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Ten days ago I put up a post about multiple load lines on a Torm tanker, and I appreciate that many of you weighed in here and on FB.

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Here’s an explanation of load lines I found online.

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When I saw another Torm tanker leaving today, I thought I’d check.

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And sure enough, this one too had three sets of load lines, although I understand that only the one painted is the valid one.

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Neches dates from 2000, and Mary from 2002.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Over half a year ago, I did a series of posts on Atlantic Star, the first of the new ACL c-ships arriving in the sixth boro for the first time.  The other day was my first time to spot the next of the set of five.

And given the location of Wavertree, a 130-year-old  veteran of Atlantic (and all its adjoining waters)  sailing,

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juxtaposing the two seemed an opportunity not to pass up.  imagine this as cover art for a book called Atlantic Sail, Then and Now.   And no, I haven’t written it.

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Here’s a shot.  Now if only I’d had a drone….  I suppose in a few weeks if Peking is docked here, a shot with that barque and this Zim vessel (IMO 9289544) would be the one to get.

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See in the middle distance a Nukahevan craft passing Atlantic Sail?

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No matter.  Let’s study the novel shapes and angles on the CONRO, assisted out here by Eric McAllister.

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That’s the stack offset to port.

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Steel curves like this in superstructure are unusual.

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Sail on,

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Atlantic Sail.  Here’s the report for the week Atlantic Compass went to scrap.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Name that tug?

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Yes, that one on the far side of the outbound

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CMA CGM box ship . . .

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and passing all the steel skyscrapers in the distance.

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Eric R. Thornton has been doing its utmost to make the sixth boro greener. You first saw her here, and then later here.  I’m wondering about the new stack logo, though.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Torm Neches . . . has not much color contrast in the superstructure.

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This ship has clear reminders of hazards.

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Crew here work on re-elevating the antenna after clearing the Bayonne Bridge for sea.

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Ah, the sixth boro has a paddle wheeler with a wheel that never turns, yet the Queen of Hearts moves, as if by magic.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will again be leaving the sixth boro soon.

As much as this crew boat laboring through the water appears an apt metaphor of my own laboring through the dog days of August this year, pushing so much water seems unproductive.  Am I wrong in thinking this?  Just wondering.

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It did make for some photos I liked though.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Here are the previous “small craft” posts.

 

Here’s a detail I noticed recently that I truly do not understand.  There are three sets of load lines.  does this mean that significant changes have been made to the vessel such that greater load–deepest draft marks here seem to be the current ones–is now legal?  The tanker is 16 years old.

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Thanks.  Photo by Will Van Dorp.

The first two photos–showing the newest and fastest (??) ATB to arrive in the sixth boro– were taken by Randall Fahry.

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Tina Pyne is one immense mover, and Kirby 185-02 is one of two 578′ ocean going tank barges with 185,000-barrel capacity built by Gunderson Marine for Kirby.   See her christening here.

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Zachery Reinauer is a Hudson River-built tug from 1971 one of the last 10 built at Matton, and she looks as good today as new!

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This was taken a few seconds later, and this

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as she stands by, while Haggerty Girls finesses RTC 107 into position.

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An occasional sixth boro visitor, it’s Rhea I. Bouchard with B. No. 284.

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As I began this post with another photographer’s photo, so I’ll end.  Thanks to Gerard Thornton for this rare catch of Ticonderoga assisting Pleon (?) into the Kills, possibly the last float for Pleon.     That’s also Barry Silverton in the distance.

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Thanks to Randall and Gerard for use their photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

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I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

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Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

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Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

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Barry Silverton.

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Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

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Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth bork has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

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Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

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my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here were the previous posts, the last one being in April.  On June 11, I took the photo below, and since then had not been back until yesterday. Note how far along the Bayonne Bridge was on that date, as well

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Here’s a closer up of the rigging on June 11.

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Now let’s jump forward to yesterday, August 15.  Note where the crane barge

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Claude G. Forbes started the morning, and

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and check the progressing in rigging, compared with photo #2 above.

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Yard tug Jay Bee V came out to

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reposition the barge.  Note the mizzen on the background.

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Then the crane pivoted around and

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the block was lowered and

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straps added and

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all systems checked and

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then slowly tensioned.  One end of the mast lifted from off the deck

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BUT then it was lowered.  I waited around for an hour more, but then had other places to be.    I’ll have to pick up the Wavertree story another time.

Since I mentioned the Bayonne Bridge–its own process–here’s what the work looks like as of August 15 from over off the west end of Caddell Dry Dock .. . aka ex-Blissenbach Marina now known as Heritage Park, which in my opinion, should have foliage trimmed so as to be  more user friendly for land-based photographers.

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Thanks to everyone who braved the heat last night and came to the showing of Graves of Arthur Kill.  Special thanks to those wizards who problem-solved our way through the technical challenges, except I had brought along an antepenultimate version . . .  and sorry I didn’t have a chance to talk with everyone there.  What you want–prepare for an explicit commercial message here– is this version, which Gary and I call “the director’s cut,” available for a mere $11.99.

While I’m doing “commercials,” here’s an opportunity for the right people to sail offshore on South Street Seaport Museum’s 1893 fishing schooner, up to Gloucester for the 2016 schooner races, or back, or some portion thereof. Click here for some of the many Lettie G. Howard posts I’ve done over the years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

You’d have thought I use this title more often, but it’s been almost three years since it last appeared. I’m starting with this photo of the lightship WLV-612, because this is where I’ll be this evening for a FREE and open-to-the-public 6 pm showing of our documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.  Seats for those who arrive first.

Over the years I’ve done many posts about the WLV-612, but my favorite is this one.

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Here’s a very recent arrival in the sixth boro’s pool of workboats . . . Fort McHenry, just off the ways, although just yesterday an even-more recent arrival.  more on that one soon, I hope.  I don’t know how new Double Skin 315 is.

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Ships in the anchorage and waterways must think they are in a tropical clime, given the temperatures of August 2016.

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NS Parade, Iron Point, MTM St Jean …  have all been here recently.

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Robert E. McAllister returned from a job, possibly having assisted Robert E. Peary.

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MSC Lucy headed out past

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Larry J. Hebert, standing by at a maintenance dredging job.

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MOL Bellwether, all 1105′ loa of her, leave into the humid haze, existing here along with

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some wind to propel this sloop.

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Finally, just the name, sir;  No need for the entire genealogy. This photo comes compliments of Bob Dahringer.

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Thanks to Bob for the photo above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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