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I’m trying to catch up with the photos you all have been good enough to share on tugster.  The first five here come from some salts up on the Caloosahatchee Canal in Florida.  John Parrish was westbound here, but a week later it showed up in the sixth boro, and by publication of this post, it’s already back to Norfolk.   That’s some sea miles.  Here are some of my previous photos of John Parrish.

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Also, westbound in that Canal, it’s Brittany Beyel.  She’s Beyel Brothers equipment, who have a dramatic photo on that link.

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This one’s eastbound on the Canal with a crane.  I can’t quite make out the name, but the the steersman has great visibility.

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Boomalong was getting hauled out.  Her fine lines made me think she has a storied past, and it turns out she does.  She began life in 1944 in Owen Sound, ON as HMCS Neville, HMCS being Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship.   She’s a Russel Brothers boat that has been around, currently quite far from

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Sault Ste. Marie.

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Thanks to Jed, who previously contributed many photos, here’s a photo and text:  “it’s Stephanie S (1986) returning to Port Canaveral after escorting the bulk carrier VENTURE out of the port.”

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

From Birk Thomas, it’s Barents Sea, now over in Port Newark, having moved for the first time in at least five years.  She looks rough, but I’m hoping there’s a make-over in the works for her.   If she moves again, I’d love to see some photos.

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Here’s my photo of W. O. Decker, docked at Caddell Dry Dock, being worked on  . . . or waiting for Wavertree to make her promenade back to South Street.

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From Jason LaDue, here’s a good view of the underbelly of Grouper, frequently referred to in this blog.  Such belly will be visible until the pool level of the Erie Canal is brought back up for the start of the season.  Jason’s also a frequent contributor.

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Now here’s an oldie but goodie from the other JED.  It shows Labrador Sea and Taurus, significant because now that Taurus is being phased out, Labrador Sea–which had worked on the Mississippi and Gulf for the past few years, has moved back up here into Taurus‘ place, I’m told.   And they’re in K-Sea colors.

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And I said “and more” in the title?  Here’s the more, a new dock book from Tony Acabono.  If it’s your business to know where berth 60 is in Port Elizabeth in relation to berth 61 in Port Newark, you might want to check it out.

Many thanks to the secrets salts and the not-so-secret ones for sending along these photos.

 

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Liberty Island is a Wisconsin-built dredge from 2002.  Here’s a long history of other vessels from her same yard.

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Here’s Swarna Mala (2010) being lightered by Dolphin and Quantico Creek and anchored slightly south of Fidelity II (2011).

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White Pearl (1985) ha left the sixth boro and is headed for

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Veracruz.

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UASC vessel Al-Kharj heads for sea.

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It almost looks like a container escaped off the deck of CMA CGM Dalila  and is now southbound on 440, along with three persons of interest walking in the same direction.

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That can’t happen, right?

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A deep-laden Maersk Sarnia meets Barney Turecamo near the same bridge.

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And we will call it quits here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has left the robots in charge of posting them.

 

. . . upon.  That’s what happened when I was just minding my own business the other day . . . and a voice calls my name and “Be careful.  I could have thrown you to the fishes,” he said, before showing this photo below.

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Getting USNS Red Cloud,  Helen Laraway, Andrea, and Sea Wolf into a single frame had been my aim just seconds before.

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No matter.  Here goes Lucy Reinauer pushing RTC 83.

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I think Stephen-Scott was headed for a barge out beyond Gulf Service with GM11103.

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What I found was Bluefin and

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Morgan Reinauer and

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Amberjack and

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Scott Turecamo with barge New Hampshire.  And more.

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And maybe getting kept upon and thrown to the fishes . . . might just work out alright, although watch out for shadowy characters like the lurker over there.

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It made me think about a day a mere 100 or so days from now when photographers photographing get photographed themselves.

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Happy leap day.

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Here’s what I put up last leap year.

All photographs here–except the obvious two–by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was 4.  Of course, many more than seven Seas exist and work east, south, and west of the United States.

Let’s start with Irish Sea, which was called something before that . . . .

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taken September 2009, with Iona McAllister in Brooklyn Navy Yard

 

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taken February 2016

Siberian Sea, before it was called that.

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taken in 2007

 

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taken in 2009

 

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taken in 2013

 

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taken in 2015

Barents Sea . . . .  anyone have news on her?  She too had names before it became Barents, although I suspect Barents Sea will be her last name ever.

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taken in 2015

Mediterranean Sea, which  originally painted green.

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taken in 2015

McKinley Sea, and I hope you get the point that all these boats had previous names.

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taken in February 2016

Ross Sea, which actually shows its Thoma-Sea heritage. If you don’t know what I mean, look at the string of vessels built by Thoma-Sea just after Ross Sea was launched in February 2003. Thoma-Sea here actually makes eight seas.

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taken in 2015

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, my take on the identification of the tug from the film in yesterday’s post, it’s a model and filmed in New Deal Studios in LA.    That would explain the logistics.

So, for today, let’s start with Miss Katie . . . outbound last Thursday.

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Miss Katie, 1998

 

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Mister T, 2001

 

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Ruth M. Reinauer, 2008, pushing RTC 102

 

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Discovery Coast, 2012

 

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Kirby Moran, 2015, assisting STI Fulham

 

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JRT Moran, 2015

 

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McAllister Girls, 1968, moving B. No. 231

 

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Amy C McAllister, 1975, also assisting B. No. 231

 

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Brian Nicholas, 1966.   Sturgeon Bay, 1987

 

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Eric McAllister, 2014, passing NYK Nebula

 

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Irish Sea, 1969

 

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James D. Moran, 2015, assisting NYK Nebula

And finally, we return to Miss Katie because two days later, she caught some unwanted attention.  Details here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Technically the first vessel I saw–before dawn– in 2016 was Hudson River-built Jean Turecamo and then Surrie Moran, as they headed south to assist this outbound tanker, Kingcraft, which seems to be barely off the ways.

And once I spotted such a bright clean LNG vessel headed my way, my noirish self dissipates;  call me Marinus de Blauw.     Tugboat Jean Turecamo is off the starboard bow, whereas Surrie is invisible at the stern.   Parading behind are USCGC WPB 87361 Sea Horse and Vane’s Chatham.

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As it turned out, Kingcraft still had its USCG escort as it continued out the Thimble Shoals Channel of the CBBT, Morocco bound.

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From Island 1, to the north I could see a tug and barge headed southbound through the Chesapeake Channel between Island 3 and 4.

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It turned out to be Sea Robin towing  . . .

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Sugar Express . . . Florida bound, I presume.   Here’s more info on Sea Robin.

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And I include this next set as a jog-memory for myself:  at the Route 13 scenic area pull-off  in southern Kiptopeke, a look past the weirs I got a glimpse of a future destination . . .

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the concrete ships of the breakwater.

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I have to allow enough time to see them closer next time.

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More on the first twelve hours of 2016 tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Marginally related . . . concrete barges also languish on the Erie Canal.

Directly related . . . some previous posts featuring the Hampton Roads area are here, herehere, and here.

Differently marginally related:  Kingcraft–whatta name!!–is a new vessel;  Horizon Trader, seen in this sixth boro post from less than two years ago, is about to beach for the scrappers in India.

Remember the logic in this series is . . . the first pic of the month and the last pic of the month . . .

Early September found me still along the Acushnet . . .  Malena–as of this writing–is in Sierra Leone, having bounced around the Caribbean since departing New Bedford.

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By September’s end, Wavertree was slathered in a beautiful red primer.

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Early October . . . that’s North Star off the Orient Point, and Plum Gut, with Plum Island in the background.

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Late October . . . a conversation led to an invitation to tour iMTT Bayonne and see Marion Moran at the tug fuel station from the waterside.  I still need to post about that.

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November . . . and Med Sea bound for the Sound and beyond.

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Joyce D. Brown going back to the kills.

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And late in the month, my only view of Patty Nolan, on the hard in Verplanck. Click here for some of many posts on the 1931 Patty.

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Early December . . .it’s mild and I decided to experiment with some color separation on Margaret Moran. Click here for a post from seven-plus years ago with Margaret Moran  . . .

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And since December has not yet ended, I will post this in its incomplete state, with the promise of a “last December 2015”  post yet to come.

This is my last post for 2015.  Happy New Year.  May it be peaceful and safe.

Picking up this retrospective post with the beginning of May 2015, it’s a nearly 40-year-old and tired Barents Sea, waiting then as now for what’ll likely be a “fish habitat” future.

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The end of May saw Quantico Creek move Mary Whalen to its public space over in Atlantic Basin.  Was there a docking pilot calling it out from the drone?

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Here’s first glimpse of an early June trip I’ve never reported on via this blog.  More on this vessel will appear soon–currently working in the Dominican Republic.  The red vessel in the distance is F. C. G. Smith, a Canadian Coast Guard survey boat.

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Eastern Dawn pushes Port Chester toward the Kills.

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July opens with the ghost of Lafayette arriving back in the harbor aboard L’Hermione. Click here for the set of posts I did about this person. 

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I’m omitting a lot from my account here;

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The end of July brought me back to the south bank of the KVK watching Joyce D. Brown go by.   July was a truly trying month . .  is all I’ll say for now.

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In early August Wavertree awaited the next step into its rehab, and I

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made a gallivanting stop in New Bedford, a place I’d not visited in too long.

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All photos by will Van Dorp.

For GHP&W 10, let’s gallivant over to the West Coast and look at some photos there by Glen, who moved to the Columbia watershed after a long career working on sixth boro waterways.

Let’s start out with Shaver’s Washington.  Notice anything unusual about this photo?  Answer at the end of the post.

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And some more starting with Kirby’s Sirius,

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Tidewater,

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Shaver’s Umatilla and Foss’ Howard Olsen,

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Shaver’s Deschutes,

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Portland,

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Vancouver,

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P. J. Brix, and

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and Bernert’s Diane B.

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And in that first photo, Washington travels on the river any way forward she pleases.

Many thanks to Glen  for these photos.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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