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Ellen McAllister first appeared on this blog almost 10 years ago here.  At the time I knew nothing about an entire category of navy tugs repurposed for civilian life.  Here were the two previous posts in this series.

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For a vessel that turns a half century this spring, to my outsider eyes, she’s as good as ever.

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Here she delivers the docking pilot

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before serving as escort to the dock.  By the way, while ROROs like Boheme are underway, is there a panel the seals off this area?

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Here are a few photos of her in Lake Michigan, off Scotland, and then as a single-engine McAllister tug.  I’d love to see more….

Anyone identify the YTB below?  There’s a spoiler if you scroll past, so guess before proceeding.

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taken by Will Van Dorp  January 1, 2012

It’s YTB-786, which did its Navy service in Rota Spain,

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and is now based as Margaret McAllister in Wilmington NC.

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All photos by Will Van  Dorp.

One of the joys about living in the sixth boro is its size and dynamism.  There are three bridges in this photo below that will not be the same if I take this shot again in three or four years;  this is my first notice of the stays already in place at the new Goethals. Will the new bridge still honor an engineer who worked on the Panama and then the PANYNJ?   I was interested in the ship because a friend had assisted docking when she arrived . . .

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Overseas Long Beach last had a strange paint job, too.  AIS showed that Erin McAllister was on the bow, which I took possibly being a misspelling of Eric, pictured a bit farther below.

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To my astonishment, when the escort emerged around the stern, it was

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Erin, not Eric.  After the pilot was retrieved,

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she spun

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to port and

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returned to base, allowing me to get a closeup and

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compare the two boats, Erin from 1996, although I believe her bow has been modified since then, and

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Eric from 2014.  And the differences are clear.

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Erin actually originates from the same time, design, and shipyard as this tug, Z-One.

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Photo by Will Van Dorp, San Juan, PR, March 2013

 

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For more comparisons, click on this “Tale of the Tape” post from a year and a half ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I’m doing a short post today, but it may be big in questions.  First of all, Goat Locker?  It’s a name rich in tradition.  Click here and make sure to read the reference by Mark D. Faram.

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So, 1200 hp on the stern of large RIB .  .  . That’s impressive.

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And then there’s this, the ONLY boat in North Cove.  Here’s what the website says it’s for.  Read what it says here about the use of this 25′ SAFE, i.e.,  “Plan B maintains your Military RHIB boat and keeps it fueled, maintained and ready to go. Then, in the event evacuation is required, you simply proceed to your boat’s Westside location.”  Wow . . . James Bond?

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Some six hundred miles farther south in Southport, NC . . . No Wake dwells in a wholly different climate.  It’s a nice boat, although I know nothing about it.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts in this series go back almost seven years.

 

I do not try to group tugboats in posts by company, but in the past week I’ve noticed an inordinate number of Weeks boats in the sixth boro.  Let’s start with this shot of Trevor, which I caught yesterday.   Here are some previous Trevor shots.

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Earlier I’d caught Trevor tailing a tow pull by Alexandra.  I might have to dig in the archives to 2009 and 2008 to find my previous photo of Alexandra.

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Here was that tow, the Weeks 533, the flagship of the Weeks fleet.   The 1965 crane also has tragedy associated with it now.

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A few days ago I caught Thomas and

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Shelby over on the KVK.  Beyond Shelby here are Jill Reinauer and Brooke Chapman.   This was a first to see Brooke Chapman in the sixth boro.  Will she become a regular?

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All photos in the past week by Will Van Dorp.  And speaking of Weeks tugs, I’d be happy to see Candace again.

My favorite Shelby photos have her towing the Starship Enterprise. and tailing here.

I realize that snow days occur here every year, even though not as frequently as they might farther north, but the movement of a squall across the boros rewards with interesting photos in spite of the cold.

At 0925 the other day, Maersk Edgar was in the clear although a squall concealed the lower Manhattan skyline.

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Here’s zoomed in closer because I hoped to confirm the unit to the left as Kirby’s Rebel, which I’ve not seen in ages. I hope I see her close up before she leaves town.

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Corpus Christi was clear.

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At 10:00 Weeks’ tugs Thomas and Shelby moved in to retrieve a crane as soon as they completed the salt pile job.  That’s Dreggen in the background. Nearly eight years ago Thomas and a crane were involved in a job that involved fishing out a certain geese-ingesting aircraft  from a forgiving North River.

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Red Hook moves a barge past a snow-cloaked IMTT.

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Emerald Coast heads out at 11:37.

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Peking appears from the edge of space.

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And here by noon, I was disappointed in my hopes to get a photo of Hyundai Pluto, entirely invisible beyond ACL Atlantic Cartier.  The port may have been closed around this time because Hyundai Pluto had arrived inside the Upper Bay, then spun around–not a lightly undertaken feat–and headed out to the Long Beach anchorage.  Atlantic Cartier anchored in Gravesend, and Atlantic Conveyer did the same off Stapleton, not a common occurrence for a containership.  Or maybe I just misunderstood what what going on, my perception beshrouded from myself.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are some snows days in the sixth boro from previous seasons.  Yesterday’s saw crews on duty doing what they always do.  Cielo di Milano was outbound, as was Peney, a practically new ship, emptied of her Mejillones safety product.

09:50  My thermometer registered 23 degrees F, and a squall was passing over Manhattan but not here.

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10:15  In less than a half hour, the snow squall has intensified on the KVK.

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10:15  Portside watch reports on distance already away from the salt dock, where product was trucking out the gate.

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10:18  That’s Jonathan C at starboard and Margaret on the bow.

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10:19

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10:20  JRT heads westbound after an assist in the harbor.

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11:42  See the juice carrier, Orange Blossom 2, Jonathan C, IMTT, and WTC1?

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11:42  Here’s what the unaltered version of the photo above looks like.  I enhanced color in the version above.

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11:45

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11:46  All were cautious but moving.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More tomorrow from the same Saturday morning snow squall.

 

ooops, new pigs, there must have been an incident.

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A little background . . . .  A conductor of the The Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway Marching Band & Chowder Society emailed me yesterday about what they said was “strange small boat activity” just north of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.   Since I was in the area, I thought I’d check it out, and what I saw would be

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considered at very least unorthodox nets on small boats, now that we are in harbor “fishing” season.  Pannaway is dredging for critters, I believe, although I’m puzzled by her New Hampshire registration, if I’m not mistaken.

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See the rig with “sock” skimming the surface?

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These rigs are designed to soak up stuff that should not be in the water, as opposed to critters that find it acceptable habitat.

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Ken’s Marine does a lot of types of work, and

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responding to spills is one of them.

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The news had nothing I could find, but I’m guessing

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there was something under-reported here.  By the way, a flat oil absorbent product is often called a diaper.

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Again, thanks to the good conductor for the tip.

All photos and speculation by Will Van Dorp, whose already taken but too few rides on the Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway.

An added plus of my trip here was to have another look at Soldiers and Sailors Monument, which I’ll feature in an upcoming post.

 

Ken came up with additional photos of his overnight in the transient slip at South Street Seaport Museum many years ago . . .  so here they are.  Note the Twin Towers in the background.  To the right side of the photo, I’m guessing that’s a mastless Lettie G. Howard and Major General William H. Hart, now languishing along the Arthur Kill.

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Here’s a close up of the stick lighter, identified by eastriver as Vernie S. 

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Russell Grinell, among other things, was an owner of schooner Pioneer before she came to SSSM.

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Here’s Black Pearl in the foreground, with a respectable looking eagle’s figurehead.

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And finally, this might be the stern of Anna Christina, which sank in the “perfect storm” as mentioned in this NYTimes article.

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Again, many thanks to Ken Deeley for bringing these photos he took from the transient dock several decades ago to the light.  One of my tugster goals is to publish photos like these, bringing them into the  “creative commons.”

 

 

Many thanks to Ken Deeley for today’s photos.  The vessel with the red house is surely one of the Standard Boat stick lighter fleet, but I can’t read the name on the bow.  A half decade I posted a photo here (scroll) of a decrepit Ollie, the stick lighter that used to tie up at South Street.   He can’t quite put a date on this photo taken at South Street Seaport Museum’s pier.  Can anyone date these photos?  And what was that green/white dome in the background?

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Coming down the Hudson, Ken got this photo of suction dredger Sugar Island.  Currently, Sugar Island is working off Bahrain.

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Many thanks to Ken for sending along these photos.

Click here for a 1992 publication by Robert Foster and Jane Steuerwald called “The Lighterage System in the New York/New Jersey Harbor,” referencing stick lighters and much more.

Here’ve been previous posts in the series.

See the crew up behind the glass;  one might be a pilot.

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The scale of container ships calling in the port renders the bow watch keeper almost invisible, but here

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he is zoomed in.

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Ditto this crewman.

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See the person in the rigging, partway up the center mast here?

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Here he is zoomed in.

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I’m not sure what the watch stander requirements are on these ships, and which people are just taking in the sights before

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they head out to sea . . ..

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See the two people on the bow?

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No matter the biting wind, a lookout must be kept.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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