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Who else greeted Wavertree on the rest of the way home?  John J. Harvey is always in on celebrations.

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Lettie G. Howard was there,

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as was the helicopter.  Feehan presented herself on the far side of Rae.

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Pioneer accounted for

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herself with crew in the crosstrees.

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Pioneer and Lettie teamed up at times.

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Wire showed up.

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New York Harbor School had two boats there, including Privateer and their

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newest vessel Virginia Maitland Sachs, about which I’ll post soon.

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Melvillian throngs came down to the “extremest limit of land” on Pier 15 and 16, for one reason or another, but who were about to be treated to some excellent ship handling.

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Rae took the lead, showing the need for tugboats of all sizes.

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The larger tugs pushed and pulled as needed to ease into the slip

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until all lines were fast and

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and the shoreside work needed doing.

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Bravo to all involved.  If you want to take part in a toast to Wavertree, you can buy tickets here for the September 29 evening.

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If you haven’t read the NYTimes article by James Barron yet, click here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes I left no one out and who as before is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

Often folks ask how one can learn about the harbor or is there a book about the sixth boro.  Volunteering at South Street Seaport Museum is a great way available to all to get access to the water, to learn from like-minded folks, and to start on a journey of reading the harbor and its traffic for yourself.  Each volunteer’s journey will be unique, and willing hands make institutions like this museum survive and thrive.

Almost exactly 16 months ago, Wavertree left Pier 16 for a lot of work at Caddell Dry Dock.    Here was my set of photos from that day, and here,  subsequent ones at several month intervals.  Yesterday she made way, back to Pier 16.

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Here’s looking back west.  Compare the photo below with the third one here to see how much work has been accomplished on the Bayonne Bridge during the same 16 months.

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Yesterday, Rae helped, as did

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Dorothy J and Robert IV.

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The combined age of Rae, Robert IV, and Dorothy J is 139 years, whereas the beautifully restored flagship they escorted in is 131 years old.

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And as the tow approached the Statue, John J. Harvey joined in.

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These photos all by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

For some interesting history on Wavertree and info on a fundraiser on board on September 29, 2016, click here.  For the story of how Wavertree came from Argentina to New York, read Peter & Norma Stanford’s A Dream of Tall Ships, which I reviewed here some time ago.

More photos of the return tomorrow.

I’ve done posts about the East River, like these, and I’ve done a post at least about canyons, but it’s never struck me as vividly as right now how much this part of the East River is like a canyon.  These too are images of the varied sixth boro.

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HMS Liberty pushes east past the cliffs before entering the terrifyingly-named Hell Gate.  Click here for the youtube video that periodically surfaces about a barge grounding in Hell Gate and then skillfully extricated.  Here and here are some discussions of that name . . . originally “beautiful opening.”

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Sea Lion pushes a recycling barge up toward the Bronx River, I think, with

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Dorothy J alongside, until

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she makes the turn in the direction of the Harlem River, where the E. 91st marine transfer station–I think–is being built.  It’s been a long time since I’ve walked around up there.

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And finally . . . it’s Mister T pushing scows eastbound and under the 59th Street Bridge.  And the aerial tramway to  . . . the sixth boro’s ski slopes?   Here’s the website for the operator . . . Leitner-Poma.    But I digress.

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At the right times of tide, the waterway between Roosevelt Island and Manhattan Island move a lot of cargo.

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All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

Frying Pan came back to Pier 66 yesterday after several months at Caddell Dry dock, assisted by Dorothy J.  I use this photo with permission from Renee Lutz Stanley.

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It turns out that I also recently received a photo and spec sheet from barrel, formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  When I looked up where Liston, the vessel below, was built, I

Tug Liston

 

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learned that it was being built the same time as the lightship listed as Frying Pan Shoal.  First, it makes me wonder whether a photo exists that shows them both on the ways.  Second, I wondered if there was an error in shipyard site here about the initial name of the lightship, or if there was a time when the word “shoal” got dropped from the name of the vessel.  Third, the shipyard site says that LV115 became a museum in Southport, NC.  Click here and scroll through for a photo I took in Southport five years ago showing where some folks had wanted to build a museum with LV115 as the centerpiece, but it had never happened.

Some years ago, I used to spend a good amount of summer evening time at Frying Pan/Pier66.  If you’ve never been, you should try it once.  Here are some photos I took way back then. I must have many more somewhere.  Pier 66 opens in early May, and I think it’s time to have a large gathering there once again.  Let’s agree on a date and meet there, eh?

Many thanks to Renee and barrel for use of these photos.

But a closing shot, barrel writes:  “USACE TUG LISTON    became ARGUS of Salter Towing in 1970. #561597. At a later date became fishing vessel MR. J.C. now out of documentation.”

USACE TUG LISTON

Dorothy J was once known as Angela M

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and first appeared here about four years ago.

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Mediterranean Sea working and

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being worked upon.  There’s no significance to the blue bicycle in foreground lower left, but I like that it’s there.

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Peggy Winslow is a boat I’ve not seen in a long time, unidentified here but identified in the next one here, in town last week with Mrs W.

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Mrs W has some sort of shaft on board.

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It’s a Hebert boat . . . Larry J?, and Bering Dawn dredging in the Arthur Kill.

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Now known as Caitlin Ann, this 1961 tug first appeared here (scroll) in 2008 as Vivian L Roehrig.

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And if that’s Oleander, it must be Thursday.

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Most photos taken fairly recently by Will Van Dorp, who is amazed by changes in ownership in the sixth boro.

And unrelated, check out George Conk’s post here about a vessel with an unusual name and even more unusual purpose.

 

Here was 4.

So I ‘ve had a problem today:  I tried to do a portrait of Gage Paul Thornton, and that tall building and confederates jumped in the way.

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I took another . ..  and the green lady interrupted.

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I attempt a solo shot of James Turecamo, and the green lady AND the orange ferry need to get involved.

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So I thought I’d try it again . . . a bowshot of the 1930 charter yacht Diplomat . . . same effect.

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Ditto . . . Dorothy J.  Well, maybe background context is important  . . . like to show that the New york York Media Boat is timely as well as punctual

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or

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maybe it’s time to listen what the woodchuck told me yesterday, go home, polish my lens, have some really hot tea . . . and wait for warm sunshine.

All photo by Will Van Dorp.

Here was post #1 of what could become a series from over five years ago.

Dusk rarely finds me at my places along Richmond Terrace, but last night I was here with elizabeth, and she took a pic much like this one, and when she sent it to FB with the question “Guess who my dinner date is?” one friend wrote back . . .  “the great Gatsby?”  So call this  . . . what the great Gatsby sees as tugster on a short day’s journey into night, apologies to Mr O’neill.

Barney Turecamo passes Gatsby’s place, as do

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Frederick E. Bouchard and B. No. 210,

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Ellen McAllister,

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Fidelio,

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Dorothy J,

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Blue Fin,

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and Weddell Sea.  

Gatsby’s for the night . . . was actually Blue–formerly known as R. H. Tugs.  From Blue, it was a short walk to Sailors Snug Harbor for the 25th annual John A. Noble Art Auction.   And I’m very pleased to say that

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a print of my foto below brought $500 into the museum’s funds for restoration of Robbins Reef Light, and the framed foto went home with a very happy friend.  To see the other 49 items in the auction catalog, click here.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

All these fotos–except the ones identified as flashbacks–I took while resting yesterday.  The indomitable Helen Parker, intrepidly westbound among giants.  I believe she was last on this blog a year ago here.

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I believe this is Coastline Bay Star.  If so, when did she get the reconfigured exhaust route?

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Also squeezed between giants, James Turecamo, who has appeared on this blog possibly more than any other tugboat.   James was launched in greater Waterford, NY late in 1969.   Click here to see James tailing Caddell’s new drydock back in May.  More on this flashback later in this post.

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Hunt Girls, which I haven’t seen in a while.

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AT IMTT Bayonne Dean Reinauer and RTC 106, which appeared on this blog last week, configured differently.  Dean is so new that if you go back to that link with the foto of James tailing, you’ll see the upper house of a Dean which at that time had never yet floated!

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Here are two flashbacks from Port of Albany last week . . .

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as Dean spun around to head south.

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Dorothy J eastbound yesterday morning

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and as seen in mid-May 2013 . . . with her former name–Angela M–visible.

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Arabian Sea‘s angular sides are mimicked  by the building in the distance.

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Quenames heads out of the Kills pushing

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Bunker Portland.

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And check out the stack on St Andrews.  Maintenance or  . . . something more?

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All fotos except for the flashbacks  . . .  Will Van Dorp took yesterday.

As I post this, Hurricane Isaac approaches New Orleans, and the work  of every mariner on the river is to ride out the storm. Even if it appears that almost nothing is moving on the river, movement is there and intense.  Click here (now) for live views on the street and on the river in the Crescent City.  To see what Isaac looked like over in Florida from Jed’s perspective, click here.

In the sixth boro, a race is a few days away, but vessels like Susan Miller--pushing the barge with the “rolled on and about to be rolled off” trailer–are at work.

Ditto an unidentified DonJon tug, Pati E. Moran, inbound CMM CMA CGM Eiffel, and schooner Pride of Baltimore II go about their business.

Having “rolled-off” said trailer truck, Susan distances herself from Mary Whalen (just the bow at the starboard stern of the cruise ship) and Queen Mary 2.

Viking moves a barge through the KVK,

as does Arabian Sea and 

Weeks’ Elizabeth, 

Dorothy J,

St. Andrews,

Gramma Lee T Moran, and

the list could go on.  Here, Doris Moran and Dace Reinauer . . .  that’s tug work too.   This last foto below comes compliments of Marian & William Hyman.  Thanks.

All other fotos taken by will Van Dorp, who will be at the race Sunday.  Thanks for reading.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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