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This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Here are the birds.  Now what’s the rest of the story?

Part of the story is told by these flags, US courtesy, German registry, and is that a pilot flag?

She was large for a 2008 container ship:  1098′ x 140′ with a capacity of 8606 teu.

 

I’d love to know more about accessing that lifeboat, given the cargo configuration.

And where are the birds?

 

Doubleclick on that last photo to see the closeup . . . you can almost hear the excitement!

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous installments.  What’s different here is that in this case I’m inside  the Narrows and shooting to the east and north.

Yankee passes in light before sunrise.

I rotate the lens 90 degrees to the right and Margaret stands by

along with James D to support Maersk Chicago, anchored in Stapleton.  As I write this,  24 hours later, the container ship is leaving port, although her destination shows NYC as both “from” and “to”….

Meanwhile Mary Turecamo comes out of its base in the KVK

just as the sun rises above the horizon and its cloudbank and gets reflected.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this set perfectly illustrates why I take photos at dawn whenever I can.  It’s worth getting up and out.

It was my first time to see her.  She arrived this morning after a monthlong voyage from Busan, which she departed on December 17.  With her containers all squared away, I’d gather she has delivered a full load.

CSCL operates eight of these vessels, valued at $117 million each.

The sight of these giants gives pause.  China’s  first container ship, Ping Xiang Cheng, launched in 1978 for a route between Shanghai and ports of eastern Australia carried 162 containers!  Their first service to US ports came in 1981.

Who then could have imagined these.

Mariner gear in 2021 . . . it’s not what I’d expect.

With the two crew above and these four, this must be half or more of the deck crew. 

 

For an afternoon’s reading, click here for an analysis of the shipyard which builds these behemoths and many other types of ships.

All photos this morning, WVD.

Here was the part A.  CMA CGM Argentina, sister toMexico and Brazil, steamed up the coast Sunday evening, making me think I’d miss it.  But it dropped anchor 15 or so miles off Point Pleasant, and stayed there making pattern like this.  Another ULCV was similarly anchored off Jones Beach, and it came into the boro last night.  This raises a question:  are the ULCVs causing a shortage of berth space?

Early afternoon yesterday after three ULCVs–Hyundai Ambition, Cosco Shipping Camellia, Tampa Triumph— left port, Argentina was off like an arrow for Ambrose Channel.

I debated going to see it, given fading light, but … decided I needed a distraction on a Friday afternoon.

I went.  The docking pilots lands from Jonathan C, which then

swings around the stern.

End of the day twilight has its own richness;  here the straight lines of the ship (?!) contrast with the irregular lines of the city.

She’s long, stacked as they were when she left Busan, Korea’s largest port,  on December 9, and nearly dragging her belly through the silt and fluff at the bottom of the channel.

 

And I’ll bet there not more than 30′  clearance with the underside of that bridge down there.

All photos, WVD, whose previous ULCV posts, some of them, can be found here.  And I have other ULCV photos from recently I’ve not posted yet.

Unrelated but followup on the Rotterdam tug Limburgia video that sleepboot posted in a comment yesterday.  The 1942 boat has retired from commercial work and been sold.  You will enjoy looking through the photos on the sale notice.

Btw, “sleepboot” is the Dutch word for “tugboat.”

 

Given yesterday’s post, I’ll subtitle this “tugster:  the return.”  From a weather perspective, it wasn’t ideal weather.  From a traffic perspective, I also thought it was not ideal, because I’d hoped a certain ULCV would enter  the boro in daylight, but it had moved in three hours before the sun rose behind thick cloud strata.  

However, it was a busy morning.  And seen through one filter, a certain set of colors dominated. 

Get the picture?

It’s time to meet the incoming ships, 

 

There’s work around that bend.

Just count them:  all four Moran 6000s as well as Margaret and Kimberly . . . farther away and along the right side of the photo.

I don’t believe I’ve seen all four 6000s in the same frame before, as above.

The morning had brightened a bit as they escorted in the box ships.

 

 

 

 

It’s always good to get away, but it’s even better to get back.  All photos, WVD.

Remember the post on the CMA CGM 14414s?  How about the Wall of New York?

Below you are looking at 25,000 teu on the Maersk PLUS the CMA CGM vessels, Maersk 10k and CMA CGM 15k,

making this the largest ULCV yet to call in the sixth boro, CMA CGM BrazilBrazil came off the ways earlier this year.  The rest of the series will carry names including CMA CGM Argentina, Mexico, Panama, and ChileDoes Brazil have the special scrubbers?  When will LNG catch on as fuel?

Hayward must have been the spectator vessel, but I didn’t get my invitation.

Maybe someone can opine on why James D. provided the tow moving astern?  My supposition is that this configuration places the wheels farthest ahead of the tow, providing the dynamic equivalent of a longer lever, but that’s only a supposition.

 

 

James D. and Kirby worked in tandem, as opposite ends of the ship.

If my math is correct, 15,000 teus, if lined up end to end, would make 56.8 miles of containers.  Big ship.

All photos, WVD, who wonders what is in all those boxes and of all that, what could not be made or grown in this country.

If you didn’t see her arrive, maybe you can catch her when she exits.

 

 

Glovis Cosmos has a beam of 105′.  YM Warmth . . . 167′.  Of course, we’re looking at the pier from an angle,so there’s that accentuating the difference in beam.  We’ll return to YM Warmth.

The next day just after 0600, CMA CGM A. Lincoln appeared around Bergen Point with an entourage of tugboats.

 

 

As big as these 1200′ box ships are, they will be diminshed by the 1312′ size working other ports around the watery globe.

To make my morning even better, Warmth was bound for sea the same time as A. Lincoln.

 

As booming as the ports of NY/NJ seem to be, they’re asking for relief money, as explained here, with the cost of temperature checks on local port workers adding up to $60,000 weekly.

All photos, WVD.  That morning, obviously, two 1200’ers left port in succession.  As I write this [Sunday morning] three of the current sixthboromax vessels are in our fair port.  For a look at the next generation, in this case coming into Rotterdam, check out this video . . . and I’d jump ahead to the 23-minute mark . . . behold the 20,000 teu 1312′ Ever Given.

Two final points . . .  I find it odd that CMA CGM has named these vessels for former US presidents.  Imagine US-flagged ships with names like Jules Armand Dufaure or Charles Dupuy  . . .

And second, for a glimpse of CMA CGM plans in the next two years, check out CMA CGM Jacques Saade,  named for the company founder.

Jasmine and Rose are two of eight, all ordered mid-year 2015  At about $120 million each, that’s close to a billion dollar order handed to the Shanghai Jiangnan Changxing Shipbuilding Ltd. co., right across the river from Shanghai proper.  Google-map that to get a sense of the shipbuilding and shipping infrastructure along the mouth of the Yangtze.

Mary Turecamo overtook Jasmine at the perfect moment to give the sense of projected power, while Jonathan C holds back and otherwise guides the stern.

 

 

A few days later, a clone arrives from the Ambrose Channel . . .,

one of the clones that I’ve not yet seen.  I’ve have seen Peony, Camellia, and Sakura.  I believe I’ve yet to see Azelea, Lotus, and Orchid.  I’ve seen some of them come and go, but just didn’t have reason enough to go out to see a clone.

Whenever you see a clutch of tugs like this, you know they’re waiting, and the more tugs, the bigger the escortee.

Maybe someone can instruct me on the air draft of these ULCVs.

JRT delivers the docking pilot.

To conclude with an echo back to the scale posts . . . see the 2014-built Taipei Trader off the port bow of Rose.  Both are container ships but their size is vastly different.  One way to think of it, it would take 13 Taipei Traders to carry the same number of containers as Rose.

All photos, WVD, who wants to know if there is a term used for small “feeder” box boats like Taipei Trader.

 

Mary Turecamo has the distinction of having been built at Matton Shipyard near Waterford.  She’s a big boat:  106′ loa and 4300hp.

James William was originally Lisa Moran.  She’s 77′ and generates 2800hp propelled by three screws.

Barney Turecamo, built in 1995, was intended to push cement barges.  She’s 116′ and rated at 5100hp.

Brendan Turecamo was launched in 1975.  She’s 106′ and her twin EMDs generate 3900hp.

James D. Moran is one of the four 6000hp tugboats that have worked in the sixth boro for the past five years.  She’s 88′ loa.

Notice that all the above boats had some connection with Moran?  Anyhow. Ava M. is the newest escort tug in the boro.  She arrived here about a year ago, 100′ and 6770hp.

Alex McAllister has been in the harbor–I believe–about five years now.  Built in 1985, she is 87′ and 4300hp.

When I first saw Genesis Vigilant, he was a Hornbeck Offshore boat called Michigan Service.  Built in 1981, she’s 99′ and rated at 3000hp.

Josephine might be the newest T of an ATB in the boro.  She was launched in 2018, is 110′, and moves with 4560hp.

Here she was pushing the 347′ loa RTC 83 into a berth at the east end of IMTT, with assistance from Franklin ReinauerFranklin was launched in 1984, is 81′ and generates 2600hp.

All photos, WVD.  Again, sorry I posted prematurely sans any text. Sometimes I’m looking right at something, seeing a word or a number, and just calling it something else.  I believe my brain is becoming like my mother’s.

 

 

 

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