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Let’s do 2013 and 2014, or redo them, same conditions as I stated yesterday. But first let’s look at the 2013 crowd, packing in like you wouldn’t with covid.  Here was the crowd at 1010 and

by 1035 they had grown significantly.

The compulsory muster takes place, irrigated by fireboat John J. Harvey.

Once the race begins, a front-runner like Decker

might soon get left in the wake.

The fire boat slices up from behind and

propels itself between two Miller boats.

Pushoffs happen next, sometimes quite equally matched like here, with 3900 hp countering 4200.

Let’s jump ahead to 2014, with the arrivals on the watery carpet,

the processing to the starting line,

and get straight to racing without all the preening and posturing.

Someone seems a bit oversize in that gray livery.

This is a fairly mis-matched pair:  Wayne at 5100 hp, and Ellen at 4000.  Maybe a re-match is in order Wayne v. Ava.

Thanks to Jeff Anzevino for this shot, the Media Boat has military background in common with Wayne.

After Wayne has strutted its stuff in the push-offs, some of the boats lined up for the roping the bollard.

Let’s hold it up here.  All photos, WVD.

 

I’ll devote a whole post once again to the 2012 races, since I have a  lot of photos.  What I did was look for the most dramatic or interesting photos and, in some cases, re-edited them.  What I didn’t do is go back through the 2012 posts, but you can here if you want.

Again, you can identify these, or I’ll help you if you can’t.  I call this the pre-race cluster, with some even pointing upstream, as if Yonkers would be the finish line.

The cluster continues as more boats arrive.

And then there’s the burn-out, or in this case . . .  froth-out as two Cat D-399s crank out over 2200 hp.

The pack spreads out quickly.  This was almost 60 seconds into the race.  If this were a terrestrial drag race, the contest would already be over and the smoke clearer.

I’m not sure I’d want to be in a kayak, particularly a double, as all this wake translates into wave motion.

A full five minutes into the race, Quantico Creek‘s two Cat 3512 3000 hp power plants take her past the finish line with sturm und drang . . .

Seven minutes into the race . . . they’re still coming.

At the 19-minute mark, the race is over, but the bulls appear to have scores to settle . . .

and next thing you know . . . it’s tugboat rugby!

Tomorrow . . .  how about returning to 2013.

All photos, WVD.

 

Decked out in canvas for the postponed move last week, it’s the venerable Margot.  She’s appeared on this blog many times, house up as below and house down as here.

Believe it or not, Saint Emilion appears here for the first time, although she’s been here as Arabian Sea and Barbara CThe fisherman in the background was catching too many fish to vacate that spot.

Franklin Reinauer . . . she’s a classic.

Lincoln Sea . . . for me is a different kind of classic.

Gulf Coast is an infrequent visitor in the sixth boro.

Crystal Cutler has appeared here many times since her first arrival as a newbuild in 2010.

Cape Henry is one of three

Kirby boats of the same design.

Could Lincoln Sea look any better?

And to end . . . have a look at Thomas D. Witte, a 1961 tug that looks great.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Enjoy the photos.  Can you guess which of these tugboats is oldest?

Greetings Rae and hello to the crewman at the railing. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen Rae.  The first time I saw her I was with Bonnie and the tug was then called Miss Bonnie.

Several people have said Matthew Tibbetts is the best looking tug in the harbor.  Who am I to argue with them about that?

Pathfinder cuts a sharp image as it leans into its empty trash containers . . . . and the barge CVA-601.

Some mornings the dawn light enhances everything.  Because I was a NASA fan a long time ago, a tug named Cape Canaveral will always get my attention.  I’m guessing she may be the newest boat among these.

Above, along the left side of the photo, see the barge with GL 54 on it?  Ocean Tower was moving it along,as below.

This light perfectly complements Sarah D‘s lines and colors.

The sun is already rising well after 0600;  I took this photo of Ruby M before 0600.

A very light Frederick E. Bouchard passed me by the other day.

Normandy has the throatiest sound of the boats I know best.

And finally,  well before 0600, Emily Ann was moving a scrap (?) barge westbound.  I believe she was last on this blog back in June.

All photos, WVD.

Oh . . . the oldest?  That would be Rae, launched 1952, same as me.

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

I’m always excited to see something new, even if I almost miss it . . . like Wachapreague.  I chased it here, but interminable stop lights, slow drivers . . .  grr.  But enough of me.  Wachapreague was in the sixth boro the other day, of the newest class of Vane ATBs.  She’s 110′ x 38′ and powered by two QSK-60M generating 4400hp.

Follow up on John Joseph . .  . photo by Ben Moll, she’s almost completely made over.

These two photos of Paul Andrew and scow . . . demonstrate directionality of dawn light.  This one was west of me at 0538, and this

east . .  at 0541.  Being out in the morning is not just about comfortable temperatures.

Harry McNeal is a sixth boro fixture in marine construction, but at 53′ x 18′,

she’s easy to miss, as demonstrated here alongside Linda Moran (116′ x 36′) and Houston.

Cape Canaveral, with its evocative name for anyone who came of age in the brief US space era, is another fairly new vessel in the sixth boro.

She comes in at 105′ x 36′ and 5000′.

Two Bouchard units waited in Grabesend the other day . . .

Denali bunkered intriguingly-named Eco California.

Another shot of Wachapreague eluding me . . . is a good place to end.

Many thanks to Ben for the John Joseph photo.  All others by WVD.

 

 

The sixth boro, like any location, offers infinite perspectives, compounded by equally countless nuance of season, hour, weather, and activity variation.  This view of Kimberly in the stalls at Caddells the other day differs considerably from the dynamic ones of the past 18 months.

Kust a few days different but quite different location and atmospherics . . .  Weddell Sea came into the Narrows the other day as we began feeling the effects of Fay.   She had Penn No. 90 on a wire.

Further to the west in another spot, Discovery Coast was on the outside, mostly blocking Brooklyn, who’s been in here for a few months already.

In clear weather, land would be visible beyond the tug, but Fay changed that for a while.

Dace Reinauer was high and dry in Dry Dock No. 7.

 

And finally, just west of Dry Dock No. 7, stacked up were at least seven Bouchard boats, sadly waiting.

All photos, WVD, who’s starting to think about random tugs three hundred.  If you have a photo of a tug never depicted on this blog, send it along. The big three hundred COULD be all never-here-before tugboats.

You’ve seen this boat right in this location two years ago here.

And yet to see her pirouette around, waiting for “sail time,” was a treat.  She’s fairly new boat, 2007, 105′ x 38′ and twin CAT 3516Bs generating 4800hp.

Someone may have been learning the drift, the current.

Finally, show time came and she was on her way, Penn No. 2, quite light.  Since the barge is designed for black oil/asphalt, I’m guessing the boilers are shut off.  Maybe not, since that would allow a film of residue to cake on.  Maybe someone can help me out here.

She heads out alongside, but

the wire is already rigged for a quick evolution.

Once clear of the Kills, she went on the wire and out to sea.

All photos, WVD.

 

Hats off to all mariners today on National Maritime Day.  For key statistics from US DOT on role of mariners on US economy, click here.

If you want to see all the previous iterations of other peoples photos, click here . . . over a thousand photos, I’m sure. And I’m sure not going to count to know exactly.

From  Tony Acabono, here’s the latest tug to be called

Coney Island, the location of the mermaid parade, now postponed. Not cancelled. But back to the tug,  Coney Island has classic lines, and is a dozen years older than my jeepster!

From the Great Lakes Mariner, this photo was taken in 2017, before Paul McLernan and barge Kirby 155-02 made their way out of the Great Lakes to salt water.  She’s currently in the Gulf of Mexico.

Also from Great Lakes mariner, have a glance at Dutch steam tug Finland was built in 1919 just upstream from Rotterdam in Slikkerveer, and looks pristine.

And finally from my daughter Myriam D, here’s Luther and Calvin.  Those names make me look around for some more Protestants, like Zwingli and Hus . . .  I see the company does have a Wycliffe.

Want another shot of Luther with barge Santos?

Seaspan Rogue is a Canadian tug, although she‘s originally built in Serawak, Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Island Viking  and Island Explorer (both built in 1970) operate for Island Tug and Barge and are former Crowley boats.

Polar Viking (4900 hp) and Polar Endurance (5000hp) appear to be in Dunlap Towing livery.

And the mother lode is last, the Boyer tugs.  You can read Kirsten W, Carolyn H, and Sonja H. Beyond Sonja,I’m guessing that’s Halle H.  And the treasure . . . beyond Carolyn H, the tug with the upper wheelhouse must be Marie H, formerly Adriatic Sea.  The former Java Sea is also in the Boyer fleet.

Tony and Great Lakes Mariner, many thanks.  Myriam, thank you and apologies for putting your photos in a folder and mislabeling it.

 

 

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

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