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2011 began in Charleston, a great place to welcome a new year.  Strolling around, I encounter the 1962 75′ buoy tender Anvil, 75301, here made up to CGB68013.  In the background, that’s cutter Cormorant or Chinook.

Heading farther north a day or two later, it’s Hoss, sister of Patricia, and now habitat for fish and other sea life.  Click here to see her sink if you do FB.

Still farther north, I see this T-boat, a 1952 Higgins named for a high point in Ireland.

Lucinda Smith, then based in Maine, is currently based on Cape Cod.

Bering Sea, like a lot of K-Sea boat, has become a Kirby boat;  it is currently in Philadelphia.  According to Birk’s invaluable site, this boat was Stacy Moran for a short time.  I never saw it in Moran red.

Thanks to my friend Paul Strubeck, this Kristin Poling needed an assist from Cornell to get through an ice jam.  This is one of my all-time favorite photos.  It looks to me like a submarine in the very deeps.

McCormack Boys was active in the sixth boro back in 2011, and although she’s still working, I’ve not seen her in years.

I glimpsed Stephen Scott in Boston a few months back, but since this photo was taken, she’s lost the upper wheelhouse.

There’s classic winter light beyond Torm Carina, provisioned here by Twin Tube.  Torm Carina is currently in the Taiwan Strait. 

Later Margaret and Joan Moran assist the tanker westbound in the KVK while Taurus passes.  Taurus has become Joker, wears Hays purple, and I’ve not even seen her yet.  I guess it’s high time I hang out in Philadelphia again.

A wintry photo shows McKinley Sea in the KVK eastbound.  In the distance,

notice the now foreign-based Scotty Patrick Sky.  If you want to see her, gallivant to St. Lucia.  McKinley Sea is currently laid up in Louisiana.

Erie Service, now Genesis Valiant, pushes her barge 6507 westbound. 

And on a personal note, it was in January 2011 that I stumbled into a locality that had been attracting me.  I suppose if ever I created a retreat, I’d have to call it Galivants Hideaway.   Here‘s another Galivants Ferry set of photos.

Thanks to Paul for use of his photo.  All other photos, a decade back, WVD.

 

Having seen the forecast for December 25, I did my watch on Christmas eve.    These are the latest sunrises of the entire cycle . . . photo taken around 0745, and the sky was still reddish and offering very little light.   Fort McHenry and survey boat Christina cross. Yes, Christina . . . namesake you know who. 

Diane B was pushing John Blanche deep in the water with heating fuel.

Fort McHenry passes my station.

Ocean Endeavour was heading in ahead of the strong winds . . . or maybe just to be at the dock for Christmas.   Note the Staten Island ferry off her starboard and a tip of Twin Tube off port stern.

 

By now, it’s a little after 0800.

Twin Tube is the ultimate sixth boro Christmas boat;  there’s no Santa or reindeer, just a competent captain and enough horsepower to get alongside ships.

The reindeer . . . they’re atop the tarped salt pile.   Santa may have abandoned the sleigh, however.

All the above photos were taken before 0900.  The photo below. . .  it’s W. O. Decker, currently getting work done upriver, but ensconced between Wavertree and  work barge Progress a few years ago . .  .

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all Merry Christmas and gifts of life, health, and happiness however you find it.  And one more . .  . bravo to the Normandy crew for the decorations.

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

Here’s a new one, Stephen B with

James Joseph.  I’ve not seen Stephen B with that barge in quite a while.  Maybe I just have not been looking carefully. 

Kristin Poling

is moving Eva Leigh Cutler.  When we’re past the first of November, usually the number of barges increases, even if the outdoor temperatures are in the 70s.

Mister Jim, for the first time that I’ve noticed,

has a bunker barge, this one Richardson Sea, a Centerline Logistics barge.

Evelyn Cutler was moving a fully loaded Edwin A. Poling

 

Genesis Eagle

had a deeply loaded GM 11103.

And finally for now, RTC 80

gets moved through the Kills with Kristy Ann.

All photos, WVD.

More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

Count the tugboats in this one shot . . .  six! And a seventh is obscured right behind the nearest.  And no, it was not part of the annual tugboat race.  From (l) to (r), it’s JRT Moran, Amy Moran, Stephen B, (and Ellen McAllister is obscured) then Genesis Eagle, Magothy with Double Skin 57, and Elk River doing assist.

In case you suspect I’m making up the seventh tugboat, here’s a closeup of Ellen assisting Eagle just nine seconds earlier.

A bit later, I noticed a similar density over in the anchorage.  Just naming ships, (l) to (r), there’s Advance II, White Horse, Sten Odin, and Cielo di Londra.

Then among then, there are two more tug/barge units with tugs Barry Silverton and Helen Laraway.  Interesting how Barry Silverton is shrunk when beside a tanker.

And a bit later I zoomed down, around, and in to see the service vessels clustered around White Horse:  HMS* Liberty (I think), a Miller Launch boat, and on the far side Lesney Byrd.

All photos, WVD, who’s now outa town for a while.  Thx to everyone who’s sent in or pledged relief posts.

Also, a certain exotic ship is coming into the harbor, and I’d be very grateful if someone stepped forward to get photos of it as it arrives.  Email me, please, if you might be able to get the shot.

*HMS . . . Harley Marine Services is no more; out of its ashes rises Centerline Logistics.

Excuse the branches and tendrils reaching out over this dense pack of tugboats:  five Bouchard boats plus a Harley behind Denise and a Genesis on the drydock.

Crystal Cutler here in profile is heading for the Kills;  this photo prompts me to wonder how this wheelhouse “window” configuration has worked out.

Stephen B assists Fells Point leaving IMTT with Double Skin 302.

Marie J Turecamo heads east on the KVK.

I can’t recall now whether this is my first time to see Vane’s New York, here with Double Skin 53.

Seeley moves a scow eastbound.

Mount St. Elias goes west here.

And finally . . . J. George Betz heads east, possibly to pick up a barge.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for content . . .

Here’s another calendar’s worth . . . starting with Josephine.  I have many more of this bot coming up soon.

Capt. Brian heads out through the Narrows to meet a tow.

Cape Lookout returns for her anchored barge.

Nathan G delivers a brace of scows.

Ava M heads out for a job.

The “new” Kristin Poling returns to her barge as well.

Ellen and Bruce A follow a job.

St Andrews heads east and

Ernest Campbell, west.

Challenger, some weeks ago, brings a Weeks crane up for a lift.

Stephen B has some additions to her paint job since last I saw her.

CMT Pike heads back across the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who can’t believe it’s already mid-November 2019!!

 

 

Heraclitus has to be the classical philosopher most referred to on this blog.  I thought of this person again as I returned into the city after my longest ever so far time away;  this is a familiar place of six boros, and yet it does not seem familiar.  It is new, renewed by multiple sunrises and by my recollection as I gallivanted afar, seeing new places.   We enter beneath the GW, which I’ve never seen lit up this way.

On the water side of a wild and dynamic clutch of architecture, Pegasus stands guard,

 

As we make an initial run to the Upper Bay, we pass a renewed Harvey, a resolute Frying Pan, and an ever working Chandra B.

Hunting Creek follows Chandra B up to the cruise terminal.

USCGC Shrike waits near FDNY’s Hudson River station and the sprouting Pier 55.

Ernest Campbell brings more fuel to the cruise terminal.

Sarah Ann (I believe) delivers waste, passing the Battery, where Clipper City awaits another day of passengers.

As we circled back to dock, an unfamiliar tug was southbound.

Robert T and that livery are not ones I recognized, until

I realized this was the old Debora Miller.  Who knew!!??

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous three installments of this title.  After seven straight weeks away, I’m back in the boro for a while, a short while, and it seems the best way to catch up–attempt to–is to work backwards, starting from now.

A welcome sight on the west side of midtown . . . . Chandra B, ensconced here in the marine guard.  A great name for an organization?

Nearby, Miss Circle Line stands at the ready.

Still earlier this morning, I caught St. Andrews, 

and before that Frances.  More of her as I work backwards in time.

Earliest of all today . . .  Helen Laraway.

 

One from our arrival yesterday . . .  it’s Thunder Bay, an icebreaker assigned to summertime and UN Week duties.  As the name of a Lake Superior port, this name goes with lakers as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels a bit like Rip Van Winkle this morning.   Maybe I should gallivant a bit in the sixth boro . . .

 

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