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Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Who even knew such a vessel as Integrity existed?  I can imagine all manner of things they dive for.  Here’s more info on requirements and job description.

Unrelated, the East River gets shut down sometimes if high profile traffic travels through the heliport.  One such event happened about a week ago.   Here besides two (of five) Gladding Hearn NYPD boats in the distance is FDNY’s Feehan, all asset in the sixth boro for under 10 years years now. Here and here are photos of Feehan— a FireStorm 70— before she ever arrived in the sixth boro.

I can’t tell you anything about State Trooper URT-7  (underwater recovery team??), but it looks legit.

USACE locally has a set of these small boats boats, which I believe do bathymetric surveys. It’s instructive to see this list of USACE missions.  In the distance, one of NYPD’s 55′ patrol boats can be seen.

The blue/yellow logo marks the NJ State Police . . .

here traveling in twos.

Sentinel II was hauled out when I last traversed the Troy lock in October,

but in summer 2016 I caught her just south of Albany serving as a push boat. 

And in closing, here’s a photo I took summer 2016, but so far as I can tell, I’ve never posted it, until now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I first used this title seven years ago, and a comparison shows how much things have changed:  some box ships “dead”, tugs modified and moved around, and the Bayonne Bridge clearance now above 151′.

Two of the three tugs waiting for Tage were James D and JRT, both 6000 hp tugs probably not even on the drawing board back in 2010 when the first post by this title was published.

Although CMA CGM Tage has the same midships bridge design as CMA CGM Roosevelt, she is considerably smaller, large though she is.  Tage has 9365 teu capacity compared to Roosevelt‘s 14000+.  Roosevelt first called here in September, and is currently back on the East Coast.  I missed that event because of a Great Lakes gallivant.   Note the next box ship a few miles behind her in the Ambrose Channel. In fact, five in a row lined up.

Here she passes Norton’s Point Light before

the docking pilot

comes aboard.

Compared with CMA CGM Roosevelt, Tage is 200 feet shorter.

The third tug on this arrival is Miriam Moran. 

Comparing the photos above and below–same shot wth different cropping–you can see some of what else was in proximity.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders when the Roosevelt will return (she was here again in November)  or the next even-bigger ship comes in and eclipses Roosevelt‘s record.  Actually last night a 14,000-teu Cosco Glory –same size as Roosevelt–was escorted into Port Elizabeth.

Anyone know CMA CGM Tage‘s namesake?

 

I have a bunch more “cypher 12” calendar-ready ideas to come, but time flows, changes and evolution press, and I don’t want to get left behind.  Again, I’m NOT selling calendars, but they are easy to make.  

Back eight years ago I did a post called Labrador Sea.  There she is below, photos I took yesterday.  You’ll notice a radically new paint job.  There’s a name change as well.  She’s still pushing the same barge, but now she’s Brooklyn, the latest Brooklyn.

 

DBL25 she’s pushing was the same formerly Kirby/K-Sea barge, and if you scroll through here, you’ll see DBL25 as paint was making her transition from a K-Sea to a Kirby barge.

Below is a photo from February 08, 2017 showing her in Kirby livery.  I’m wondering if the crews moved over to Vane with the boat.

All photos–yesterday’s and February’s–by Will Van Dorp.

As tugster continues its CYPHER series,  this is the 3633nd post, and almost 2.1 million hits.  Thanks for staying with me.

On the other hand, if I were selling calendars, the number 12 would be significant.    So for the next few days, let me offer some diverse dozens chosen quite subjectively, although what the photos have in common–besides subject–is that I like them.

Here’s a November 2016 photo along the Gowanus under the BQE.  This tug looks good in blue, but I’ll never forget her in orange.

Here’s a November 2015 when the upper deck of Bayonne had yet to be assembled, and the lower disassembled.  Amy C last appeared here as she nudged Empire State into her Fort Schuyler dock.

Here’s 2014.  She’s recently worked in the Keys.

Here’s ’13.  Where is Houma today?

’12.  Ellen‘s a regular on this blog.

’11.  Tasman has been doing this work since 1976!

’10.  Is ex-Little Bear in Erie along with Bear?

’09.  She now makes her way around the lower Caribbean .  . . and currently anchored in Trinidad.

’08.  And I’m adding another photo right after Linda (launched in ’08) of

Scott Turecamo (below) launched in 1998 but radically retrofitted in 2005, originally quite similar to Greenland Sea, here see the photos by Robert J. Smith.  How many of these ATBs does Moran now operate?  .

’07.  This was the only time I ever saw Penobscot.  Anyone know where foreign she went?

’06.  Note the size of the yard workers around the wheels on Ralph E. Bouchard.

Again, some of these photos show what has changed in the sixth boro, spawning ground for this blog.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are dozens of previous posts in this series.

I put this one up today specifically in response to a comment by a dear friend Rembert, who commented here about the apparent high center of gravity on American tugboats.  Mein Schiff 6, which is 969′ x 139′, appears to be quite “tall” but largely because of its verticality.

TUI operates Mein Schiff 7.  I’m guessing the “Leinen los”  here translates to the Dutch lekko [itself an approximation of the English],  the English “cast off.”

Here, from a different angle, is TUI’s logo projected overtop USNS Gilliland.

Steel–a great name–has similar vertical sides,

as does Orange Star, a transporter of my favorite beverage.

Ditto Denak Voyager.

For tugster, here’s an unusual shot of Avra, at the dock at night.

Let’s conclude with Navigator of the Seas, 1021′ x 127,’ so appearances aside, N o t S is actually less beamy than Mein Schiff 6.  Note the Chrysler Building in the photo below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp,who’s been unable to find air draft, particularly on Mein Schiff 6 and  Navigator of the Seas.  Anyone help?

And if you fans of the NYTimes missed Annie Correal’s story about shipping vehicles to Haiti out of Red Hook aboard Beauforce (replacement for Grey Shark?), click here to read it.

 

You can find the first eight installments here.

Little C is a relatively seldom seen harbor tug

dedicated to Warren George projects.

Coal?

Navigator these days has been pushing coal around the harbor, coal as I understand it thanks to ws–a frequent commenter here–that

was previously intended as fuel to the now-retired Hudson Generation Station.

Transport of some of the coal out of the sixth boro has been performed by SBI Jive;  from here, the vessel’s traveled to Rotterdam, then Ust-Luga on the Baltic.

Photos by Will Van Dorp; thanks to ws for following the coal.

As to SBI Jive, she has fleet mates with gambolling names like SBI Macarena, SBI Swing, SBI Zumba, SBI Reggae, SBI Mazurka, SBI Samba, SBI Capoeira . . . and more.

Sarah D passes the Con Hook range markers while leaving the Kills the other day.

Subjective only, I find Sarah D, ex-Helen D. Coppedge–a very attractive boat.

I was pleased to get these photos with Newark NJ and

the occupants of Bayonne Dry dock in the background.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to Sarah D, here’s a story of the connection between Con Hook and the Rockefellers.

A lot of time has elapsed since this first installment of this series here.

Here Evelyn pushes north with Edwin A. Poling loaded.

 

And not even a few hours later, Kimberly headed southbound in the same location with Noelle.

 

 

All those photos above date from mid-October, but a few days ago, I caught Crystal

crossing the sixth boro with Patricia.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who understands the need to upgrade, but I still miss the gravitas of the old Kristin Poling and the Queen.

 

. . . a sixth boro set on a day that was predicted to bring rain.  When I first saw the photo below, I thought the McAllister tug was assisting a DonJon unit?

A few seconds later it was clear that Alex was overtaking the slower Paul Andrew.

 

Dr. Milton Waner–named for a plastic surgeon!!— here travels light.  Harley does have this focus on medicine in their recent namings, like Fight ALS and One Cure.  That’s Durham in the distance with the spud barge.

 

Around the same time, Eric McAllister, Thomas D. Witte, and James E. Brown appear, headed for the Kills.

 

Mr Russell comes out of the Kills.  And can you name the Vane tug in the distance?

Philadelphia!

It must be the newest Vane tug in the sixth boro, and I don’t know if she’s even more recent than Capt. Brian A. McAllister. For all I know, this could be her first week in town….  And from a full decade ago, here’s the previous Philadelphia in town, the ITB Philly.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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