You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘James D. Moran’ tag.

Here are previous weather posts, and although today the sixth boro and surrounding land masses are experiencing the first serious snowfall this season, this post is not about that.  Rather, it’s about something I saw and felt yesterday, when it was 65 degrees F for a few midday hours.  65!!

So here was the weather phenomenon photo taken at 0834.  I take it that’s a squall line, but it seemed so isolated.

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Here was the scene at 0826.  CMA CGM Amber headed into Port Elizabeth with JRT on the stern quarter.  Tomorrow I’ll have more Moran photos.  Notice how clear and calm it was right at the bridge, although Elizabethport seems enveloped in some mist.

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0827 . . . shows HMS Justice in that mist.

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So here I repeat the 0834 photo of that line moving rapidly in my direction.

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Here’s 0840 and

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below,  0841, as Jonathan C escorted CMA CGM Georgia around Bergen Point to Port Eliz.  Notice the dull finish on the Bayonne Bridge, since that squall line has obscured the morning sun at my back.  The temperature also dropped noticeably.

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At 0846, besides Jonathan C, we can now see (l to r) Jennifer Turecamo with barge Portland, James D., and Miriam.

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By 0922 my back was nicely warmed by the sun again, with the temperatures heading to a blue sky 65 in February, although Elizabeth seemed still misted in.

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All photos taken on February 8 by Will Van Dorp.  Did anyone else see and feel this front move through?

 

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The evolution depicted in the next photos took all of five minutes.  In the photo below, note where James D.‘s wake is.

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Now the tug’s vector is lateral but increasingly astern.

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I’m glad for my sake the sequence happened so quickly because 18 degrees F was killing my fingers.

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Note Brendan around the stern of Erikoussa.

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The bow line here is about to go slack as the tanker makes headway.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who just happened to be passing at this moment.

Can you identify these boats?  This is a game I sometimes play . . . trying to guess before I can read by my eyes or some device . . .

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Do you know the unit headed away?

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Here’s that Moran vessel from the first photo of this post.

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OK.  Did you get Sea Fox?  I had guessed Sea Wolf. There is no Sea Coyote.  Yet.

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I didn’t get this one either.

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James D. here had just finished the salt ship job,

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along with Margaret .  .  . and headed back to base to await the next job.

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And finally, Turecamo Girls heads out for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the whole series.  The different colors in the pile reflect trace minerals from different global sources.

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Anyhow, the latest salt ship came in yesterday at sunrise.  I’d come to my spot early in hopes there would be enough light when TTM Dragon arrived , but I was wrong.

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James D. Moran worked the bow as the line boat stood by.

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Pilot on the bridge wing calls the shots, and

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when the signal is given, mooring lines are ferried to

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shore and looped over the bollard.

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When it’s all fast, James D. and Margaret Moran  prepare for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Random means random, and I challenge you to come up with a more random set . . .

Let’s start with a Gmelin photo from 1930.  I’ll give the name of the tug later in this post so that all experts of arcane sixth boro history can play.  Since today is the V-Day, let me mention that Herbert Hoover was POTUS, and not very popular at that time, post-crash, in spite of his 1928 campaign slogan “A Chicken in Every Pot and a Car in Every Garage.”  Well, that did not work out so well.  A few things impress me about Hoover though, like . . . in what language would he and the First Lady–Lou–converse privately when guests were in the White House.  By the way, why is the 2nd Tuesday in November Election Day?  Answers at the end of this post.

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Here’s a photo from my archives, Surrie Moran (2000 built) assisting with a big south-bound Crowley barge El Rey (1979) in June 2013 on the Delaware River.  I was shooting against the morning sun.   You see a little of Cape Henry (1967) on the stern also.   Any guesses which Crowley tug was towing?

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And another photo from 2013, January,  in the KVK.  It’s Rebel, built 1976, with her odd hull.  Is she now scrapped?

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So now a few from the past week . . . James D. Moran (2015) passes the KV buoy heading for the North River.

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Genesis Victory (from 1981) heads into the Kills.

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The 2002 Labrador Sea comes in from somewhere out east.

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And over on a waterway I don’t get to see that often, I stumbled onto the 1940 Ireland,

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1958 Bergen Point, and

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the 1947 basic Harbor II.

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And since a lot of things are cyclical, we’re back at the mystery tug.

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With my magnifying glass, I read enough to make me think this is Richard J. Barrett, which would have been 11 years old in 1930.  Here’s Birk’s info. The ship is the 1925-launched MS Gripsholm, significant as the first transAtlantic liner powered by a diesel engine.

And Hoover and his wife spoke Mandarin for their secret asides when guests were in earshot.  I’m impressed.

And towing El Rey, here’s Sentry  (1977).

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And we have our 19th century agrarian roots to thank for the 2nd Tuesday being election day . .  . here.

 

 

Today’s a good day to return to this series I had going for a few years and now return to.  More Chrononauts in the next few days…

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But first, this vessel bringing in my favorite celebratory drink.

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The fabulous September weather has allowed this project to rush to completion.  Remember, tomorrow

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in early afternoon she goes on a towline back to South Street Seaport through a portion of the sixth boro of this city made great thanks to shipping work and capital.  You can watch from along the KVK, from the Battery, or from South Street Seaport Museum.

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The name paint is on the list of about a thousand “last” things to do before departure.

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Also, enjoying the spectacular equinox weather, the crewman who becomes almost invisible in the bow

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of this 1100′ box ship,  

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tethered to James D. Moran.

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More on Peking as she gets prepared for her home-going.  Doesn’t this look like a shipyard for the ages?

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a detail I noticed recently that I truly do not understand.  There are three sets of load lines.  does this mean that significant changes have been made to the vessel such that greater load–deepest draft marks here seem to be the current ones–is now legal?  The tanker is 16 years old.

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Thanks.  Photo by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Some people are up before dawn on Easter because of work.  But at sunrise this morning from Bard Street and looking west . . . it was gray.

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Looking east . . . dawn smudged the rosy fingers’ painting.   Lucy Reinauer pushed RTC 83 in that direction, while the Moran 6000 hp tractors returned to the barn after helping Hanjin Shenzhen out to sea and southbound.

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And the Bayonne windmill has revived its current production.  Passing it in order were JRT Moran,

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and James D.  In the distance, that’s Barney Turecamo and

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Miriam also passed.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Hunting Creek also worked their way into Easter morning.

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And I decided to get to work also.  All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did versions 1 and 2 of this in previous years.  Here was a different take on Easter.  As for Caitlin Ann’s being blue . . .

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here’s how I first saw her.

 

“Backing down” is a term I’ve heard used to describe a ship assist in which the tugboats control the sternwise movement of a vessel away from a dock.  Most of the work here seems to be tide current driven, if I saw it right.

Let’s pick this up at 16:28 hrs.

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The evolution waits for incoming traffic, in this case Seoul Express, which I watched getting backed down half a decade ago here and here.  Margaret Moran was involved that time as well.

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At 16:49, Seoul Express, accompanied by Kirby Moran, is passing and Margaret throttles up, catching

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the attention of a crew member on the superstructure of Seoul Express.

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By 16:51, Heina is well away from the dock, and now

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James D.Moran needs to get the stern out, but I’m not well placed to capture that.

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Margaret moves around to the bulb.  I love how the load markings mimic the tug profile.

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By 16:58, Heina is at least two ship lengths east of the salt dock, and

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by 17:07, Heina has begun to rotate counterclockwise in preparation to head under the VZ Bridge out to sea.  By now, she’s south of the Bahamas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, to whose untrained eyes this all seemed to evolve with masterful control.

As to the meaning of “heina,” try this.

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