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It’s time to remedy my long having short-shrifted bulk carriers.  One came in Saturday morning called Angelina the Great N.  I missed it because I estimated timing wrong.  I hope someone got photos of the bulker with that incomparable name . . . Angelina the Great N.  What’s “N,” I wonder…, but what a great Name!!  Maybe you have a sense of what the “N” stands for?

But to bulkers . . .  often they’re exporting scrap, and Denak Voyager is a common visitor to Claremont.  Notice Rebecca Ann along the left margin of the frame?

Johanna C was in the same berth, Claremont, some time back.  Also, notice that Johanna C has cranes, swung out of the way, which Denak Voyager does not.

Ditto Nordic Barents, and again notice Rebecca Ann. In this case, Nordic Barents is using its cranes and orange peel grab buckets to transfer scrap from scows alongside.

Fu Quan Shan has cranes stowed and clamshell buckets at the ready.

Spar Indus is using its crane to lighter salt, as

is Kodiak Island over by the salt pile.  Because of the so-far mild winter, it’s been a while since a salt ship has discharged there.

Here’s a closer up view of Denak Voyager, seen above, its decks sans cranes, making it less versatile.

Nord Pacific is discharging salt via its cranes. 

And finally, Alerce N appears to have log racks as well as cranes and buckets. 

I’m starting to wonder if this is a bulkers post or a cranes post. Check out the cranes on

Curacao Pearl, a 1984 vessel previously known as Crane Arrow.   I’m not sure the name of this type of crane, but I’ve seen them before on her sister vessel, Atlantic Pearl here.

All photos, WVD, who knows that even more types of cranes exist, like these automated ones on Evans Spirit.  I’m not sure how they work.

Claremont  . . . the place of ore and scrap.  Stand by. 

Let’s get oriented.  See the Statue midright slightly top in the map grab below?  Now follow the line representing the longer ferry route.  That is the Claremont Terminal Channel, a place you don’t go to unless you have to.  That ferry picks up on the south side of Port Liberté.  Here‘s a great montage of images in different directions from there.

See the bare earth and all the scows stacked up along the SW side of channel?

This is the domain of Sims Metal Claremont Jersey City. Find out about the shredder pulpit, zorba, and the monetary values of things related to Claremont here.  Sims is named for Albert Sims, of Sydney AU, who started the company over a century ago. To see the yard closer up, go to google earth and zoom in.

Quite often a bulk carrier is docked there, loading mostly steel and ferrous scrap in chunks created by the megashredder mentioned above along with zorba. 

One fact that’s interesting to me is from 150 years ago back to time immemorial, this was likely marsh grass leading into rich oyster beds.  In 1920 it was bulkheaded “by the Lehigh Valley railroad to unload ore-laden freighters from South America, the Claremont Terminal’s considerable dockside trackage was used to quickly deliver raw ore for use in the steel mills of Bethlehem Steel at Bethlehem, PA.”  During WW2, it “was repurposed for the loading of US Army troopships and transports following the war and working in conjunction with the Caven Point Army Terminal provided much of the material used by US forces in the early years of the Korean War.”  I’d love to know where in South America the ore came from.

On the other side of the channel is Caven Point, “operational from early 1900’s until the early 1970’s [as] a large US Army installation located on the tidal flats of Jersey City. Caven Point’s proximity to key rail networks and the ports of New York and New Jersey made it invaluable for the marshalling of troops, munitions and materials heading for front lines in Europe. During WWII, the facility was one of the major points of embarkation of US soldiers heading overseas, and was also one of the major East Coast POW processing points for captured German and Italian troops during the war. Following the cessation of hostilities, Caven Point was a key receiving point for homeward bound American servicemen, and again used its proximity to US rail lines to send tens of thousands of troops on their way home.”  Sources are here and here. Near the end of this link are photos of USN vessels at Caven Point.

This photo is taken from the innermost area of Claremont looking back out.  The USACE buildings at Caven Point are to the left, and Atlantic Veracruz is along the dock to the right.  Rebecca Ann and Sarah Ann are managing the scrap scows.  Shoreside here is not Sims but Clean Earth, Inc.

That’s Brooklyn in the distance.

All photos and reads, WVD.

That more tankers and fuel barges arrive in the sixth boro in the colder months is just my hunch;  maybe someone reading this can supply numbers to prove or disprove this.  It would make sense, given that there’s the need for heating.  In any case, let’s look at some vessels in town in recent months.  By the way, here was the first post of this series.   One of these is arguably misclassified here;  see if you can determine which.

Afrodite was a frequent and controversial visitor here a few years back.

 

Note the person climbing the ladder from a Millers Launch launch.  Also, can you explain the T on the bow?

Overseas Mykonos, despite its name,

is a US-flagged vessel, assisted by Mary Turecamo. However, when launched in 2010, she was registered in Majuro.  I have to admit that I need a “big picture tutorial” on shifting ship registries, aka reflagging.

In the morning light as thousands of cars make their way (upper left) along the arteries called parkways and expressways, Grand Ace9, launched in 2008,  has been here before–never on this blog though, as Eagle Miri.  I’ve not seen Eagle tankers in the harbor in years . . . possibly some of the older ones have been scrapped.

 

Maya, like Afrodite, is a TEN tanker, “TEN” expands to Tsakos Energy Navigation. See the T on the stack? Maya is of a smaller class of TEN tankers, and has switched registry from Maltese to Marshall Islands.

Orange Ocean is a regular in the port, and the only Liberian tanker in this batch.

Seapike has been here before.  For full context of this vessel, check Michael Schmidt’s site here . . . for Seabass, Seacod, Seatrout, etc. . . you get this gist. Also, note a Millers  Launch launch, maybe Emily, along the port side.

The green stripes near the bow mark this as a BW Group vessel, one of many that call in the sixth boro.

One series has names like BW Panther, BW Puma, BW Bobcat . . . you get the idea.  The founder of the company was Sir Yue-Kong Pao, who started in the family shoe business.  Although you’ve likely never heard of him, he made Newsweek’s cover in 1976.  The company is currently run by the founder’s son-in-law Peter Woo, who was on Forbes cover a few years ago. 

Rounding this post out, shown in the breadth of the Upper Bay, it’s Aegean Star.

She’s the newest of vessels in this post, launched in 2019.

All photos and research, WVD.

And if you said that Orange Ocean was misplaced here, you’d be right, since the liquid she carries is edible . . . or potable.

At first light, Navigator passes a docked Saint Emilion

This 1981 build has called the sixth boro her home since 2015.  Saint Emilion (2007) has been here in two previous liveries and names.

Barney Turecamo was launched in 1995.  Note her cutaway forefoot.

Barney, married to Georgia, gets an assist from Doris Moran, 1982, as she departs the dock.

 

Meaghan Marie, 1968, follows a box ship into port but is not involved in the assist.

Meaghan Marie is a former fleetmate of Margaret Moran, 1979, doing the assist.

Emily Ann, 1964, moves a sanitation scow.

 

And finally, coming in from sea with a dump scow, it’s Captain Willie Landers, 2001.

When she first appeared on this blog in 2015, she had a prominent mast, not an upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

What’s this?

I’m just trying to figure this out.  My best guess is that suspended from a 20-ton capacity A-frame is a set of underwater hands, a sampling device, a seafloor-drill, all tallied 14 tons of instruments  and tools in a seafloor frame. 

I can’t tell you the division of labor between the equipment lowered/raised through an approximately 10′ x 10′ moon pool by the 90′ derrick and the seafloor drill.  My guess is the the seafloor drill can function at great depth.   Note the Panamanian registry.

All those portlights . . .   relate to the 50+ crew the vessel can accommodate. 

The helideck . . . 62′ diameter, can accommodate helicopters of the Bell 412 type, i.e., up to about 3.5 tons. 

If you didn’t click on the equipment and specifications link earlier, my source for all I pretend to know here, you can click here now.  Since she was anchored in Gravesend Bay yesterday, the tide pushing her stern toward shore, I managed to get my first photos of her stern.   I have seen the vessel, working to amass wind farm bottom terrain data, several times since January 2018.   With the green light to transform South Brooklyn Marine Terminal into a dedicated wind farm construction hub, I suspect some interesting and exotic vessels will be transiting the Narrows in the next few years.

All photos and attempted interpretation, WVD.

Maybe a reader out there can explain how this equipment really works and what super-detailed examples of bathymetric chart of the New York Bight look like.

Find a great diagram here, as well as this quote:  “container carrying capacity has increased 1200% since 1968.”  This increased size drives developments in escort tugs.

As of 2021, the sixth boro has accommodated vessels no larger than 15,000 teu, like CMA CGM Argentina.  These can be called mother ships, since they can call in only a limited number of ports in the US for reasons of draft, air draft, and crane size. Vying for position as the largest, Liebherr appears to have a 25-row crane design, while ZPMC has a 26-row product.

Count them, it looks like Argentina has 20 rows across.  Imagine each of these row, each of these containers, as towed by a truck on the highway lane beside you.

YM Wellhead, an odd name in my opinion, is one of 20 W-class 14,000 teu ships.   World was the first of this class that I caught. 

 

She departed the sixth boro yesterday, sans the container that crossed the VZ as she made her way out.

Back in spring 2017, Cosco Development was the largest container ship to transit the new locks in Panama.  Her capacity is just over 13,000 teu.

 

At least half dozen Hyundai vessels have called in the sixth boro of late, all around 13000 teu.

I was surprised when the docking pilot boarded up the companionway.

 

Cosco Shipping Camellia is one of more than half dozen Cosco Shipping “flower-class” vessels to call hewre, all around 13,500 teu.

 

Orchid is a sister vessel, and in the next day or so, Sakura will arrive.

The most powerful escort tugboats in the sixth boro shrink in size alongside these behemoths.

All photos and interpretation of info, WVD, who wonders what the next milestone of any sort the sixth boro will see.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

The combinations in the sixth boro might surprise you, cargo and clams, for example.

Mary Virginia crossed Gravesend Bay to get to the Upper Bay. Back in 2013 I posted photos of Mary Virginia here.

Over in Stapleton . . .  Giulianna Maria  . . .  is that an anchoring system?

Crossing Hell Gate and leaving 91st Street Marine Transfer Station behind, Never Enuff seems fishing bound, rod fishing.

Here’s a NJ crab boat.  Note the rake toward the stern.  That’s the Miller’s Launch fleet along the distant shoreline.

And although it carries the name Lobster Boy,

the rakes show they’re going for clams.

Commercial fishing vessels is a hallmark of winter in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD.

The Kill Van Kull is a relatively narrow strait, but skill and experience allows passing like this to occur routinely.   Zim Tarragona (856′ x 106′) and CMA CGM Tosca (1096′ x 140′) need to mind the physics in this passage.

MSC Toronto (1065′ x 140′) heads into Port Elizabeth with another container ship not far behind.

MOL Courage (1036′ x 150′) heads for sea.  She seems to have shed the false AIS signal that accompanied her last trip.

Chacabuco (905′ x 31′)  heads toward the container port.  Years ago, I met this vessel in Brazil.  The name comes from a region in Argentina.

 

Ever Lasting (1098′ x 160′)  heads for the next port.

YM Evolution (849′ x 122′) comes in.

The past few years, she’s been a regular here.

Ever Front, (1095′ x 157′) and the newest vessel in this post, heads for the next port.

 

Taipei Trader (485′ x 76′) does a regular shuttle run.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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