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The sixth boro, like any location, offers infinite perspectives, compounded by equally countless nuance of season, hour, weather, and activity variation.  This view of Kimberly in the stalls at Caddells the other day differs considerably from the dynamic ones of the past 18 months.

Kust a few days different but quite different location and atmospherics . . .  Weddell Sea came into the Narrows the other day as we began feeling the effects of Fay.   She had Penn No. 90 on a wire.

Further to the west in another spot, Discovery Coast was on the outside, mostly blocking Brooklyn, who’s been in here for a few months already.

In clear weather, land would be visible beyond the tug, but Fay changed that for a while.

Dace Reinauer was high and dry in Dry Dock No. 7.

 

And finally, just west of Dry Dock No. 7, stacked up were at least seven Bouchard boats, sadly waiting.

All photos, WVD, who’s starting to think about random tugs three hundred.  If you have a photo of a tug never depicted on this blog, send it along. The big three hundred COULD be all never-here-before tugboats.

You’ve seen this boat right in this location two years ago here.

And yet to see her pirouette around, waiting for “sail time,” was a treat.  She’s fairly new boat, 2007, 105′ x 38′ and twin CAT 3516Bs generating 4800hp.

Someone may have been learning the drift, the current.

Finally, show time came and she was on her way, Penn No. 2, quite light.  Since the barge is designed for black oil/asphalt, I’m guessing the boilers are shut off.  Maybe not, since that would allow a film of residue to cake on.  Maybe someone can help me out here.

She heads out alongside, but

the wire is already rigged for a quick evolution.

Once clear of the Kills, she went on the wire and out to sea.

All photos, WVD.

 

Hats off to all mariners today on National Maritime Day.  For key statistics from US DOT on role of mariners on US economy, click here.

If you want to see all the previous iterations of other peoples photos, click here . . . over a thousand photos, I’m sure. And I’m sure not going to count to know exactly.

From  Tony Acabono, here’s the latest tug to be called

Coney Island, the location of the mermaid parade, now postponed. Not cancelled. But back to the tug,  Coney Island has classic lines, and is a dozen years older than my jeepster!

From the Great Lakes Mariner, this photo was taken in 2017, before Paul McLernan and barge Kirby 155-02 made their way out of the Great Lakes to salt water.  She’s currently in the Gulf of Mexico.

Also from Great Lakes mariner, have a glance at Dutch steam tug Finland was built in 1919 just upstream from Rotterdam in Slikkerveer, and looks pristine.

And finally from my daughter Myriam D, here’s Luther and Calvin.  Those names make me look around for some more Protestants, like Zwingli and Hus . . .  I see the company does have a Wycliffe.

Want another shot of Luther with barge Santos?

Seaspan Rogue is a Canadian tug, although she‘s originally built in Serawak, Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Island Viking  and Island Explorer (both built in 1970) operate for Island Tug and Barge and are former Crowley boats.

Polar Viking (4900 hp) and Polar Endurance (5000hp) appear to be in Dunlap Towing livery.

And the mother lode is last, the Boyer tugs.  You can read Kirsten W, Carolyn H, and Sonja H. Beyond Sonja,I’m guessing that’s Halle H.  And the treasure . . . beyond Carolyn H, the tug with the upper wheelhouse must be Marie H, formerly Adriatic Sea.  The former Java Sea is also in the Boyer fleet.

Tony and Great Lakes Mariner, many thanks.  Myriam, thank you and apologies for putting your photos in a folder and mislabeling it.

 

 

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Back in December, I posted a variation of the photo below.  But that view didn’t allow me to see the bow.

Now I have:  what an attractive boat!

Now that I see her bow and complete profile, I see how similar the hull is to Sea Hawk but maintains a functioning lower wheelhouse.  It was too bad the froth obscured the Bludworth connection.

 

Updated photo of the ladder on the nose is below.

It was a pleasure to see the 1998 Sea Eagle light as I was out doing my exercise in social and actually physical distancing.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all health.

Unrelated:  Some mariners are trapped on their vessels, and likely not thrilled to be calling in the sixth boro.

Guess the port?  The tug is Orgullo De Izabal [Pride of Izabal] , built in 2007 by Damen in Gorinchem, NL.  She measures 72′ x 22.’

In the same port was AS Fiorelia, a small container vessel I believe I’ve seen in the sixth boro, just never–so far as I can determine–posted here. Note the container cranes. And the port is?

How’s this for the non-stealth sub.  I’ve never seen one, but Joseph T said he traveled down to 100′ without “donning dive gear or calculating decompression tables.”

 

Boca Grande, a Kirby tug, and Seabulk Towing’s Condor  . . .  make this port of Miami, and Terminal H, according to Joseph.   The tugs are 1100 hp and 6700 hp, respectively.   Have you guessed the top two photos’ location yet?

Bayou Teche here secures the 403;  farther down the dock, Oceania Sirena is about to depart.   Bayou Teche is a 3000 hp Kirby boat about five years old.

So, the first two photos Joseph took in Santo Tomás de Castilla, Guatemala, heart of Garifuna land.  Surprisingly, that bay was first colonized, unsuccessfully, by the Belgians!

Below, l to r, it’s Oasis of the Seas and Seven Seas Explorer, Joseph’s ride.

Many thanks for these photos, Joseph.

 

More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

She first came through bit over a month ago, but I missed her.  But two days ago, I had no work,  a coin or two in my pocket and nothing to interest me on shore,  I decided to do my Otis Redding thing, and look at the watery world  . . .

Seeing this new boat headed my way enhanced an already perfect day.

She’s the third of three Cape-class boats and carries a name that was magic for me when I was young, probably magical then all around the world.

Just over a year ago, I caught the first of them here.  A few months later, I not only caught the second Cape but,better yet,  also photo’d them passing each other. 

Her two twin Cats generate 5000 hp in this 102′ x 36′ boat.

And by the end of the day, I caught Cape Henry and Cape Canaveral in the anchorage side by side.

All photos, WVD, whose previous newest hulls can be found here.

Denali arrived in the sixth boro for the first time about three years ago, and I compared her with a fleet mate here. I believe that fleet mate is now scrapped.

If you’ve never seen a tug out of the water, here’s a sense of that.  I’ve done other “dry hulls” photos, as you can see here.  These photos of Denali come from Mike Abegg.

A lot of traffic passes through the East River, like Foxy 3 here.

That appears to be a scrap barge, a commodity that gets concentrated along the creeks and in ports along the Sound.

Buchanan 12 must earn its owners a lot of money;  it seems always to be moving multiple barges of crushed rock . . .

 

 

Curtis Reinauer here heads for the Sound pushing

an 80,000 barrel barge, if I’m not mistaken.

All photos, WVD.

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