You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘fish’ category.

Here are the previous posts.

And let’s start with unnamed tug, left where the bushes might overwhelm her.

Susie Q, on the other hand, seems to get lots of love. The other day it was docked near the Rogers Street Fishing Village, a piece of Two Rivers on the National Register of Historic Places. More on Rogers Street tomorrow.

 

Closer to the Lake, I saw Iown and Jamie Ark.

And going down the line, it’s the 1937 Bossler Bros,

Avis-J, and

Peter Paul.

Nothing says old-time Great Lakes more than fish tugs.  For the definitive guide, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Anna May is not anime, not matter how much they sound alike.  She’s a cargo boat, sometimes carrying horses over to Mackinac Island. Here she is at the St Ignace dock.

And the 906 Express . . . she’s AF’s

landing craft mail boat, Mackinac Island’s version of the supply boat Ojibway or the mail boat Westcott, aka zip code 48222.

Laura Ann is one of the fish tugs bringing in wild catch for Massey Fish.

 

Farther west and over by Grays Reef, some sort of research boat is at work.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who in real time is hours away from getting back in these waters down bound from Chicago by the time this posts.

 

 

This post picks up at Illion marina, where Gradall #2 and

a scow and Governor Roosevelt  

worked.

 

A scow and a self-propelled scow waited on the dock while tug Seneca

received attentions.

A fishing kayaker demonstrated multi-multi-tasking skills.

Rebecca Ann waited at the dock.  Madison R assisted with breakwater work.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, between Illion and Oswego.

 

It’s been nearly a decade since I last used this title and alluded to that big encounter . . . leading to the settlement of the Hudson River.

Looking at the photos I took yesterday morning, it did seem like an encounter as well, one of the type unique to summer.  QM2 had just come in when it was too dark to get clear shots.

Sarah D was inbound . . .

and Fishing Creek–her first appearance on this blog I believe–was outbound.

Sarah D was pushing Weeks 108, and

and Fishing Creek had DoubleSkin 53.

 

Encountering the Sarah D tow was this sweet fishing boat,

Mary Sue.

And way out toward the Hook, the USCG was doing their thing  . . .

meeting a foreign-flagged sloop named

Choucas3, named for a bird maybe and

which sported this flag from the Isle of Man.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was enjoying the calm and cooling breezes of dawn.

 

 

Here was the first installment of this, and who knows where this will go.

Congratulations to Mage and Linda and anon who recognized the location almost as soon as I put up yesterday’s post.  Les, I don’t have a calendar yet, but I’ve already re-read the Steinbeck and Ricketts log. I don’t know how the restoration of their 1937 boat Western Flyer is going, but here’s a link to follow for updates.    If you have nine and a half minutes, watch this video account of the whats and whys of one of the most influential “science boats” in 20th century western North America.

Let’s kick up from where installment 1 ends . . .  and in Manzanillo, and the 1998 tug Manzanillo.

VB Yucatan is the forward tug here;  maybe someone can identify the others. Boluda has recently begun to provide towing services in the port.

Crossing over into the western inside of Baja, a parade in LaPaz featured very familiar KW trucks like this.

There is fishing, but some fisherman have re-invented themselves in the tourism industry.

 

There are charters and small cruise ships. 

But here’s a gem,

even older than Western Flyer, Ted Geary’s 1924 creation MV Westward and still at work.

Meanwhile, to paraphrase the bards, I’m stuck here in early northern spring with the baja blues again.

Thanks to the mystery mariners for these glimpses of western Mexico.

 

Although the sixth boro may see its first snowfall today, it’s not winter for over a month yet.  Winter fishing, though, has seen lots of posts on this blog.  But here’s a focus on something new for me.  See the fishing machine in the photo below?

Here’s a closer up, a set of photos I took a month ago.  I’ll call it a hands-free kayak.

Nearby and maybe chasing the same school of fish was another.

And they’re geared out:  high-visibility flag, beach trolley wheels, outrigger, spare paddle, rod holders, landing net . . . and likely electronics. .  .

Has anyone reading this tried out a “hands-free” kayak?

Just the other day I saw so many hands-free fishing kayaks that at first I thought it was a tour, but these fisherfolk seem just follow following the fish, as the folks in the motorboats are.

 

I didn’t see anyone land a fish, but I wonder how much pull a large fish could apply to the kayak.

Below a a view out to sea, with a southbound Tammo and core sampling Seacor Supporter.

I have an ulterior motive in posting this: I’m considering a long kayak trip and wonder if for long trips a pedal kayak would be more efficient than a conventional one.  Can you really pedal for an hour and then switch and paddle, moving for longer periods  of time by alternating the part of the body at work?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who bought his first kayak back in 1987.

Call this Buffalo to Cleveland.  Starting out with the other half of the Erie Canal inaugural trip of DeWitt Clinton, yes there was a Buffalo ceremony too, and it wasn’t a wedding.  Rather, maybe it was the reception when they offered appeasement to the Lake gods.

up the Buffalo river, it’s NACC Argonaut offloading at the LaFarge elevator.

Cotter . . . it’s my first time seeing her outside the river and under way!

Kraig K . . .  my first time to see a commercial boat fishing on Lake Erie.

 

BBC Kibo . . . in port in front of the city.

Eagle, a 1943 Bay City tug,  with matching bridge….

Sam Laud takes about two hours to back out of the Cuyahoga, using thrusters at stern

and bow.

And let’s end with Meredith Ashton. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently at wifi in Manitowoc.

 

 

In Bayfield WI, this park adjoins a complex named Reiten Boatyard condos,

but the namesake is a gentleman who–with his crew–partook of the food intended for their own wake.  The story?  Click here.

Now you’d imagine that this fish tug–Dawn–would have been built at the Reiten boatyard.  Nope.  She’s another Burger Boat product from 1928.

South Twin was Bayfield-built, 1938.  It fished until 1995 but since then has been a yard ornament in Red Cliff.

Heading south on the Bayfield peninsula, we come to Washburn WI, where I saw John D, which appears to be a greatly modified fish tug.  Maybe I’m wrong but I find no info on her from my sources.

The fish tug site has this to say about H. W. Hocks:  “built at Milwaukee, Wis., in 1935, by Harry W. Hocks, the 50 ft. x 14 ft. all-steel vessel was originally equipped with a 100-120 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. By the early 1940s the boat had been sold to Reuben Nelson, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. Nelson re-powered with a Model D13000 Caterpillar diesel. In 1955 Clyde and Clarence Anderson, Algoma, Wis. purchased the boat, and fished her up until 1991, when she was sold to Cliff Parrish, Brimley, Mich.”

In the village of Cedar River MI, I spotted Art Swaer VI, which I believe was built as late as 1974.

Nearby trap net boat Robert J tied up.

Now way over by the Bruce Peninsula, it’s Mamie and

Anzac K.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I still have lots of these. If I were to spend money for a boat and lived in a place where I could walk to it every day, I’d get a fish tug.  All boats today are within a three-minute walk of the market at Bodin Fisheries.

Let’s start with the 1938 Ruth, which has become a static display at the Bayfield Marine Museum, which–to my disappointment– was closed when I visited.

Noree Jo was built in 1948.

Let’s have a look from all angles.

 

Cassie-K is slightly older, a 1945 boat.

John R seems to have gone to the birds . . . She’s from 1942.

 

The smaller red-hulled boat beside John R gave no clue of her name.

x

 

x

x

x

Just east of the dock featured a few days ago here is another dock.

Eleanor B might be among the “newest” of the fish tugs I’ve seen, 1950.  Click here for photos of her christening at Peterson Brothers in Sturgeon Bay and more.

In the same fleet colors–I think–and two years older than Eleanor B is Twin Sisters, a trap net boat.  If my info is correct, she was once known as Sue Carol.

Kristin Beth  . .  .I can’t find any info about her.  I’m wondering if the shelter forward is original or a repurposed portion of an old boat.

Crews were mostly working on the three boats above, even though I caught these photos without them.  Obviously, no one earns money when the boat’s at the dock.    There were boats–fish tugs–moving toward and away from the docks, like this unidentified one, and

this one, Gary.  If I may borrow from “the fish tug” site, here’s their info on all the modifications done to Gary: “GARY 247461 .Built by Burger Boat Co. in 1945, for William Yauger, Jr., Algoma, Wis. The 40 ft. x 11 ft. steel hulled fish tug was equipped with a 45-54 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. The cabin was of wood, over steel frames, with pilot house mid-ship. Yauger was owner until 1951, when she was sold to Canadian owners, and renamed BARRY MCKAY. In 1962 the boat came back to the U.S., retained her original name, and was owned by William Heward, Rogers City, Mich., until 1969. Bought by Gilmore Peterson, Bayfield, the Kahlenberg was removed, and a Cummins diesel installed. The wood cabin was replaced with steel, and the pilot house moved to the stern. Gilmore sold the boat to his nephew, Michael Peterson, who still has ownership.”

Boats came and went at the dock.  An arrival was Thomas C. Mullen, a 1946 Burger built boat.  Click on the link in the previous sentence for info on all her modifications since 1946.   I may have mentioned this before, but Burger–still in Manitowoc–has built many vessels since 1863.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who plans many more posts on fish tugs and is fully to blame for any errors in info here.

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