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The other morning was without wind and busy, so this next “hour” is actually 30 minutes, and these are only a few of the photos I took between 0900 and 0930 of this extraordinary morning from my single vantage point.

A team of Dann Marine tugs leave the dock, framing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer dock.

Vane’s Brooklyn leaves her dock;  notice the Moran barn (red with the white M) and Pegasus at the Metropolitan dock.

Charles D heads to job.

Bulker Maina heads for sea, passing Elandra Blu and

Marjorie comes to retrieve the docking pilot.  Do you see four people in the photo below?  Elandra tankers are based in Latvia.

The calm here is barely broken by MSC Korea.

Brendan waits to retrieve the pilot.  Note the scrubber and its effects on emissions?

Over by IMTT  Glory and Potomac sand by with their barges.

And we’ll leave it here, actual 28 minutes elapsed . . .  name that approaching ship?

All photos, WVD.

Here’s an extraordinarily busy photo;  Nicole Leigh is about to ease right around Shooters.  Beyond that tug, a half dozen or so more tugboats, an antenna, a bridge, a refinery, steam . . .

Gulf Coast waits in front of a 12-pack of IMTT silos.

Navigator continues shuttling around, moving fuel.

Buchanan 5 is not a common visitor here, so I was happy to see her pass.

Brooklyn and Dorothy J  head west although with different goals.

St Andrews moves a barge eastbound.

Ava M. waits for a container ship at sunrise.

Sea Fox moves a loaded recycling scow toward the Arthur Kill, and

Caitlin Ann moves an empty one back.

And finally, C. F. Campbell, first photo here with her upper house, heads west.  Light. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Sea Fox as a cold front moves across the Upper Bay.

Mary Turecamo off to the next job.

Dorothy J returns from an assist.  I’ve lots more photos of the assist to post soon.

Joyce and James eastbound in the KVK to start the work day.

Dean Reinauer heads over to fuel up.

Kings Point going over to Gowanus Bay.

Brooklyn going to pick up her barge.

Fells Point returning from a job.

The very busy Patrice waiting for a ship as Dobrin heads over to her daily projects.

The always moving Brendan making money, as all these boats and crews are. 

And finally Sea Lion outbound in the Lower Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

In a real way, this post is about cargo also.  Look at this top photo . . .  any guesses what’s unique about the cargo?

This is the only the second time I post a photo of Double Skin 510A, here pushed by Wye River, but it’s the first time I call attention to it as an asphalt barge.  In other words, cold as it was outside, the cargo in the barge is

being transported at a scalding 300 degrees F.  Unless you knew, you might not have imagined that.  This hot product might finally cool off when it’s squirted with some crushed stone into a pothole somewhere.

You can tell the temperature out by the snow accumulated on the stern of Genesis Glory, here with GM 11105.

Soon afterward, she spun around and

left the barge at the dock.

I’ve seen this tug in several liveries as Sea Bull and Labrador Sea, as well as without  and then with an upper wheelhouse

DBL 25 appears here for the first time though.

In the years I’ve been doing this photography, I’ve learned a lot, and have paid attention to different things as I’ve learned new things.  Barges are the money makers.

All photos, WVD.

If you subscribe to Professional Mariner, you’ve seen the article I published there in the March issue.  If not, it’ll be available online in a few weeks.

 

The sixth boro, like any location, offers infinite perspectives, compounded by equally countless nuance of season, hour, weather, and activity variation.  This view of Kimberly in the stalls at Caddells the other day differs considerably from the dynamic ones of the past 18 months.

Kust a few days different but quite different location and atmospherics . . .  Weddell Sea came into the Narrows the other day as we began feeling the effects of Fay.   She had Penn No. 90 on a wire.

Further to the west in another spot, Discovery Coast was on the outside, mostly blocking Brooklyn, who’s been in here for a few months already.

In clear weather, land would be visible beyond the tug, but Fay changed that for a while.

Dace Reinauer was high and dry in Dry Dock No. 7.

 

And finally, just west of Dry Dock No. 7, stacked up were at least seven Bouchard boats, sadly waiting.

All photos, WVD, who’s starting to think about random tugs three hundred.  If you have a photo of a tug never depicted on this blog, send it along. The big three hundred COULD be all never-here-before tugboats.

More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

Want to check out Random Tugs 001?  The  001 got added more recently than 2007 because back then,  I had no idea I’d go on.  In the 2007 photo, might that be Mary Turecamo along with the Reinauer tugs, which are also still at work operating out of the sixth boro.  The other morning Mary Turecamo was assisting MSC Maria Elena  . . . . The tugboat has always been known by that name.

The many times renamed and reconfigured Brooklyn approaches from . . .. Brooklyn.  I first saw her as Labrador Sea.

Brendan Turecamo, also renamed a number of times,  takes the back channel out the Kills.  That’s Bayonne in the background and a crane in Port Elizabeth beyond that.

Catching Genesis Eagle out of the notch is a treat.  The third photo here shows a photo of the same boat as Eagle Service in roughly the same place a decade ago, although I was catching the opposite perspective.

 

It’s been quite a while since I’ve seen this particular Mary Gellatly moving around the sixth boro, but here she is, and I  recognize the man with a camera between the wheelhouse and the stacks.

She was previously Vernon C, as in the top two photos here.

Dory is another boat that has changed hands and names and appearances.  See her here . . .  if you scroll.

Dory appears to be working with a Harley barge alongside a ship, bunkering ? . . . Kitikmeot W.

And let’s conclude with one of the newest boats in the harbor . . .  Ava M McAllister, here returning from escorting a c-ship out toward the Narrows.   Click here for photos from her christening half a year ago.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Compare the verticality of Evelyn Mae’s “windshield” in the photo below with the rake in the next photos.  The photo was taken in April 1946.

The interior photo below shows the helm and the modified “raked” windshield.

Here Evelyn Mae gets some emergency work done at the floating dry dock at Matton’s in Cohoes in July 1947.

In 1959 Evelyn Mae made a trip to the Champlain Canal.

 

Here’s a closeup of the whole crew.

During that trip, she went up on the marine railway at Velez Marina in Port Henry.

Steve continues with his narrative:  “Circe was a sister boat to Evelyn Mae. She is up on beach in Mill Basin Brooklyn after hurricane of Sept 1944. I was told by my uncle that these pics were taken after hurricane of 1946 or 1947, but apparently no hurricane hit NY in those years as per internet.”

 

“[This was] the last year the yacht club was at Mill Basin because the City of NY condemned the property so a builder could build lots of houses. So the vacant land in background of pic is now all houses. In 1955 the yacht club moved to Paerdegat Basin. My grandfather, Frank, was instrumental in obtaining a 99 year lease from the city as he was working at the NY Dock Company in Brooklyn and “knew” NY City Marine and Aviation people to help with obtaining the land. Midget Squadron Yacht Club is still there today (internet) as well as the Hudson River Yacht Club on the other side of Paerdegat Basin, which was there in the 1950s also.”
Many thanks to Steve for this look to the past, when summer boats” were just gorgeous wood.
More decades-old sixth born photos to come.

There are summer yachts, and then there are summer yachts of yore,  those ones magnificent back then  and then magnified by time.  Evelyn Mae, platform for these posts from last month, is of this second and extraordinary sort.  Photos and reminiscence come from Steve Munoz.

Enjoy the photos and I’ll tell you more later in this post and in subsequent ones.

 

These photos were taken at the Midget Squadron Yacht Club in Canarsie, Brooklyn. 

 

When I asked Steve if he knew the manufacturer, here’s what he said:  “The builder’s plaque at the steering stand said built by Fleetwing, Greenport, LI, NY, built 1928, 5 of them built as sisters. My grandfather bought it (used) after hurricane of 1947 when it was up on the beach.”
I search for “Fleetwing Greenport”  brought up this Motorboating article from November 1928, p. 154.
A few pages farther on 159, I found this unrelated but stunning image for a GarWood advertisement.

Anyhow, a bit of farther searching tells me I’ve been inside the old Fleetwing Shipyard building in Greenport.

More Evelyn Mae to come.  Many thanks to Steve for sharing these stories and images.

 

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