You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York harbor’ category.

Here are previous installments of this title, all conjectural, especially given that the seafarers here might have a difficult time getting tourist visas to walk freely around the other boros of NYC.  Yet here they are, seeing what sights they can as their vessels transit the channels to and from the docks.

Remember the Miroslav Medved story?  I was hoping to find info on a former Soviet-state seaman jumping ship to defect in NYC in the 1950s or 60s, but I can find no record of that.  Anyone help?

And yet, they do some of the same things any of us might do . . . shooting a selfie, for example with part of the ship and the Bayonne Bridge . . . “yes, I visited New York…” he might write on his FB page in whatever language he would write that.

For some, this might be the first voyage, first trip along the the waterways.  Or it might be the most recent of many and they are looking for progress in whatever shore project has captured their fancy.

They may hold political views of recent developments, current manifestations of US-their country bilateral relations.  They may be bitterly homesick or reeling with economic setbacks.

They may have relatives that live in the US, long lost cousins they hope to catch a glimpse of as they steam by.  They might be basking in warmer weather since they were last here in a blinding and numbing winter storm.

Whatever fascinates them might reflect ignorance of whatever else might fascinate were they able to leave the ship and gallivant about for a few days.

And then some are on duty, maybe just come on watch and thinking only about the next task, counting down the days until they get to leave the ship for whatever sad or exciting reunion awaits somewhere on the other side of the world.   This might be the last US port before they head for a home and loved ones they’ve not seen for moths.

All photos and conjecture by Will Van Dorp.

Ships of all sorts call in the sixth boro.  Quick  post today . . .  showing a range of recent callers.

MSC Zlata R,

Grande Torino,

 

Gerhard Schulte, 

 

Elbeborg,

 

and Adrian Maersk . . . each with a smaller vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

First there was one, and Mike

got a close up look of the “boss,” the curvaceous raised metal plate on the bow.  I love the vintage “fish” representations on either side of that plate, a throwback to an era when mythological creatures decorated ocean charts.

 

 

Then beginning a week ago, there were two,

stern to bow.

Whatever work is underway on these two vintage vessels at GMD,

I’d say it’s akin to a restoration.

 

Many thanks to Mike Abegg for all these photos.

Previous related posts can be found here and here.

 

Local government boats  . . .  NYPD actually are out all year ’round training, patrolling, for whatever purpose.  If I were differently ambitious, I’d develop a crime fighter television series based on the lives and work of the marine unit of the NYPD.  But one impediment to fulfilling that goal is that I know very little about the marine unit.

This blog is not so much an end result of content research as a starting point for me, so besides putting up recent photos of NYPD boats, here are some facts that I just located:  NYPD employs 55, 304   people, of whom 38,422 were officers in 2018.  They operate 9624 cars.

Here is info on some of the boats in the harbor unit.

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The harbor unit, established in 1858, is made up of 150 officers today, of whom 31 specialize in scuba operations.

Since they cover the 576 miles of water’s edge as well as the 146 square miles of NYC navigable water, I’d call them the sixth boro police.

Here’s a previous government boats post I did.

For more historical info, click here.

Doing this post has given me some ideas for some sort of project.  To be continued . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s a horn.   You could call it a ship’s whistle or audible signaling device.  It’s clearly not a bell, but that would work also.  From three years ago, here’s another one of these devices.

From this photo below, you have no sense of size, though, do you?

 

Nor do you get that from here, unless . . . .

you identify the structure “behind” the horn as a ladder, scaled to a member of a crew.  Now imagine this horn atop the roof of your pickup truck.

Below and to the left . . . you make out the name?

Still see the horn up there?  Can you imagine being on that ladder when the horn sounds?  Can you imagine a seagull that has perched there just before a signal?  Click here if you want to hear it, but first, turn the volume waaaaay up to 11.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders whether both horns blow the same pitch and whether it’s true that some QM equipment has been integrated into the QM2’s whistle.

Here are some sound codes.

And here are lots of Great Lakes sounds.

By now you’ve seen a trend in several posts . . . my showing you what my eyes want to misperceive.  Does this not look like a tug with a heaping deckload on a barge?   I took the shot Sunday in the rain, camera protected by an umbrella.   Precipitation diffuses the subject.

A minute later, what is approaching has become more apparent.

It’s Gargano, which I’ve watched for a spell now on AIS. Built in 2002, she’s been transformed from an OSV to a wind farm construction support vessel.   Read more here.

Her crew was catching some photos from the underside of the VZ Bridge here.

 

For relative size, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister, 

at the Narrows to meet what was not a barge at all.   The “barge” in the top photo was Maersk Kowloon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who just learned that Gargano is the location of a wind farm off the east coast of Italy.

Alternate classification for this post could be under “specialized” or “whatzit“.

 

OK, I know today is blue skies and clear air, but yesterday I stood in the rain at the Narrows waiting for an exotic vessel that I knew wouldn’t arrive for a while.  But around virtual sunrise . . . virtual because the sun never rose or set all day . . . this was in the offing.

Since Mary Alice was involved, I had assumed it would be a floating crane or a dump scow.  Mary Alice is to the right, light blue, DonJon blue.   But along with her are Normandy, Treasure Coast, and Sapphire Coast.

By this time, I’d put together that I’d learned that the “dead ship” that had arrived about two weeks earlier was the first of two coming to GMD Brooklyn.  They were moving “slow bell,” which was fine by me, because the vessel I’d come out to see was still . . . at sea.

Some changing-up took place in the alongside-tow before they came through the Narrows.

I mastered holding an umbrella while framing the shots;  the secret was repurposing a garbage can against the railing, which worked because there was drizzle but no wind.

 

Once I got the photos home, as so often happens,

I could make out the “riding crew” on the dead ship.  Previous dead ship posts on tugster can be found here.

Sapphire Coast (4860 hp) by now has moved to the apparent port side.

Normandy brings 1900 hp and Mary Alice . . . 3000.

Here’s more riding crew.

Scan through here to find context for these vessels . . . C4-S-58a . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks some vessels look just right on rainy days, better than on sunny days.

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

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Here was the first in this series.  Let’s go to a different location on the East River, and I know I’m late coming to this story, but it’s an exciting one.  Hunts Point is now receiving regular cement shipments, by ship via the East River.  Shipments originate at Port Daniel Gascons, QC.

Here under the 59th Street Bridge a cement ship heads for the terminal  . . ..

 

Above and below, the ship and tugs pass the soon-to-open new campus of Rockefeller University.

I took the next two photos at a McInnis facility just upstream from Montreal, along the Beauharnois Canal.

Here’s more on the company.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As of this writing, another cement ship is at the terminal.

 

When I saw Anthem of the Seas departing the Narrows as I waited for “da world” the other day, I was aware of a possible shot . . .  juxtaposing a large cruise ship with an ULCV.  Is there a ULCV/ULCC-type abbreviation for cruise ships . . .  eg, ULPV?  But I digress.  Imagine for now how that juxtaposition would look…

Earlier the same week, I’d seen QM2 at the Brooklyn Passenger vessel . . .  so let’s throw the tapes at that.  I recall reading the QM2 funnel was designed to accommodate the NYC market, more precisely, the fit under the VZ Bridge.

I know it’s a different vantage point again, but here was YM World entering the Narrows.

And here are World and Anthem, and it surprised me how much more air draft on Anthem this shows.

So here are the lengths:  World  1200′  Anthem 1139′ and QM2  1132′

Beams  World  167′  Anthem  162′  and QM2  135′

And for air draft, I know World‘s as it came in, but for the two passenger vessels, I’ll estimate air draft from “height minus deep draft,” using published numbers.  You naval architects may take issue with that, as may others of you with specific expertise I lack.

Anthem  208′  (Is that possible?)   QM2  199′  and World  177′

I’d expected the air draft of YM World to be greater.

So here’s a question I don’t know the answer to:  how many crew work on World?  Total crew on Anthem is listed as 760 and on QM2 is 1253, for 4905 and 2695 passengers, respectively.

Here are more numbers.

 

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