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Different day . . . different character . . .  the Hudson can have thick patches of fog, which

allow Dorothy J to slip past structures on a mysterious shore.

Farther along, Miss Gill guards some incongruous piles of

coal that surely did not arrive through the Delaware and Hudson Canal, which I visited recently but didn’t dip my foot into.

Wendell Sea waits alongside a fuel barge, and

Christiana–not a frequent visitor in the sixth boro–does in her own way

up by the GW Bridge.

 

Helen Laraway stands by scows of different sized crushed stone.

And this gets us down to the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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I’ve left on another gallivant before “processing” photos from the trip in from Chicago, these being from a portion of the Hudson in various times of day, qualities of light, and types of weather.

Down bound in the port of Albany, we pass Daniel P Beyel, Marie J Turecamo, and –I believe– Comet.

By now, Daniel P is part of the way to Florida.  And I’m intrigued by the units on the dock beyond her stern . . .

…nacelle covers–and I assume the innards–for what looks like 20 wind turbines.  This led me to find out how many wind turbines are currently functional in upstate NY.  I come up with a total of at least 770 as of a year ago: 528 installed since 2006  in the northernmost band from the Adirondacks to the Saint Lawrence Valley, 165 since 2007 in western NY, and 77 since 2000 in central and Southern Tier NY.  Read specifics here.

Treasure Coast loads cement in Albany County, where Lafarge has just dedicated an upgraded facility. 

Pike awaits the next job at Port of Coeymans.

B. No. 225 gets moved northward

by Jane A. Bouchard.

And Tarpon–has to be the only one in the Hudson–moves a fuel barge as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I took these photos over a two-day period in late July, traveling the entire 130 miles of the Hudson from the Battery to Troy while on the trip from Narragansett Bay to the “source” of the Chicago River.  RV Shearwater here surveys the river/bay;  that’s Willy Wall on the horizon left, so the Battery is behind us.

The Tappan Zee nears completion:  the gap on the left side is all that needs to be bridged.  The Left Coast Lifter will then become the “left coast lowerer,” I assume.

Infrastructure materials come out of the ground here in Haverstraw,

Viking passes below Osborn Castle,

summer play happens in the Hudson,

Buchanan 12 pushes more raw materials for infrastructure,

a tribe paddles over to Bannerman’s,

a truck lifts three vessels in imitation of Combi-Dock III,

Vane’s Delaware pushes DoubleSkin 50 upriver,

Spring Sunshine offloads aggregates at Caymans, where

a 400-ton 12-story structure awaits (then) its float down to NJ [more on that soon],

yacht named Summer heads south for Key West,

raw materials that once rolled on roads await the trip back to the blast furnace,

a horde does sun salutations on shore,

the American goddess Columbia trumpets at the top of a needing-to-be-updated soldiers/sailors monument in Troy,

 

and an oracle wearing a sea creature hat and using an old-school device taps out verbiage suggesting I’m headed for Ithaca and not Chicago, although I’m pleased with that too.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to the oracle.

Somewhat related:  Click here for a CNN Travel clip called “Liquid City” and starts out with the sentence “most people think NYC has five boros, but there’s really a sixth one;  it’s the largest one and it connects all the others.”  I heard it while waiting at the airport in Indianapolis the other day and was stunned.  Do you suppose Justin Davidson reads tugster?

For blog posts written by folks going first northbound and then southbound on a LNV tug, click here and here.

 

I’m guessing Eric R Thornton is off in search of some scrap waiting in

the Bronx maybe?

It’s been a long while since I’ve seen Penn No. 6, and here she and Normandy are made up to Penn No. 121.  See those four shore cranes against the sky?  Here’s a post I did on them almost a decade ago.

 

Here’s B. No. 250 eastbound for the Sound, with

Evening Star in the notch.

Some people would be pleased with this juxtaposition: MTA’s Highbridge Yard, with Harbor II, MetroNorth, and the 44th Precinct Police Station!

Barbara Ann holds station at the University Heights Bridge, with the unmistakeable Hall of Fame for Great Americans dome over the treeline.  That’s a place I’ve yet to visit, one of many places in the five boros.

Ditto . . . Ireland on the north side of that bridge.

 

And to conclude for another day . . . it’s Penn No. 91 with

Skipjack in the notch.

Oops!  All photos by Will Van Dorp . . . from aboard Manhattan II.

First, thanks to Joseph Chomicz . . . it’s Rebel and Dolphin over by the Philadelphia Navy Yard   . . .

Quo vadis, Rebel?

And the second batch comes from Ingrid Staats with likely the most unusual backstory ever on this blog . . .  Ingrid took the photos from a room in New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where her healthy baby was born. She writes, “We had an amazing view of the East River and for four days as Mom & babe recuperated. I amused myself by capturing as many tugs as possible.”    Congratulations to all and here they are:

Sea Lion above moving recyclables and and Evelyn Cutler pushing petroleum product.

TJ and Catherine Miller . . . and is TJ really doing all the work here?

And finally . . . Navigator light and Gulf Enterprise pushing a petroleum barge westbound.

Many thanks to Joseph and Ingrid for these photos.  And I’m happy to hear that one of the next generation of tugboat watchers has been born.

 

Enjoy this sampling of boats and the dates associated with their launch starting from Arabian Sea (2007) on Dry Dock No. 7,

Stephen Reinauer (1970) nearby on 4,

Miss Circle Line . . . (1954 as ST 2124 and later Betsy) ,

Alex McAllister (1985),

Joyce D. Brown (2002) headed home after completing the daily chores,

Crystal Coast (1983) and Justin (1981) heading south into the Chesapeake,

JRT Moran (2016) holding onto an argosy,

Ivory Coast (1967) waiting on the next job,

All photos by Will Van Dorp (1952).

Unrelated, for a long interpretation of Moby Dick (1851) and connections between “grammar school literature” like the Odyssea (est. 1000 BCE) and All Quiet on the Western Front (1929) and connections with folk songs, listen to Bob Dylan (1941) making his Nobel Prize acceptance speech (2017)  here . . .  It’s the best 27 minutes of listening you’ll do today, I believe.

 

Norwegian Sea seemed to leave town soon after it received its transformative K-Sea to Kirby paint job here about five years ago.  I can’t say for certain that she’s been back in between, but I spotted her immediately from several miles off, given her distinctive upper house support.  Note the Ikea barge there beyond her stern.

Here was a post I just happened to do earlier this month, as a glance back, that alludes to her lines.

She was hooked up to DBL 81   .  . .

Good to see you, Norwegian Sea.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This photo of Godfather should catch someone’s eye, but I’m going to direct that attention then to Paul Johnson’s wonderful site, which if you have an hour to kill, will make that go by in what seems a minute.  Thanks to RG, my brother-in-central-African-1970s-experiences for passing this along.  As to Godfather, she’s by a year or so an older sibling of the boats currently known as Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.  Currently, she’s called Crosby Enterprise.

Here was a surprise . . . Petrel in the sixth boro.  I haven’t seen her in quite a while, since I’m not in Philly much any more.

 

Here’s a head-on view of HMS Justice.

Thanks to Jed, here are some photos from last year showing the mighty Bluefin.

photo date 6 JUNE 2016

with photos taken in Virginia waters.

photo date 6 JUNE 2016

Jan van der Doe has recently returned from a trip to the Netherlands and sends along photos of these tugboats.  Given the stack logo, I’m guessing this one below is a live aboard, and

Alphecca was built in 1913, converted to diesel in 1959 and you can click here to see and hear the engine running.

Below, it’s FairPlay 23, which has appeared on this blog before.

Unrelated:  A reader wrote to ask this question:  “Could you help me find info about a little tug named the Ali M.  My friend SK owned and operated her out of Bayonne for a while and sold her before his passing many years ago.  I believe he had her at the Atlas Yacht club.  I was curious what ever happened to her.”            I don’t recall ever seeing a tug named Ali M.  Anyone help out here?  Anyone have a photo?

The reader is also looking for any info on the vessels shown below in a painting by his father from the 1990s.  Thanks for any help.

Thanks to RG, Jed, Jan, and Peter for sending these along.  And be careful out there.

Petrel and HMS Justice photos by Will Van Dorp.

Guess the unit below here and

here?  Lots of similarities, and the one below was less than 10 minutes behind the one above, both westbound the Kills.

A and

B.  Guess now?

a is Viking pushing DBL 134.

B is new to the sixth boro, here pushing DBL 103.

New York and

New Orleans….

Viking, built in 1976 and powered at 4300 hp, is 132′ x 34′ and here pushing DBL 134, built in 1986, with capacity of 136k barrels.

Denali, built in 2010 and powered at 5000 hp, is 115′ x 36′ and here pushing DBL 103, built in 2005, with capacity of 101k barrels.

 

Random is  . . . well the word comes from French which comes from German which comes from some extinct language describing the galloping horses,  going just going without a pattern.  I might assemble in patterns, but they’re not really there.

So, first up it’s Helen Laraway, based in the burgeoning port of Coeymans.

Next, it’s the fairly new Crystal Cutler pushing Patricia E. Poling.

 

Color scheme give this away?

It’s Quenames . . .

 

And finally, as Quenames heads away from us, it’s Bering Sea (once known as Cougar and later Stacy Moran) on the approach

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wouldn’t remember any of this if not for Birk’s site.  Thx, Birk.

 

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