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Tankers don’t usually dock here, and 

tankers of this size, Suezmax and 910′ x 157′ are not even the norm in the sixth boro.

I don’t know the story, but 

since she’s so light, I needed to get these close ups at

dawn.  

She’s sailed the oceans for less than a year since leaving a shipyard–don’t know which–of this company.  If she’s not the actual newest, she’s certainly among the newest, and since she’s the only Suezmax tanker in town, I’m certain she’s the newest Suezmax tanker in the sixth boro this morning. 

She’s exposing a lot of hull.

All photos, WVD.

Here are her fleetmates. 

Call this the push knee set.  And let’s do it this way . . . given all the features that could be discussed, focus of these for oldest/newest, smallest/largest, and least/most horsepower.

CMT Pike.  An aside about CMT Pike is that she was not built with a retractable wheelhouse.  When launched, she had a fixed wheelhouse, the “stalk” of which can be seen directly behind where the raised wheelhouse is now.  I’ve not been able to find a photo of her in that original configuration. 

Shiloh Amon aka Jillian Irene

 

Lightning

Discovery Coast

Miss Madeline

And finally, a photo from January 2013 and showing one that has been sold out of the sixth boro . . . Herbert P. Brake. 

Have you written down your final decisions?

All photos, WVD.  All info here thanks to Birk Thomas’ invaluable tugboatinformation

Ready?  No cheating.

Just guesses.

Oldest is Miss Madeline, and newest is Shiloh aka Jillian Irene. 1976 and 2022.

Smallest considering both length and beam is Herbert P. Brake, and longest is Discovery Coast although both Discovery and Jillian tie at 34′ for beam. Lengths are 60′ and 96′.

Least horses is Brake, and most is Discovery.  They range from 375 hp to 3000 hp.

Kimberly headed out on a mission, as 

did Mary.

They converged alongside Bow Chain, 

where crew mustered. 

As daylight opened between Bow Chain and the dock, 

Kimberly moved to the opposite side

and with guidance

Bow Chain moved slightly forward and toward port and 

 

rotated counterclockwise

with Kimberly helping the bow around while

Mary pushed the stern. 

Pilot and crew directed from the bridge wing

and once sailed, Bow Chain began a voyage to the Gulf of Mexico. 

All photos, WVD. 

 

A couple days ago in the 77 Days post (which I’ve since learned added up to 79 days) I saw a mariner I know on the boro on a Maersk container vessel.

Most of the time though I don’t know the folks I see working on the water.  The folks in yellow and orange coats below are likely longshoremen mustering before ruunning in and driving all the vehicles out that are to be discharged here . . .  in the sixth boro.  

Note the mariners below preparing the messenger line down to the tugboat. 

The deckhand retrieves it, makes it to the tugboat, signals, 

and the ONE crew move forward to standby at the forward mooring area. 

Meanwhile, the deckhand secures the line. 

All photos, WVD.

Hat tip to the people out on the boro in all kinds of weather. 

 

A small 14-year-old general cargo vessel named Industrial Emma

was inbound from Salvador Brasil.   Any guesses on how long that voyage would take?

She’s a 5800 hp ship coming in with an assist from Miriam Moran, a 3000 hp tug. 

Industrial Emma is the product of a Polish shipyard, Remontowa, whose 1960s history I find not surprising but interesting. 

Her container capacity is 535 teu.

Travel time from Salvador was 17 days and 3 hours.  The Intermarine vessel’s next port of call is Houston. 

All photos, WVD. 

Even on overcast days, the sixth boro aka NY harbor offers sights.  It’s long been so;  here’s much abridged paragraphs 3-5 Chapter 1 of Moby Dick:

[People] stand … fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning … some seated … some looking over the bulwarks of ships from China… [some] pacing straight for the water…  Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land… They must get just as nigh the water as they possibly can without falling in. And there they stand…  infallibly [move] to water…  Why did the poor poet of Tennessee, upon suddenly receiving two handfuls of silver, deliberate whether to buy him a coat, which he sadly needed, or invest his money in a pedestrian trip to Rockaway Beach? Why is almost every robust healthy [youth] with a robust healthy soul… at some time or other crazy to go to sea? Why upon your first voyage as a passenger, did you yourself feel such a mystical vibration, when first told that you and your ship were now out of sight of land? Why did the old Persians hold the sea holy? Why did the Greeks give it a separate deity, brother of Jove? Surely all this is not without meaning…. we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans … the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.”

OK, so that might be over the top, but I find at least as much entertainment along the water as in all the other places in NYC.  Maybe that makes me a hermit, but that’s irrelevant.  Can you name these boats?  

At less than 10 miles an hour, trade comes in, commerce of all sort goes on. 

different hour different goods, 

different tasks, 

different energies

and errands 

by different 

companies . .  .

All photos, WVD.

And in order, Jonathan C Moran, Meaghan Marie, Ellen McAllister, Andrea, Schuylkill, Rowan R McAllister, Thomas D Witte, Susan Miller.

 

Truth be told, I should have passed this 100 milestone long ago, but I forestalled a number of times by differentiating within the title:  for example, besides the August 2007 starting point of random ships 1 but also random ships *1 and really random ships 1 posted inAugust 2016 and March 2019.

Forestalled or not, we are here, and I still enjoy doing this.  These photos all date from this month and December . . .   like B. Franklin Reinauer here lightering Atlantic Blue

Atlantic Crown here has a deck barge alongside delivered by Susan Miller, while in the distance you see the Bayonne peninsula and beyond. 

The next two photos show Laura K Moran assisting MSC Greenwich as an outbound Seaspan New York

shares the KVK as it heads for sea. 

If I’ve learned anything from these years of documenting the traffic the watery boro, it’s the value of light to (duh!) photo graphy.  When you have the dawn light illuminating the orange hull of vessels like NCC Tabuk, with red and shadow image of Miriam Moran, and the cold black steel of the barge to the left,  what more need I say about the joy of spending time in the cold morning solitude watching and “recording.”

What’s not to enjoy about shivering while taking photos of a CMA CGM with the name of a huge tropical city.  

Before completing this post, any ideas about the reference in Tabuk or the age and population size of Surabaya?  Answers follow. 

One more dawn photo here . . .  the enigmatic name Eco Revolution on a tanker escorted into the KVK by a 6000 hp Moran tugboat.  

All photos, WVD. 

Tabuk, in Saudi Arabia, and Surabaya, on Indonesia’s Java Island, have both been settlements for over a millennium.

As for Surabaya, some of you might know the lyrics of the Kurt Weill song here by Marianne Faithfull, but I prefer this one from Javanese myth

Twins today, but as with any twins, one will be deemed older. Do you know which?

Genesis Vigilant used to be called Michigan Service.  Launched in 1981, she’s 99′ x 34′ and propelled by 3000 hp.  The barge GM8001 is 348′ x 75′.

Years ago, i errorneously assumed she was an ATB.

This barge is slightly shorter, narrower and about a decade newer. 

GM 6506 is being towed by Genesis Victory

same dimensions as Vigilant and slightly newer, although still from 1981.  Genesis Victory used to be Huron Service. 

All photos, WVD. 

What made this stand out was the mostly horizontal member quite high off the water.  So I started snapping.

I’d noticed a few days back that Pelham had headed unusually far east in the Sound, and had run

sometimes tandem with Captain Willie Landers.  So this must be the tow.  

Any guesses?  

Names are always a clue. 

McInnis is a name that has appeared on this blog previously.  Here’s their network;  in that link, click on the map enlarger.  Below that, Van Aalst is another clue, given what they do.  So if you looked up both links in this paragraph, you can identify what this is. 

Put them altogether, and you’ve solved this whatzit puzzle:  it’s a dry bulk ship unloader built for McInnis.

Where it is headed and why . . .  

now I’ve no clue. A decade ago, I saw an antique specialized barge like this on the Maas (or Meuse) River;  the barge was named “graanzuiger no. 19,which is pretty explicit Dutch for what it was designed to do:  graanzuiger translates literally as “grain sucker.”  This barge Resolute might be called a cementzuiger. A similar vessel called a floating grain elevator incorporating some of the same principles used to be quite common in the sixth boro, back when our watery boro was a major grain transshipment point. 

All photos, WVD.

 

I caught her at the fuel dock the other day, and knew a bit of back story.  Do you recall seeing her before on this blog?

Since she was fueling and I was not waiting around for that process to end, I left.  I wish I’d gotten a 360-degree view, because changed paint really changes appearance.

She used to be Marion Moran, as seen in these Bayonne Bridge April 2013 photos

here muscling a HanJin container ship around Bergen Point. 

Another new name . . . Marilyn George, stencilled on for now. 

As you can see, before that she was Steven Wayne and before that . . .

she was 

Patapsco, as seen here in a September 2008 photo.

Welcome Marilyn George and Topaz Coast.  All photos, WVD. 

 

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