You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York harbor’ category.

Kimberly Poling and barge lie alongside Maritime Gracious for lightering.

 

Eastern Dawn, here pushing a mini barge, continues to work in the sixth boro,

with a base over alongside the dormant Evening Tide

Bruce A. travels west in the East River after a job over near Throg’s Neck.

I love the “whitewater” on the uptown side of the 59th Street Bridge.

A mile or so behind Bruce A., Ellen McAllister passes  Rockefeller University’s River Campus.

Back exactly six years ago, pre-fab sections of the new campus building were lifted in place by a fleet of DonJon vessels here

And finally, in the late spring haze, it’s Mary Turecamo

approaching her next assist.

All photos, WVD, who’s entrusting these posts to the tugster tower robots.  Hat tip or whatever, robots.  Actually, I don’t even know how many robots are involved in this effort, since they appear happy to subsist on nothing more than the electricity I provide.

I’m trying to get together a post or two from my current location, which I was supposed to depart from a week ago . . .

Here was the first post in this series, but Wednesday I caught the crane again, this time being handled by a regular in the boro as well as a newcomer named Brinn Courtney, who appeared here once before as Patricia Winslow

Thinking the better shot would be with Manhattan as background, we opted for the NY side,

but as we passed on our way to another job, we noticed the green stack on the starboard side of the tow.  I’d not seen that earlier and had not taken time to look at AIS.

At first I thought Charles James, but her red paint has been covered over a few years ago, so i finally looked at AIS and saw

it was Brinn Courtney, a new-to-Stasinos boat. 

I would have taken more of Brinn Courtney, but we were already late for a rendezvous.  

Welcome to the boro, Brinn Courtney.  She appeared here once about eight years ago as Patricia Winslow.

All photos on the fly, WVD. Thanks to the New York Media Boat for conveyance.

Note:  By this time tomorrow, I will be out of the boro and the robots in tugster tower will again have their virtual fingers and hands on the controls.  I’ve no idea how long I’ll be away on this gallivant, nor what the WiFi situation will be.  Go, robots!

 

June 2012 was pivotal for me.  A photo sent along by a friend alerted me to Canal commerce–Canadian corn– entering the US at Oswego, a place I knew something of from my youth. 

If that was a spark, then the breeze that fanned it was an invitation to do my trial article for Professional Mariner magazine, which led me to Kingston NY, the mouth of the Rondout, and a project involving use of a half century old tug Cornell to do TOAR signoffs.  My most recent article in the magazine came out today and can be seen here.

On that assignment, I was privileged to have a mentor, Brian Gauvin, do the photography.

Other big events for June 2012 included the movement of shuttle Enterprise from JFK airport ,

ultimately to the Intrepid Museum to be

hoisted onto the flight deck as part of the display, now covered.

My daughter went off to Brasil (again) and the Amazon, leading me to go there myself a year later, fearing she’d never return because she loved it so much there.

I’d given her a camera before she went, and was rewarded with some quite interesting photos, like these small motor boats that looked almost like slippers …

with straight shafts coming straight out of air-cooled engines.

During my trip up to the Rondout, I stopped in Newburgh, where replicas of La Niña and Pinta, crafted using traditional techniques on the Una River in Bahia, Brasil, attracted crowds, one of many stops along the great loop route. 

Other festivities on the Hudson that summer . . .

included the sails and music associated with the Clearwater Festival, and of course the small boats moving in some of the venues.

 

Patty Nolan and Augie were the small tugs, and of course the sailboats including Mystic Whaler, Woody Guthrie,

 

and of course the sloop Clearwater.  The Clearwater organization will not be doing a music festival in June 2022.  Mystic Whaler is now working in Oxnard CA at the Channel Islands Museum.

Summer time and the living is easy well, at least it feels that way some days . . . . 

All photos, except the first one, WVD.  That first photo was taken by Allan H. Seymour.

 

For the past week on AIS, this has been “govt vessel 5,” and she’s currently in Stapleton taking on fuel.

Clearly she’s a Freedom-class LCS, with its distinctive bow-low profile.   It’s powered by four engines:  2 x Fairbanks Morse/ Colt-Pielstick 9,100 hp diesels plus two 2 x Rolls-Royce 48,000 hp gas turbines run through four Rolls-Royce/Kamewa waterjets.  For routine cruising, I was told on my tour yesterday, only the diesels run.  For sprints, all four are on line.

Tours were open to the public in Stapleton the past few days.

The vessel has no curves, but neither does it have many right angles.

 

 

The explanation offered for the large flight deck is that as a relatively small vessel, it rolls/pitches/etc. in a sea.  The additional space is appreciated by helicopter and drone operators. 

I’d love to have seen the engine room, but this is as close to the engine I got.

Here’s the view back toward the bridge, as seen from between the anchor machinery and the deck gun.

And finally, some views from the helm and

assorted screen, indicators, and the four engine controls.

All photos, WVD.

Below is an article from Saturday’s NYTimes, and the women of the fleet.

 

Novel bow marking,

unusual box colors,

familiar port . . .

recognizable tugboat,

 

container with the “I” painted out,

certainly a container line marking I don’t recall seeing before,

 

oh wait . . .  what did that character’s name mean in Swahili?  And what’s been painted out is X-press Annapurna . . .  same same,  Hakuna Matata or Likambo te…, as I would say it back in the 1970s . . ..

no problem . . . .  Any Lingala speakers out there today?  Oh well, don’t worry be happy is the same.

All photos, WVD.

New container shipping lines have appeared in the boro here and here recently.

I’m just observing, not criticizing, but the vessel turnout in 2022 seems quite small. I understand that lots of other things are happening globally.   Following USS Bataan, USCGC Sycamore (WLB-209) and HMS Protector (A-173) arrive.  They are both about 20 years in service and have both done assignments in the Arctic.

Sycamore made a run up to the GW before turning around. I saw her here in the sixth boro just over a year ago.

Protector did not begin life as a UK Royal Navy ice patrol vessel.  Rather, it was built as the 2001 Polarbjørn in Lithuania for GC Rieber, a Norwegian company based in Bergen, a port I visited way back in 1985, on one of my early gallivants.  Unfortunately, in those days I traveled sans camera.

 

 

USCGC Dependable (WMEC-626) built at AmShip in Lorain OH and commissioned in 1968,  is over the midcentury mark and still at work.  AmShip Lorain-closed since the early 1980s-  built some icons, several of their lakers still very much in active service.

 

Most of the medium endurance cutters of Dependable‘s cohort-Reliance class– are still in service, either in the US or elsewhere.

 

 

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) was commissioned in 2015.   Like Sycamore and Dependable, she was built on the Great Lakes

Four years ago here, I visited the Marinette Shipyard town where Milwaukee came into existence. Some products of Marinette include Sycamore–above–and Ellen McAllister, also involved in Wednesday’s parade into the sixth boro. Katherine Walker, part of the welcoming committee Wednesday, is another Marinette product, as are some of the current Staten island ferries (Molinari class) and some ATBs, like Brandywine and Christiana that pass through the port now and then.

 

As Milwaukee steamed upriver, she slowed and spun a 180 turn much faster than I imagined possible for a 378′ vessel.   I wish I’d been on shore just off her improvised turning basin when she did so. Was anyone there and can send photos?

A sister of Milwaukee, USS Duluth (LCS 21) was commissioned in her namesake city only earlier this week.

All photos, WVD, who hopes to get in some more Fleet Week sights this weekend.  If you’re reading this and arrived in the sixth boro–aka the primary boro–of NYC, welcome. 

 

 

Dana Alexa is another seldom seen tugboat in the sixth boro of NYC;

although painted DonJon blue, she’s now a Breakwater Marine boat, I believe.

It was good to see the 1958 54′ boat with a barge of what appears to be sheet piling.

William F. Fallon Jr. has appeared here several times recently.

Robert IV has worked in the boro for over 30 years.

 

Linda L. Miller originally was called Frog Belly.  I like that name.

And finally, you most likely by now have heard about the barge carrying scrap metals that caught fire on Delaware Bay and you may have wondered how scrap metals could burn.  What follows is a series of photo I took in mid-April of a similar load.

This load was towed by Mackenzie Rose;  the one that caught fire was towed by fleetmate Daisy Mae. Loads like this have been fairly common on the run from the sixth boro to the Delaware River.

Of course an investigation of the fire, which was confined to the barge, will take some time,

but scrapyard fires are fairly common.  Here‘s an unrelated though germane article from the BBC.

All photos, WVD.

I’ve posted a lot of unusual ship names here over the years. 

If you don’t read Greek, as I don’t, the one above and below are the same ship, just from different angles.

Triton is a 14k+ teu vessel, making it quite the giant. 

Whether it’s jolly or not, i can’t tell.  It is truly jam-packed.

Over on the far side of Triton, yup, that’s Happy Lady.

 

Justine, Ava, and Ellen all played a role in getting Triton safely into if not out of the sixth boro.

 

Taipei Triumph is a bit newer and has roughly the same teu-capacity. Notice how small the ferry Barberi, which is closer, looks in comparion.

Gregg McAllister is working the starboard bow, 

with an untethered JRT Moran following, and Bruce A. ready when needed.

Bow and stern on the two green giants are slightly different.

Other than the sixth boro setting, the escort tugs, my framing in the post, and the fact that all the photos were taken by me, WVD, they are unrelated.

Anyone catch the vessel in this post that I did not acknowledge in any way?

Not quite half a year ago, I used a variation on this title, but photos I took yesterday necessitate a modification as you see above. 

Imagine my surprise when I saw this nameplate on the most famous–and only–wooden hulled tugboat in the sixth boro.

I’d noticed before on AIS that there was USCG vessel in North Cove, but I never imagined this would be it.  In the background, Mariner III adds an allusion to another time period.

Now does that look like contemporary font the USCG would use?!!  I don’t think so.

And the stack marking and registration board “New York Harbor Patrol” no longer say what it used to . . .  might this be some leasing arrangement.  But hey . . . this is NYC, a movie-making-magnet metropolis, and this just smacks of a made-for-movies-makeover!  Remember this one?  Find a lot more film tugs previously on tugster here.

As to the other part of the title check this out . . .   the name of the barge B. No. 280 follows the Bouchard nomenclature pattern.

Of course, I never imagined Bouchard boats in anything other than their original livery . . .

For now at least the name is the same;  in fact, the name board appears not even to have been refinished.

The stack is unadorned white.

And “Portland OR”  registration on the starboard stern corner of the barge and

on the tug.  Maybe some lion motifs are forthcoming?

All photos, WVD.

 

Quick . . .  what do you know about this white lionine tugboat?  Answer follows.

We’re still being quick here?  What can you tell me about this model of Dianne E. in a display case on the lower level of a barge of Pier 66?  I know nothing about the model, but I stopped by at Pier 66 Wednesday for the first time in way too long.  Any interest in meeting gathering there one of these warm days?

And speaking of piers, I made my first stop at Pier 76 ever Wednesday as well.  It seems I’ve not been out here in a really long time. 

Harvey looked resplendent alongside the seating  . . ..

The NYS Canal system opens officially today, and that means Sparky might be a looper headed up there traveling north and then west to get back to Florida.  I’m just speculating. 

Anne Moore is busy.  Hey, NPS, I’d like to talk with you about this vessel.

Media Boat 5 is always out, always doing and seeing interesting sights.

RCC Africa is a RORO I’ve not seen before.   Here are Autoliner routes. 

Pacific Basin‘s Sharp Island left town light. 

Rolf Williams was returning to base after delivering lube solutions. 

And that brings us back to this tugboat . . .  the former J. George Betz.

All photos, WVD, who suggests you too gallivant around the original boro, the sixth boro, some warm day soon. 

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