You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Dorothy J’ tag.

Here’s a photo from a friend who works for a naval architecture firm.  Guess the function of the completed vessel below.

Here’s a rendering.

To the gentleman from New Zealand from the William C. Daldy Preservation Society who recently inquired about functioning steam tugboats in the US, I can’t think of any.  Can any reader here?  Here and here can get you info on steamer Daldy.  And all that smoke was photoshopped in, I was told.

Christiaan Brunings was built in 1900 as an icebreaker home-ported in Dordrecht NL, in the Rhine delta.  She survived two world wars that happened all around her.  I took this photo in Dordrecht in 2014.  For more photos of smoky Dutch steam tugs, click here.

If coal was the fuel of the past, then wind will make up a share of an increasingly harnessed renewable sources of energy.  Susie S was at the the Damen Den Helder yard back in 2014, same trip.

Even more variety is  here, the reason I put this post in the “line locker” group . . .   tugs on the highway . . .

and the boat ramp, and

sometimes nearly getting away . . .  once they enthusiastically take to water.  Well that tug, formerly know as Atlantic Hunter has changed hands and is now Little Giant.  Neptune himself was consulted about the deal and he approved.  Keep your eyes peeled.

And further rounding out this post . . .  On July 14, 2017, Peking was floated out of Caddells by the tagteam of Dorothy J and Robert IV to

be slipped onto the back of Combi-Dock III for transit over the Atlantic.  See the full story here.  Today, September 7, 2020, it arrives fully restored at its new museum in the port of Hamburg.

After more than three years of work, Peking will be arriving here today.  The FB site is shown there. If you don’t do FB, I have permission to copy some pics and paste them in a future blog post.  To the Hafenmuseum, where I wanted to be today . . .  Herzlichen Glückwunsch zur schönen Restaurierung!

Back to those first two images, that is a state-of-the-art Russian factory trawler called Captain Sokolov, one of six identical vessels being built at the St. Petersburg Northern Shipyard.  Here’s more on the design of these vessels with a capsule hull.  Dimensions are 268′ x 51′ with a cold storage capacity of 1200 metric tons. Here’s more on Norebo.  The design is by Knarr Maritime Consortium of Iceland.

The first two images thanks to Aleks, number 3 is from seapixonline, and the others, WVD.  Many thanks to Rembert for reminding me that today is the day Peking in Hamburg goes public.

Finally . . . it’s Labor Day, which I learned is a good day to work.  But if you want to stream some good music on a Labor Day theme, try this from Bread and Roses, where I used to go when I lived in the Merrimack Valley of MA.

 

 

See the exciting announcement at the end of this post.

Sunday I got word thanks to Shipshooter–Jonathan Atkin–that the pilot boat-to-be would be moving from Caddell’s back to the Sandy Hook Pilots (SHP) base on Monday morning right around sunrise.  Pilot boat-to-be?  There’s still much work to do before she enters service.  And at 0626, I saw the shift begin, as Dorothy J pulled her away from the floating drydock that has been her home the past few months. I visited her here back in December 2019 after she’d appeared at the SHP base about a year ago.  The current SHP No. 1 New York is at sea at the sea buoy end of the Ambrose Channel.

Once clear of the dry docks, the several-mile tow got underway.

Dorothy J kept the bow pointed while Robert IV had the stern.

Just east of the salt pile, the tow was reconfigured so that Robert IV got the Pilot No. 1 on the nose.

Robert IV continued the push toward the Narrows, after Dorothy J had gone ahead.

Just off the pilot station, Dorothy J came back alongside . . .

and Pilot No. 1 slides in opposite side of the dock from Pilot No. 2 New Jersey.

 

All photos, WVD, who will update the continuing transformation as available.

Here‘s a NY Media Boat report on a day at sea on the current Pilot Boat No. 1.

The big announcement, click on the image below.  A week from today you can join me for a different type of virtual canal tour.

A few weeks ago I posted photos erroneously identified as Dorothy J, even though plain as day Robert IV was on the bow.   That’s called distraction.  But the photo below, plain as day, is Dorothy J.  Here was Dorothy J on a foggy morning upriver almost two years ago.

Plain as day again . . .  Rebecca Ann in the KVK eastbound, and again

in a photo from Bob Stopper, plain as day way up the Erie Canal just below lock E27 with a barge loaded with reef fodder.  Here are previous photos from Bob.

Frances pushes a loaded scow westbound on the KVK, and

Janet D moves a spud barge over to the westside tower of the VZ Bridge, about to duck behind Sider Miami, previously known as Asian Prosperity.

Tug Ireland (renamed Hoppiness) has left the sixth boro for good

and is currently in the fresh waters of the Erie Canal, where I might see her soon.

Closing this post out, it’s an unnamed (to me) tug pushing a deck barge at the intersection of Hell Gate East River and the Harlem River.   The bridges there are the Triborough and the Hell Gate.

Thanks to Bob for his photo from Lyons;  all other photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be leaving the sixth boro tomorrow for a lot of weeks.

 

This is a long-overdue post:  Dorothy J Robert IV has frequently appeared on this blog, but never had a post devoted to her.  And then there’s the generic-sounding Oil Barge No. 6;  I’ve often noticed that by the St George Ferry Terminal, yet I’ve not even taken a photo of it in too many years for me to checked out in my archives.

I always wondered who moved that barge, but here is proof of who moved it the other day.

Hats off, Dorothy J.  Hats off to Robert IV too. And please scroll through this link for some of the jobs she’s worked in recent years.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

*Thanks to Chris R for pointing out a quite basic error in this post.  I’ll have to do a REAL Dorothy J post to make up for this.  By way of defense, all I can say is  . . .  the heat is baking my brain.

 

Let’s start out at Little Falls NY, above Lock E-17, where Jay Bee V had just departed and was now delivering the Glass Barge to the wall there.  Notice C. L. Churchill along the left edge of the photo.

Here above Lock C-7, it’s Margot.

On the Hudson River, tis is my first closeup view of Liz Vinik, formerly Maryland.

Westbound on the East River, it’s Sea Wolf moving uncontainerized thrown-aways.

Farther east, it’s Hudson with a fuel barge,

and meeting her, it’s Morgan Reinauer with the same.

Notice here, looking toward the Queensboro Bridge, Morgan and Hudson.

Here at the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge project, it’s  Dorothy J.

and to close this post out back on the Hudson, it’s Elizabeth, moving Weeks 533.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to John Paul for this photo of the big crane as seen the land area called Spuyten Duyvil in the Bronx.   The tidal strait–entrance/exit of the Harlem river–is also called Spuyten Duyvil.  That 328′ boom shrinks the swing bridge it’s assisting with the repair of.  Of course the crane is the one that arrived from California 4.5 years ago here to raise components of the new TZ Bridge and lower the old one.

Paul Strubeck caught the crane from the water side, showing relative size of crane and swing bridge.  The higher bridge is Henry Hudson crossing.  For much more info on that bridge, click here.

I got these photos yesterday from Inwood Hill Park.  The railroad swing bridge was opened in 1900, although it was closed for most of the 1980s.  Now it carries 30 trains a day and opens about 1000 times a year, mostly for Circle Line boats.

According to this source, maintenance will focus on mechanical and electrical equipment damaged by Hurricane Sandy.   “Navigation strikes” may be another explanation.

The crane is rated at lifting capacity of 1929 tons, powered by three diesel 601 kW (806 hp) main generators and one 91 kW (122 hp) auxiliary generator provide its lifting power.  It has no propulsion power of its own.

The manufacturer is ZPMC, the same Chinese firm that provides state-of-the-art port gantry cranes here and here.

I’m not sure whose crew boat this is,

but the tugs on the scene are Dorothy J and

Robert.

Maybe I’ll find time to go back up that way tomorrow.

 

Different day . . . different character . . .  the Hudson can have thick patches of fog, which

allow Dorothy J to slip past structures on a mysterious shore.

Farther along, Miss Gill guards some incongruous piles of

coal that surely did not arrive through the Delaware and Hudson Canal, which I visited recently but didn’t dip my foot into.

Wendell Sea waits alongside a fuel barge, and

Christiana–not a frequent visitor in the sixth boro–does in her own way

up by the GW Bridge.

 

Helen Laraway stands by scows of different sized crushed stone.

And this gets us down to the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

No need for much language here.  I started these photos around 0830.  Despite some rain, conditions were ideal for this loading . . . or engulfing.

Here Dorothy J gently moves the antique barque foot by foot closer to Hamburg.

Combo-Dock III, the engulfer, lies in wait.

Robert IV assists when needed.

Without the zoom, I imagined the gentleman with the yellow helmet to stand by on the helm.

We have 20 meters and closing . . .

 

 

 

With big power on minuscule tolerances, Dorothy J eases her in.

 

 

 

The barque floats gently forward in the hold.

Lines to capstans on the heavy lift ship are doing the work, as the tugs stand by until released from service.

 

 

 

 

 

Peking is now engulfed.  Time is about 1130.  Operations to make fast and secure now begin before they head out into the Atlantic for Germany.

Many thanks to Jonathan Kabak and Jonathan Boulware for the floating platform.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is thrilled to have seen this today.

Who else greeted Wavertree on the rest of the way home?  John J. Harvey is always in on celebrations.

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Lettie G. Howard was there,

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as was the helicopter.  Feehan presented herself on the far side of Rae.

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Pioneer accounted for

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herself with crew in the crosstrees.

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Pioneer and Lettie teamed up at times.

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Wire showed up.

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New York Harbor School had two boats there, including Privateer and their

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newest vessel Virginia Maitland Sachs, about which I’ll post soon.

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Melvillian throngs came down to the “extremest limit of land” on Pier 15 and 16, for one reason or another, but who were about to be treated to some excellent ship handling.

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Rae took the lead, showing the need for tugboats of all sizes.

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The larger tugs pushed and pulled as needed to ease into the slip

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until all lines were fast and

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and the shoreside work needed doing.

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Bravo to all involved.  If you want to take part in a toast to Wavertree, you can buy tickets here for the September 29 evening.

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If you haven’t read the NYTimes article by James Barron yet, click here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes I left no one out and who as before is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

Often folks ask how one can learn about the harbor or is there a book about the sixth boro.  Volunteering at South Street Seaport Museum is a great way available to all to get access to the water, to learn from like-minded folks, and to start on a journey of reading the harbor and its traffic for yourself.  Each volunteer’s journey will be unique, and willing hands make institutions like this museum survive and thrive.

Almost exactly 16 months ago, Wavertree left Pier 16 for a lot of work at Caddell Dry Dock.    Here was my set of photos from that day, and here,  subsequent ones at several month intervals.  Yesterday she made way, back to Pier 16.

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Here’s looking back west.  Compare the photo below with the third one here to see how much work has been accomplished on the Bayonne Bridge during the same 16 months.

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Yesterday, Rae helped, as did

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Dorothy J and Robert IV.

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The combined age of Rae, Robert IV, and Dorothy J is 139 years, whereas the beautifully restored flagship they escorted in is 131 years old.

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And as the tow approached the Statue, John J. Harvey joined in.

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These photos all by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

For some interesting history on Wavertree and info on a fundraiser on board on September 29, 2016, click here.  For the story of how Wavertree came from Argentina to New York, read Peter & Norma Stanford’s A Dream of Tall Ships, which I reviewed here some time ago.

More photos of the return tomorrow.

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