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As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

Port Shanghai just happens these days to be in a berth on Staten Island

discharging salt from Chile.

I know what this says, but I can’t claim to read it until I study Greek.

Thor Integrity I CAN read, but

until I know Thai, I can’t vouch for “Thor Integrity” being a translation.

Chinese is a common language in the sixth boro,

 

and it’s interesting which writing systems do not appear here . . .  too many to name.

All photos, WVD.

I’d been watching No.11Asomaru for a few days, wondering what the story was.  It appeared to coexist with containership MOL Courage, the green symbol surrounding the smaller gray one.  It did this screen grab Friday morning . . . yesterday.  When I saw there was a Asomaru No.8  and it was a tugboat, I thought possibly there’d be a tugboat riding on the containers, and I made excuses to avoid work and zoomed out to the Narrows.

There I saw MOL Courage anchored, an unusual spot for a container ship.

Several Moran tugs were standing by with it.

When the MOL vessel headed in, I leaped into motion and followed it, hoping to catch a glance of the Japanese tug.

 

But I saw nothing, except containers.

Later in the day, I checked on MOL Courage in Port Elizabeth, and sure enough, the

gray icon for No.11Asomaru is still there.

Can anyone explain this signal?  I saw a similar signal once before last fall . . . supposedly an unspecified vessel on a container ship, also in Port Elizabeth.

I’m puzzled.

Dd you catch my reference to leaping into motion . . .   Sorry . . . I couldn’t pass up that opportunity, given today’s date.  Previous leap days’ posts are here and here and here.

All photos, captures, leaping imagination here, WVD.

 

This is what 13,000 teu looks like coming straight at you in the early morning . .

And when another 8500+ passes you, that’s a lot of boxes, tractors, and stuff.

 

 

 

See the three bridges in the distance . . . Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Williamsburg?     I’d like to see a comparison of the strength to weight ratio of that towline and the cable holding the roadbeds on the bridges?

Lady of the Harbor reaches up, and her assessment is . . . impressive breaking strength.

From here, the tow winds itself toward the Bayonne Bridge, where the big turn to starboard get made, assisted by Jonathan C and that towline, with James D and Kimberly. assisting from vectors needed.

All photos, WVD.

Click here for specs on Cosco’s fleet list.

This series goes way back . . . in fact, the first installment was in 2006 using some photos I took in 2003, on my first trip up the Hudson.

What struck me yesterday as Nord Gainer headed out . . . was how much business was being taken care of on the fly . . .

As she headed out on the ConHook Range–I believe–opposing traffic is winter dragger Eastern Welder.

The docking pilot departs, via James D Moran, and after I’d gotten out ahead, it seemed odd to see the crane pitched over to port until

I caught sight on the vessel alongside her port . . .

the venerable Twin Tube!

Whatever needed to be transferred . . .  Twin Tube was there.

Photos by WVD, who’s always surprised by sights in the sixth boro.

Nord Gainer is part of a huge fleet of tankers, some of which I’ve seen in the boro previously.

 

It’s a dark and soon to be rainy day in the sixth boro, so for your enjoyment . . . colorful photos from yesterday.

This ship uses the old spelling . . .  like Peking v. Beijing.  Know the current spelling?

 

Crystal Cutler came by with Patricia E. Poling, to add some greens to the palette.

 

The Hapag Lloyd box ship was assisted in by James D. Moran and

Mary Turecamo.

So . . . today’s maps would spell this as Qingdao, home to China’s second largest brewery . . . which uses the old spelling too.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

Maybe a reader of Chinese can translate this….

or place name, contemporary or historical?

If I read this right, this 2013 vessel has had eight names in seven years, some very similar to Fu Quan Shan!

She’s left Norfolk by now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous names posts can seen here.

Cosco is a huge, fairly new response to twists and turns of the world shipping fortunes.

Day in day out . . . and night in night out, port work goes on.  Here James D finishes up escorting a gargantuan “flower” ship out.

Sea Eagle stands by with her barge while Dace refuels.

Pearl Coast heads for Caddells,

where Kings Point is getting some work done.

Discovery Coast leaves the Gowanus Bay berth.

Atlantic Coast lighters a salt ship while Lucy waits in the anchorage.

Lyman moves Sea Shuttle southbound while some Bouchard units heads for the KVK.

And completing this installment, it’s Kirby, all finished with another assist.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Update on the calendar voting, i.e., “polling… 1 through 4”   you’ve now seen the options for each month, but voting remains open, and I’m still accepting candidates for the December page.  And I’m grateful for all the voting so far.

Less than a handful of years back, a buzz could be heard in all the boros about these new ships that were going to arrive.  Well, they did and now seem routine.

Antwerpen Express departed the other day.

She and all the other ULCVs are longer than the Chrysler Building, once the first building to exceed 1000′, is tall.  The Chrysler is now obscured by all the taller buildings in the distance.

The same morning, the next “flower ULCV” departed.   We’ve seen Jasmine, Peony, and Camellia . ..   welcome  . . .

Sakura!!  aka cherry blossom.

The Moran 6000s arelarge tugboats, but here Jonathan C barely extends upward of the bottom paint.

 

Yesterday I drove past a trucking company yard with lots of trailers.  Compared with the “trailer boxes” you see here, that trucking yard was tiny.

“O ship!!” indeed!

 

And the story does not end here;  later Sunday afternoon–the day I took these photos–another ULCV YM Warmth arrived, but I was tied up and couldn’t run out to get a photo.   O ship!!!

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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