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Back in December, I posted a variation of the photo below.  But that view didn’t allow me to see the bow.

Now I have:  what an attractive boat!

Now that I see her bow and complete profile, I see how similar the hull is to Sea Hawk but maintains a functioning lower wheelhouse.  It was too bad the froth obscured the Bludworth connection.

 

Updated photo of the ladder on the nose is below.

It was a pleasure to see the 1998 Sea Eagle light as I was out doing my exercise in social and actually physical distancing.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all health.

Unrelated:  Some mariners are trapped on their vessels, and likely not thrilled to be calling in the sixth boro.

Guess the port?  The tug is Orgullo De Izabal [Pride of Izabal] , built in 2007 by Damen in Gorinchem, NL.  She measures 72′ x 22.’

In the same port was AS Fiorelia, a small container vessel I believe I’ve seen in the sixth boro, just never–so far as I can determine–posted here. Note the container cranes. And the port is?

How’s this for the non-stealth sub.  I’ve never seen one, but Joseph T said he traveled down to 100′ without “donning dive gear or calculating decompression tables.”

 

Boca Grande, a Kirby tug, and Seabulk Towing’s Condor  . . .  make this port of Miami, and Terminal H, according to Joseph.   The tugs are 1100 hp and 6700 hp, respectively.   Have you guessed the top two photos’ location yet?

Bayou Teche here secures the 403;  farther down the dock, Oceania Sirena is about to depart.   Bayou Teche is a 3000 hp Kirby boat about five years old.

So, the first two photos Joseph took in Santo Tomás de Castilla, Guatemala, heart of Garifuna land.  Surprisingly, that bay was first colonized, unsuccessfully, by the Belgians!

Below, l to r, it’s Oasis of the Seas and Seven Seas Explorer, Joseph’s ride.

Many thanks for these photos, Joseph.

 

More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

She first came through bit over a month ago, but I missed her.  But two days ago, I had no work,  a coin or two in my pocket and nothing to interest me on shore,  I decided to do my Otis Redding thing, and look at the watery world  . . .

Seeing this new boat headed my way enhanced an already perfect day.

She’s the third of three Cape-class boats and carries a name that was magic for me when I was young, probably magical then all around the world.

Just over a year ago, I caught the first of them here.  A few months later, I not only caught the second Cape but,better yet,  also photo’d them passing each other. 

Her two twin Cats generate 5000 hp in this 102′ x 36′ boat.

And by the end of the day, I caught Cape Henry and Cape Canaveral in the anchorage side by side.

All photos, WVD, whose previous newest hulls can be found here.

Denali arrived in the sixth boro for the first time about three years ago, and I compared her with a fleet mate here. I believe that fleet mate is now scrapped.

If you’ve never seen a tug out of the water, here’s a sense of that.  I’ve done other “dry hulls” photos, as you can see here.  These photos of Denali come from Mike Abegg.

A lot of traffic passes through the East River, like Foxy 3 here.

That appears to be a scrap barge, a commodity that gets concentrated along the creeks and in ports along the Sound.

Buchanan 12 must earn its owners a lot of money;  it seems always to be moving multiple barges of crushed rock . . .

 

 

Curtis Reinauer here heads for the Sound pushing

an 80,000 barrel barge, if I’m not mistaken.

All photos, WVD.

Day in day out . . . and night in night out, port work goes on.  Here James D finishes up escorting a gargantuan “flower” ship out.

Sea Eagle stands by with her barge while Dace refuels.

Pearl Coast heads for Caddells,

where Kings Point is getting some work done.

Discovery Coast leaves the Gowanus Bay berth.

Atlantic Coast lighters a salt ship while Lucy waits in the anchorage.

Lyman moves Sea Shuttle southbound while some Bouchard units heads for the KVK.

And completing this installment, it’s Kirby, all finished with another assist.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Here’s another calendar’s worth . . . starting with Josephine.  I have many more of this bot coming up soon.

Capt. Brian heads out through the Narrows to meet a tow.

Cape Lookout returns for her anchored barge.

Nathan G delivers a brace of scows.

Ava M heads out for a job.

The “new” Kristin Poling returns to her barge as well.

Ellen and Bruce A follow a job.

St Andrews heads east and

Ernest Campbell, west.

Challenger, some weeks ago, brings a Weeks crane up for a lift.

Stephen B has some additions to her paint job since last I saw her.

CMT Pike heads back across the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who can’t believe it’s already mid-November 2019!!

 

 

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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