years ago, WVD, who is currently traveling again, out of tugster tower for an indefinite period of time, getting more indefinite every day.  I have re-activated the robots, but we’ll see how reliable they are this time.

 

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