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There’s lots of lifting capacity here, but no towing or pushing capacity.

Philadelphia passes the Manhattan skyline solo.

From the west, Justine and Jonathan head for a job.

 

Magothy passes Helen Laraway, Cape Lookout, and Lois Ann L. Moran

There’s a progression here . . .  more tugboats in this photo than in the previous . . .

See the three guys . . .

here?  I wonder who they are.

Yesterday a hearing had been scheduled in US Bankruptcy Court, and I suppose some report on that is forthcoming . . .

All photos, WVD.

 

 

 

Here were previous iterations of this title, as well as here, an AK Sunrise.  If this effort were for a work published when complete, inconsistencies like dawn v. sunrise would be aligned, but this has always been a work in progress, a wandering that could end at any time.

So yesterday morning I was at my office before the 0550 sunrise, and I saw nothing until this.  In fact, at 0554, I was wondering where the sunrise was, since there was not the sky show that often heralds the dawn.  Anyhow, you might prefer a sun rise over a calm body of water or a forested valley or a garden, pasture, ravine, building . . . but I offer you our local star, source of terrestrial energy, over a tank farm, and below that Brooklyn crane . .  as of 0555.

If you imagine an equilateral triangle, the sun as one point, myself another, then Cape Lookout was the third, and that shows how dim that sunrise was.   When the sun rises through a clear atmosphere, you’re expect more golden color on this tugboat.

Pivoting back, the striations are not on the solar surface.  Rather . . . they indicate a film in our atmosphere. 

The 2018 5000 hp Cape Lookout glides in toward the fuel dock.  Lois Ann L. Moran is tending her barge as some petroleum product gets transferred.   An easy question for some of you;  for her Caterpillar engines, Cape Lookout at full tanks carries 86,114 gallons of fuel, and 9550 gallons of urea.  You can do the math for the fuel if you assume different prices per gallon.  I don’t know how much fuel goes per gallon.  Question:  What’s the almost 10,000 gallons of urea for?

At 0558, clouds passed the sun, almost giving the impression of sunspots.  By the way, I didn’t look directly at the sun; rather, I shot in that direction and saw what I got later, after the photos were “developed” . . . well downloaded.

Nearby at that dock, Haggerty Girls lies alongside her barge, RTC 107.

By now, the sun has risen NOT straight up from its appearance point, but at an angle, and is now partially obscured by the LaFarge–now Holcim–cement silos.

 

I’m at a fixed point, although I’ve varied the camera angles and settings.

 

For her power, the 2013 4000 hp Haggerty Girls has two MTU/DDC engines, and her fuel tanks add up to 114,202 gallon, and no urea.  What does that tell you?

The 2009 5100 hp Lois Ann L. Moran has EMD engines, and carries 105,000 gallons of fuel and no urea. Time now is 0622, and Lois Ann L. lies beside her barge, Philadelphia.

By the way, all my numbers come from this site:  tugboatinformation.com    ….

All photos, yesterday, WVD.

And the urea?  It’s ONE of the ways diesel engines are designed to meet clean air standards.  I’m just learning about this, and smart people have been working on this for a long time.

 

If you can’t get to the fuel, you can have the fuel come to you.  It’s Chandra B now, and it was Capt. Log before that. 

The fuel boat comes in while the Circle Line Sightseeing boats all rest at their pier.  Inland  from the pier, it’s the city that never sleeps or stops building. 

 

Fueling complete, Chandra B spins around and heads to the next job. 

Time flies . . .  as photographer, I rode along on Chandra B over five years ago, and I rode along on the cramped Capt. Log even longer ago.

All photos here, WVD.  Hats off to the Chandra B crew.

 

 

This follows on yesterday’s post, using Lew’s photos taken on the Connecticut River.  Shawn Miller brought it up the North River for the airplane’s reunion with Intrepid

All that greenery forms the base of Stevens Institute of Technology

 

For more on the aircraft, click here

 

A truck-mounted crane was ready on the pier north of Intrepid, and preparations for the lift began immediately.

Less than 15 minutes after tying up, the crane swiveled around and lift crew began attaching the straps.

 

The tail lifted first, 

 

and then clearing the flag poles,

the crane did its work, almost giving the impression the Skyray was coming in for a landing . . .

 

Aircraft was on the pier before 1000, the announced lift time.

All photos this morning, WVD, who learned long ago the only way to be on time is to be way early.

Click here and here for aircraft on barges in the sixth boro.

Now to see it up close, get your Intrepid tickets here.  

 

 

Usually when I see an MSC vessel, it’s a container ship, but as this post shows, that is not always the case.  Melissa, though, IS a container ship.  When she passed the other day, I also saw a lot of people, not surprising on a warm but not torrid summer’s morning.  See the crew in the line boat?

Here’s a closer up showing a deckhand on the bow of Miriam and another crewman at the top of the tanker companionway.

On Mary Turecamo, a crewman gets a line to MSC Melissa.

 

 

MSC Melissa dates back to 2002, and at 6402 teu, she was a large vessel of that time almost two decades ago.

Crew . . . I wonder how long they’ve been aboard.  What was breakfast this morning?  What are nationalities of the crew?  Where all has the vessel called in the past 12 months?  Here‘s a partial answer that may prompt more questions.   And of course, what is in all those containers?  And the crews on the tugboats, what are their stories.

 

All photos, WVD, who has lots of questions sometimes and not many answers, which is the story of my life.

 

“Scarlet Begonias” has a line “the sky was yellow but the sun was blue…”  Well, you may have noticed the sun this morning here was pink and bluish;  the sky was a uniform gray, and 

that made the water gray as well.  Thank the Canadians . . . well, the smoke from wildfires in western Canada.

 

 

See the WTC1?

 

All photos this morning, WVD.

 

A new assist boat in town bringing 3800 hp to the job?

Right . . .  I was kidding.  It’s Jones Act non-compliant anyhow. 

Genesis Eagle is a 6140 hp pin boat. 

 

JRT Moran and Capt. Brian McAllister do an assist of an ULCV.

Pegasus gives Mount St. Elias an assist as it moves DBL 82 out of IMTT bound for New Haven. 

Andrea gives HMS Liberty an assist as it delivers a bunker barge to Port Elizabeth. 

Miriam Moran delivers a pilot to the ship. 

Mary Turecamo assists a container ship. 

Doris waits for a job to approach in the Upper Bay, 

and finally, Kirby Moran moves in closer to an incoming ship. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Swarming is one thing, but 

in a congested waterway,

riding wakes

to feel the surges

 

 . . .  well I gotta wonder ….

All photos, WVD.

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

According to PANYNJ stats, May 2021 saw 396,417 loaded teus arrive in the sixth boro;  May 2020 saw 266,004!    That is an increase of 49%.  Exports of loaded teus in May this year totaled 134,458 versus 95,462 last year, an increase if 40.8%.  So the port is  . . . busy.  So as I’ve done before, I offer a sampling of the ships involved in the moving teus, i.e., container ships.

Check out OOCL Europe, head on . . . launched in 2006, with her 8063 teu capacity.

As you know, CMA CGM Marco Polo  [yes, I missed it] has been the largest container ship to call in port of NYNJ to date, recently she called in Laem Chabang and Vung Tau, and I’ll let you guess where those megaports are.

Ikaria, 2002, and 4492 teu, is the smallest box ship in this batch.   In 1999, I was not blogging about the port, but the record shows the largest container ship in the world then carried 6200 teu. 

There’s not much view of either the box ship, CMA CGM Brazil or the tanker, but check out the bow wave compared with the small trawler just beyond. Of course, foreshortening is involved and the 30+- trawler was in no danger.

CMA CGM Brazil, pictured here, is the newest in this batch, launched in 2020 and has the capacity of 15128 teu.

MSC Tavvishi is the oldest, from 2000, with a 5468 teu capacity.  Launched in 2000, she was not that much smaller than the largest in the world at that time.

And RDO Fortune, a 2012 launch with a 5033 teu capacity

came into the sixth boro appearing to be entirely empty.  Might that be to pick up empty boxes?

All photos, WVD.

Laem Chabang and Vung Tau are ports in Thailand and Vietnam, respectively.

 

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