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Let’s do the numbers again.  No, Pelham is NOT becoming a tugantine in the tradition of Norfolk Rebel.  Seeing Pelham out of the water really reveals a beauty I hadn’t noticed before.

OK, numbers, built in 1960 and rated at 3000 hp.

Atlantic Coast, 2007 and 3000hp.

 

Genesis Vision, 1981 and 3000hp.

Margaret Moran, 1979 and 3000hp.

(l to r) Fort Schuyler 2015 and 3000hp, Patuxent 2008 and 4200, and Kings Point 2014 and 3000.

Note the difference in “neck” length leading to the upper wheelhouse;  that hints at the difference in engines.

Resolve, 2007 and 9280hp.

Brownsville, 2008 and 12,000hp.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is playing in the Great Lakes by this time.

As we leave the cold of the past months, we see more crew of all vessels out on deck just to enjoy the balmy weather and sun, like these crew taking photos of the northern side of Staten Island.  I’ve often wondered what they say about this port of the US;  of course they see the skyline of Manhattan as they enter and depart the port, but I wonder what they say about the borders of the KVK.

I’m not “developing” it, however, maybe just taking advantage the “educational” opportunity it offers, to create a space as they have designated in Port Huron as the Great Lakes Maritime Center.  The assemblage of containers there is attractive and functional. Click here and scroll for a post I did back in 2012 about this Center on a brownfield.  NYC is failing to recognize the KVK for the tourist destination it could be.

Pilots boarding in windy frigid months must find this part of spring part of the joy of the profession.

Crew heading back out to sea . . . do they compare ports?

The deckhand needs to stay on station, a much easier task from temperature perspective.

Another crewman headed for sea . . . is this the last port departure of his hitch or his first?

Ditto the crew indicted by the red arrow, what do they talk about?

 

These boom boats, they work all year round on these utilitarian vessels.

This was a coup, I thought.  The USCG had come aboard during cargo transfer to take the crew through a life boat drill.

Again . . . crew entering the port from sea . . .

 

And finally, nobody has time to enjoy these seats right now, but when work is done, I’m guessing they are enjoyed.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is currently headed west again.

 

I caught this T-boat back two years ago, and here she is again.  I’ve posted on this vessel before, (scroll) here and here. It’s the 1953 Sea Dart II, originally T-513.

She’s become a sign of spring for me.

A good old boat like this to learn marketable skills would have been heaven-sent for me as a kid.

 

Fly your flags high, Scouts.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

Some cruise ships look great after having sailed for many years.  For example, Artania entered the sixth boro a few weeks ago.  She was launched as Royal Princess in 1984 in Finland, 756′ x 97′ and carried around 1200 passengers with 537 crew.

The even older Stockholm still sails as well.  Rich Taylor caught it here three years ago in St Kitts.

The following day, Norwegian Escape arrived.

30 years newer, 1069′ x 136′ and with capacity of 4266 with 1733 crew.

NCL vessels have featured an evolving use of art on their hulls.  The artist for Escape was Guy Harvey.

 

The quality of the next photos is not great;  it was drizzling, this is not a good camera, and I was not expecting her to depart at 1000.  Bliss‘ tale of the tape comes in a 1082’ x 136 and about 4000 passengers.

The hull art here is from Wyland, Robert Wyland, originally a Michigander.

Bliss was doing 14kts by the time she exited the Narrows, and 24 hours after her departure for Miami, she was doing 23kts and already off Myrtle Beach!

But Justin Zizes caught the real difference between a previous NCL generation  (Gem)  and Bliss;  a tremendous difference in scale.  Gem was was launched about 10 years ago, 965′ x 125′ and 2400 passengers on 15 decks.  For a great photo showing the scale of Gem compared with a NYC Circle Line vessel, click here and scroll.

 

Many thanks to Justin for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Two unrelated blog links:

Emita II is a 1953 Blount built excursion vessel long operated by MidLakes Navigation of Skaneateles, NY.  But it has recently been sold to Harbor Country Cruises in New Buffalo MI (outside of Chicago).  The sellers–the Wiles family–are delivering the boat to southern Lake Michigan and doing this blog on her journey.

GirlAtSea is a blog kept by a Romanian environmental officer aboard a cruise ship.  If you click here, you’ll see that she has recently called at the cruise terminal in Bayonne.

Recall that “fifth dimension” is my code for the time travel series;  call it history if you wish.

In 1968–50 fast years ago!!–  Mon Lei, which transited the harbor last weekend, was more of a presence.  All photos here come from Steve Munoz, who writes:  “I saw your post and remembered seeing a Chinese junk at the South Seaport in June 1968, and I looked at my pics, which were originally slides. I was on the tug Dalzelleagle (1958 and now McAllister Brothers) with my uncle Bob Munoz, captain and pilot with McAllister. We had some time between jobs so we walked over to the Mon Lei and the people on the boat let us go aboard and inside to take a look. If I remember correctly, the boat was built in Hong Kong around 1895. The interior was beautifully hand-carved mahogany, but very musty smell. You will also see the USCG sail vessel Eagle at seaport pier. I did not know that Mon Lei was still around.”

Another reader of Monday’s post wrote:  ” I boat-sat her for one week in maybe the winter of 87-88. Was bitter cold and she was wintering at the late great Pier 15 [pictured above and below].  Normally she lived at the E 23rd St. marina, but some construction was going on there.  Alan York was traveling on business, so I looked after her. The interior was nothing short of a  fantasy world of Asian carving and ornamentation. One friend described it as a “floating fornicatorium.” Also a nice comfy oil burner for heat. I remember he was scouring the world for new bamboo of a certain kind for her sail battens. Quite the gentleman.”

If you didn’t look at this link previously, see it now for some interior shots.

I’m curious about the two vessels alongside the pier in the lower right.

Continuing here with photos from Steve, below is the future that never was . . . NS Savannah passing Ellis Island (onion domes) bound for sea.  It was June 1968, almost exactly a half century ago for all these photos.

Back when some tugboats had eagles atop their wheelhouses . . . this was Steve’s Uncle Bob at the helm.  A few years ago, I recall seeing one of McAllister’s boats with a plastic dinosaur atop the wheelhouse for a while.  I’ll have to look for the photo.

 

On a different note, here’s a photo by Elizabeth Wood taken in 2005 of Lettie G. Howard along the Brooklynside of the Upper Bay.  Lettie G., built in 1893  (125 years ago, making her as old or even older than Mon Lei, depending on which story you believe.   for all you readers downcast of me, Lettie G. departed the Hudson River around 0700 today, heading for Lake Erie via Gloucester and Nova Scotia.  She is on AIS.  Nelson, Joey, Mac, Jack, Marc, Brenda, Jake, Barry . . . you know who you are.   I hope to see Lettie G. on Lake Erie this summer;  I hope you do too.

 

Thanks to Steve and Elizabeth for use of these photos.

For a history of the Chinese “junk,” click here and here.

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

Joyce D. Brown with a resplendent paint job on a bright spring morning.

A new boat entering the Narrows in springtime.  Know it?

Sea Oak, which I last saw in Southport, NC.

Crystal Cutler, also looking great in the spring sunshine.

The extraordinary Bosco, passing the boscage of Shooters Island.

The vertically oriented Genesis Vision, previously known as Superior Service.

Paul Andrew, once sported a respectable Christmas tree here (scroll).

Another great name .  . Sea Fox.

Marjorie B McAllister, perfectly positioned with the arrow on CMA CGM Almaviva,

Rebecca Ann, with a great origin story that maybe someone who reads this knows better than I do.  All I remember is that it was locally built . . . with spare steel . . . I hope I’m right about that.  And she’s currently involved in a project that might place her in tomorrow’s post.  I believe she first appeared in this blog in 2010 here (scroll).

Any guesses?

Answer below.

Yes, Seeley, which was once a Vane Brothers boat called Vane Brothers.

All photos taken in april 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Eric McAllister went out the Narrows to

meet her ship out beyond Swinburne.

 

It seems the gulls are excited by whatever chum follows in the wake, chum made from all those shad.

The shine on the hull suggested a fairly new ship, and

in fact, I’d never seen this one before,

Grande New York.

How grand.  She was completed at CSC Jinling Shipyard in late October 2017.  I don’t know if this was her first arrival in New York.  Sister ships are Grande Baltimora, already in service, and Grande Halifax . . . yet to be completed.

Here are previously posted other “Grande” Grimaldi vessels:  G Senegal,  G Marocco, and G Guinea, which came into the sixth boro early Monday and departed yesterday.

And here’s the rest of the title . . . as a way to show the varying weather.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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