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Can you identify these boats?  This is a game I sometimes play . . . trying to guess before I can read by my eyes or some device . . .

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Do you know the unit headed away?

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Here’s that Moran vessel from the first photo of this post.

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OK.  Did you get Sea Fox?  I had guessed Sea Wolf. There is no Sea Coyote.  Yet.

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I didn’t get this one either.

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James D. here had just finished the salt ship job,

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along with Margaret .  .  . and headed back to base to await the next job.

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And finally, Turecamo Girls heads out for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Jonathan Steinman, who once a week has a moment to look out his window at work, here’s an angle on Kimberly Poling showing a weight bench just behind the wheelhouse.   In pleasant weather, that must make a great gym.rt.jpg

Chandra B meets Morton Bouchard Jr with the Goethals Bridge–old and new–as backdrop.

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Ditto Ellen S. and Erin McAllister, with added details of the Linden refinery.

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A closeup of Erin, as she plows eastward.

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Ellen S.  and Evening Light meet near the salt pile.

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And to close out today’s post, it’s the too long absent Vulcan III passing Gracie M.

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How about a flashback to June 2009.  Cheyenne looks different today, but so does the shoreline of Manhattan, now that Pier 15 has institutionalized itself over on the far side of where Wavertree rests.

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The first photo by Jonathan Steinman;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I missed this one, but I saw it on AIS.  She used to be called Eagle Hope, but I’m thinking someone’s running out of names.

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I caught up with Alice though, here to discharge what she always does . . . aggregates.

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Denak Voyager waited in the anchorage at sunrise and before midmorning coffee, she moved to load what she always does . . . scrap.   Can

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this be the reference?

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Hafnia Lupus . .  being provisioned by the venerable Twin Tube and bunkered by a Vane unit.

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CMA CGM Musset gets escorted by Jonathan C Moran.  I had to look up Musset, but I’d figured it was an artist.

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See that outboard skiff over off the starboard bow?

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Latgale anchored off Stapleton a while back, and

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there goes Chandra B, the can-do, think-big tanker passing by Energy Champion and on its way to bunker the mothership at Sandy Hook pilots.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s off on a reconnoitre.

It appears I’ve not put up a batch of photos of this handy floating fuel station since here, but I’ll have to check the archives later today.  For now, these are photos of Chandra B and her hard-working crew I took last week.  Know the location?

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The two buildings through-lit by sunrise are Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue and Gehry’s IAC Building.

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And in the recesses along Chelsea Piers, Chandra B is well into its workday as the sun rises.  Here she tops off Utopia III.

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Chandra B‘s crew is ready for lunch before most people have breakfast.

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Click here for some of my Chandra B photos from Professional Mariner magazine.

 

Please read the El Faro Relief event notice at the end of this post.  TODAY is the deadline to sign up.

It’s rained most of this week and last . . . and the forecast is the same for next week, but that just means sheltering (and wiping) the lens of the camera, as needed.    I wonder if John Huibers knows something we need to pay attention to . . .  but that’s another story.

For now, I noticed a lot of Reinauer boats the other day, like  . . . the 1971 Matton-built Zachery Reinauer,

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interrupted by the 1960 Blount-built Eric R. Thornton with the best logo in the sixth boro,

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the 1984 Rayco Ship and Main Ironworks Franklin Reinauer,

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the 1983 Cenac Shipyard-built Stephen B,

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the 1967 Main Iron Works Jill Reinauer,

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the 1966 Allied Shipyard Brian Nicholas,

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1973 Jakobson Lucy Reinauer,

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the 2010 G and S Marine Incorporated Crystal Cutler,

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the 2011 Senesco Reinauer Twins.

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and the 1978 Eastern Dawn, though I know not the builder.  And it appears to the the 1947 Harbor II alongside, though I noticed that almost too late.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been evading raindrops.

Anyone have more info on the previous Lucy Reinauer, the 1943 Odenbach Shipbuilding M/T?  Birk has this photo, but I’d love to see some more and to know what became of her.

And here’s a note from the organizers of the El Faro fundraiser event:  “On Sunday,  May 15th from 12-2 at Club Macanudo we will be holding a fundraiser for the families affected by the loss of the El Faro. All proceeds will go to the Seamen’s Church Institute El Faro Relief Fund. Pricing is $75.00 per person with Beer and Wine being served. Email me at Goodwindmaritime@hotmail.com. Please see the attached flier (the link in the first sentence above).
Please send your checks as soon as possible.   Make the checks out to Good Wind Maritime Services and mail to Good Wind Maritime Services 14451 25th Drive, Flushing, NY 11354″

I don’t actually go looking for parallel posts;  maybe it’s just that my brain thinks and eyes see in similar ways from one year to the next in March, but here and here are posts from exactly four years ago.

Although this blog focuses on work boats, I’ll comment on backgrounds today.  What’s on the water is fluid, but all the constant transformations on the landsides here are more permanent and yet constantly evolving.  Baseline might have been 500 years ago, but even by then it had evolved.  The cruise ship here is docked at what today is called Cape Liberty Cruise Port;  thirty years ago it was MOTBY.

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Frances waits at a barge anchorage near Anthem of the Seas

Over on the nearest shore, left half of the photo is evidence of work where next year an attraction called New York Wheel will spin.  I know we’re way past name discussions now, but I’m still for alternatives like Ferries Wheel or NY Wheeler Dealer . . . .  And with the reference to “pods,” I’m thinking of a series of sci-fi movies . . .

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Eastern Welder fishes as New Jersey Responder exits the KVK.

The uneven, brown land just off the starboard bow of USNS Red Cloud is part of the Bayonne Golf Club, below the surface of which is a capped landfill.

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Discovery Coast passes in front of Red Cloud.

Off to the left, you see current status of the Bayonne side of the bridge named for the same town.

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From l. to r., there’s Chandra B, Celsius Manila, New Jersey Responder, and (I think) Robert E. McAllister.

Looking from behind the construction site for the Wheel, some miles to NE are part of the Statue of Liberty and  the iconic 1931 Empire State Building.

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Anacostia (2009)  and Tangier Island (2014)  look a lot alike, but the older boat has 1200 more horsepower.

Note the double deck traffic on the VZ Bridge.

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l. to r. it’s Caroline Oldendorff and Australian Spirit.

This is looking from the middle of Upper Bay across Red Hook to downtown Brooklyn.

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In front of the busy background, it’s Alice Oldendorff, Rossini, and Robert E. McAllister.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts with photos by Paul, who decks on Cornell

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which does most of its work on the Hudson.  Deborah Quinn (1957) has been here several times, the first here.

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Here’s old and new side by side in Red Hook Erie Basin, Scotty Sky and Chandra B.

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And some old boats together, Spooky, Pilot, and Gowanus Bay. Click here for one of my favorite sets of photos involving Gowanus Bay.  Pilot and Spooky (as Scusset) both came off the ways in Wisconsin in spring 1941 as USACE vessels.

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Evelyn Cutler first appeared on this blog as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

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I don’t know the story of the seaplane landing on the Rondout on the far side of Cornell, but soon I will be putting up a photo I took last weekend of a seaplane on the St. Lawrence.

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It’s that time of year, with hints of

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the dark side.

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Many thanks to Paul, who took all of these photos.

Safe travels.

You can call this “Capt. Log gone;  Chandra B arrived.”  Log out or log off . . . might work also.  Anyone know if Capt. Log, launched 1979 and retired at 0000 hrs on 1/1/15,  has sold and if so to whom?  Click here for a Professional Mariner article  on the vessel.

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taken September 2013

But the real story here is that a new appropriate-sized double-hulled tanker has taken her place in the sixth boro. Welcome Chandra B.

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Here she fuels up

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Positive Carry, a Feadship,  on the Upper Bay.

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Many thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat for these photos.

See that tug over there?   This photo comes from Asher Peltz, and I’m very grateful . . .

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because I was seeing the tow from this angle, quite backlit, but

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fascinated nonetheless, given the load

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on Marmac 300 . . . parts of the turbine bases for units 3, 4, and 5 of 5.   See the base for unit 1 here.  At the pace the tow is moving, it’s barely to Montauk as of this posting.  By the way, for scale, the tug is 97.7 ‘ loa.

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Here’s Stephen B in a logical though unlikely location.

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nestled between Manhattan Elite and Celestial.

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Dean Reinauer sidled over to my part of the Kills, and I got a good look.  Thanks.

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This Dean has been at work for just over two years.  Click here to see–along with some other departed vessels– the previous Dean Reinauer, currently in Nigeria under different ownership.

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Bluefin appears to have just been painted, as the lettered Kirby logo has not  been applied.

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The last time–I think–Bluefin was on this blog she was still gray.

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Here’s Robert Burton in yesterday’s strange pre-rain light and here

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at dawn yesterday interestingly backlit though not quite.  A couple of years ago, I caught her down in Morehead City.

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All photos taken yesterday.  Thanks to Asher for the lead photo here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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