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Cosco Prince Rupert came into town recently 27 days out of Pusan, Korea.

She was launched in South Korea in 2011, has dimensions of 1095′ x 141′, and has container capacity of 8208.  By current standards, she’s upper medium-sized calling in the sixth boro of NYC.

Prince Rupert’s namesake?  He was the first governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

JPO Capricornus, 2005, 865′ x 106,’ teu capacity of 4132 . . .  makes her a smaller size calling these days.  She was a week out of Cartagena upon her arrival in NYC.  She was built in South Korea.

 

Atlantic Sky, a CONRO vessel with capacity of 3800 tea and 1300 vehicles, was launched in 2017 in China.  The tape has her at 970′ x 121′.

 

 

 

Ever Leading launched in 2012 in South Korea.  She has 8452-teu capacity and has dimensions of 1099′ x 151′.

 

Zim Ukrayina  was launched in 2009 in the Philippines.  Her dimensions are 849′ x 105′ and her teu capacity is 4360.

She made the voyage from just north of  Hong Kong (Da Chang Bay) to NYC in 40 days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

Click here for the first installment of this story . . .

Tuesday 0630.  Note here that crews have already begun lowering the booms of these new gantry cranes in order to fit under the VZ Bridge.

Wednesday 0915.  Plans were to begin the transit, but an anchor windlass refused to cooperate.

Wednesday 1030.  And the fog began to descend.

Thursday 0630.  It was a glorious morning.

Thursday 1000.  It’s a go.  That’s Media Boat 4 in the foreground.

1026.  I read there’s a 10′ clearance, but my perspective–faulty–said otherwise.

1027.  Yup . . . plenty clearance.

1140. near the Bayonne Bridge

1141.  James D. Moran in the hard hat area.

1146.

1147.  Under the bridge and then a turn into Port Elizabeth.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Read a Staten Island Advance article here.

 

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

She was waiting on the Pacific side of the Panama Canal just a few weeks ago, so when I figured she was departing the sixth boro, I went out to catch her, esp. since her fleet mate, the 1200′ CMA CGM G. Washington recently arrived and departed in the wee hours before light.

Tugs (l to r) assisting her in the turn outbound are James D. Moran, Miriam Moran, and Kirby Moran.  

 

 

 

She draws about 35′ here.  I wonder how much of that is ballast.

Enjoy a mash-up photo here to close out the post:  I was fortunate to catch CMA CGM Dalila and APL Denver both under the VZ Bridge at the same time.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp,  still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic or high-tech.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got a good number of photos so far, but I’d like to see greater variety.  Thanks to all of you who’ve already shared photos.

 

Definitely some sort of military truck, probably FMTV made by Oshkosh.  Some of the numbering is Hebrew.

And there’s a bunch of them, up there

squeezing under

the Bayonne Bridge, as they and the rest of the cargo

aboard the Norddeusche ship

rounds Bergen Point on the way to Port.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has seen military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

A different post was scheduled for today, but when good fortune smiles, I smile.  Behold  J. Adams bound for sea, as she could not have a year ago . . . in fact, she may very well not even have been completely fitted out a year ago. As of this writing, I believe that J. Adams and T. Roosevelt are the only two of CMA CGM’s 14,414-teu vessels calling in the sixth boro. CMA CGM has just launched a 20,600 tee vessel, not scheduled to call here.

I’ll smile even more once the walkway on the bridge opens, allowing photos from a different perspective.  Such a change in capacity from the vessel carrying the first containers outbound from the sixth boro back on April 26, 1956!  This tech spec sheet starts out with an interesting graph of vessel capacity since 1980, and much more.

Kirby Moran (6000 hp) looks small here, and notice the two bow thrust symbols on the bow, which–if I interpret this info correctly–operate with 5000 hp.

Captain D and her trash barge provide some sense of scale here.

 

 

 

For cleaner port air, she’s equipped with an HVSC by Wärtsilä , which also provides the propulsion power.

 

Kirby Moran–work on this vessel complete– heads back to sail the next ship out of port.

Following are James D and JRT.

I don’t know the calling ports for the other two 14,414 teu vessels:   A. Lincoln and  T. Jefferson.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

English is the international language of navigation, air and water.  I can pronounce the name below the Chinese, although I’ve no idea what it means or refers to.  Do folks still talk about Seaspeak?  I once applied for a job teaching Seaspeak but never even got a response.

Xin Mei Zhou arrived in the sixth boro of NYC–Port Elizabeth– on February 1, after having left Kaohsiung two days after Christmas.

She’s not a record-setting size these days, although 10 years ago nothing of this size came to the port,

but that’s what the billion-plus-dollar raising of the Bridge was all about.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

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