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If you focus on national weather, you might imagine snow has fallen to the extent that we’re back in the ice age, but I decided to walk out to the fishing pier near Owl’s Head, and 

voila!  there were Unico’s Teresa with Acadia as well as Regulus, bathed in rainbow light. Likely it was raining in Manhattan, but not on me, nor was it snowing.

More photos from my walk tomorrow, but I’m guessing Regulus is in port because of big seas out where she’s been working in the Bight. 

All photos this morning, WVD, who has previously seen rainbows in the boro here

 

Here are previous iterations of this title.  Sometimes it’s energizing to return to places you’ve not visited in a while. We followed North River for a bit and then turned into

the Brooklyn Navy yard, a quite busy place.  Sugar Express was there along with Carolina Coast.  The barge shuttles less-refined sugar from Florida to Yonkers, where the sugar is further refined at a riverside facility.

 

Atlantic Salvor was in one of the graving docks.

Once under way again, we followed Genesis Eagle heading for the Sound.

North River was docked at DEP Ward’s Island Central (actually WPCP) by the time we passed by.

NYC Department of Correction Vernon C. Bain Maritime Facility was still where I last saw it, the only traffic being who goes in and out. 

Ditto this wreck, which deserves a name or a series of ex-names, where the only traffic is the ingress and egress of tidal current water.

All photos this week, WVD.

Magothy has worked for a decade and a half already, but I caught her on the East River yesterday, first eastbound to pick up barge Double Skin 59, and then

return it westbound through Hell Gate.  I’ve done several dozen posts about names, mostly vessel names, but Hell Gate is certainly one of the mythic names of a section of the sixth boro.  Interestingly, no vessel I know of has been named for this turbulent stretch of the East River.  Magothy itself is a waterway, mostly tidal, that flows into the Chesapeake.  Check out the etymology here.

Magothy pushing a tank barge through Hell Gate was quite the sight.

 

We overtook it

and I got this photo of the Vane unit with the RFK (Triborough) Bridge and the Hell Gate Bridge framing it.

Where we went east of Roosevelt Island, an unusual side to navigate, Magothy took her barge along the west side.  The Lighthouse here is positioned on the split in the channel at the north end of Roosevelt island.  The cupola/lantern of the lighthouse has recently been redone, and it appears some scupture display is just south of it;  maybe it deserves a walk one of these days, along with another visit to Socrates right across that channel.

All photos, WVD, who’s finding that winter chill is a better time for some explorations than summer humidity.

The phrase “supply chain issues” appears to have eclipsed “pandemic” in my thoroughly unscientific and entirely anecdotal and mental survey. The PANYNJ website does provide some “facts and figures” you can mine and crunch to compare 2021 container movement here to that in 2012.  An easy conclusion is that the container ships are generally larger, so throughput in and out is going to be greater.  Can you guess how much greater?

Let’s look at a sample of container ships I saw in January 2012.  I’ve no idea what the largest container ship serving P of NYNJ was in 2012, but CMA CGM Jules Verne, a 2013 vessel, is 1300′ x 176′ and carries 16,000+ teu.

Evergreen back then was operating Ever Devote. The 1998 Panamax ship is still around.  Numbers are 964′ length x 105′ width and 4211 teu.  That means it fit through the original Panama Canal, just barely;  anything over 105′ wide does not.

2005 Cosco Tianjin is also still working.  She’s 915′ x 131′ and 5752 teu.

 

Cosco Osaka, 2008, 849′ x 105′ and 4578 teu.  She’s still working.

MOL Endurance, 2003, 964′ x 125′ and 4578 teu.  She’s been scrapped.

APL Chile, 2000, 656′ x 89′ and 4038 teu.  She’s also scrapped.

OOCL Norfolk, 2009, 852′ x 105′  and 4506 teu.

By the PANYNJ numbers, I see that in 2021, a total of teu lifts (loaded and empties) is around 9 million, not quite double the 2012 figure of about 5.5 million.  Bigger ships calling, like CMA CGM Jules Verne, slows things down obviously;  one of those carries almost the same number of containers as FOUR times APL Chile.

All 2012 photos here are credited to WVD, and any errors in calculations get blamed to the same guy.

Keep in mind that besides container traffic, the port moves a significant amount of other cargo, including dry bulk materials, petroleum, other wet bulk cargoes [like orange juice], vehicles, and passengers. If I’ve left anything out, I’m sure you’ll tell me.

The point of this series–other than the point of this whole blog which is to document commercial happenings in the sixth boro–is to track changes, and changes in size and capacity have clearly happened in the container vessel department. I try to add other info as well.

Yesterday, besides enjoying the cold and snow accumulation, I caught three ULCVs moving through the KVK within the same hour.  Although this did happen, you shouldn’t conclude that ULCVs regularly pass through the KVK at the rate of three per hour. 

Cosco Development was the last of the three, so these are not in chronological order. 

For the stats, the 2011 build had assistance from four tugs;  her dimensions and capacities are as follows:  1200′ x 158′ and 13100 teu.  She departed Busan Korea on November 21 last year, making this the end of a one month, nine-day voyage.

The first ULCV moving yesterday was Ever Far, which had been in port almost exactly 48 hours. 

Her stats are as follows:  1095′ x 158.7, launched 2020 and carrying up to 11850 teu.  After clearing the Ambrose pilot, she headed in the direction of the Panama Canal at an unstoppable and consistent 21 mph, about the same speed I rolled eastward on the Belt Parkway yesterday. 

If you look carefully to the right side of the photo below, you’ll see Cosco Development beyond the trees and following the vessel below, CMA CGM Jules Verne.

Ditto below.  CMA CGM Jules Verne also had a complement of four assist tugs;  it was windy yesterday.

CMA CGM Jules Verne is one of the handful of largest ULCVs–or vessels of any sort– to traffic the sixth boro ever:  1299′ x 177′ and 44′ draft.  the capacity of this 2013 launch is 16,100 teu.  She departed Port Klang Malaysia on December 10, making this the end of a 29-day 4-hour voyage.

All photos, WVD, who hopes you enjoyed seeing these photos and reading these numbers and places.

If you’ve read through to this point, I have a curious story I can not confirm, but it was told to me yesterday by my friend bowsprite, who attributes it to someone she spoke with in a phonecall to the Department of Motor Vehicles.  She had called DMV because she’d not received her replacement for an expired car registration sticker.  The DMV told her not to worry because they would send her a new temporary sticker to print out herself because–here’s the kicker–the DMV was out of official sticker paper because of the supply chain backup.  Wait a minute . . .  does NYS, which has a paper industry of sorts, get its DMV “sticker paper” from abroad?  Of course, i know that many specialty papers exist, and even consumer toilet paper differs from the commercial type.  Ah, the things we’ve learned because of Covid!

Like I said, I can’t confirm the veracity of this story, but don’t you suspect were are truly doomed if we’ve outsourced sticker paper to foreign manufacturers?

 

 

Snow is the norm in January in the sixth boro, and we’ve just had unusual weather.  On January 2, I was splitting NY wood wearing a t-shirt in the balmy almost 60 degrees.

As you may have guessed, I slipped my noon deadline today because I wanted some evidence of the normal snow accumulation that happened overnight.

Enjoy the results.

Decks are cleared, but snow blown into the outside of the bulwarks is just decorative.

Docklines and footing DO need to be cleared so that

operations proceed with safety.

 

If you’re not accustomed to this weather, you may not appreciate how unpleasant this pretty stuff can be,

especially if, as I hadn’t, you’ve not waterproofed your boots.  Wearing the right clothes and footwear, helps you stay warm and safe.

 

Bollard pull remains the same, a little snow notwithstanding.

All photos today, WVD.

 

This September post gives a clue about why I pay attention to the birds when waiting for a ship.  Of course, buffleheads

migrate into the sixth boro in late autumn and stay until spring.  But since the onset of 2022, birds have been everywhere, including the names on ships.  Check AIS or the waters themselves and there’s a Southern Owl moored along the KVK and an STI Finchley anchored in Stapleton.

See the name on the blue tanker . . .

Phoenix Beacon!!!?  It’s an immortal bird.

While out powerwalking to stay warm while waiting for the cold pink ship the other day in SW Brooklyn, I saw a one of the NYC Ferry boats arrive.  Which one?

Great Eagle of course.    I’m not making this up.

And to reuse this photo from the other day to show the relative size of the tanker and the ULCV, what are their names?

Got that . . .  Great Eagle, ONE Hawk, and Owl 1, all not only birds but also predatory birds moving people or products for people.  To digress, someone told me the other day that owls intimidate eagles!  More on that later.

So here’s a question . . .  in this context of birds, what bird name would you assign to a barge–with green boxes in the foreground–that disposes of cast-offs, throwaways, and undesirable remnants?

All photos, Tuesday, WVD, who has to imagine it would be carrion bird like a crow or vulture, certainly smart, clean-up fowl.

If you’re new to this blog, I’ve done lots of posts on ships’ names, all started out by Surfer Rosa here and still going here

Going way beyond unrelated here, another question:  Given how many nations have the eagle as a symbol appearing on national symbols/coats of arms, why do so few have owls?  In this era of high-tech stealth, should the owl be more prominent?

Consider this to be in the spirit of Dawn 2021.  I wasn’t there at dawn because the ship I wanted to catch–CMA CGM Von Humboldt–departed in the 0’darks, but I arrived a bit later, cold notwithstanding.

The first tugboat I photographed in 2022 was Zeus!  Truth be told, her profile against the Raritan highlands was unmistakeable, but I was a half hour too late for a better shot;  I hadn’t expected a traffic tie-up.  She’s headed for Hampton Roads and beyond.

The second and third are Bruce A. McAllister and 

Ava M, going to the Narrows to see someone about a ship

Next it was Brendan Turecamo assisting a Liberian-flagged tanker, Horizon Thetis.  If you want some interesting origin stories, check a mythology text about the relationship between Zeus and Thetis

Chemical Petrochemical Trader with Brownsville as the prime mover was next.

A while later Bruce A and 

and Ava M came in with their catch, Ever Far.  I’ll put up more photos of this new Ever F-class vessel later. 

And finally, it’s my first view ever of Centerline’s Rubia, ex-Denise A. Bouchard.  If you look closely, you can see Centerline’s lion on the stack. And the name Rubia . . . that’s Spanish for “blonde”… hmmm;  it looks more platinum to me.

All photos, January 4, 2022, WVD, who finds it interesting what cold, clear winter temperatures do to photos.

Why does time pass so quickly?!  As if it were just a few years ago, I recall this Wilmington NC stop on the road trip return from family in Georgia.   I was surprised by the amount of traffic in this Cape Fear River port, like Margaret McAllister here passing Corpus Christi with Petrochem Supplier. Margaret McAllister is one of McAllister’s ex-USN Natick-class tugs, in Margaret‘s case previously known as Tonkawa (YTB-786)

Kathryne E. McAllister (the 1980 one) followed the Margaret to sail a tanker. 

Kathryne E. is currently laid up, but Moran’s Cape Henry (That’s a popular name for tugboats;  I know of at least two others, one Kirby and one Vane.) below is still working, although currently in the Caribbean.

The first few days of January 2012 were as mild as those in 2022.  Here Ellen S. Bouchard heads west in the KVK pushing B. No. 282.  Ellen S. now wears Centerline’s lion logo.

Iron Mike might still wear Wittich Brothers black, blue and white, although I’ve not seen her out in the boro in a while. 

Atlantic Salvor passes in front of a quite changed Manhattan skyline, as seen from St. George.

Gramma Lee T. Moran has departed the sixth boro for Baltimore.  Southern Spirit is an active crude tanker  but she goes by Celsius Esbjerg, currently departing the Bohai Sea for the Yellow Sea.

A light Mckinley Sea heads west in the Kills.  She’s currently painted in Kirby colors, but laid up in Louisiana. Beyond her, Laura K Moran–now based in Savannah–assists tanker Mount Hope.

Marion Moran is out of the Moran fleet, and is likely wearing Dann Ocean livery, although I can’t confirm that.

The 1983 Sand Master was always a favorite of mine;  she was sold into the southern Caribbean, but she may be scrapped by now. 

Capt. Fred Bouchard was sold to a southern California construction company.

And we hold it up here, midmonth, with a vessel type I’ve not seen in a while . . . a livestock ship, Shorthorn Express, which had come into the Upper Bay for services, not to transfer cargo. The 1998 Luxembourg-flagged  Shorthorn Express is active, currently traveling between Israel and Portugal.  I used to see these regularly coming into the Kuwaiti port of Shuwaikh.  I also recall a horrendous sinking of a livestock ship heading for China back in 2020.

All photos, WVD, in January 2012.

How about a new day, a new month, a new year, and a new hull in the sixth boro!  Can you recognize the profiles sans color?

As it passes Norton Point inbound, you begin to make out the color.

Once well inside Gravesend Bay–that’s the west end of Coney Island in the background–the colors increase in their vividness.

Here is the moment when the new ferry,

Sandy Ground, actually enters the Upper Bay portion of the boro, where she will work, if ferry JFK is her model, until the year 2078!!  That’s 56 years from now, and I’ve no clue what the sixth boro will look like–or what vessels will traffic it– 56 years from now.  Here‘s more context on Sandy Ground, Staten Island.

Once she was inside the VZ Bridge, I ran from South Beach, where I got the photos above, to Fort Wadsworth, and caught Margaret Moran sidling up to Sarah Dann.

I first thought the final portion of the tow would be Margaret‘s, but I was wrong; 

while Susan Miller provided a close-up platform, Margaret then delivered

crew to the new ferry, and

lines came across from Doris Moran, the tailboat for the last several miles to Caddell‘s , where the protective gear will be removed and the ferry prepped for service. 

 

By this hour, the fog had cleared just enough that the iconic skyline of Brooklyn and Manhattan was blotted out, giving the illusion that the tow is still at sea. 

All photos December 31 morning by WVD, who likes illusions and unreality sometimes.

Healthy, harmonious, hard-working, hearty 2022 from all of us at tugster tower.

And if you’re not going on a First Hike today, check out Trevor’s Seapixonline from New Zealand and beyond.  Tell him tugster suggested it.

For some other high profile tows done by Sarah Dann recently, click here.

 

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