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Here’s a photo from a friend who works for a naval architecture firm.  Guess the function of the completed vessel below.

Here’s a rendering.

To the gentleman from New Zealand from the William C. Daldy Preservation Society who recently inquired about functioning steam tugboats in the US, I can’t think of any.  Can any reader here?  Here and here can get you info on steamer Daldy.  And all that smoke was photoshopped in, I was told.

Christiaan Brunings was built in 1900 as an icebreaker home-ported in Dordrecht NL, in the Rhine delta.  She survived two world wars that happened all around her.  I took this photo in Dordrecht in 2014.  For more photos of smoky Dutch steam tugs, click here.

If coal was the fuel of the past, then wind will make up a share of an increasingly harnessed renewable sources of energy.  Susie S was at the the Damen Den Helder yard back in 2014, same trip.

Even more variety is  here, the reason I put this post in the “line locker” group . . .   tugs on the highway . . .

and the boat ramp, and

sometimes nearly getting away . . .  once they enthusiastically take to water.  Well that tug, formerly know as Atlantic Hunter has changed hands and is now Little Giant.  Neptune himself was consulted about the deal and he approved.  Keep your eyes peeled.

And further rounding out this post . . .  On July 14, 2017, Peking was floated out of Caddells by the tagteam of Dorothy J and Robert IV to

be slipped onto the back of Combi-Dock III for transit over the Atlantic.  See the full story here.  Today, September 7, 2020, it arrives fully restored at its new museum in the port of Hamburg.

After more than three years of work, Peking will be arriving here today.  The FB site is shown there. If you don’t do FB, I have permission to copy some pics and paste them in a future blog post.  To the Hafenmuseum, where I wanted to be today . . .  Herzlichen Glückwunsch zur schönen Restaurierung!

Back to those first two images, that is a state-of-the-art Russian factory trawler called Captain Sokolov, one of six identical vessels being built at the St. Petersburg Northern Shipyard.  Here’s more on the design of these vessels with a capsule hull.  Dimensions are 268′ x 51′ with a cold storage capacity of 1200 metric tons. Here’s more on Norebo.  The design is by Knarr Maritime Consortium of Iceland.

The first two images thanks to Aleks, number 3 is from seapixonline, and the others, WVD.  Many thanks to Rembert for reminding me that today is the day Peking in Hamburg goes public.

Finally . . . it’s Labor Day, which I learned is a good day to work.  But if you want to stream some good music on a Labor Day theme, try this from Bread and Roses, where I used to go when I lived in the Merrimack Valley of MA.

 

 

I’m always on the lookout for “first-timers” in the harbor, but I’m equally thrilled to see the “seldom-seen.”  I realize that some people might see these boats everyday. The “seldom-seen” relates to me.

This is true of Pelham.  The 1960 built is on her sixth name, if I count right.  She started out as Esso Pelham.  You’ll have to scroll, but here are a number of times I’ve posted photos of her, in and out of the water.

Evelyn Cutler, a 1973 build,  is a frequenter on this site.  When I first saw her, she was a Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boat called Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

In the few months that this boat has been know as Mackenzie Rose, she appears to stay quite busy.  That’s a good thing.

Rae also fits into the rarely seen list, although maybe she was laid up and is now busy again.  Meeting her here is Normandy. Rae and Normandy were built in 1952  and 2007, respectively.

Philadelphia and

Jacksonville are both recent 4200 hp Vane boats.  Jacksonville, 2018, is one year newer than Philadelphia.

I first saw the 1981 Genesis Victory as Huron Service.  Periodically, some of the Genesis boats do make their way into Lake Huron and beyond.

As i said earlier, Mackenzie Rose is quite busy.  Does anyone know her namesake?  I don’t.

Frederick E. Bouchard is the second boat to carry that name.  She was built in 2016 and operates with 6140 hp, but

these days she looks quite light and her exposed waterline somewhat rusty.

Barney Turecamo, the fourth (?) boat to carry that name, brings 5100 hp to the job.  When she was built in 1995, she had a different upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD, and taken in the past month.

 

Happy 4th of July.  Here’s some sixth boro, some heartland, and some Pacific Northwest.  Here‘s the series.

But let’s start with Robert IV, a workhorse who last appeared in this blog here.

Hundreds of Cheyenne photos have appeared on this blog, showing her in a range of colors and trims; this photo was taken last week in Manitowoc by a Great Lakes mariner, who, by the way, at one time worked in the sixth boro.

Ellen McAllister has worked in the sixth boro longer than I’ve been taking photos here; as a result, hundreds of photos of her can be found here.

For a red-white-blue tug today, what could be better than a Nicholas Vinik photo.

 

An outa-towner has come through the sixth boro twice this week with an unusual bargeload;  bad decision-making means this is the best photo I got.  Sorry, Elizabeth Anne.  Did anyone get a better photo?  Any idea what the “marshmallow” load on that barge is?

Two of the tugs assisting in a Cosco Shipping ULCV, Brendan Turecamo and JRT Moran, seem small but bring adequate power to the task.

Another view of Cheyenne shows her location on the Manitowoc River, adjacent to Erich.

Thanks to Kyle Stubbs for sending along this photo of a raft of Boyer tugs.  L to r, it’s Sea, Billie H, Gretchen H, and Kirsten H.  You might have recognized Sea as the former Java Sea, a regular operating out of the sixth boro. Despite what’s on the bow, she’s now called Kinani H.  In the back row, that looks like Sonja H.

How about another red-white-blue boat for today?  This is from over 11 years ago. It’s the 1951 Dorothy Elizabeth, ex-Gotham, Christine Gellatly, Mobil 11, Socony 11.

To close out the set, Iron Salvor, a Vanuatu-flagged tug, is back in town. Anyone know her story . . . who she works for?

Many thanks to Great Lakes mariner, Kyle, and Tony A for some of these photos;  photos not otherwise attributed by WVD.

Now that I’m at installment 291 of this series, I’m rethinking the adjective random.  Check out these meanings old and new here. But “random” it is until I come up with a better word.  I’d rejected the descriptor “miscellaneous” when I first started.  How about one from this list:  some, select, chance, serendipitous, entropic, stochastic . . ..

Enjoy this novel juxtaposition, Coney Island Light and Denise A., with her barge.  Denise A. is from 2014, a 4000hp tug with dimensions of 112′ x 35′ x 17′.

Marjorie B McAllister waits in the offing.  You might not guess that she’s worked since 1974 with her 4000hp and 112′ x 30′ hull.

Franklin Reinauer pirouettes her 81′ x 28′ hull right in front of me, the 1984 tug propelled by 2600 hp.

Capt. Brian A heads out for yet another job.

Meanwhile, Linda Lee Bouchard and two of her sisters, Ellen and Evening Star, bide their time at old Home Port. Linda Lee is from 2006, her 125′ x 38′ hull powered by 6140hp.  The sisters are 1982 104′ x 35′ and 3900hp and 2012 112′ x 35′ and 4000hp, respectively.

B. Franklin has been hard at work since 2012, measuring in at 112′ x 33′ and powered by 4000hp.

Robert IV came off the ways in 1975, and sometimes her  56′ x 22′ and  1050hp is just right.

More shots of Linda Lee

and Capt. Brian A.

and Evening Star.

And to conclude, hat tip to Stephen Reinauer, from 1970 and 101′ x 31′ and 3000 hp.

All photos, WVD, who thanks all who watched the Erie Canal presentation yesterday.  Here‘s more Erie Canal on Saturday.

 

 

See the exciting announcement at the end of this post.

Sunday I got word thanks to Shipshooter–Jonathan Atkin–that the pilot boat-to-be would be moving from Caddell’s back to the Sandy Hook Pilots (SHP) base on Monday morning right around sunrise.  Pilot boat-to-be?  There’s still much work to do before she enters service.  And at 0626, I saw the shift begin, as Dorothy J pulled her away from the floating drydock that has been her home the past few months. I visited her here back in December 2019 after she’d appeared at the SHP base about a year ago.  The current SHP No. 1 New York is at sea at the sea buoy end of the Ambrose Channel.

Once clear of the dry docks, the several-mile tow got underway.

Dorothy J kept the bow pointed while Robert IV had the stern.

Just east of the salt pile, the tow was reconfigured so that Robert IV got the Pilot No. 1 on the nose.

Robert IV continued the push toward the Narrows, after Dorothy J had gone ahead.

Just off the pilot station, Dorothy J came back alongside . . .

and Pilot No. 1 slides in opposite side of the dock from Pilot No. 2 New Jersey.

 

All photos, WVD, who will update the continuing transformation as available.

Here‘s a NY Media Boat report on a day at sea on the current Pilot Boat No. 1.

The big announcement, click on the image below.  A week from today you can join me for a different type of virtual canal tour.

A few weeks ago I posted photos erroneously identified as Dorothy J, even though plain as day Robert IV was on the bow.   That’s called distraction.  But the photo below, plain as day, is Dorothy J.  Here was Dorothy J on a foggy morning upriver almost two years ago.

Plain as day again . . .  Rebecca Ann in the KVK eastbound, and again

in a photo from Bob Stopper, plain as day way up the Erie Canal just below lock E27 with a barge loaded with reef fodder.  Here are previous photos from Bob.

Frances pushes a loaded scow westbound on the KVK, and

Janet D moves a spud barge over to the westside tower of the VZ Bridge, about to duck behind Sider Miami, previously known as Asian Prosperity.

Tug Ireland (renamed Hoppiness) has left the sixth boro for good

and is currently in the fresh waters of the Erie Canal, where I might see her soon.

Closing this post out, it’s an unnamed (to me) tug pushing a deck barge at the intersection of Hell Gate East River and the Harlem River.   The bridges there are the Triborough and the Hell Gate.

Thanks to Bob for his photo from Lyons;  all other photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be leaving the sixth boro tomorrow for a lot of weeks.

 

This is a long-overdue post:  Dorothy J Robert IV has frequently appeared on this blog, but never had a post devoted to her.  And then there’s the generic-sounding Oil Barge No. 6;  I’ve often noticed that by the St George Ferry Terminal, yet I’ve not even taken a photo of it in too many years for me to checked out in my archives.

I always wondered who moved that barge, but here is proof of who moved it the other day.

Hats off, Dorothy J.  Hats off to Robert IV too. And please scroll through this link for some of the jobs she’s worked in recent years.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

*Thanks to Chris R for pointing out a quite basic error in this post.  I’ll have to do a REAL Dorothy J post to make up for this.  By way of defense, all I can say is  . . .  the heat is baking my brain.

 

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

Here’s a different perspective on the sixth boro, different from my more usual ones.  And in this morning light, Sarah Ann looks like a beauty as she heads somewhere past Robbins Reef Light and

well . . . along that island.

Let’s continue trying to get some different POVs.  Patricia has some fine lines here accentuated by the low light of dawn.

Elk River and Hunting Creek pass, with missions in opposite directions.

Evelyn Cutler moves product for somewhere up the North River.

Paula Atwell moves garbage containers past an incoming green new shipment, and

Julie Anne, a new one for me in the sixth boro although I have posted a “down south” photo of her here, moves a scow up toward the Passaic River.  Notice that until I got to the Norfolk tugs, there were no tugs with even a drip of red paint on them in this post?

And finally, Brian Nicholas is neither a huge nor a small tug, 72′ loa, but as she passes the stern of CMA CGM Nabucco, she

looks almost like a toy.  My first reaction was excitement  . ..  erroneously thinking I’d see either the elusive  Susan E. or Elizabeth Anna.  But don’t get me wrong, greetings to Brian Nicholas!

All photos and sentiments here the product of and/or the opinion of Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Pacific Reliance (9280 hp) transfers cargo before heading to Texas . . .

with the 155,000 bbl barge 650-1.

B. Franklin Reinauer (4000 hp) passes by

with RTC 82 (80,000 bbl, if I read that right)

and Austin (3900 hp) eastbound here light.

Dean Reinauer (4720 hp) moves westbound under the Bayonne Bridge.

Foxy 3 (1600 hp) and Brooklyn (2400 hp) wait at the dock west of Caddell Drydock.  Foxy was previously Barker Boys, and this Brooklyn, Labrador Sea.

Brooklyn on her way to a job.

Delta Fox (1200 hp) and Morton S. Bouchard IV (6140 hp) tied up here  just east of Foxy 3 and Brooklyn.

Morton S. Bouchard IV makes up the next three photos here:  in front of a Saint Lawrence like eglise

against the Brooklyn skyline, and

and still more in front of T-AKR-306 USNS Benavidez.

And let’s finish up with Patrica (1200 hp) and Robert (1800 hp).

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in info here.

 

 

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