You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘James D. Moran’ tag.

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

See it between those ships?  It’s  . . .

 Utopia! And that’s within the dimensions of 207′ x 36′ and powered by 4 x MTU 16V 2000 M96L’s.

Well, Utopia IV, that is, the $50 million yacht of someone with the net worth . . . of Bob Dylan.  Back to that later, the owner’s previous yacht, as you can imagine was Utopia III.  

The IV is available to charter for a mere half million a week, chartered through Moran Yacht and Ship, which has no connections, that I know of, to Moran Towing.

The low-profile yacht is capable of 33 knots, with a range of 3600 nm.  At 30 knots, it can cover the 950 nm between Miami and New York in a day and a half, if my math is correct. 

Not visible here is the fold down transom that has a square footage greater than my Queens apartment!

All photos, WVD.

The Bob Dylan reference above . . . he sold his rights to his work recently for $300 million, said to be the net worth of JR Ridinger, owner of Utopia IV.  Maybe he came up for the fireworks?

 

I had several “pink” posts, but let’s go with the official designation of the hue, magenta.  Magenta, believe it or not, is a term for the created color derived from an Italian town where a significant battle took place in 1859!!  How’s that for obscure.

In June I caught ONE Hawk (again) and ONE Munchen.

Yesterday brought in another pink sorry magenta vessel, ONE Hangzhou Bay, that body of water that separates Shanghai and Ningbo and can be crossed via the 22-mile bridge that opened in 2008.

 

Miriam delivered the docking pilot,

 

while Kirby and James D. stood by.

 

All photos, WVD.

Hangzhou is also noteworthy as the southern terminus of the Grand Canal, the thousand-mile water first designed and worked on over 2000 years ago, completed over 1400 years ago. 

With Eastern Dawn in the foreground, the massive scale of these box boats is apparent.

Foreshortening gives the illusion that MSC Lauren cannot possibly avoid a collision.

Although this may be her first arrival in the sixth boro, this 12400 teu vessel has sailed the seas for a decade already.

See the crewman near the port bow quarter?

Now you see him?

 

If I recall correctly, she arrived here from Jamaica;  from here she travels to Italy.

Again . . . Linda L. Miller and the 6000 hp tugs show scale.  MSC Lauren is one of 560 container vessels operated by MSC, the second largest shipping company in the world.  Know the largest?  The third largest?  Answers are here.

So here’s a merger of truckster! and ULCVs, a photo I took last week from a parking lot.  I know what was loaded into that 20′ MSC container.  I invite you to guess.  Answer will be posted tomorrow . . . .

All photos, WVD, who is always happy to collaborate.

 

Most of you know that dawn is my favorite time. Yesterday dawn–between 0545 and 0645–was quite busy;  two of the five vessels that transited the KVK were among the largest–so far–that call in the sixth boro.

Pink sky with gradations, faded purple Brooklyn, huge but silent shapes, and spots of artificial lights.

Birds silhouetted and reflections in the still water make the scene as one point over by central western Brooklyn turns a deeper shade of red.

When the ship blocks the blinding rising sun, its name becomes legible.

Once CS Rose passes my vantage point, all that light illuminates the details.  Three tugboats along her starboard, one on stern, and one on the far side, the port side.

Not much later–another smaller container ship has passed–the next hulking shape appears, and the light has already turned gradations of yellow.

When CMA CGM Mexico blocks the rising sun, details become available  . . .

 

By now, 0645, the light suggests the sun has created daylight.

 

Tugboats on Rose include  James D, Mary Turecamo, Kimberly Turecamo, and Kirby.  Tugboats on Mexico include Marie J Turecamo, JRT, Kimberly Turecamo, and Miriam.

All photos, WVD.

 

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Here are the birds.  Now what’s the rest of the story?

Part of the story is told by these flags, US courtesy, German registry, and is that a pilot flag?

She was large for a 2008 container ship:  1098′ x 140′ with a capacity of 8606 teu.

 

I’d love to know more about accessing that lifeboat, given the cargo configuration.

And where are the birds?

 

Doubleclick on that last photo to see the closeup . . . you can almost hear the excitement!

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous installments.  What’s different here is that in this case I’m inside  the Narrows and shooting to the east and north.

Yankee passes in light before sunrise.

I rotate the lens 90 degrees to the right and Margaret stands by

along with James D to support Maersk Chicago, anchored in Stapleton.  As I write this,  24 hours later, the container ship is leaving port, although her destination shows NYC as both “from” and “to”….

Meanwhile Mary Turecamo comes out of its base in the KVK

just as the sun rises above the horizon and its cloudbank and gets reflected.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this set perfectly illustrates why I take photos at dawn whenever I can.  It’s worth getting up and out.

It was my first time to see her.  She arrived this morning after a monthlong voyage from Busan, which she departed on December 17.  With her containers all squared away, I’d gather she has delivered a full load.

CSCL operates eight of these vessels, valued at $117 million each.

The sight of these giants gives pause.  China’s  first container ship, Ping Xiang Cheng, launched in 1978 for a route between Shanghai and ports of eastern Australia carried 162 containers!  Their first service to US ports came in 1981.

Who then could have imagined these.

Mariner gear in 2021 . . . it’s not what I’d expect.

With the two crew above and these four, this must be half or more of the deck crew. 

 

For an afternoon’s reading, click here for an analysis of the shipyard which builds these behemoths and many other types of ships.

All photos this morning, WVD.

Here was the part A.  CMA CGM Argentina, sister toMexico and Brazil, steamed up the coast Sunday evening, making me think I’d miss it.  But it dropped anchor 15 or so miles off Point Pleasant, and stayed there making pattern like this.  Another ULCV was similarly anchored off Jones Beach, and it came into the boro last night.  This raises a question:  are the ULCVs causing a shortage of berth space?

Early afternoon yesterday after three ULCVs–Hyundai Ambition, Cosco Shipping Camellia, Tampa Triumph— left port, Argentina was off like an arrow for Ambrose Channel.

I debated going to see it, given fading light, but … decided I needed a distraction on a Friday afternoon.

I went.  The docking pilots lands from Jonathan C, which then

swings around the stern.

End of the day twilight has its own richness;  here the straight lines of the ship (?!) contrast with the irregular lines of the city.

She’s long, stacked as they were when she left Busan, Korea’s largest port,  on December 9, and nearly dragging her belly through the silt and fluff at the bottom of the channel.

 

And I’ll bet there not more than 30′  clearance with the underside of that bridge down there.

All photos, WVD, whose previous ULCV posts, some of them, can be found here.  And I have other ULCV photos from recently I’ve not posted yet.

Unrelated but followup on the Rotterdam tug Limburgia video that sleepboot posted in a comment yesterday.  The 1942 boat has retired from commercial work and been sold.  You will enjoy looking through the photos on the sale notice.

Btw, “sleepboot” is the Dutch word for “tugboat.”

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,480 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

July 2021
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031