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1959  Dalzellera (launched in Staten Island in 1915 as CRRJJ Bethlehem) at the Bush terminal.

SS United States at its North River Pier.  Thanks to my “group-sourcing” friends on FB, I’ve learned that tank was part of “the gas regulator at West 45th Street, part of a manufactured gas plant at that site, likely operated by Consolidated Edison. Erected late 1800’s and demolished in 1965. Some “good” stuff in that ground, part of the reason it’s still a parking lot.”  Also, the sign says “gas heats best”,  and after WW2, a large banner hung there proclaiming “welcome home.”

1957 East River looking toward Manhattan, and

farther south and west, showing the McAllister yard.  Interestingly, the Singer Building, the world’s tallest building from 1908 to 1909,  still appears in the photo above, just to the right of the Brooklyn Bridge Towers.

Many thanks to Steve munoz for these photos.  You can see more of Steve’s vintage NYC and sixth boro photos here.

 

How’s your Greek?

Cape Taft, here with Miriam Moran, has been in the boro before.

Stolt Ocelot appears on the blog for the first time, as

 Fivelborg and Maria G. await dock activity.

Here’s USNS Sisler dug in before she departed for sea trials.

Celebrity Summit is currently in port  . . . for enough time to debark one set and embark the next set of passengers.

Acrux C followed by Mary Turecamo and  . . . Helen Laraway.

Cape Ann (T-AK-509),is still in the East River, as is Cape Avinoff (AK-5013),  pictured here, here, and here.

Bright Ocean 3 (III) is headed for Turkey, after having made a stop on the Delaware River.

Weco Josefine is currently Egypt bound.

All photos since the start of summer by Will Van Dorp, but one of the photos was not taken in the sixth boro.  Any ideas which?

Unrelated but current:  yesterday the USACE tender Hudson was reefed off Fire Island.  You can see three photos I took here, and the press release from the USACE here.  The press release answers a question I long had:  where was it built.  The answer is Paasch Marine Services on the Delaware River.  This is itself confusing, because Hudson is not listed as being built in Paasch Marine, which was in Erie PA and did build boats.  There is a Pasch Marine on the Delaware River (actually in Easton PA–opposite side of the state from Erie PA) but I don’t know that they ever built boats there.    Hmmm.

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Here’s my article on Daisy Mae in the August 2019 issue of Professional Mariner magazine.  And as I have often done, this post is mostly images that didn’t make it into the magazine.

All the specifics are in the article, but here’s the SW New Jersey dock where this sand is loaded.  Washed sand from the conveyor in center right of the photo below is falling into the barge CMT Y NOT 2.

Here’s the shore side loading, and

here’s the waterside view.

Once loaded it’s a short but

tricky run out of tidal Salem River when there’s sufficient water.

After arriving in Delaware Bay, the transition is made from push gear to …

[I’ll bet you didn’t expect this front-end loader here.]

… the wire.

 

I know the coastal NJ waters are not always this flat.

Just outside the Narrows, the tow is remade so that

 

 

the last few miles to the Brooklyn dock

can be performed with precision and efficiency.

Many thanks to CMT and the crew for helping me tell their story.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Check out the link to the story here.

 

The 1963 Patricia is always a head-turner, and she was especially so the other morning.  The longer I look at the photo below, the more I imagine it framed.

Her throaty sound catches the ear as well.  Am I mistaken or has that color scheme changed a bit?

Carolina Coast makes the sugar run all year round, but that billowing spinnaker clearly states the season.

 

Nathan G has been spending a lot of time of late on runs outside the VZ Bridge.

 

Here, a busy distant Bayonne port as seen from Owls Head, is Genesis Victory with barge GM 6506 and a very busy background, as

she gets assisted into a lightening position by Pegasus.

James D. Moran escorts a quite empty Leo C.

toward Port Elizabeth.

Discovery Coast here takes on Edwin A. Poling.  It amazes me that the sylvan shoreline beyond the unit is actually in New York City and masks a dense residential area.

Moments before she was headed in from an anchorage area.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who favors another shot of Patricia.

 

This weekend the Upper Bay portion of the sixth boro cradled two “fast logistics ships” or “Large, Medium-speed, Roll-on/Roll-off Ships” (aka T-AKR, although I’ve no idea how that alpha indicator relates to those descriptors;  LMSR would make more sense.)  at the same time, one off Fort Wadsworth, below) and the other

off Owl’s Head fishing pier.  The T-AKR above–USNS Sisler T-AKR-311–was preparing for sea trials at the end of her refurb period, and the one below–USNS Watkins T-AKR-315 was preparing to enter the graving dock in Bayonne to begin hers.  Sisler was launched in 1998, and Watkins, 2000, both by NASSCO in San Diego.

I also have questions about the relationship between the MSC–to which these vessels belong–and USNS, unless it is that technically all “ships” serving the USN are referred to as USNS.

Framing from memory, I took what were intended as identical photos of each.

 

I’m not sure when Sisler will return from her sea trials or

when Watkins will exit the graving dock.

I’m wondering if Sisler will be back in for a final coat of gray to cover what appears to be a primer coat.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts of T-AKRs can be found here.

 

Peony has appeared on this blog twice, but this is the first time for Jasmine.

I waited at the Narrows until one of the two box ships I was eyeing headed out yesterday, a hot seat in spite of the shade and the breezes, and Jasmine was first.  The other was the irregularly named ONE Contribution, a large pink ship you can see here.  It’s pink but not a ULCV.

Peony and Jasmine are about 1000 teu smaller than the mountain class….   Camellia, Azalea, Lotus, Orchid, Rose, and Sakura make up the rest of the flower class.

Anyone know the airdraft of these boats?

 

 

As of this writing, she’s headed for Norfolk

through the summer haze.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is wondering the relationship between the abstract boats like Cosco Faith, Glory the country boats like Cosco Vietnam,  and the flower boats.

Click here for an interesting article by Capt. Max Hardberger called “China’s Dominance in Shipping” on the long-term strategic global hegemonic implications of these ships and lines and our consumerism.  Seized is a great read.

 

This is a long-overdue post:  Dorothy J Robert IV has frequently appeared on this blog, but never had a post devoted to her.  And then there’s the generic-sounding Oil Barge No. 6;  I’ve often noticed that by the St George Ferry Terminal, yet I’ve not even taken a photo of it in too many years for me to checked out in my archives.

I always wondered who moved that barge, but here is proof of who moved it the other day.

Hats off, Dorothy J.  Hats off to Robert IV too. And please scroll through this link for some of the jobs she’s worked in recent years.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

*Thanks to Chris R for pointing out a quite basic error in this post.  I’ll have to do a REAL Dorothy J post to make up for this.  By way of defense, all I can say is  . . .  the heat is baking my brain.

 

I’ve seen lots of the L-class, but this was my first view of Ever Lotus.   I’m not sure what’s in the boxes, but she’s carrying a lot of boxes.

Ava escorted her out.

 

Bow watch was performed by this relaxed-appearing seaman, while

stern watch was controlled by this hitchhiking but discerning raven.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This next batch were all taken from the deck of tug Dalzellaird. Steve writes:  “Captain Bob Munoz helped us aboard the tug Dalzellaird at 0800 hours. His tug was normally the Dalzellera, but it was out of service for many months because of damage to the variable pitch propeller and awaiting replacement parts from Holland. Looking out across the East River toward Brooklyn, Brooklyn was not to be seen because of the fog. It looked as if the parade wasn’t going to happen. However at about 0900 hours we pulled away from the pier with our portion of the press corps. The Dalzellaird headed down the East River, swung around Governors Island where we should have been able to see the Verrazano Bridge. It was not there.”

Vessels included Bluenose II, currently doing the Great Lakes Challenge 2019.   She recently appeared on tugster here.

Gorch Fock II at anchor.

Sagres musters the crew forward to ready sail,

With crew high in the rigging, USCG Eagle passes USS Randolph-CV15 . . .

. . . with lots of small boats being reviewed as well.

Marie J Turecamo and Mobil 12 make an appearance,

Libertad unfurls sails

Bluenose II moves through the Upper Bay,

Esmeralda gets underway,

 

tug Esso Massachusetts sails with ceremonial flags,

St Lawrence II and Esmeralda and a brace of USCG 40-footers , and we’ll end this series with

Esmeralda passing the NY skyline, such as it was in 1964.

Let’s close the narrative getting back to Steve’s words:  “Toward mid-afternoon it was time to return to pier 8 and let the press return to their offices to make the deadline for their stories in the newspapers. As we were about to come alongside the dock and all of the press were anxious to get off the boat, Capt. Munoz stopped and went full astern with the engine and stopped again. He leaned out the pilothouse window and looked down at the press as they looked up at him. He asked them if they got good pictures, got good stories, had a good lunch and had a good day. They all answered with a resounding yes. He said that he was busy all day making sure that they got their good pictures and he didn’t have time to take one picture. Because the Dalzellaird was a bell boat, he told them his arm was about to fall off from the constant bell ringing to allow them to maneuver in and around the ships-all for them. He asked if any one of them could possibly send him a few photos of the day’s activities.

The overwhelming response was, of course, ‘Cap, give us your address.’ He pulled the Dalzellaird up against the dock and they all rushed off. All these years later, he is still waiting for a few photos.”     Maybe they got his email address wrong?

Thanks much, Steve, for sharing this.

Any errors here are entirely mine.

 

 

In continuing reportage from Steve Munoz:  “On Sunday, July 12th, 1964, my family sailed out of Paerdegat Basin in Jamaica Bay on the Evelyn Mae (below)

and arrived at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, still under construction and not to be opened until late November [1964].

Throughout that afternoon we drifted and steadily rolled in a southeast wind as sailing ships from around the world came up Ambrose Channel.”

Below, behold an anchored Statsraad Lehmkuhl, currently [shifting to 2019] at a dock in Fredrikstad, Norway.

Gorch Fock II was nearby.

Anyone have ideas on what that small boat off GF’s starboard bow might be?

Esmeralda . . . is as of July 2019 sailing off New Zealand.  I love the crew hanging off the vessel, including the bowsprit, sprucing up her appearance before the parade.

Black Pearl passes Gorch Fock II.  I’m told Black Pearl is currently in the Great Lakes, but I’ve never seen  or heard of her there.

Juan Sebastian de Elcano .  .  .  is a Spanish training ship launched in 1927 and whose namesake assumed leadership of Magellan’s journey from the Moluccas back to Spain.  She appeared on this blog here in 2012.

Libertad fired their saluting cannons off Ft Hamilton.”   Libertad has a special relationship with Wavertree, the South Street Seaport Museum ship.

“A return salute was provided by the USS Willis (DE-1027) at anchor in Gravesend Bay.

My father positioned himself with his Kodak camera, with slide film in it, against the lifeboat and mentally calculated the timing of the saluting cannon of the Argentine full rigged sailing ship Libertad and caught the flash of the cannon seen in the picture in this article. We didn’t see all of the ships enter the harbor that day, but they arrived under full sail, saluted the USS Willis and settled in at their assigned anchorage position in Gravesend Bay. There weren’t many other boats or harbor craft around that day, but in those days we were able to get up close and circle the ships after anchoring and watch the cadets secure the ship from sea.”

USCG Eagle was there, as was

SS Rotterdam entering NY harbor before parade.  SS Rotterdam is currently docked near the Hotel New York in  . ..  Rotterdam.

Note the cranes atop to western tower of the VZ Bridge;  it wouldn’t open for a few more months.

Would that helicopter be an HH-62A?

“Darkness was approaching and we set course back to Paerdegat Basin.”  This is reprinted from NY TUGS magazine, vol2, no2 in 2009.

Many thanks, Steve.  More to come.

By the way, one upcoming post features Evelyn Mae.  Until then, are there any guesses on her date and place of build?

 

 

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