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Many thanks to you all who reached out about yesterday’s post.  Let me recap what I’ve learned since taking the photos on Sunday and posting them on Monday.  First, the dock has been returned to Pier 66 on the North River, where it seems to have broken loose Friday.  Sunday in the wee hours it was reported–as an unseen but substantial piece of debris– in the wee hours off Caddells on the ebbing KVK, which is even farther west than where I saw it Sunday soon after dawn.  This means it was shuttling with the tides west and east in the KVK.  Since being retrieved by Driftmaster, it was claimed by owners over near Pier 66 and towed back there, reportedly, and not by USACE.

Ironically, I walked past Pier 66 yesterday midmorning, but didn’t notice an absence.  I’ve walked there only twice in the past three months.  Here’s a post I did from one of the walks in late January under the Whatzit title.

There’s that other Vessel along the west side of Midtown, one which seems to be commanding attention and controversy, as here.

I first became aware of the planned structure in April 2017, when I caught and posted this photo of Sarah Ann and barge  under the title Whatzit 36.

Here’s October 2017.

And here’s March 25, 2019.  If we zoom in on the top of the “Vessel,” you’ll see

people who are standing there.

You can offer a new name . . . I’d go with Hudson Yards Carapace, as it reminds me of a metallic carapace of a sea turtle, but I’ll bet you have your own ideas.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks the name “vessel” has to go.

It’s the first full day of spring, which means that soon many more small craft will operate on the sixth boro, yet all winter long, many small boats never leave.

If this is a Class A 25′ SAFE Defender boat, it may have entered service in 2002.   I’ll be back with this.

Here are a team of the newer 29′ USCG vessels.

Line and boom boats, patrol boats . . . these small craft operate in the sixth boro all year round.

Ditto survey boats like this one.

Over alongside Rhea‘s stern, that’s certainly a launch from Miller’s.

I’m guessing these are 31′ SAFE boats operated by NYPD, but they’ve been running in threes of late.  They also have larger Vigor (ex-Kvichak)-built boats.

NJ State Police has a few small boats that patrol/train all year round.

NYPD has had a few of these for almost five years now.  When they first arrived, I was astonished by the speed they could make.

USACE Moritz first launched in 2001.

 

So let’s go back to that 25′ Defender in the first photo, but at closer inspection . . . see the logo on the door . . . it’s a DonJon RIB.

USCG checking me out with a long lens? . . . Nah, that’s Bjoern of New York Media Boat.  Check out their blog here, and book a tour here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s again reminded that you’ll see something new each time you go down to the water and look closely.  And in the next few months, in all waters recently ice-bound, be ready to see an influx of recreational boats coming north for the summer.

 

and to someone else who took these photos back in 1974.

From what I can see in these photos, taken in the shipyard over in Jersey City, the lines are simple and very pleasing.

Of course, I can’t see the frames, and even if I could, I’m not a naval architect in any way shape or form.

Here’s she’s had finish paint.  Joe Weber was the yard foreman.  Here’s a photo of Joe Weber at work in 1983, and here’s one of her at Miller Girls at work around 2006.

I took the next photo, below, in January 2007, thirty-three years after she was built.  And my question is . . . since I have not seen Miller Girls in a long time, is she still around?

It looks like some sponsons have been added.

Photos this old qualify this as a “fifth dimension” post.

Many thanks to Paul for passing these along.

 

 

Here goes another 3-fer, three cargo vessels making their way again through the KVK simultaneously.  JRT here at dawn assists orange juice carrier Orange Blossom 2 through the ConHook Range.

Jonathan C passes in front of them, returning from assisting another vessel now bound for sea.

Right behind the juice carrier is a box ship.

 

As the juice ship nears midpoint in the KVK, notice a RORO rounding Bergen Point at the west end of the KVK.

As I said, congestion . ..   that’s routine.  Kimberly travels along the starboard bow of the RORO,

Meanwhile, that box ship mentioned earlier has Eric on port

and Capt Brian A. at the stern.

Glovis Safety . . . headed for Philly and as of this moment is midAtlantic on its way to Zeebrugge.

 

As I said . . .   skillful mariners make a congested waterway seem just routine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Pushing and shoving  . . . are they different in this context with 3000 hp concentrated in the right location?

New steel and recycled name . . . Torm Hilde, the 114,000 dwt tanker in port recently, got spun around in the KVK by Kimberly and JRT.

Torm Hilde is one of the largest tankers operated by the company, now in its 130th year!

And while two Moran tugs are assisting the Torm tanker out, two more are assisting crude tanker Compassion into her berth.

And then two more are assisting an Evergreen L ship through as well.

Congestion? . . . it’s just another day in the Kills….

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a different perspective on the sixth boro, different from my more usual ones.  And in this morning light, Sarah Ann looks like a beauty as she heads somewhere past Robbins Reef Light and

well . . . along that island.

Let’s continue trying to get some different POVs.  Patricia has some fine lines here accentuated by the low light of dawn.

Elk River and Hunting Creek pass, with missions in opposite directions.

Evelyn Cutler moves product for somewhere up the North River.

Paula Atwell moves garbage containers past an incoming green new shipment, and

Julie Anne, a new one for me in the sixth boro although I have posted a “down south” photo of her here, moves a scow up toward the Passaic River.  Notice that until I got to the Norfolk tugs, there were no tugs with even a drip of red paint on them in this post?

And finally, Brian Nicholas is neither a huge nor a small tug, 72′ loa, but as she passes the stern of CMA CGM Nabucco, she

looks almost like a toy.  My first reaction was excitement  . ..  erroneously thinking I’d see either the elusive  Susan E. or Elizabeth Anna.  But don’t get me wrong, greetings to Brian Nicholas!

All photos and sentiments here the product of and/or the opinion of Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Using the asterisk or not is something I started a few years ago, to distinguish vessels mostly used in salt v. fresh water on this blog.  Ships v. ships *  …. the asterisked set is up to 8 now.

So where might this vessel have been photographed?

For what it’s worth, it was built in Guanabara Bay . . . way back in to a spot I never got to…. in Rio state.  It would have been grand to see this vessel depart north bound past Sugar Loaf.

Last chance to guess here . . . .

Algoma Integrity has been replacing Alice on the aggregates runs from the Canadian maritimes. As of this writing, Alice is on a run between Boston and the Bahamas.

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

All these photos were taken in this order yesterday between 0647 and 0704 EDT.  CMA CGM T. Roosevelt was bound for sea.  As of this moment, she’s off Norfolk waiting to enter the Chesapeake.  If you don’t know, Roosevelt is one of now quite a large number of ULCSs or ULCVs [I’ve read both terms for these behemoths.] calling in NYC’s sixth boro, all 1200′ loa and carrying between 13,000 and 14,500 teu.  By the way, there’s a good graphic of container vessel evolution in that link.

At 0647 she was passing Caddells.  Dawn and dusk shots have lots of lights and their reflections in them.

 

Jonathan C sees her out  . . . .

Imagine the number of tractors needed to move each of these containers out of a port.  Better still, imagine a parking lot of all those tractors parked as close together as you could. I’ll get back to that.

The bow was illuminated by dawn; the stern is quite dark. In the extreme left to the left of Jonathan C, Scott Turecamo had a waiver to move into the KVK to get to her berth with a favorable tide.

 

Note where the docking pilot will exit.

 

When I zoomed all the way out, the camera sees more of what I saw, big picture adjusted for light.  The photo above and below I took just a few seconds apart.

Although the images below relate to Great Lakes shipping, they do illustrate the point I was trying to make with the comment above about tractors needed to move all of these containers all tightly parked in single lot. I’d love to see an illustrator create this image, including the cross county double-decker container train cars.  And I know fuels differ as well.  Of course, an alternative is to make and consume all out machines, tools, toys, etc. aka what we import and export locally.

Again, this is Great Lakes, but I’m guessing this is part of the green oldie-but-goodie deal.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

This light is available for only a few minutes twice a day but then only if the rising or setting sun is not cloud covered.  Humidity existed the other morning too, in advance of the impending rain.  I’m not sure why, but late winter/early spring light seems richer as well, although that may be related to directionality.

Alex McAllister approached from the east end of the KVK, and her illumination and that of her background differs

from that of Amy Moran, approaching from the west end of the strait.

Pokomoke followed Alex, about a minute later, but the light has already changed.

 

Andiamo‘s port bow has caught no rays yet, unlike the west side of the dock where she’s tied up.

Meanwhile, Amy moves past and into the Upper Bay.  Lighting like this is certainly worth getting up and out for.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who linked previous installments of this title here.

For good photos, andiamo one of these pre-dawns.

 

 

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