You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York harbor’ category.

Type the word training into the search window to the left on this page and you’ll get a variety of posts, as here.  And truth be told, many other options exist for summer training and sea time for ocean academy students;  I met cadets from at least three on my “go west” trip.  Yesterday David Silver got me advance notice of when this training ship would leave port;  thanks to him, I got these photos.

sm1

Kimberly Turecamo assisted, as did Julia Miller and Amy C McAllister.

sm2

 

sm3

By 1230 Friday, she was west of the Brooklyn Bridge and headed for sea,

sm4

 

sm5

for Maine, and by

sm6

this posting, she’s already east of Cape Cod.

sm7

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to watch David Silver’s 20-minute video of her departure from pier side.

 

Time to recapitulate the “go west” journey and post the many photos of tugboats I’ve omitted . . . .

Passing Senesco, we saw Buckley McAllister approaching us;  I photographed the boat as someone there photographed us.  I’m not sure which Reinauer tug that is in the background.

rt

In the East river the next morning, we passed Cornell at the Brooklyn Barge, a food and drink venue I need to make time to visit.

rt1

 

Over by the Circle Line pier, it’s–well–Miss Circle Line, a reinvention of a Matton tug launched in 1955 and previously called Betsy.  Thanks to Paul Strubeck for reading the name board lettering here before it’s applied . . .  That was a joke, but thanks, Paul.

rt3

James William moves stone Mississippi River style down the sixth boro into the gargantuan building site encompassing the other five boros.

rt75

Near 79th Street, this unidentified tug was supporting a pier project.

rt76

Along the Palisades north of the GW Bridge, Comet pushed Eva Leigh Cutler.

rt77

 

And Miss Yvette moved a scow not far from where

rt5

Carolina Coast waited for her sugar barge to be emptied into the maw of the Domino plant in Yonkers.

rt6

 

All photos by will Van Dorp, who hopes to see you at the screening of Graves of Arthur Kill at the the Staten Island ferry terminal on August 13.

Summertime and the living is easy . . . and Sassafras is bringing fuel to MSC Marianna.

rt1

JRT Moran is preparing to assist MSC Busan out of its berth

rt2

Another section of Rockefeller University’s River Campus is shipping in aboard Witte 1401 moved by Emily Ann, 

rt3

passing Zachery and Jason Reinauer and

rt5

and Dean.

rt4

Crystal Cutler moves Patricia E. Poling westbound . . .

rt6

Brendan Turecamo assists MSC Busan back out

rt99

on its way

rt7

to Norfolk.

rt8

All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who is leaving the area for a while.  Details tomorrow.

 

Is it Jonathan C Moran, which arrived in the sixth boro at some point in the past month?

jc1

It was.

jc2

Actually, as of now, it IS Jack T Moran, which arrived via the East River

jt3

yesterday afternoon, and will be christened along with Jonathan C, in a double ceremony at noon today.

jt4

More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I should use this title more often, given the frequent renewal of robust industry in the sixth boro of NYC, but here is the previous usage.

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

0613a

Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

0613b

Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

0613c

receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

0613d

 

0613e

The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

0613f

By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

0617a

A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

0617b

water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

In case you’re wondering if this blog has gone adrift . . . I’ll just plead solstice-ogling syndrome.  Why stay on course when a grape popsicle 1949 Mercury oozes by like this, and it’s tickling your tastebuds and it’s

ch1

for sale, although I did not ask any particulars.

ch2

Only at the mermaid parade could you get a photo like this, although the photographer here might

ch3

be photographing the Chevy here with a right angle spy lens.  Or maybe she was putting me in the frame?

ch4

Rattus rod!

ch5

I’d let this guy park for free.

ch6

Mesa sunrise on this mid-1950s Lincoln?

ch7

And finally, seeing this old Ford made me remember this unit from

ch8

way south Coney Island Caribbean.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has now recalled that although Coney Island is surrounded (mostly) by the sixth boro, it is still part of Brooklyn.

 

NYC DEP has a diverse set of vessels in its fleet, from sludge tankers to this water quality testing vessel.  It even had a skimmer at one point called Cormorant.

HSV (hydrographic survey vessel) Osprey has been around for a quarter century already.  I caught it being refurbished here earlier the spring.

hsvosp

 

hvvosp2

Here she is under way a rainy morning a few years back.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now osprey and cormorant are winged creatures.  And I’m posting one hour earlier today so that more of you reading this can still make it to the annual migration of winged and scaly creatures coming ashore on Coney Island, and that’s where I’ll be, documenting my heart out in the name of science, of course.  STEM needs you.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I started a series called transitioning, but here’s something new.  Actually I did a transit post a few years back when a Boston ex-fireboat transited the sixth boro on its way to  Lake Huron to reinvent as a dive boat.

This post started with Glenn Raymo catching a shot of NOAA 5503 northbound in Poughkeepsie.

ll2

Then, unprompted, Mike Pelletier, engineer of Urger noticed it between locks 2 and 3 in Waterford, westbound.  When I noticed it on AIS, southbound on the Welland, I knew she was doing a long haul.  So here’s what I’ve since learned:  this vessel “was transferred to NOAA from the CG in Fort Macon NC.  Its final destination is Muskegon MI,  where it will undergo a full overhaul and be refit for service as a research vessel on the Great Lakes.”   Many thanks to Glenn, Mike, and my other sources.

ll3

But if NOAA is transiting far, Sand Master is going much much farther.  Any ideas what HN RTB is?

ll1

Here’s a photo of Sand Master I got just over a month ago at the Great Lake just west of the Bayonne Bridge.

0asm

Try Roatán, Honduras.

Thanks all for the photos and the information.  And please help keep eyes open for unique transiting vessels and those who work mostly here.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

rt1

 

rt2

I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

rt3

Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

rt4

OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

rt5

visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

rt6

Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

rt7

lies alongside Petali Lady.

rt8

Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

rt9

 

rt10

And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

rt11053151brazil

Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

r12053151govislamd

All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

and so much more!  Never have I seen so many barges in such close proximity one to another.  What if you woke up and saw this from your bunk?

13453077_10209818881814122_410662910_o

I’d thought to call this a whatzit post, but

wz1

 

wz2

the prime mover is a tug I’d long hoped to see . . . Elsbeth II, of the Smith Maritime fleet, and that link is to Burkhard Bilger’s article from the New Yorker a few years back.

wz3

6000 hp and three screws.

wz4

 

wz5

Built in Palatka, Florida, Sarah D was another of my subjects this morning, since she’s a new acquisition for NYS Marine Highway.  .

wz6

I never got her and the tow–aka Atlanta Bridge–in the same frame until here. Cargo barge Atlanta Bridge has transported some interesting cargoes.

wz7

Here Sarah D has pulled ahead of Elsbeth II.

wz8

You can see how windy it has been for the past 24+ hours in the sixth boro.

wz9

 

wz11

I hope there’s someone upriver getting photos of the ballasting and floating off, aka the second half of the FLO-FLO ops.

wz10

 

The first photo comes from Seaman Sou-Sobriquet, whom I thank;  all the others were taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 973 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Free showing of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Click the image below to order your own copy!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

July 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 973 other followers