You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Barney Turecamo’ tag.

April 1, 2011 … and this was not a joke.  More on this distressed vessel at the end of this post.

McCormack Boys and

Turecamo Girls with Barney Turecamo.  All three are still working in the same liveries, I believe.

Long Island-built Escort was phased out as a certain coal-fired power plant shut down.  She’s taken on new life as Northstar Innovator, based on NJ’s

Maurice River, although I’ve yet to see her. 

Stad Amsterdam is not currently in Amsterdam;  she’s not far away though in Scheveningen.  If you want to pronounce this shibboleth as a Dutch speaker would, have a listen. 

Spring sunrises . . .  Coming into port is the 2017-scrapped Atlantic Cartier

escorted by Ellen McAllister and

passing Bow Clipper and Maria J.  That tug is now Nicholas Vinik. Bow Clipper is now in Santos Brasil. 

The venerable Chemical Pioneer was ushered in by Ellen McAllister and McAllister Responder. I say “venerable” because she was built using the stern of Sea Witch, after a massive conflagration in the port, told here by the Fire Fighter site.   .

Two small USMMA boats made their way through the fog.   I’m not sure the name of the vessel to the left, but the one to the right was Growler and she’s back (though hidden away) in the sixth boro.

Of course, I post a photo of Kristin Poling, which had only a few months of service left at this point. She started service in 1934 as Poughkeepsie Socony.

Marion M . . . I’ve been told she was sold to parties in the Chesapeake who planned to restore her and put her up for sale in 2018.  Does anyone have an update on that?

And finally, we return to Le Papillon . . .  the 48′ steel schooner was dragged off the beach but I lost track of her after that.  I believe she was cut up.

It all seems like stuff from long ago . .    all photos, WVD.

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

Mary Turecamo, 4300 hp and waiting for a ship at the Narrows, could not look better.  She’s an almost 40-year-old product of Matton Shipyard.  In fact, she was their last product.

Christiana heads out as

Virginia, 1440 hp and launched in 1979,  comes in

from sea, out of the haze.

Christiana was launched in Marinette WI in 2007, a year after Brandywine and a few years after the Molinari class of Staten Island ferries.  She’s married to Double Skin 143, another Marinette vessel.

Barney Turecamo (1995 and 5100)  and  barge Georgia gets rotated by Marie J Turecamo (1968 and 2250). Yesterday I started a re-read of the 1956 book Tug Boat:  The Moran Story, and am finding it very satisfying.

Here’s a dense pack over at the east end of IMTT:  Josephine, Evelyn Cutler, and Cape Lookout:  (2018 and 4560), (1973 and 3900), and (2018 and 5000).

Crystal Cutler arrived here from the shipyard in 2010 and works with 1500 hp.

She’s pushing Patricia Poling

And finally, a light Hunting Creek, 2011 and 3000 hp.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

At first light, Navigator passes a docked Saint Emilion

This 1981 build has called the sixth boro her home since 2015.  Saint Emilion (2007) has been here in two previous liveries and names.

Barney Turecamo was launched in 1995.  Note her cutaway forefoot.

Barney, married to Georgia, gets an assist from Doris Moran, 1982, as she departs the dock.

 

Meaghan Marie, 1968, follows a box ship into port but is not involved in the assist.

Meaghan Marie is a former fleetmate of Margaret Moran, 1979, doing the assist.

Emily Ann, 1964, moves a sanitation scow.

 

And finally, coming in from sea with a dump scow, it’s Captain Willie Landers, 2001.

When she first appeared on this blog in 2015, she had a prominent mast, not an upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

It’s the end of another month, and maybe because everything’s been so bleak of late, let’s just admire and enjoy the complexity of the sixth boro.

Diverse people work here on diverse missions.

Places like NY Harbor School and M.A. S. T. as well as SUNY Maritime College and King’s Point MMA are here.

On foggy days a narrow navigation channel gives the illusion of being as expansive as the ocean.

Keeping it as ideal a place as possible is the mission of many people and much infrastructure, seen and unseen.

Professionals pass through the sixth boro without ever technically entering the space, both a boon and a bane to all involved,

and their safe passage is ensured by the named and the nameless.

Work and recreation can happen in the same space because of

professionalism.  If you have a lot of time, you can binge watch these videos by a pro who works the sixth boro and beyond.  Now, when I hear his voice on VHF, it’s familiar.  There are books as well.

The universal language of gesture is powerdful.

The sixth boro has at least as much specialized equipment as the other five boros combined;  another way to put it, the specialized equipment of the sixth boro enable the other boros to perform.

And if the land boros have spirit, don’t imagine the sixth boro  lacks anything.

Photos and sentiments, WVD.

I’m always on the lookout for “first-timers” in the harbor, but I’m equally thrilled to see the “seldom-seen.”  I realize that some people might see these boats everyday. The “seldom-seen” relates to me.

This is true of Pelham.  The 1960 built is on her sixth name, if I count right.  She started out as Esso Pelham.  You’ll have to scroll, but here are a number of times I’ve posted photos of her, in and out of the water.

Evelyn Cutler, a 1973 build,  is a frequenter on this site.  When I first saw her, she was a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat called Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

In the few months that this boat has been know as Mackenzie Rose, she appears to stay quite busy.  That’s a good thing.

Rae also fits into the rarely seen list, although maybe she was laid up and is now busy again.  Meeting her here is Normandy. Rae and Normandy were built in 1952  and 2007, respectively.

Philadelphia and

Jacksonville are both recent 4200 hp Vane boats.  Jacksonville, 2018, is one year newer than Philadelphia.

I first saw the 1981 Genesis Victory as Huron Service.  Periodically, some of the Genesis boats do make their way into Lake Huron and beyond.

As i said earlier, Mackenzie Rose is quite busy.  Does anyone know her namesake?  I don’t.

Frederick E. Bouchard is the second boat to carry that name.  She was built in 2016 and operates with 6140 hp, but

these days she looks quite light and her exposed waterline somewhat rusty.

Barney Turecamo, the fourth (?) boat to carry that name, brings 5100 hp to the job.  When she was built in 1995, she had a different upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD, and taken in the past month.

 

Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

Mary Turecamo has the distinction of having been built at Matton Shipyard near Waterford.  She’s a big boat:  106′ loa and 4300hp.

James William was originally Lisa Moran.  She’s 77′ and generates 2800hp propelled by three screws.

Barney Turecamo, built in 1995, was intended to push cement barges.  She’s 116′ and rated at 5100hp.

Brendan Turecamo was launched in 1975.  She’s 106′ and her twin EMDs generate 3900hp.

James D. Moran is one of the four 6000hp tugboats that have worked in the sixth boro for the past five years.  She’s 88′ loa.

Notice that all the above boats had some connection with Moran?  Anyhow. Ava M. is the newest escort tug in the boro.  She arrived here about a year ago, 100′ and 6770hp.

Alex McAllister has been in the harbor–I believe–about five years now.  Built in 1985, she is 87′ and 4300hp.

When I first saw Genesis Vigilant, he was a Hornbeck Offshore boat called Michigan Service.  Built in 1981, she’s 99′ and rated at 3000hp.

Josephine might be the newest T of an ATB in the boro.  She was launched in 2018, is 110′, and moves with 4560hp.

Here she was pushing the 347′ loa RTC 83 into a berth at the east end of IMTT, with assistance from Franklin ReinauerFranklin was launched in 1984, is 81′ and generates 2600hp.

All photos, WVD.  Again, sorry I posted prematurely sans any text. Sometimes I’m looking right at something, seeing a word or a number, and just calling it something else.  I believe my brain is becoming like my mother’s.

 

 

 

The light has been right the past few times I’ve seen Chele-C.

After seeing these winter draggers in the sixth boro for over a decade, they still amaze me; that it happens is surprising.  Here Chele-C works the water alongside Barney Turecamo and barge Georgia.

 

She’s down by Cass Gilbert’s Brooklyn Army Terminal and alongside RTC 107.

 

 

The many backgrounds like Erie Basin and the Red Hook Grain Terminal behind her . . . all make her a sight to be seen.

All photos, WVD.

 

When the temperatures drop and days are short, tug and barges units in the NE get busier than in summer.

RTC 42 here gets pushed by Franklin Reinauer, as Gracie-above–waits at the dock with RTC 109.

 

A bit later, J. George Betz moves her barge B. No. 210 toward the east.

Navigator appears from the east with her barge.

 

Barney moves Georgia toward a Bayonne dock, with assistance from Mary.

 

And Curtis comes in with RTC 81 for more product.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently in the state of Georgia, but a few days back when I took these, needed some of that fuel to stay warm. Here from 2007 was my first post by this name.

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