You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York harbor’ category.

It’s another dark, rainy day in the sixth boro, so let’s recall the vibes of a warm, sunny September last week and BBC Kimberley swooping through the KVK.

Does it get more photogenic?!

Kirby Moran escorts at a distance until needed.

Name the country of “St. John’s” registry?  Answer follows.  While we’re at it, how about BBC . . . what does it expand to?  British broadcasting  . .   uh, no.

 

Here rounding Bergen Point and heading into a berth, later BBC Kimberley stayed in port only a short time.

All photos last week, WVD.

St. John’s is the capital of Antigua and Barbuda.  It’s also the name of the capital of Newfoundland and Labrador, whereas St. John [no apostrophe or s] is the port city of New Brunswick.

The ship registry was established in 1986 and lists 1400 vessels.

And BBC expands to “Briese Bischoff Chartering,” a shipping group of more than 150 general cargo vessels based in the Ems watershed. “Briese” refers to BBC partners Captain Roelf Briese and Bruno Bischoff.  Anyone visit much along the Ems international border and the outlying islands?  If you’ve not read Riddle of the Sands, put it on your list. 

 

Christy Anne is a small tug that I’ve not seen in 15 years!!  I posted it here, after seeing it in the Hackensack River, a place I see rarely.  Unrelated:  where are those buildings on the ridge in the distance?  Is there some Fata Morgana effect going on there?

With the placement of tire fendering fore and aft, I had the impression of an amphibious craft, the hull shaped around the tires almost like fenders on a flat-fender Jeep.  Here’s the late Fred “tug44“s post about the boat. 

When I saw this boat sailing in the other day, with its serious lines, I had to learn its story.  It’s Sparrow, an Open 50 racing sloop, preparing for the Global Solo Challenge. More on the boat here

 

Nicholas Miller, 33′ x 11′ crew boat, is picking up a pilot on the fly as

MSC Elodie, 980′ loa, comes into the harbor.  Nicholas matched the ship’s six-knot speed, sidled up, and stuck the rubber to the ship’s hull;  once the pilot was safely aboard, 

powered her way to overcome the physical forces and get away from the ship.

Ocean Venture is a purse seiner that comes through the boro periodically.. Some concern exists about the menhaden fishery.

She was possibly headed for her base on the Penobscot.

The seiner skiff helps deploy the purse  net.

What was curious, I thought, was that UConn’s 90′ loa Connecticut came in right behind Ocean Venture. 

 

As seems true a lot these days, I suspect there’s much more to the movements of these vessels

than I will ever know.  

All photos, WVD, who’s just being his customary curious.

The sixth boro and other harbors have those vessels that seem to hide in plain sight.  Maybe it’s more accurate to say these craft, like the one below,  are visible but their usage might not be so clear.   

Here’s how Annie Moore gets described:  “a utility vessel for the National Park Service designed to transport national and international VIPs to the Statue of Liberty.”   That’s vague and not vague at the same time.  Who are these national and international VIPs, I wonder. 

Here’s more:  “to transport VIPs, official passengers, supplies and equipment to Ellis Island from Battery Park, New York, NY.”    Only Battery Park?  Some contradictions exist in these two pubs.

As many questions as I have with Annie Moore, when HOS Browning came back into port after some days offshore, I have even more.

 I know what the boat does, but I crave specifics.  For HOS Browning, I’d like to know where they went, why that location, what specifically was accomplished with which tools and to what end . . . .

In port, what and who leaves the ship and what and who comes aboard?  Maybe that makes me a landlubber with too much time on my hands . . . .  Who are the crew?

See the name on the bow of the high speed vessel below?  Clearly, it’s not THIS Sea Vixen,  but somewhere in the weapons “kit” carried on Ro8 HMS QE is an enterprise called Project Vixen, involving aerial drones, and named for the de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen carrier-based fleet air-defense fighter.  

Technically, the vessel above and below is a 43′ PTB, a personnel transport boat, and  “the HMS Queen Elizabeth class will each carry four PTBs made by Blyth-based company Alnmaritec. Each 13.1 m (43 ft) long PTB carries 36 passengers and two crew to operate the vessel.”  Find more photos here.

The PTB seemed to be flitting all around the boro, checking out the sights.  Who gets to ride the Sea Vixen and who the larger sixth boro-based PTB, whose name I didn’t catch.

Why those sights?  Had HMS Prince of Wales come to town as planned, it would have had evolved PTBs, such as the one here

All photos, any errors, WVD, who’s always looking for novelty.

Lightning is here and has been for at least four years, and Thunder is on its way.

From 2014 and therefore two years newer than Lightning, Adeline Marie, previously Denise A. Bouchard, was heading over to the Industry Day on Wednesday. I caught a few photos of her as Rubia in between her original and her latest livery. 

The 2006 Kristin Poling first came to the sixth boro as the 5000 hp 111′ x 36′ Chesapeake.   Here was my first good view of her as a Poling/Cutler tugboat.

Atlantic Enterprise has been keeping busy with runs with dredge spoils from the North River passenger terminal out to the dump site aka HARS.   For a day’s worth of reading, click here for a July 2022 report on HARS. 

The 1981 Susan Miller pushes a small deck barge through congested waters here. She’s been working in the boro for as long as I’ve been doing this blog. 

The 1968 Marie J. Turecamo has worked in the Moran livery for over 20 years. 

Scale is clear from this side-by-side photo of the 2007 Saint Emilion (105′ x 38′ and 4800 hp) and the 1982 McCormack Boys ( 74′ x 26′ and 1200 hp), both hauled out over at Bayonne Dry Dock. 

The 2007 Normandy (79′ x 27′ and 1900 hp) has been in the boro since 2015. 

The 1981 Navigator (64′ x 24′ and 1200 hp)  has to be one among the busiest boats in the harbor and the region.

The 1975 Mary Emma (100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp) has worked under this livery since 2021.  I caught her transformation here about a year ago. 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who thanks you for continuing to read this blog. 

and that would be in order of appearance.  

But check out this lead photo, a scene  no longer so common in the sixth boro, a ship being escorted in the direction of Manhattan and 

then turning into the East River.

When you see that, it likely means aggregates, cement, or shipyard.

I was fortunate to follow Bruce A. McAllister and Meloi as they made their way toward the Brooklyn Bridge earlier this week.  Here’s info on the Japan-built, Panama-flagged, and Greek-owned bulker.

I’m supposing the name is Greek, but other meanings of that word, that spelling in other languages, exist. 

 

I’ve been unable to determine where the aggregates originated, but where they’ll reside for the next century is in five boros’ construction.

 

All photos, WVD. 

 

The whale happens to be a 2007 1284-teu container ship previously called Beluga Constitution and CMA CGM Corfu, but has carried the “whale” name for almost a decade now. I’ve seen other Warnow–named for a river in NE Germany– vessels in the sixth boro, but never posted any of them until now. 

Some time ago I saw Warnow Dolphin and was intrigued, but I never followed up.

So I felt fortunate the other day

when I passed Kirby Moran assisting the Whale into Red Hook container port.

 

Light and color and composition all came together as

her crew eased her in.

 

She’s left port now and is currently heading for the Panama Canal.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

All day long, one ferry or another crosses the harbor, and one tug or another

travels light from point A to

point B and

makes up to another vessel

to move it to where it’s needed.

I was fortunate to see this vignette

of one part of someone’s day play out.

All photos, WVD.

Crushed stone is a commodity indispensable for construction.  Previous commodity posts can be seen here from 2010, here 2011, here 2013, here 2017, and many other instances not identified as such, like this one.

Here was the post I’d planned for yesterday, put together in a moment when I thought a single focus was too elusive, random scenes, like a container ship anchored off Stapleton, elusive detail in a set all diverging from usual patterns. 

Or seeing a Mein Schiff vessel in town after a hiatus… with Wye River passing along her stern?

Or this bayou boat discovering it offers solutions all over the boro and beyond, here passing a lifting machine?

How about this speedboat chasing a tugboat, or appearing to, with lots of hulls in the distance?

Or a single terrapin crawling out of the surf in a non-bulkheaded margin of the wet boro?

Two pink ONEs at Global terminal?

A ketch named Libra or Libre heading south with a scrap ship at Claremont?

Two commercial vessels out at Bayonne?

Two Ellens?

And finally two elongated RIBs with

camouflage-clad Coasties aboard?

All photos, seen as slight deviants from existing patterns, WVD.

 

This series goes back more than a decade to here

But this is only the second time the 2019 NYNJR200 (rail) carfloat is identified.  Metal Trades of Yonges Island SC built it less than a half dozen years ago. 

The previous time the carfloat appeared here, it was handled by the Brown boats, now history.  James E. Brown is now Kayla T.  Any updates on Thomas J. Brown?

The contract to move cross-harbor rail is currently with McAllister, and Marjorie B. does that and other jobs daily. Click here and here for more on this car floating operation. 

There’s also a NYNJR100 float here.

All photos this week, WVD.

Cormorant and I talk sometime; yes, the one on the piling and not the former DEP boat.  Anyhow, cormorant prompted me to get these three photos.

So, evidence here is that I did.  A red . . . Freightliner Summit Hauler was preparing to tow an odd bundle off M8001 barge held in place by Michael Miller.  Might those be bundled barricades?  Any idea where this post is going?

Then another Hauler backed onto the barge to tow off another oddly loaded trailer. This was Monday, I believe.

Then last night, I was messaging with some friends and learned about this . . .  to the right side of this photo . . . a building on Governors Island.  Know it?

It appears that this week, in addition to being UN Week, is New York’s leg of a global show jumper tour, and if not the horses, then certainly all the bleachers and everything else arrives on the island . . .  by barge.  I’m not knocking anything in this post, but the fact that Governors Island hosts such an event boggles my mind, although you’d think that after living in NYC for 20 years now, nothing would surprise me.  Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, it’s not, and Staten Island hosted those horses over 130 years ago!

Three top photos mine, WVD.  Previous Governors island posts can be seen here. Hat tip to cormorant.

Millers Launch pushes a lot of interesting cargo around the harbor, like this one (scroll) from July 2014, this one I missed in September 2018, and the five boros sometimes spill out onto the sixth boro with their show business pursuits.  And consumer side of show business, I think this 2020 concept was nixed because of Covid?

The previous 70 “something different” posts can be seen here.  Not included is the 2006 “floating island.”  Recall any other odd barges in the sixth boro?

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,563 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2022
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31