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This post covers a day and a half of travel, shown in pink and green.  You’ll understand why by the end of this post.

We departed Chandeleur Islands and headed for Mississippi’s Gulf Islands, part of a National Seashore.

In the distance off Pascagoula, we saw Crowley tug Achievement and her barge.

 

No Worries . . . that’s the small open fishing boat anchored near the rig.

 

F/V Apache Rose was at anchor showing off its “wing trawling” innovation.

Lois Ann L. Moran, with its very familiar livery, anchored off Mobile Bay, to the west of a dozen or so anchored vessels.

Sand Island Light marks the southernmost tip of the state of Alabama.

I’ll just point out here that we saw countless rigs off Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.  That fact contrasts with what will follow in an upcoming post.

Lots of placards indicated presence of Cox and Telos, but I saw none marked Hilcorp or other energy companies. 

We ended that day off Perdido Key Resort in Floribama, where some skullduggery appeared to warrant keeping our distance. 

The next morning we entered Pensacola

for some crew change and grub shopping. 

Fort Pickens, one of only four southern US forts to remain in Union hands during the Civil War, lay on a barrier beach.   Updates were made to the fort up through WW2.

USCGC Walnut (WLB-205) is homeported in Pensacola, but nearby were two other CGCs,

Reliance and

Diligence.  A WLB and a WMEC made up part of the fleet in the sixth boro back in May 2022.

And here is the reason I extended this installment all the way to Pensacola.  As we made for our landing, we passed Gulf Dawn, which itself was passing that large blue/white vessel in the background . . . .

It’s Jacklyn, Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin rocket landing ship-to-be.  Well, now it will never be, since Julie F towed it out of Pensacola just two days ago, destination ISL Brownsville TX.  The story in detail can be read/heard here.

All photos, any errors, WVD, who will reprise this trip on the blog soon with more vessels.

 

 

I’ve previously cited the line about eight million stories in the naked city, a reference to a 1948 movie and subsequent TV show.  More on all that at the end of this post, but for now, with the sixth boro added in, I’d double that number . . .  16 million stories in the naked city, considering all six boros.   And thanks to Tony, here are a bunch of stories from the past few days that I’d otherwise have missed entirely.

An Italian destroyer visited the sixth boro, D-554 Caio Duilio.

A Maine purse seiner Ocean Venture came through.  I caught her coming through the boro here two years ago. 

More on Ocean Venture can be found here on pp. 20-23 of March 2021 of National Fisherman.

And there’s more . .  all from the past week, name that tall ship with the flag of República Dominicana?

That’s Weeks James K in the foreground. 

So here it gets confusing;  it appears this DR training ship barquentine is called Cambiaso.  She was acquired from Bulgaria in August 2018.  However, it’s possible that for a short and unrecorded period of time, the same barquentine carried the name Maria Trinidad Sanchez.  What happened?  Was that simply a delivery name, or am I still showing effects of my time in the heat with the alligators while the robots attempted a coup?

That being said, along with a DR training ship, there was also another DR naval vessel.  Do her lines look familiar?

Vintage?  Where launched?

Today she’s known as DR’s Almirante Didiez Burgos.  But at launch in Duluth in 1943, she was USCGC Buttonwood, a WW2 veteran and now flagship of the DR Navy.  She reminds me of USCGC Bramble, which I saw way back when on the St. Clair River. After an epic journey from Michigan to Mississippi for refitting by a private individual, she might now be scrapped.

All photos by Tony A and shared with WVD, who feels privileged by this collaboration. 

I also think, given the reference to Naked City, that moving pictures producers should revisit the concept of a Route 66 series, incorporating Charles Kuralt’s influences.   Want the season 1 episode 1 of Route 66?  Click on the image below and prepare to go back in time for good or ill!  It’s disturbing watching.  Season 1 episode 1 provides some backstory about how a “broke” Manhattan kid came to be driving a 1960 Corvette.  Hint:  Hells Kitchen, the East River, barges, and bankruptcy are all involved.  A luminary of the series was screenwriter Stirling Silliphant, a name I should have known earlier. 

And to give equal time to Charles Kuralt, watch this 8-minute segment on wooden replica vessel building in Wisconsin.  Watch highlights as the boat builder, Ferd Nimphius, works on his 113th build.

 

 

Count them . . . at least four very different vessels:  Saint Emilion with barge, JRT waiting to assist, Grace D shuttling people and supplies, and a sloop. 

Here’s more from hither and yon around the sixth boro:  Navigator at “old navy” topping off the ferry reserves, 

Popeye fishing in front of Ellis Island, 

Meagan Ann taking the stern of this interesting sailing trawler,

another sloop passing the Statue line, a Circle Line boat, as well as a Statue Cruises vessel,

and a NY Media Boat touring RIB.

Yes, I’m back to that trawler.  It’s called Briney Bus out of Miami, but besides that, I don’t know much.  My guess is that, like many boats, it’s heading for the  NYS Canal system, which opened two days ago.

The parting shot . . . Meagan Ann.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Three and a half years ago I started this series.  I realize now I should just have called the three posts for the ports in question:  Guaymas in Sonora, Manzanillo in Colima, and Lázaro Cárdenas in Michoacán.  Having started the way I did, the Ensenada post will then just follow the pattern.  With half a million people, Ensenada is the third largest city in Baja California.  Besides being the starting/ending point for the Baja 500 and 1000 races, it’s also an important fishing port, although less so than it was prior to the US tuna ban.   I have enough pics for a second post on Ensenada, so I’ll call this the fish and road version, with another to follow.

I took this photo from the road. Down there but out of sight at that moment were tuna pens.

Translate whatever you want on this menu.  I can vouch for the marlin ahumado, smoked marlin soup!  The $45.00 Mexican converts to about $2.25 US, and it was realmente delicioso!

Southern Horizon is inside the port tied up to a floating drydock. 

Galileo is too common a vessel name to locate.

 

 

From my conveyances, I was witness to the arid and steep terrain.

Other fishing machines lounged on the moorings.

This is the rocky shoreline south of Rosarito.

A few days later, I got lots of photos through a bug-spattered windshield.

 

 

All photos, WVD, who is back in the sixth boro, behind in work, but for now successful in reclaiming the reins from the robots.  I hope you enjoyed their tenure.  They will be back for an extended period in June.

They say the devil is in the details, but so are the delights.  I often take photos without knowing what delightful details I will uncover.  Like the photo below . . .  what caught my attention was that it was the first ketch I’d seen in the boro in 2022.

When I looked closer, I saw it flew a French flag.  Unfortunately, I can’t make out the vessel name below; maybe you can.

Lion’s Paw looks to be a non-winter boat as well.  

Aluminum hull and red flag caught me here, and no, I don’t mean the tugboat, which is obviously Frances

Is this “flag” called a “red duster”?

I saw the name on AIS, but have forgotten it;  it started with an A and had an X, I recall.  I do know that it’s a Boreal 47 though. 

And on this gusty day last week, she appeared to share the wind with a local sail school boat, I believe. 

I’d taken the next photos earlier and couldn’t quite figure out why the tug–clearly Pelham-and the party boat were so close together.  My first thought was that Pelham was towing a party boat that had possibly broken down. However, there was no tow line.  

Later I thought these folks clustered on the bow of the party boat hardly looked like they were going fishing!

Have you figured it out?

Look closely at Pelham.

Nope!  That does not say Pelham.  I imagine I’m a good reader, given how much of it I do, but because I recognized the profile as that of Pelham, I never bothered to read the name boards, which clearly say . . .  Katrina.  It took me two and a half weeks to notice that.  OK, I know that spring gives everyone giddiness, but let’s settle down here.  My conclusion now is that Sound Bound Star was the camera crew boat and Pelham/Katrina, the talent.  Anyone know the project, the movie?

All photos, WVD, who’s likely to get even more giddy along with the rising temperatures. 

I’m on the road again, so today I’ll share some recent photos on the boro.  Of course, winter is still fishing time in the harbor, as Viking is doing here.

Others are feeding in the boro, like

this guy below . . . closeup of the photo above.

I’m always looking for intriguing things, like this ladder that appears to extend over board from the Miller crewboat.  I couldn’t get a closer shot.

Details always attract me, like these color-coded connection on a tanker, or just

colorful deck machinery maybe for its own sake.

Conversely, this 2008 barge needs some rustbusting and fresh paint.

Now and then a boat I’ve not previously seen in the boro shows up . . . like the 125′ fishing party boat out of Brielle NJ.

How about a tanker with a local name  . . .

or a busy lineup scene?

Of course, the down side of observing is sometimes discovering that you are yourself being observed, folks wondering who would be sitting in the 20-degree weather on a dock of the bay wasting time . . . .  Thx for checking up on me, folks.

All photos, WVD, who comes here to relax.  And speaking of, my travel schedule the next few days may preclude posting.

 

In Mackinaw City four and a half years ago, I took and posted photos of the very rusty 1938 fish tug Kari A, one of which you see directly below.  But a lot can happen in that period of time, further decrepitude or thorough rehabilitation.

Above, that’s before, and what follows, is now.

Many thanks to Darrin Lapine, who wanted updated photo of his boat.  The good news is that Kari A. has been rejuvenated and is ready to fish again in 2022. 

Kari A. began life at Burger Boat in Manitowoc and christened Hustler, as seen here

You notice there’s no name on the bow?

 

When 2022 is upon us and it’s fishing time, the name Hustler will be repainted on the boat, her once and future name.

Many thanks to Darrin Lapine assisting in updating this post.  After all, suppose you imagined that my still unfinished 1948 beast still looked like the first photo here and not the last photos here.

Many previous posts with fish tugs can be found here.

The sixth boro, i.e., the watery part that holds the other boros together, is the one that never sleeps, with current, tides, mechanical denizens and their operators, their flora and fauna,  . . .  I’ll leave the list there for now.

You can read the season changing in the fact that Eastern Welder has reappeared for sixth boro clams.

Morning Claire is a regular in the boro, but last time I saw her was several thousand miles to the south.

Stolt Larix is one of the world’s largest parcel tanker fleets, but

what really caught my attention was its PBA backboard, where crew might play watch against watch. I’m always checking for hoops on ships that pass.  I wonder how good the crew teams are.

Gregg is off to assist a tanker in.

Names intrigue me, and I find bulk carriers have the best of the best, like Mega Maggie here.

Century Royal headed into the North River, prompting me to double check her provenance, and her voyage from Progresso MX to Yonkers USA tells me she’s loaded deep with raw Mexican sugar, not road salt as I’d originally assumed.

Here’s an obvious clue to season.

And finally, I’ve not yet seen the newest ferry carry any passengers, but she is training for the shuttle.  For one of my most recent articles, click here for my review of SSG Michael H. Ollis.

All photos, WVD, who’s out to see what and who he might next see.

Sometimes the photos can speak for themselves….

Needless to say, local fishermen and women brave dangers to get out to where the fish are plentiful.

Snags are quite plentiful also.

All manner of boats go in pursuit.

 

Humans are not the only fishers out there . . .

Some have a minimal gear approach…

 

 

 

And what’s a nearby ULCV when there are fish to be had . . .

You should have seen the bunker I had on the line recently . . .

 

 

 

All photos, except the two of me by bowsprite as I was cranking in a silver landbass, WVD.

Unlike birds, which inhabit the atmosphere as we do, fish aren’t seen very clearly unless you pull them out of their medium.  Recently I enjoyed watching Gotham Fish Tales, on youtube, an hour and 15 well spent.

The combinations in the sixth boro might surprise you, cargo and clams, for example.

Mary Virginia crossed Gravesend Bay to get to the Upper Bay. Back in 2013 I posted photos of Mary Virginia here.

Over in Stapleton . . .  Giulianna Maria  . . .  is that an anchoring system?

Crossing Hell Gate and leaving 91st Street Marine Transfer Station behind, Never Enuff seems fishing bound, rod fishing.

Here’s a NJ crab boat.  Note the rake toward the stern.  That’s the Miller’s Launch fleet along the distant shoreline.

And although it carries the name Lobster Boy,

the rakes show they’re going for clams.

Commercial fishing vessels is a hallmark of winter in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD.

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