You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘East River’ category.

Is it Jonathan C Moran, which arrived in the sixth boro at some point in the past month?

jc1

It was.

jc2

Actually, as of now, it IS Jack T Moran, which arrived via the East River

jt3

yesterday afternoon, and will be christened along with Jonathan C, in a double ceremony at noon today.

jt4

More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I should use this title more often, given the frequent renewal of robust industry in the sixth boro of NYC, but here is the previous usage.

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

0613a

Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

0613b

Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

0613c

receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

0613d

 

0613e

The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

0613f

By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

0617a

A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

0617b

water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

Each year around this time, SUNY Maritime cadets go to sea.  Click here for photos from last year’s departure and here, for ports throughout the summer.  You can track the vessel here.

Here was a clue that a ship was headed this way.

oapil

The next three photos here come from Roger Munoz, high atop the 74th St ConEd plant.

es1

That’s Roosevelt Island on the other side, at the southern tip of which i waited.

es2

 

es3

Here the training ship passes under the 59th Street Bridge,

es4

 

es5

and past the Empire State Building . . .

es6

 

es7

escorted by a fireboat and

es8

two McAllister tugboats.

es9

 

es10

Some of the cadets who made this journey last summer are already employed as professional mariners today.  And somewhat related, any guesses how long ago this particular T/S Empire State, the VI,  was launched?  Click here for info on her former life.   To see some dramatic shots of the knife edge cutting through the middle of the Atlantic, click here.  If you’re impatient, jump ahead to the 3-minute mark.

Thanks much to Roger Munoz, a SUNY grad,  for the three photos from high atop the East River.

And here is a time lapse gif of ES VI passing, thanks to Rand Miller.

ezgif-3076598435

I’ve done posts about the East River, like these, and I’ve done a post at least about canyons, but it’s never struck me as vividly as right now how much this part of the East River is like a canyon.  These too are images of the varied sixth boro.

rt1

HMS Liberty pushes east past the cliffs before entering the terrifyingly-named Hell Gate.  Click here for the youtube video that periodically surfaces about a barge grounding in Hell Gate and then skillfully extricated.  Here and here are some discussions of that name . . . originally “beautiful opening.”

rt2

Sea Lion pushes a recycling barge up toward the Bronx River, I think, with

rt3

Dorothy J alongside, until

rt4

she makes the turn in the direction of the Harlem River, where the E. 91st marine transfer station–I think–is being built.  It’s been a long time since I’ve walked around up there.

rt5

And finally . . . it’s Mister T pushing scows eastbound and under the 59th Street Bridge.  And the aerial tramway to  . . . the sixth boro’s ski slopes?   Here’s the website for the operator . . . Leitner-Poma.    But I digress.

rt6

At the right times of tide, the waterway between Roosevelt Island and Manhattan Island move a lot of cargo.

rt7

 

rt8

 

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

The sixth boro tidal strait typical known as the East River, surrounded as it is by impressive urbanity, is nonetheless a significant waterway.  These photos today come from Jonathan Steinman, as did these of Ginga Lion, a 507′ loa vessel.

0aafp1

But Jonathan was surprised–as was I when I got his photos– to see ATB Freeport travel through the strait last week, even though New London, its destination, is closer by the “inside” route than by the alternative outside of Long Island, which it followed on the return.  The tape says the tug is 144′ loa and the barge–Chemical Transporter— is 521.’  While tug and barge are notched, the combined length of the units exceeds that of similar large units operated on this strait by Kirby, Bouchard, and Reinauer.  For what that’s worth.  Here’s some backstory on Freeport‘s costly construction.

0aafp2

Thanks to Jonathan for these photos.

Given today’s date, the reference above to Lion, and the beautiful weather outside in NYC, I need to link to this lamb post from a year and a half ago.

Here are previous posts in this series.

These photos come thanks to Jonathan Steinman, who keeps vigil on the East River.  Here, he reports from a week ago, “construction of Rockefeller University’s River Campus continues apace … see Susan Miller guiding a barge and crane into position.”

0aaer1

While the day passes, Paul Andrew (?) comes by with a recycling barge, I believe.  Here’s an interesting article by David Gelles on the effect tumbled oil prices have had on the recycling business.

0aaer2

And that’s Kimberly Poling . . . but has her color scheme changed back slightly?  Or just snow in my eyes?

0aaer3

And on a day when the sixth boro is seeing single digit temperatures, I know it’s inhuman to post these next two photos.  I took them about three weeks ago in this location, where I started my sailing project. Any guesses?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s a shot I took about a mile south of the previous photo.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Answer tomorrow.   Meanwhile, if you need warming up, here’s my tribute to today . . . .

Thanks to Jonathan for the first three photos; Will Van Dorp took the last two.

 

 

Know this water, more of a waterway than a harbor?  The distant buildings are a clue.  See the one just left of the center of bridge center, needle thin?

0aaeer

Here’s another clue . . . the structure near the right side of the photo, like an old time gas station pump?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Or this one left of the crane, looking like the business end of a blue crab whose pincers are down?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Or this wreck?  What WAS this boat?  I’ve asked a million people who all say they also asked a million people.  Anyone know?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And seriously, the first photo showed the Throgs Neck Bridge, the second the LaGuardia airport traffic tower, and the third . . . Arthur Ashe stadium.  The photo above with the mystery wreck in the Whitestone Bridge .  .. the second one in when you travel from Long Island Sound into . . . the East River

And that needle thin tower in 432 Park, said to be the tallest residential building in the hemisphere.  Click here for views from the tallest bathtub in that building.  And in the foreground of the photo below, truly a place of superlatives . . . . Rikers Island, i.e., one of the largest incarceration places in the world.  No gunk holing is tolerated anywhere near this place.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Rikers has literally overflowed its banks.  This is the off-Rikers portion of NYC Corrections, the Vernon C. Bain Center.   

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Click here for a tugster photo of part of the Rikers fleet.  And here for Bain’s NYC floating prison predecessor.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

By now, most of you know this is the East River and we’re traveling west.  Here the DEP sludge tanker Red Hook prepares to depart the Hunt’s Point wastewater treatment plant.   Click here for some tugster posts on treating waste and keeping sixth boro waters as clean as possible despite the teeming millions that live along the banks of these waters.   And if you’ve never read my Professional Mariner story on the latest generation of these tankers, you can do so here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Between Rikers and Hunts Point, there are the North and South Brother Islands;  see my post from South Brother here from a long time ago.  The safer channel goes around the north of North Brother, but in daylight, most vessels can shoot between the two.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ve never set foot on North Brother, but I imagine it a terrestrial version of the “graveyard” on the Arthur Kill. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A “night wharf” on Wards Island for the sludge tankers lies here just east of the Hell Gate and RFK bridges there.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This strait–between Roosevelt Island and the upper east side of Manhattan–in the tidal strait that’s known as the East River can see some fast currents. Somewhere off to the right is the vantage point Jonathan Steinman takes his East river pics from.

0aaer

This is not a cargo pier.  These vessels are repairing the bulk heading.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Anyone know the identity of these two “houses” nestled up there in the eastisde of Manhattan cliffs?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

These barges called the Water Club  . . . I’ve never been there.  Any personal reviews?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Newtown Creek awaits its fate here at a dock in Wallabout Bay right across

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

from the rock wharf where Alice Oldendorff has discharged millions of tons of crushed rock over the years.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After we duck under the Brooklyn Bridge, we near the end of the East River,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

where South Street Seaport Museum has been fighting the noble fight to

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

preserve ships and the upland including the wharves.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This is day 8 of the GHP&W series, so let me break pattern a bit.  If you missed the beginning, GHP&W is not a law firm; it’s abbrev for “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves.”  I haven’t dusted off any wharves yet, but two-thirds of the months still lie ahead.

The story here is that TS Kings Pointer was out serving as a training platform and not at Kings Point, although there was a potential meeting somewhere south along our track to Portsmouth, VA.

Mile 1, 0738 Wednesday, heading for the Throg’s Neck Bridge.

0aafn1

0756.  Passing SUNY Maritime and TS Empire State. Click here for photos from her summer sea term 2015.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0804, Robert Burton, a Norfolk boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0907, Mary Gellatly with a sand scow at the southern tip of Governors Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1010, passing the northern tip of Sandy Hook but looking back at Naval Weapons Station Earle, with USNS Medgar Evers at the wharf.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1017, Romer Shoal Light and Coney Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1517, Capt. Willie Landers northbound off Beach Haven, I think.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1612, FV Jonathan Ryan and tug Pops in the distance.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1618, entering a grid marked “numerous scientific buoys.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1657 off Atlantic City, with unidentified tug and barge

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1740 and about to switch watch.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thursday, 0852, looking north into the Chesapeake after going wide around Fisherman Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0910 . . . it’s the current  TS Kings Pointer, ex-Liberty Star. . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

. . . heading along Virginia Beach

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

before turning northward toward Long Island Sound.  Her former sister ship–Freedom Star–was in the area but we did not see her.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Meanwhile, we head north into the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel and into port, which you can follow tomorrow.  And that tug and crane barge in the distance . . . survey work for new infrastructure or maintenance dredging?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.  It was a smooth trip.

Here are the previous installments.

Rare as it is to see a chemical tanker traverse the East River, there’s no mystery about this vessel’s identity…  Ginga Lion.  For outatowners, the bridge goes by Koch Bridge, 59th Street Bridge, or Queensboro Bridge.

0aagl1

These photos were taken last Wednesday–October 21–by Jonathan Steinman, frequent contributor of photos from along that tidal strait, which is not really a river.

0aagl2

So here’s the mystery . . . or at least the question.  Given the Jones Act, how can this vessel make the stops it does.  On this run, it was traveling from Bayonne to Port Jeff, and as of this writing, she’s on her way to New Orleans. Prior ports of call and dates are as follows:  10/8 Gibraltar, 9/10 Pasir Gudang Malaysia, 9/4 Kuala Tanjung Indonesia, 8/18 Nantong China, 8/17 Zhangiagang China, 6/22 Houston.

Ginga Lion is clearly a foreign flagged chemical tanker.

I suspect the answer is that she’s not transferring cargo from one US port to another, just loading or offloading at a series of US stops, which I understand would be permissible.   Anyone clarify?

Many thanks to Jonathan for keeping eyes on the East River and sending along the question and photos.

 

The 94′ Red Star tug Ocean Queen, Bushey-built in 1941, towing the barge Bouchard No. 110 with 20,000 barrels of petroleum, was going up the East River on 12 March. The 572′  tanker Four Lakes, (likely not the ESSO tanker shown here) was going south when she rammed the Ocean Queen just below Hell Gate. The captain of Ocean Queen was lost; four other crew were rescued, and the barge did not sink.  Click here to find the “findings of fact and conclusions of law” by Judge Motley, September 1974.  Unrelated, Four Lakes was lost in February 1972 when it exploded during tank cleaning 60 miles off Galveston.

0aa1ht

Click here (and scroll) for a photo of this tug–Lac Manitoba–taken in May go this year.  In June, Lac Manitoba was one of two tugs that capsized in Cornwall, ON, sucked under while working upstream of a spudded barge.

0aa0jvd

I also took a photo of Lac Manitoba here seven years ago in Ogdensburg, NY.

Many thanks to Harry Thompson for the top photo and to Jan van der Doe for the bottom one.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 955 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

July 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 955 other followers