You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Regulus’ tag.

Below is a variation on the photos I posted yesterday, showing a bit more context to the west.  Let’s recap identifying right to left:  Regulus, Teresa with Acadia, and GLDD tugboat Douglas B. Mackie and dredge barge Ellis Island.  

I’ve posted other GLDD dredges in the past:   Padre Island here, Terrapin Island here, Dodge Island hereGLDD trailing suction head dredges have “Island” in the name, but they are only some of GLDD’s dredging machines.

Mackie is huge:  158′ x 52′ x 27.3′ draft, and powered by two Mak 12M32C-T3, 7,831HP each, turning controllable pitch propellers. The dredge barge has its own power for the pumps.  See some stats here, and more  stats here.

Note the black hull of Mackie and the red of Ellis Island

Ellis Island measures 433′ x ’92, can dredge down to 122′ and has hopper capacity of just shy of 15,000 yd3.  Dredge spoils can discharged through the bottom of the hull over a designated dump site.

She’s been working off Sandy Hook. I believe this is the only ATB trailing suction hopper dredge in the US.

All photos, WVD, who supposes she came in for protection from rough seas;  as of this morning, she headed back out to the work area.

 

If you focus on national weather, you might imagine snow has fallen to the extent that we’re back in the ice age, but I decided to walk out to the fishing pier near Owl’s Head, and 

voila!  there were Unico’s Teresa with Acadia as well as Regulus, bathed in rainbow light. Likely it was raining in Manhattan, but not on me, nor was it snowing.

More photos from my walk tomorrow, but I’m guessing Regulus is in port because of big seas out where she’s been working in the Bight. 

All photos this morning, WVD, who has previously seen rainbows in the boro here

 

I’m always thrilled to see these specialized vessels in the sixth boro.  I’d seen Regulus before, but see how her deck machinery back in November 2019 was different than it is now.  Versatility is key.

That red T identifies her as a Tidewater boat, a PSV (platform supply vessel), one of hundreds of speciality vessels operated around the world.  The link in the previous sentence provides lot of information about the company, its history back to the mid-1950s, and its boats.  Most Tidewater boats have a two-word name, the second being “Tide”, eg., Desoto Tide or Ebb Tide, which launched the company in 1956.  See a photo of Ebb Tide here

The fact that Regulus does not indicates she came from the Gulfmark fleet, which Tidewater absorbed.

 

I’m out of my depth here, but I’d wager there’s a “moon pool” directly beneath the red tower, an opening in the hull though which subsea equipment can safely be lowered or retrieved.  Scroll through this link to see a great photo through the moon pool and into the deeps.

The A-frame on the stern can also be used to lower/retrieve instrumentation, here inside the yellow frame.

 

 

If you didn’t notice in the links above, the dimensions here are 272′ x 58′ and powered by a total of 10250 hp.

As is true of many of the “exotics” in this blog, the impending wind farm construction explains their presence here. 

As of sunrise this morning, the Jones Act Regulus has headed back to sea.

All photos, WVD. 

 

Polling has not yet ended, the clock goes on for two more days now, since I got a bunch of votes last night. With all certainty, though, polls will close on December 21 . . .  earlier if two days elapse without a single new vote.  Your votes and suggestions –in comments and in emails–have already influenced the design of the calendar.

Many thanks to David Silver for this photo . . .  can you guess where it was taken?

You might want to see where previous photos shared by David Silver were taken here.   You can find the answer at the end of this post.

While you’re trying to figure out the answer using the title and the night pics, have a look at the project of converting a Responder class OSRV into a new Sandy Hook Pilots “mothership”.

For a complete Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC) equipment list, click here.

As I understand it, Maine Responder was sold out of MSRC because it was considered excess.   Maybe someone can confirm that.

Here’s the wheels.

Have you guessed where David took the top picture?  The answer is .  . . Elizabethport, NJ.  In the darkness are three exquisite exotics:   Regulus, Kelly Ann Candies, and Highland Eagle.  Kelly Ann came into the sixth boro yesterday just before dark, but it was so foggy in the Narrows that in the 500′ or so visibility she was as invisible to someone there as she’d be 500 miles at sea.  And then, she left before good light this morning.  I caught Kelly Ann entering Guanabara Bay almost six years ago.  Regulus I caught in Bayonne earlier this fall, and Highland Eagle I caught in northern Lake Huron this summer, where she was doing some sounding work.

Many thanks to David for this photo.  The others by Will Van Dorp, who is eager to see how the ex-Maine Responder evolves.

 

Here the previous posts on exotics, vessels not typically seen in the sixth boro.  I take the label from birders, as they use it to classify birds.

Regulus is a 2014 product of Thoma-Sea in conjunction with TAI.

She left to go offshore yesterday, but she’d been at the Bayonne dry dock at least a few weeks.  I believe that red derrick was not mounted on the afterdeck when she arrived, but I’m not certain of that.  Anyone help?

Click here for more specs.  Most likely that derrick is mounted over a moon pool, as would be the case with a DP2 OSV.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who could classify this as a specialized vessel as well.

 

I could be wrong, but a raft of unusual vessels coming through the sixth boro recently is related to priorities set and now contracts signed by a NYS agency created in 1975 called NYSERDA.  Three organizations you’ll be hearing a lot from are Equinor Wind US, Ørsted A/S, and Eversource Energy, and their projects Empire Wind and Sunrise Wind.  Click here for a map of the target areas.

Geosea is one of these vessels.

She has accommodations for 70 crew, 

some of whom you see taking photos as they enter the Narrows.

 

As of this posting she’s in port in Elizabeth NJ.

 

Also in port this morning–and hence the rainy photo until I get a better one–it’s Regulus, a US-flagged platform supply vessel.

Here’s another, taken earlier from a slightly different angle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s always welcoming of others’ photos, particularly now in relation to wind farm related developments in the sixth boro.

Click here for my series related to the already functioning offshore wind farm along the NE coast, Deepwater Wind.

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