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Whatzit?

Well, six names later (George E. Wood, Russell 9, Martin Kehoe, Peter Spano, Edith Mathiesen, and Philip T. Feeney),

125 years after transforming from hull #7 at Bethlehem Steel Sparrows Point MD, to a Baker-Whiteley Coal co. boat

after many crews lost to time and countless jobs and

lost numbers of miles in salt water and fresh,

and all the ravages of neglect,

sabotage,

and time

scrapped from the bottom yesterday without

upsetting the crane,

Philip T. Feeney is gone.

Closure I hope.

Many thanks to Skip Mildrum for the first photo and the last three.  Click on the other photos to see the tugster post where I first used them.

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Here are previous posts in this series.

See the guy paddling along on the recreational board  . . . ?

Now you barely can on a blown-up portion of the same photo.

Here I zoom in . . .

but to the naked eye, he is invisible.

I’m not opposed to the concept of enjoying all manner of craft,

but safety is an issue.  On that subject, is that PFD around his hips!!?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who prays for safety.

Meanwhile, PQ writes more on this from the Jersey side of the river:

Ariadne has been part of the view for a week from my place across from 79th Street on the Jersey side. At night it lights up like a Christmas tree. I followed the initial cable laying in 2012 by the Italian vessel, some photos of the jubilant construction back then can be found here.

A repair was attempted in 2016 when the cable cooling system sprung a leak at the north end. The power has been since switched off; when on it may or may not be used for full-time transmission, there were early reports that it was only for spare with the idea for it originating way back in the Great Blackouts.

Ariadne appears to be laying a complete new set of three cables, the guys at the camp onshore south of Edgewater Commons may have been told not to talk about it as the original cable cost a ton of money (nearly $1 billion including the onshore parts at each end) and these repairs do not come cheap. The company (Hudson Transmission Partners) was reportedly under financial and legal strain in 2016.

Ariadne, built 2008 in Norway, was named the Viking Poseidon prior to March of this year when the Norwegian company which used it for wind generator farms had to sell it for financial reasons and a Cyprus company now owns and operates it now – and has repainted the tan parts white.

The cable heads west through a disused train tunnel you can easily see from River Road across from Edgewater Commons and surfaces in a graveyard; there have been claims it is haunted (really). When NJ Transit built the trolley system from Bayonne they offered to extend the line to and through that tunnel if the towns would help but it was beyond their means, so the trolley heads under West New York.”

Again, thanks much to PQ for this input.

 

Here are previous “specialized” posts.

Below, the nose of an oversize aircraft?  high-speed locomotive?

sound equipment?

construction of a mini-roller coaster headed for Sandusky?

an art project?

No, it’s just Ariadne assisting Neptune, i.e.,

the CSV Ariadne laying a cable sub-Hudson for electrical transmission.  And being a lay person to this, I’m guessing it has some relationship to this repair job and this initial cable laying in 2011.  Here’s the Neptune connection.

Click here for the story of Ariadne, she is the red thread that solves puzzles and helps one escape mazes.

All photos and any errors by Will Van Dorp, who is currently far from the sixth boro but in possession of the red thread.

Click here for a state-of-the-art cable layer, and here for one that worked in the sixth born almost a half century ago.  Here’s a post that might be related to Ariadne‘s presence.

Thanks to you all who tipped me off about Ariadne‘s visit.

 

This is the third of three digressions before getting on with the account of my trip west.

The saga of SS Binghamton started in 1904,

and I last saw it from land on January 6, 2017, when demolition was said to have started.  Demolition had started but defined as “asbestos abatement” by the alien looking figures clustered near the tender and the stack.

As a relative newcomer in the sixth boro, I first set foot on the ferry in 2011, when some thought a chance still existed to save her or parts of her.  I’ve also been holding off doing this post in hopes that more photos of the demolition process would surface.  I hope I can still do another post if such photos emerge.  I would have been there, but I was on my trip west.

The next two photos I took on July 16 from the water, the last it turns out.

 

Paul Strubeck took the photo below as he passed by about 10 days later when the stack had just been removed . . . as in a decapitation.

Only a few days later, Glenn Raymo took the next two shots from the Walkway over the Hudson, rubble going up the river.

 

Here’s a TV commercial once intended to attract patrons to the now gone restaurant.

Thanks to Paul and Glenn, more of whose work is available here.

 

 

Click here for previous SUNY sea term posts.  I’m grateful to SUNY for an invitation to ride along from the Upper Bay to the SUNY Maritime campus yesterday.  What a homecoming this must be for the cadets, and their friends and families.

Families and friends were already there off Staten Island.

For cadets–aka college students–the sense of preparing for a bright future must be palpable,

a reward for study and practice.

And the welcome comes from strangers all along these last few miles.  Airports and airplanes just don’t afford this grand arrival.

Those were construction workers at Rockefeller University’s River Campus above, and ConEd workers below.

Small boats followed us.

Folks at the Vernon C. Bain Maritime facility paid attention.

Workers on the Whitestone stopped to watch.

 

NYPD came to greet and

be greeted. “Selfie taking” gives a whole new meaning to turning one’s back on a subject.

McAllister’s Ellen and

Amy C came to greet and assist.  SUNY grads work in many different industries, including the towing industry, maritime services, pilots’ associations, law enforcement, fire departments . . . and the list is much longer.

But on the SUNY Fort Schuyler campus, the welcoming is most intense.

 

 

After 17 days at sea since their last port, this one is probably the best.

 

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp. Hats off to students, families, staff, and of course the 57-year-old ship. 

After a few more catch-ups, I’ll return to the account “Go West Again.”

The top photo here comes from Brian Thigpen.  Last Monday, the first 13000 teu container ship–OOCL Berlin— entered port, and I missed it.  Bravo to Brian for photographing it.  I suspect soon the 14000 teu and then subsequent records will be set. Escort visible here is Eric McAllister, I think.

With larger ships, escort procedures seem to be changing also, like tugs coming in sets of three and meeting the vessel outside the VZ Bridge.  Just a few years ago, nothing of the the size of Northern Justice–8400 teu–was calling here.

 

I really should get more photos of the ships passing through the sixth boro and heading anywhere from Yonkers to Albany.  Here’s Western Aida along the cliffs of the UWS, 

leaving the Palisades to port once under the GW.

Here’s Spottail westbound on the KVK, assisted by Ellen McAllister and  Bruce A. McAllister,  and soon to pass

Stolt Pride, 2016, showing a new look for Stolt.

Thanks again to Brian Thigpen for use of his photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

or . . . the final installment from the west side of the Atlantic .  .  .  and I’ll use (what I imagine as) NASA times here, but I’ll modify it from “t-minus” to “U–as in underway” minus and plus.

So, at U minus 53 minutes, there’s a man-basket dangling off the portside.

U minus 48 . . .  a crew boat arrives with the pilot.

U minus 37 . . .

the pilot boards Combi-Dock III,

U minus 9, the crew boat, Nicholas Miller,  departs  . . ., likely off to deliver three technicians departing Combi-Dock III.

Judging from when I first detected “under way – making way” from my vantage point, 1616, the photo below is U plus 11 minutes.  Movement at first was barely perceptible, gauged by watching juxtaposition of Peking masts and background features.

U plus 13.

U plus 14.  The traffic in the background will welcome me when I leave my station . . .  A note on the flags here:   the red one (below) is Hamburg’s flag, and the one high in the mast of Peking (next photo below) is that of Stiftung Hamburg Maritim (SHM).

And finally–I shifted my station about a mile to Camp Gateway, Staten Island . . .U plus 21.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m guessing Eric R Thornton is off in search of some scrap waiting in

the Bronx maybe?

It’s been a long while since I’ve seen Penn No. 6, and here she and Normandy are made up to Penn No. 121.  See those four shore cranes against the sky?  Here’s a post I did on them almost a decade ago.

 

Here’s B. No. 250 eastbound for the Sound, with

Evening Star in the notch.

Some people would be pleased with this juxtaposition: MTA’s Highbridge Yard, with Harbor II, MetroNorth, and the 44th Precinct Police Station!

Barbara Ann holds station at the University Heights Bridge, with the unmistakeable Hall of Fame for Great Americans dome over the treeline.  That’s a place I’ve yet to visit, one of many places in the five boros.

Ditto . . . Ireland on the north side of that bridge.

 

And to conclude for another day . . . it’s Penn No. 91 with

Skipjack in the notch.

Oops!  All photos by Will Van Dorp . . . from aboard Manhattan II.

Name this vessel?  Right there is the name.  Answer at end of the post.

I’d love to see the interior, as it might be as stark as the lines.

This is severe, almost military, but I like it.

This to is excess with an excessive name . . . Vibrant Curiosity, which

happens to be the slogan of the owner’s company.  Here are the particulars of the vessel built in Alblasserdam as was this vessel seen in this blog before completion.

All these photos I took on Sunday a high summer day for large yachts.  What might you call this one?

Podium.  What?  Yup that’s the name.  In spite of the too-analytical name, the manufacturer–Lürssen–has a long and interesting history.    And if I had the means and the need for a Lurssen I’d go for the spaceman’s boat here.

Over in the Hudson, I spotted this yacht with the “name” on the bow as an abbreviation for

Cantina,  built in Brazil.

And the name of the top boat here is “water,”  a quite good name for anything that floats.  Check out the kanji here.  Japanese is pronounced as “mizu,” and I’m not sure how Mandarin would be pronounced. Here’s an article with info on a feature I missed . . . a feature I’ve seen on ships in the harbor, since crews of no matter what vessel need exercise on the water.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who’s posted on similar yachts here and (more modestly) here.

OK, one more, a photo I took in October 2008, an expedition trawler over in Long Island City and said to have belonged to Björk Guðmundsdóttir.  I wonder if she still owns it.

 

 

 

You saw Lauren Foss in yesterday’s post here.  Here’s a followup, from sixth boro interiors I don’t get to much.  Richie Ryden writes:  “Look who showed up on the Hackensack River in Kearny NJ:   Lauren Foss with the barge American Trader in tow with the new deck for the Wittpenn Bridge. The bridge deck was built in  Vancouver, Washington  shipped through the Panama Canal to NJ.”

If I read the AIS info correctly when I first saw Lauren off Sandy Hook, that voyage took about a month and a week.

 

And thanks to Joseph Chomicz, here’s more of that area, photo taken just upstream of the others.  Joseph writes:  “Lauren Foss was destined for the Hackensack River.  She brought in the lift span of the new Route 7 lift bridge they are building.  Also Donjon is [nearby] in the process of moving coal out of the power plant on the Hackensack River as well.   [I could count] four Donjon tugs in the photo below:  Meagan Anne, Thomas D, Emily Ann, and Sarah Ann.”

From a decade ago, here’s a post I did about the Hackensack River, including a photo of a barge delivering that coal to the plant.  The deliveries used to be made by ExpressMarine equipment. 

Thanks to Richie and Joe for these photos.

For you not familiar with the area, the green line below represents rough approximation of the track Lauren Foss followed in and

the red circle, the location of the Wittpenn Bridge.

For more of the story–on four more bridge section deliveries–click here.

 

 

 

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