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What’s wrong with me that after all these years and thousands of posts I’ve still to do one focused solely on this boat! 

She dates from 1970 and the long-lived Exxon fleet, and her lines are beautiful. So many of the dispersed Exxon fleet still toil on, especially in the sixth boro.

But Stephen . . . I’m not sure what she’s like to work on, but she always a pleasure to see for this bank sitter.

 

Excuse the blurry photo from September 3, 2006 . . . the tugboat race, I recall being astonished by the height from which the deckhand tossed the line, missing the cleat in this case. By the way, dimensions on the boat are 100′ x 31′ ….

Looking at the photos above and below has me wondering whether she’s had her pin arrangement modified in the 16 years between those two photos.

She came into IMTT the other morning to give Ruth M an assist.

 

 

All photos, WVD.

 

The Hudson treats the traveler with magical sights like these.  The castle atop the lush riverbank is still there, but that tug–Viking–is no more.  I’m not sure the disposition of DBL 134.

One morning soon after sunrise that summer 2017 I followed Delaware a ways up the Hudson before overtaking her.

Ernest Campbell had started working in the sixth boro by 2018, but its livery has changed since then.

On the last day of June, I took a ride on the Rondout and saw (l to r) Johannsen Girls, Fells Point, and SevernSevern now works in the Pacific Northwest although still for Vane.

Tarpon was working in the boro, but since that time has been sold to interests on the West Coast, although I’m not sure she’s made it there.

In June 2019, I caught Stephen Reinauer heading out the Narrows to rejoin its barge;

North of the border, SLS aka Sheri Lynn S was tied up at a Picton ON dock.

June 2020 one morning, I spotted Kirby Moran meeting ONE Minato, and

Janet D returning to her Elizabethport base.

In June 2021, it’s Charles D passing Adventurer while standing by for an incoming ship.

And finally, Sarah D was eastbound here in the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who may have made some errors here with dates, having had his brain baked in the Louisiana heat.

 

Now that I’m at installment 291 of this series, I’m rethinking the adjective random.  Check out these meanings old and new here. But “random” it is until I come up with a better word.  I’d rejected the descriptor “miscellaneous” when I first started.  How about one from this list:  some, select, chance, serendipitous, entropic, stochastic . . ..

Enjoy this novel juxtaposition, Coney Island Light and Denise A., with her barge.  Denise A. is from 2014, a 4000hp tug with dimensions of 112′ x 35′ x 17′.

Marjorie B McAllister waits in the offing.  You might not guess that she’s worked since 1974 with her 4000hp and 112′ x 30′ hull.

Franklin Reinauer pirouettes her 81′ x 28′ hull right in front of me, the 1984 tug propelled by 2600 hp.

Capt. Brian A heads out for yet another job.

Meanwhile, Linda Lee Bouchard and two of her sisters, Ellen and Evening Star, bide their time at old Home Port. Linda Lee is from 2006, her 125′ x 38′ hull powered by 6140hp.  The sisters are 1982 104′ x 35′ and 3900hp and 2012 112′ x 35′ and 4000hp, respectively.

B. Franklin has been hard at work since 2012, measuring in at 112′ x 33′ and powered by 4000hp.

Robert IV came off the ways in 1975, and sometimes her  56′ x 22′ and  1050hp is just right.

More shots of Linda Lee

and Capt. Brian A.

and Evening Star.

And to conclude, hat tip to Stephen Reinauer, from 1970 and 101′ x 31′ and 3000 hp.

All photos, WVD, who thanks all who watched the Erie Canal presentation yesterday.  Here‘s more Erie Canal on Saturday.

 

 

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

On a recent foggy rainy day, I caught Elk River bunkering (I believe) Maritime Kelly Anne.  That’s certainly an interesting name, although yesterday Endless Summer topped it, arriving from Brasil.  Might there be a string of ships with movie name references out on the oceans?

I love how fog narrows the depth of field in a natural way.

The same day Genesis Vigilant nosed into an IMTT dock.

Wye River was traveling light on the way to and likely from a barge,

as were Morgan Reinauer,

 Haggerty Girls, and

and Stephen Reinauer.

Brendan was following a ship to Port Elizabeth.

Stephanie Dann was headed for sea and south.

Ellen S. Bouchard was lying alongside B. No. 262, as her fleet and their crews languish.  And exfiltrate?

Catherine Miller moves a Caddell crane  . . . back to the KVK base.

All photos,WVD.

 

 

 

November 2009 saw the USS New York (LPD-21) arrive in her namesake city for christening commissioning. Just faintly, the name is visible on the stern.

I also went up to the Lyons NY dry dock in November 2009 and caught Urger, then in seasonal layup. Five years were to go by before I did my season on this Barge Canal tugboat.  May she return!

Firefighter was still working in the sixth boro.

Stephen was working then too, and she’s still working today.

Cape Ann’s Essex Creek is hardly the sixth boro, but you can get there from here . . . . and Essex MA is one of my favorite places, although –truth be told–I’ve been there only once since 2009.

Some miles north of Essex Creek is the Piscataqua River, and back then these were the horses in Moran’s stable on Ceres Street:  Carly A. Turecamo, Mary M. Coppedge, and Eugenia Moran.  Carly‘s now in Maine with Winslow, Eugenia is maybe laid up, and Mary M. is still working there . . . but again I’ve not been there in almost two years.

And finally . . .  she who need not be named alongside a dock in Philly.

Any since we’re on the retired undefeated speed champion, let’s zoom in on the “crow’s nest” in these next two photos . . .

Not my photo although I felt like talent that day . . .   Here and here are more photos from that day, in 2014.

This last photo is by Chris Ware.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a shot of a 1962 tug named Kristy Ann Reinauer I took in August 2008 near Howland Hook/Elizabethport

and another in Bayonne in December of that year.

By August 2015, she was waiting to be scrapped.

In late March the 2018 Kristy Ann anchored in the Upper Bay with her barge.

I can’t make out the barge name.

Here’s Kristy Ann light, just leaving the fuel dock.

The new tug is rated at 4560hp and the hull is 110′ x 33.’

Her twin, Josephine, I’ve yet to see close up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Why gild then lily?  Why add a lot of text when a well-operated machine looks this good?

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For a curriculum vitae of this machine, click here.

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All photos byWill Van Dorp.

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