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It’s that day, and although I’d planned something different, there are a lot of these green containers coming through the sixth boro.  Guess which ship?  Unrelated but something else to guess?  What is the emerald isle of the Great Lakes USA?  Answer follows.

Kimberly Turecamo was on port bow the other day, as

 

James D. and

 

Kirby assist along starboard side.

I believe 30 of the L- series have been built.  Click here (and look on the left nav bar) for their green features.

Go to any world shipping lane and you’ll see them.  The photo below was in Gatun Lake.

Their profile is unmistakeable.

I certainly haven’t even taken a photo of everyone I’ve seen in the sixth boro.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s ingesting green things like basil and oregano today.

Here is the first in this series.  Here’s another.  And from 12 years ago here’s an earlier class of Evergreen C-ships.

Emerald Isle of the Great Lakes . . .  it’s in Lake Michigan . . .  Beaver Island!!

 

When the almost 20,000 hp team is assembled this way, it means one thing.

Sometimes it’s a big bright bird in flamingo, but other times it might be a dark bird.

Kirby went in first,

followed by Miriam. This one’s a crane, dark like NYK Blue Jay is.

Click here (and scroll) for the anticipated seven other bird names in this series of 14,000 teu ULCVs.

James D. and Joan stayed on this side  .  . .

 

 

I’d love to see NYK Crane side by side with NYK Daedalus, as shown here in 2008.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who forgot about time today.

By my interpretation, this ULCV is propelled by about a 38,000 hp engine. But NYK Eagle has a different and more powerful engine.  I’m not sure my interpretation here is correct.

 

 

 

Less than five minutes after disconnecting from Seapacis,

JRT has attached to Alpine Maya and guides her into the dock so recently vacated by Seapacis.

 

Jonathan C hangs onto the stern.

James D stays alongside the tanker, since it’s headed for the Stapleton anchorage.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A hex sign?  Well that “boss” is just about a variation on those folk magic symbols so common in parts of PA.

But it’s a logo here, or a symbol I can’t interpret on a crude (?) tanker rotating away from the dock and turning in the length of the KVK . . . one of my favorite maneuvers to watch in the sixth boro.  Previous examples can be seen here.

The evolution started with James D, likely delivering the pilot to the catwalk, as no gangway was deployed.

Then JRT took station near midships.

James D took a line frowner the bow.

See the pilot on the starboard bridge wing?

 

Smoke is in the distance, about a quarter mile on shore.

 

Note the ice buildup on the part of the hull that had been in the shade.

 

When the rotation had reached nearly 180 degrees, JRT broke off in a hurry and  . . .

… well, that’s a post for another day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I haven’t used this title in half a decade, but today I couldn’t resist. JRT waited at the Staten Island side of the VZ.

But so were the geese, the brants.

Lots of them.

As well as the gulls.

James D joined JRT as an escort gull whizzed overhead.

Now you see it?

Now?

Jonathan C meets NYK Blue Jay!!

More birds soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Kirby Moran and James D Moran wait, like a team of horses, actually a team of 12,000 horses.

Here’s a different perspective on Kirby as she returns from a job.

CMT Otter and a salt barge lies alongside Nord Summit while along the other side, the venerable Twin Tube reprovisions from stern starboard.

Atlantic Salvor (or Enterprise??)  . . . I’ll never catch up as she heads for one of the many skylines of Brooklyn.  By the way, has anyone caught a photo of Hunter D in the sixth boro?

With Shooters Island and beyond that the cranes of Howland Hook in the background, it’s Discovery Coast, these days somewhat rare in the sixth boro.

Mister Jim is looking sharp these days, much better than her earlier livery.

Kodi is quite far away here, but she is a mere 42.6 footer.

Bering Dawn . . . she’s been on the East Coast some time now,

but all told, she’s spent more time on the West Coast.

The elusive Thomas stopped by the salt pile the other morning to retrieve a crane.

Margaret Moran . . . as always assisting ships into and out of the sixth boro.  More Margaret soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Today I caught the stork, one stork.

I had work to do, but I just couldn’t let this big cherry blossom magenta vessel pass unrecorded, especially not on a sunny late October day.  Besides, I could work twice as hard the next few days . . ..

Wait . . . I thought it was one STORK!??

Yup . . . one stork from Tokyo.

No way!  It’s one tug named James D. Moran.

This minimal superstructure probably contributes to fuel economy.

 

She’s a product of Japan Marine United Corporation in Kure shipyard, Hiroshima.

And for some really cool alongside on the dock photos, here are a few from Sean McQuilken in Charleston.

 

It’s more than 100 feet up to the bridge wing!

Thanks to Sean for use of these photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Cosco Prince Rupert came into town recently 27 days out of Pusan, Korea.

She was launched in South Korea in 2011, has dimensions of 1095′ x 141′, and has container capacity of 8208.  By current standards, she’s upper medium-sized calling in the sixth boro of NYC.

Prince Rupert’s namesake?  He was the first governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

JPO Capricornus, 2005, 865′ x 106,’ teu capacity of 4132 . . .  makes her a smaller size calling these days.  She was a week out of Cartagena upon her arrival in NYC.  She was built in South Korea.

 

Atlantic Sky, a CONRO vessel with capacity of 3800 tea and 1300 vehicles, was launched in 2017 in China.  The tape has her at 970′ x 121′.

 

 

 

Ever Leading launched in 2012 in South Korea.  She has 8452-teu capacity and has dimensions of 1099′ x 151′.

 

Zim Ukrayina  was launched in 2009 in the Philippines.  Her dimensions are 849′ x 105′ and her teu capacity is 4360.

She made the voyage from just north of  Hong Kong (Da Chang Bay) to NYC in 40 days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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