You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘James D. Moran’ tag.

I haven’t used this title in half a decade, but today I couldn’t resist. JRT waited at the Staten Island side of the VZ.

But so were the geese, the brants.

Lots of them.

As well as the gulls.

James D joined JRT as an escort gull whizzed overhead.

Now you see it?

Now?

Jonathan C meets NYK Blue Jay!!

More birds soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Kirby Moran and James D Moran wait, like a team of horses, actually a team of 12,000 horses.

Here’s a different perspective on Kirby as she returns from a job.

CMT Otter and a salt barge lies alongside Nord Summit while along the other side, the venerable Twin Tube reprovisions from stern starboard.

Atlantic Salvor (or Enterprise??)  . . . I’ll never catch up as she heads for one of the many skylines of Brooklyn.  By the way, has anyone caught a photo of Hunter D in the sixth boro?

With Shooters Island and beyond that the cranes of Howland Hook in the background, it’s Discovery Coast, these days somewhat rare in the sixth boro.

Mister Jim is looking sharp these days, much better than her earlier livery.

Kodi is quite far away here, but she is a mere 42.6 footer.

Bering Dawn . . . she’s been on the East Coast some time now,

but all told, she’s spent more time on the West Coast.

The elusive Thomas stopped by the salt pile the other morning to retrieve a crane.

Margaret Moran . . . as always assisting ships into and out of the sixth boro.  More Margaret soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Today I caught the stork, one stork.

I had work to do, but I just couldn’t let this big cherry blossom magenta vessel pass unrecorded, especially not on a sunny late October day.  Besides, I could work twice as hard the next few days . . ..

Wait . . . I thought it was one STORK!??

Yup . . . one stork from Tokyo.

No way!  It’s one tug named James D. Moran.

This minimal superstructure probably contributes to fuel economy.

 

She’s a product of Japan Marine United Corporation in Kure shipyard, Hiroshima.

And for some really cool alongside on the dock photos, here are a few from Sean McQuilken in Charleston.

 

It’s more than 100 feet up to the bridge wing!

Thanks to Sean for use of these photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Cosco Prince Rupert came into town recently 27 days out of Pusan, Korea.

She was launched in South Korea in 2011, has dimensions of 1095′ x 141′, and has container capacity of 8208.  By current standards, she’s upper medium-sized calling in the sixth boro of NYC.

Prince Rupert’s namesake?  He was the first governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

JPO Capricornus, 2005, 865′ x 106,’ teu capacity of 4132 . . .  makes her a smaller size calling these days.  She was a week out of Cartagena upon her arrival in NYC.  She was built in South Korea.

 

Atlantic Sky, a CONRO vessel with capacity of 3800 tea and 1300 vehicles, was launched in 2017 in China.  The tape has her at 970′ x 121′.

 

 

 

Ever Leading launched in 2012 in South Korea.  She has 8452-teu capacity and has dimensions of 1099′ x 151′.

 

Zim Ukrayina  was launched in 2009 in the Philippines.  Her dimensions are 849′ x 105′ and her teu capacity is 4360.

She made the voyage from just north of  Hong Kong (Da Chang Bay) to NYC in 40 days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

Click here for the first installment of this story . . .

Tuesday 0630.  Note here that crews have already begun lowering the booms of these new gantry cranes in order to fit under the VZ Bridge.

Wednesday 0915.  Plans were to begin the transit, but an anchor windlass refused to cooperate.

Wednesday 1030.  And the fog began to descend.

Thursday 0630.  It was a glorious morning.

Thursday 1000.  It’s a go.  That’s Media Boat 4 in the foreground.

1026.  I read there’s a 10′ clearance, but my perspective–faulty–said otherwise.

1027.  Yup . . . plenty clearance.

1140. near the Bayonne Bridge

1141.  James D. Moran in the hard hat area.

1146.

1147.  Under the bridge and then a turn into Port Elizabeth.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Read a Staten Island Advance article here.

 

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

She was waiting on the Pacific side of the Panama Canal just a few weeks ago, so when I figured she was departing the sixth boro, I went out to catch her, esp. since her fleet mate, the 1200′ CMA CGM G. Washington recently arrived and departed in the wee hours before light.

Tugs (l to r) assisting her in the turn outbound are James D. Moran, Miriam Moran, and Kirby Moran.  

 

 

 

She draws about 35′ here.  I wonder how much of that is ballast.

Enjoy a mash-up photo here to close out the post:  I was fortunate to catch CMA CGM Dalila and APL Denver both under the VZ Bridge at the same time.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp,  still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic or high-tech.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got a good number of photos so far, but I’d like to see greater variety.  Thanks to all of you who’ve already shared photos.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,268 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2019
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031