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January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

With the end of the year coming, it’s strangely difficult to put these posts together.  I’ve chased down several ideas the past few days, and abandoned them.   All these photos were taken in recent days, except one about a month ago.  They strike me as showing the different skies and waters of the unacknowledged boro. 

So, photos . . . like this of Christine M. McAllister, 125.5′ x 38′ and 6000 hp.  She’s returning to town after a rough encounter on Christmas day . . . .  Maybe someone else can tell the story of SS Denebola (T-AKR 289) first hand.  It’s been a while that Christine M. has appeared on this blog.

Soon to be ex-Eastern Dawn, 52′ x 22 and 1200 hp,  crosses the Upper Bay looking all resplendent in the new paint job.

Two Bouchard tugs are stacked up on the far side of Cape Henry, 109′ x 36′ and 5000 hp,  and her DBL 103, 102,000 barrel capacity barge. 

Dylan Cooper, 112′ x 35′ and 4720 hp, waits in the anchorage with RTC 108, around 108,000 barrels.

Genesis Vigilant, 98.5 x 34 and 3000 hp, also at anchor with GM 6508,  80,000 barrels capacity.

And finally . . .  misclassified on purpose, notice several things this windy morning  on the starboard side of OceanXplorer:  a tender, a helicopter, and areas marked ROV and CTD.  ROV I knew, but CTD I had to look up.  Check out this blog post by New York Media Boat.

All photos and any errors of fact or interpretation, WVD, who wishes you all a happy new year, or as my parents would say . . . gelukkig nieuwjaar.

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

Hell Gate has to be one of the most storied waterways in the sixth boro.  How could I have mostly ignored it so long?!!

The other day I caught Vinik No. 6 and Liz Vinik westbound  through that section of the East River.   In the background, that’s the Bronx.

An indicator of current is the fact that NYPD boat here is barely making headway.  Current in a tidal strait like the so-called East River is constantly and dramatically changing.  That’s Manhattan in the background.

Nicholas Vinik also passed through the other day, returning from a job.  That NYC DEP GUP headquarters in the background.  The Hell Gate RR Bridge seems in need of some paint.  Referencing this part of Hell Gate, captbbrucato describes it from a captain’s perspective here.

A recent development is the transit of NYC Ferry service through the Gate to the Bronx on the Soundview run.

Wye River heads eastbound to retrieve a barge, meeting

Cape Canaveral and DBL 101 on the way.

Along the shoreline here, that’s Astoria Queens to the left, and Manhattan along the entire distant background.  Most iconic is the spire of the Empire State Building.

State Trooper . . .  I’m assuming that’s a government boat.

That’s it for now.  I hope to return to Hell Gate soon.  All photos, WVD. 

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

These foggy days offer an enhancement to a photographer with a telephoto;  the background nearly disappears, causing the subject to pop out.  In this case, it’s two tugboats of different sizes. 

Linda L. Miller length is just a bit over half Cape Henry‘s beam. 

Linda L. Miller (ex-Frog Belly, a name for the ages) is 25.3′ x 14;  Cape Henry is 109’x 36′.

 

 

Each has its role.

All photos, WVD, who recalls a lecture I once heard called “Is this a tugboat?” given the late great Don Sutherland.  It made the same point as these photos.

Another post showing scale and involving W. O. Decker I did here.

Let’s do 2013 and 2014, or redo them, same conditions as I stated yesterday. But first let’s look at the 2013 crowd, packing in like you wouldn’t with covid.  Here was the crowd at 1010 and

by 1035 they had grown significantly.

The compulsory muster takes place, irrigated by fireboat John J. Harvey.

Once the race begins, a front-runner like Decker

might soon get left in the wake.

The fire boat slices up from behind and

propels itself between two Miller boats.

Pushoffs happen next, sometimes quite equally matched like here, with 3900 hp countering 4200.

Let’s jump ahead to 2014, with the arrivals on the watery carpet,

the processing to the starting line,

and get straight to racing without all the preening and posturing.

Someone seems a bit oversize in that gray livery.

This is a fairly mis-matched pair:  Wayne at 5100 hp, and Ellen at 4000.  Maybe a re-match is in order Wayne v. Ava.

Thanks to Jeff Anzevino for this shot, the Media Boat has military background in common with Wayne.

After Wayne has strutted its stuff in the push-offs, some of the boats lined up for the roping the bollard.

Let’s hold it up here.  All photos, WVD.

 

I’ll devote a whole post once again to the 2012 races, since I have a  lot of photos.  What I did was look for the most dramatic or interesting photos and, in some cases, re-edited them.  What I didn’t do is go back through the 2012 posts, but you can here if you want.

Again, you can identify these, or I’ll help you if you can’t.  I call this the pre-race cluster, with some even pointing upstream, as if Yonkers would be the finish line.

The cluster continues as more boats arrive.

And then there’s the burn-out, or in this case . . .  froth-out as two Cat D-399s crank out over 2200 hp.

The pack spreads out quickly.  This was almost 60 seconds into the race.  If this were a terrestrial drag race, the contest would already be over and the smoke clearer.

I’m not sure I’d want to be in a kayak, particularly a double, as all this wake translates into wave motion.

A full five minutes into the race, Quantico Creek‘s two Cat 3512 3000 hp power plants take her past the finish line with sturm und drang . . .

Seven minutes into the race . . . they’re still coming.

At the 19-minute mark, the race is over, but the bulls appear to have scores to settle . . .

and next thing you know . . . it’s tugboat rugby!

Tomorrow . . .  how about returning to 2013.

All photos, WVD.

 

Decked out in canvas for the postponed move last week, it’s the venerable Margot.  She’s appeared on this blog many times, house up as below and house down as here.

Believe it or not, Saint Emilion appears here for the first time, although she’s been here as Arabian Sea and Barbara CThe fisherman in the background was catching too many fish to vacate that spot.

Franklin Reinauer . . . she’s a classic.

Lincoln Sea . . . for me is a different kind of classic.

Gulf Coast is an infrequent visitor in the sixth boro.

Crystal Cutler has appeared here many times since her first arrival as a newbuild in 2010.

Cape Henry is one of three

Kirby boats of the same design.

Could Lincoln Sea look any better?

And to end . . . have a look at Thomas D. Witte, a 1961 tug that looks great.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Enjoy the photos.  Can you guess which of these tugboats is oldest?

Greetings Rae and hello to the crewman at the railing. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen Rae.  The first time I saw her I was with Bonnie and the tug was then called Miss Bonnie.

Several people have said Matthew Tibbetts is the best looking tug in the harbor.  Who am I to argue with them about that?

Pathfinder cuts a sharp image as it leans into its empty trash containers . . . . and the barge CVA-601.

Some mornings the dawn light enhances everything.  Because I was a NASA fan a long time ago, a tug named Cape Canaveral will always get my attention.  I’m guessing she may be the newest boat among these.

Above, along the left side of the photo, see the barge with GL 54 on it?  Ocean Tower was moving it along,as below.

This light perfectly complements Sarah D‘s lines and colors.

The sun is already rising well after 0600;  I took this photo of Ruby M before 0600.

A very light Frederick E. Bouchard passed me by the other day.

Normandy has the throatiest sound of the boats I know best.

And finally,  well before 0600, Emily Ann was moving a scrap (?) barge westbound.  I believe she was last on this blog back in June.

All photos, WVD.

Oh . . . the oldest?  That would be Rae, launched 1952, same as me.

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