You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Brooklyn’ tag.

Resolute rotates into the sixth boro now and again;  her truly best and bushiest fendering make her a welcome sight whenever.  I believe this is the last time I saw her here almost two years ago.

Janet D first appeared on this blog here, three years ago.  And here’s something I never realized (or if I did, I’ve forgotten) . . .  she comes out of the same yard the same approximate time as James E. Brown, a slight larger hull but with less horsepower.

Labrador Sea Brooklyn  is a Warren, RI-built tug that I’ve seen wearing four different liveries and initially had no upper wheelhouse. 

Mister T was built at the same yard at roughly the same time as Brooklyn above. Mister T is older by a year and less broad by a foot.  Both 2400hp, a difference is that Brooklyn has pins.

Quenames has worked here for over a decade…

and was more recently joined by Pinuccia.

Unlike Brooklyn above, Elizabeth appears to have carried Weeks ownership and livery for about 35 years now!!  Here’s what her bow looks like out of the water.

All photos and other observations by Will Van Dorp, who has to leave the never-ending story here today and attend to other duties on tugster tower.

 

The Browns tugs do a lot of different jobs, and who knows where James E. was headed this morning a few days ago, but

one of their regular runs is with the car float moving rail cars for the operation now down as the NYNJRR, the last application of what used to be very common across the sixth boro. 

There are no bridge rail crossings of the Hudson south of the Selkirk hurdle, about 140 miles north of Manhattan. So this is how it happens, and I know lots of you reading this know much more about this operation than I do.  For a photo of a train crossing that bridge known as the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, see the end of this post.

One or several crossings are done this way daily between Greenville NJ  and Brooklyn NY.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got the photo below of a train headed east across the Alfred H. Smith Bridge a rainy day in October 2016.

 

Take a camera and an hour and a half,

hang out at some point along the KVK,

if it’s cold then bring some hand and boot warmers and a thermos with hot tea,

monitor the scan function on your hand held,

and wait.  Soon there’ll be some traffic. Snap away.

Winter is a better time than summer for photos because of the clarity

of the air.

A wise man once told me that New Yorkers don’t really have to travel, because the world

travels past them.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth born.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

Pacific Reliance (9280 hp) transfers cargo before heading to Texas . . .

with the 155,000 bbl barge 650-1.

B. Franklin Reinauer (4000 hp) passes by

with RTC 82 (80,000 bbl, if I read that right)

and Austin (3900 hp) eastbound here light.

Dean Reinauer (4720 hp) moves westbound under the Bayonne Bridge.

Foxy 3 (1600 hp) and Brooklyn (2400 hp) wait at the dock west of Caddell Drydock.  Foxy was previously Barker Boys, and this Brooklyn, Labrador Sea.

Brooklyn on her way to a job.

Delta Fox (1200 hp) and Morton S. Bouchard IV (6140 hp) tied up here  just east of Foxy 3 and Brooklyn.

Morton S. Bouchard IV makes up the next three photos here:  in front of a Saint Lawrence like eglise

against the Brooklyn skyline, and

and still more in front of T-AKR-306 USNS Benavidez.

And let’s finish up with Patrica (1200 hp) and Robert (1800 hp).

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in info here.

 

 

On this day, the area where the Hudson enters the highlands looked every bit the fjord that it technically is. 

I took these photos and was remembering ones sent by Richard Hudson of southern Chile, here.

It’s Breakneck Ridge on the left and Storm King Mountain on the right, with West Point academy buildings in between. Check out those links for all the other names these places have had in the past 400 years.   And who knows what names have existed before then.

By now some of you have identified the two tugs . . .

Brooklyn and Evening Mist.

I was surprised to learn that Poling-Cutler Marine Transportation now operates Brooklyn.

 

Here Evening Mist moves her barge into the terminal in Newburgh.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

A few days ago I stumbled into a rabbit hole and enjoyed it down there.  I won’t stay in 2008 for too long, but evolution I found in the ship department intrigued me, change change change. It also made concrete the reality of the scrapyards in  the less-touristed ocean-margins of the globe. Take Orange Star;  she’s scrapped now and another Orange Star delivers our juice.  But what a beauty this juice tanker is,

with lines that would look sweet on a yacht. Laura K has been reassigned to another port.  This  Orange Star was cut up in Alang in October 2010.

Ditto Saudi Tabuk.  She went for scrap in November 2013.  The tug on her bow is Catherine Turecamo, now operating on the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

Sea Venture was scrapped in January 2011.

Hammurabi sold for scrap in spring 2012.   She arrived in Alang as Hummura in the first week of summer 2012.

Some D-class Evergreen vessels have been scrapped, but Ever Diamond is still at work.  Comparing the two classes,  the Ls are 135′ longer and 46′ wider.

Stena Poseidon is now Canadian flagged as the much-drabber Espada Desgagnes, which I spotted on  the St. Lawrence last fall.   Donald C, lightening here, became Mediterranean Sea and is currently laid up.

And let’s end this retrospect with a tug, then Hornbeck’s Brooklyn Service and now just plain Brooklyn.  She’s been around the block a bit, and I’ll put in a link here if you want a circuitous tour. I caught her in Baltimore last spring in her current livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what the waterscape will look like in 2028, if I’m around to see it.

What does a 70+ degree temperature day in February in the sixth boro look like?  Well . . . see for yourself.  Cornell light and likely back from a TOAR training, rafts up to Mary Whalen in Atlantic Basin.

Along the Brooklyn shore, there was Genesis Glory with GM11105.

Brooklyn–ex-Labrador Sea–light was headed for the Kills.

An anchored Crystal Cutler stood by with Patricia E. Poling.  Over in the distance is Malik al Ashtar, another 13,000+ teu container ship.  See Crystal light, high and dry here.

Over near the foot of Atlantic Avenue, Linda Lee Bouchard stands by alongside B. No. 205.

And finally, along the BQE and Brooklyn Heights, C. Angelo with EMA  1152, the EMA standing for Express Marine, the outfit that used to deliver fuel to the sixth boro’s coal-fired plants.  Express Marine tugs Consort and Escort used to be regulars in the port.  I believe they are currently “laid up.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I have a bunch more “cypher 12” calendar-ready ideas to come, but time flows, changes and evolution press, and I don’t want to get left behind.  Again, I’m NOT selling calendars, but they are easy to make.  

Back eight years ago I did a post called Labrador Sea.  There she is below, photos I took yesterday.  You’ll notice a radically new paint job.  There’s a name change as well.  She’s still pushing the same barge, but now she’s Brooklyn, the latest Brooklyn.

 

DBL25 she’s pushing was the same formerly Kirby/K-Sea barge, and if you scroll through here, you’ll see DBL25 as paint was making her transition from a K-Sea to a Kirby barge.

Below is a photo from February 08, 2017 showing her in Kirby livery.  I’m wondering if the crews moved over to Vane with the boat.

All photos–yesterday’s and February’s–by Will Van Dorp.

Actually, only part of this leg is through the ICW, or another way to say this is that from Cape May to NYC you need to be in the ocean.  For a map that shows this, click here. This leg takes us from Baltimore to New York City, which in this case is not the end of the trip.  More on that later.

Below, Key’s Anthem is Baltimore’s new Inner Harbor water taxi, the first vessel of 10, one that’s all local vernacular . . . a Hooper’s Island drake tail.

Tiwai Point prepares to discharge a load of sugar, from Colombia, I think . . .

Bridget McAllister (and other McAllister boats) waits at the dock.

We head out past Natty Boh and Brooklyn . . . ,

Vane’s Carlyn,

and Justin with an unidentified load.

Was it Justin that towed Tamaroa out to the reef site last week?

At the Chesapeake side of the C & D Canal, it’s Dann Ocean’s home base, with (l to r) First Coast, Diamond Coast, New England Coast, Sea Coast, and Gold Coast.  By the way, Gallatin called this the Delaware & Chesapeake Canal and estimated it as 22 miles long with 18 locks.  The current Chesapeake & Delaware is 14 miles long and all water is at sea level, i.e., no locks.  Here’s the history.

Defender (I think) steams inbound for Pennsauken with Cape Cod tailing a Crowley barge.  Depending on which barge this was, capacity is 400–500 teus.

Gulf Venture/Carrier anchors off Salem . . .

And then morning brings a jagged island up out from the deeps and we

line up some towers . . . while Le Grand Bleu waits in Gravesend Bay.

Note the unusual wake and splash pattern on Jonathan C.‘s stern?

And an unfamiliar Kirby vessel– Mount St. Elias–moves DBL 77 upriver.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,291 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2019
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031