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A random gallivant around the sixth boro the other day showed these boats, starting with Iron Mike (1977) under the Williamsburg Bridge.

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a trio of Navigator (1981), Susan Miller (1981) , and Quantico Creek (2010) over by Con Hook,

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Robert IV (1975) a little farther north and east,

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Scott Turecamo (1998) headed for the Kills,

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HMS Liberty (1978) in the anchorage,

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Amberjack (1981) facing Yonkers,

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Barry Silverton (2015) swinging toward the Palisades, and

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Rhea I. Bouchard (1982) making way for a point up north.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Random means random, and I challenge you to come up with a more random set . . .

Let’s start with a Gmelin photo from 1930.  I’ll give the name of the tug later in this post so that all experts of arcane sixth boro history can play.  Since today is the V-Day, let me mention that Herbert Hoover was POTUS, and not very popular at that time, post-crash, in spite of his 1928 campaign slogan “A Chicken in Every Pot and a Car in Every Garage.”  Well, that did not work out so well.  A few things impress me about Hoover though, like . . . in what language would he and the First Lady–Lou–converse privately when guests were in the White House.  By the way, why is the 2nd Tuesday in November Election Day?  Answers at the end of this post.

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Here’s a photo from my archives, Surrie Moran (2000 built) assisting with a big south-bound Crowley barge El Rey (1979) in June 2013 on the Delaware River.  I was shooting against the morning sun.   You see a little of Cape Henry (1967) on the stern also.   Any guesses which Crowley tug was towing?

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And another photo from 2013, January,  in the KVK.  It’s Rebel, built 1976, with her odd hull.  Is she now scrapped?

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So now a few from the past week . . . James D. Moran (2015) passes the KV buoy heading for the North River.

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Genesis Victory (from 1981) heads into the Kills.

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The 2002 Labrador Sea comes in from somewhere out east.

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And over on a waterway I don’t get to see that often, I stumbled onto the 1940 Ireland,

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1958 Bergen Point, and

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the 1947 basic Harbor II.

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And since a lot of things are cyclical, we’re back at the mystery tug.

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With my magnifying glass, I read enough to make me think this is Richard J. Barrett, which would have been 11 years old in 1930.  Here’s Birk’s info. The ship is the 1925-launched MS Gripsholm, significant as the first transAtlantic liner powered by a diesel engine.

And Hoover and his wife spoke Mandarin for their secret asides when guests were in earshot.  I’m impressed.

And towing El Rey, here’s Sentry  (1977).

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And we have our 19th century agrarian roots to thank for the 2nd Tuesday being election day . .  . here.

 

 

I did this once before here.  This time I was deleting near duplicates to limit the size of my photo library to accommodate the many photos I brought back from the gallivants, and my mind quickly formed today’s post.  Enjoy all these from August through October 2009 and marvel at how much the harbor changes.   As I went through the archives, this is where I stopped, given the recent developments in Bella Bella BC.

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For background on this tug, check here.

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Notice also the Bayonne approach to the bridge.

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IMO 8983117 was still orange back then.

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King Philip, Thomas Dann, and Patriot Service . . .

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Odin . . .  now has a fixed profile.

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And these two clean looking machines — Coral Queen and

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John B. Caddell — were still with us.

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This is a digression to March 2010, but since I’m in a temporally warped thought, let me add this photo of the long-gone Kristin Poling.

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Back to 2009, Rosemary looked sweet here in fall scenes.

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John Reinauer . . . I wonder what that tug looks like today over in Nigeria.

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And Newtown Creek, now the deep Lady Luck of the Depths, sure looked good back then.

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And while I’m at it, I’ve finally solved a puzzle that’s bugged me for a few years.  Remember this post from three and a half years ago about a group of aging Dutch sailors who wanted to hold a reunion on their vessel but couldn’t find the boat, a former Royal Dutch Navy tug named Wamandai A870?  Well, here’s the boat today!  Well, maybe . . .

Another boat you can dive on is United Caribbean aka Golden Venture.

Photos and tangents by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you depart at 0400, there’s not much to photograph.  Light beckoned as we approached Newburgh/Beacon.

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I saw Mt. Beacon as I never had before;

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ditto Storm King in sunrise that even dappled

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the wave tops.

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Once around Gee Point, we saw the statue (to the left on the ridge)

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of Kościuszko’s, fortifier of West Point.

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Once south of the Bear Mountain Bridge, passengers traveled upstream

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for seasonal seesighting.

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Scrap was sought.

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Sloops sailed and

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work boats waited their time.

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More statues sighted, and

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vessels waited their time.

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And we had arrived at a place where at least two boros approached each other.

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Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, is back in the boros for a while.

Let’s start with Bjoern’s photos from a month ago just about already.  The New York Media Boat runs almost all year round and provides wet and cold weather gear.

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Actually I took this photo, intending it as a baseline photo for the process of preparing the barque to travel the Atlantic next spring, on the deck of a heavy lift ship. I took this photo near Caddell Dry Dock almost two weeks ago.

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A really gallivanting Larry Seney took the next few photos in Hawaii:  Namahoe,

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Mahi, and

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Hoku Loa.  More info on Hoku Loa can be located here.

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Thanks to Alex Weiss for this photo of Independence.

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Ted M sent this papa smurf aka Pleon photo taken in early August in New Bedford.  Now it’s over in the Arthur Kill.

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And the last photo comes from an East River jogger, Art Feinglass, who took this photo of Navigator passing the old Domino Sugar refinery, an architect’s playground.

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Thanks to Bjoern, Larry, Alex, Ted, and Art for these photos.

 

Given the glorious sunshine, the transition from summer to fall begs another series.  Let’s start with Maule, 

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2/3s of her escort, and

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a fraction of her crew.

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Following in Maule‘s wake, Helsinki Bridge arrives, here with half its escort.

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McKinley Sea traverses the Upper Bay and passes

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UBC Mobile.

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In the harbor was Cordula Jacob and Seastar, as seen from two angles.

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with some ferries and a Miller’s Launch crew boat.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Miss Lizzy work the AK and in the

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KVK, for the last day, there are two glorious ships with bright futures . . .

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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The first two photos–showing the newest and fastest (??) ATB to arrive in the sixth boro– were taken by Randall Fahry.

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Tina Pyne is one immense mover, and Kirby 185-02 is one of two 578′ ocean going tank barges with 185,000-barrel capacity built by Gunderson Marine for Kirby.   See her christening here.

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Zachery Reinauer is a Hudson River-built tug from 1971 one of the last 10 built at Matton, and she looks as good today as new!

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This was taken a few seconds later, and this

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as she stands by, while Haggerty Girls finesses RTC 107 into position.

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An occasional sixth boro visitor, it’s Rhea I. Bouchard with B. No. 284.

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As I began this post with another photographer’s photo, so I’ll end.  Thanks to Gerard Thornton for this rare catch of Ticonderoga assisting Pleon (?) into the Kills, possibly the last float for Pleon.     That’s also Barry Silverton in the distance.

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Thanks to Randall and Gerard for use their photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

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I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

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Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

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Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

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Barry Silverton.

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Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

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Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth bork has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

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Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

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my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts with references to wind.  Sunday and Monday were windy but commerce went right on.

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The weight of these units is manifested by the smooth ride in the harbor chop.  Offshore it would be a different matter in the swells.

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I wouldn’t call it spindrift, so maybe

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it’s just spray?

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All photos last weekend by Will Van Dorp.

And here, thanks to Aleksandr Mariy and unrelated but interesting, it’s Black Douglas, in its many forms.  And if you like that, you’ll love Roosevelt, especially that photo off Newburgh NY.

And finally, thanks to Isaac Pennock, who caught Dylan Cooper down bound passing Detroit on a run between Green Bay and Montreal.

Secret salts sometimes send along photos, and I appreciate that, since many waterways I’ll never see . . .  and that means boats I’d never encounter, like Reliance, 1979, 127′ x 40;’

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Grand Canyon II, an offshore construction/ROV/IRM vessel, shown in this link getting towed from Romania to Norway for completion; and more.

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Here’s an unidentified Marquette Offshore boat with an unidentified Weeks crane barge,

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Paraclete . . .  look that word up here  and then see the rest of the names in her fleet,

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Gulf Faith, 

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USCGC Cobia

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Gulf Glory and an unidentified Algoma self-unloader,

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and finally a WW2-era tank-landing ship turned dredger and named Columbia, ex-LST-987.

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All interesting stuff from Mobile, Alabama.   Hat’s off to the secret salt.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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