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I’m always on the lookout for “first-timers” in the harbor, but I’m equally thrilled to see the “seldom-seen.”  I realize that some people might see these boats everyday. The “seldom-seen” relates to me.

This is true of Pelham.  The 1960 built is on her sixth name, if I count right.  She started out as Esso Pelham.  You’ll have to scroll, but here are a number of times I’ve posted photos of her, in and out of the water.

Evelyn Cutler, a 1973 build,  is a frequenter on this site.  When I first saw her, she was a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat called Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

In the few months that this boat has been know as Mackenzie Rose, she appears to stay quite busy.  That’s a good thing.

Rae also fits into the rarely seen list, although maybe she was laid up and is now busy again.  Meeting her here is Normandy. Rae and Normandy were built in 1952  and 2007, respectively.

Philadelphia and

Jacksonville are both recent 4200 hp Vane boats.  Jacksonville, 2018, is one year newer than Philadelphia.

I first saw the 1981 Genesis Victory as Huron Service.  Periodically, some of the Genesis boats do make their way into Lake Huron and beyond.

As i said earlier, Mackenzie Rose is quite busy.  Does anyone know her namesake?  I don’t.

Frederick E. Bouchard is the second boat to carry that name.  She was built in 2016 and operates with 6140 hp, but

these days she looks quite light and her exposed waterline somewhat rusty.

Barney Turecamo, the fourth (?) boat to carry that name, brings 5100 hp to the job.  When she was built in 1995, she had a different upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD, and taken in the past month.

 

Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

Mary Turecamo has the distinction of having been built at Matton Shipyard near Waterford.  She’s a big boat:  106′ loa and 4300hp.

James William was originally Lisa Moran.  She’s 77′ and generates 2800hp propelled by three screws.

Barney Turecamo, built in 1995, was intended to push cement barges.  She’s 116′ and rated at 5100hp.

Brendan Turecamo was launched in 1975.  She’s 106′ and her twin EMDs generate 3900hp.

James D. Moran is one of the four 6000hp tugboats that have worked in the sixth boro for the past five years.  She’s 88′ loa.

Notice that all the above boats had some connection with Moran?  Anyhow. Ava M. is the newest escort tug in the boro.  She arrived here about a year ago, 100′ and 6770hp.

Alex McAllister has been in the harbor–I believe–about five years now.  Built in 1985, she is 87′ and 4300hp.

When I first saw Genesis Vigilant, he was a Hornbeck Offshore boat called Michigan Service.  Built in 1981, she’s 99′ and rated at 3000hp.

Josephine might be the newest T of an ATB in the boro.  She was launched in 2018, is 110′, and moves with 4560hp.

Here she was pushing the 347′ loa RTC 83 into a berth at the east end of IMTT, with assistance from Franklin ReinauerFranklin was launched in 1984, is 81′ and generates 2600hp.

All photos, WVD.  Again, sorry I posted prematurely sans any text. Sometimes I’m looking right at something, seeing a word or a number, and just calling it something else.  I believe my brain is becoming like my mother’s.

 

 

 

The light has been right the past few times I’ve seen Chele-C.

After seeing these winter draggers in the sixth boro for over a decade, they still amaze me; that it happens is surprising.  Here Chele-C works the water alongside Barney Turecamo and barge Georgia.

 

She’s down by Cass Gilbert’s Brooklyn Army Terminal and alongside RTC 107.

 

 

The many backgrounds like Erie Basin and the Red Hook Grain Terminal behind her . . . all make her a sight to be seen.

All photos, WVD.

 

When the temperatures drop and days are short, tug and barges units in the NE get busier than in summer.

RTC 42 here gets pushed by Franklin Reinauer, as Gracie-above–waits at the dock with RTC 109.

 

A bit later, J. George Betz moves her barge B. No. 210 toward the east.

Navigator appears from the east with her barge.

 

Barney moves Georgia toward a Bayonne dock, with assistance from Mary.

 

And Curtis comes in with RTC 81 for more product.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently in the state of Georgia, but a few days back when I took these, needed some of that fuel to stay warm. Here from 2007 was my first post by this name.

Carl Sandburg said:  “The fog comes  . ..  on little cat feet.

It sits looking  . . . over harbor and city . . . on silent haunches

And then moves on.”

 

My unrehearsed version is :  “The old cat once . .  . patrolled the wharf
Now it sits over the sunlight . . . and sheds on the riverbanks
masking the distances.”

What I really mean is that taking photos on limited visibility day like yesterday benefits from heightened foreground details in comparison.
Jennifer Turecamo heads out to Gravesend Bay along with the USCG patrol vessel.

A tanker arrives with a name

that’s ironic on a few levels .  .

Meagan Ann hauls Witte 4002 out to dump and

Mary Alice returns Witte 4004 from HARS before Meagan Ann  returns.

And Barney Turecamo comes into port a bit while the barge is monitored by Jennifer.

To finish, here’s another shot of Combi Dock 1 arriving from China with lots of sea miles logged….

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Grace is a 113,000 dwt tanker delivered less than a year ago by the Guangzhou Shipyard, north of Hong Kong and China’s third largest city.  

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Is this the look of future tankers in the sixth boro?

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Jonathan C. assists her from her berth.  I may be mistaken, but 10 years ago, few if any cargo vessels of this size called in the sixth boro.

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Ten years ago there were also no 6000 hp assist tugs in the port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for a Navig8 vessel in our fair port from nine years ago.

Photography means “light writing,” or writing with light.  George Eastman said, “Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography.”

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Obviously I’m interested in the subject matter, but playing with light makes the subject matter more fun.

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“What makes photography a strange invention is that its primary raw materials are light and time.” John Berger

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To comment on the ships, anyone know what product is being discharged from Tatjana?  I believe that’s Frances alongside.

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What makes getting up early so easy is this:  the glow.  Of course, I need to get out there to get the shot.  As Henri Cartier-Bresson said, “It’s an illusion that photos are made with the camera….they are made with the eye, heart and head.”

Merci, Henri.

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That’s NS Stella above and High Strength and Harbour First below.

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The photo of Silver Sawsan below was taken about half an hour after the previous ones, and the light by then is less rich, no matter how bright the orange is.  Ernst Haas says, ““You don’t take pictures, the good ones happen to you.”  And they USUALLY happen during that first hour after dawn and the last one before dusk.  

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I used to fish a lot, and I thought the same thing about fishing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Liberty Island is a Wisconsin-built dredge from 2002.  Here’s a long history of other vessels from her same yard.

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Here’s Swarna Mala (2010) being lightered by Dolphin and Quantico Creek and anchored slightly south of Fidelity II (2011).

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White Pearl (1985) ha left the sixth boro and is headed for

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Veracruz.

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UASC vessel Al-Kharj heads for sea.

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It almost looks like a container escaped off the deck of CMA CGM Dalila  and is now southbound on 440, along with three persons of interest walking in the same direction.

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That can’t happen, right?

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A deep-laden Maersk Sarnia meets Barney Turecamo near the same bridge.

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And we will call it quits here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has left the robots in charge of posting them.

 

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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