You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘fish’ category.

By the time you read this, I should already be in Quebec, and once we get under way, we’ll reverse the trip I began six weeks ago in NYC’s sixth boro here. From Quebec City we travel up the Saint Lawrence, up as in upstream.  The waterway is truly beautiful, and although I have defined tasks on the ship, I get to spend a lot of time watching .

gl1

 

gl2

 

gl3

 

gl4

The photo below I took from the NE corner of Lake Ontario looking toward the port of Oswego.

gl5

From the Lake, we cut in at Oswego via the Canal, bypass all the fishing, and

gv1

make our way via the grand canal back to saltwater.

gv2

Here’s the 1899 Buffalo-built steam tug Geo E. Lattimer (loa 59′ x 16′ x 4.5′) exiting the low side of Lock 17.

gv3

Given the pain of finding enough of a signal to post, I can’t tell you when and what you’ll see next.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, including the photos of photos from Canal signage.

As we follow the west side of Lake Michigan, we see evidence of lots of fish and folks who say yes to catching them.

DSCF5166

 

DSCF5177

 

DSCF5178

 

DSCF5196

And there’s a boat building tradition and

DSCF5210

regular visits by an iconic vessel . . . Badger, which I’ve done a number of posts about before now.

DSCF5228

 

DSCF5232

Badger is a BIDO and carries a lot of vehicles, including this sub.

DSCF5254

BIDO?   Back in, drive out.

DSCF5271

 

DSCF5277

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the previous installment.  And here were the cargos and places of summer.  And if you missed it previously, here’s an article about Seaway Supplier I published in Professional Mariner last year.  The first six photos are used with permission from Seaway Marine Group.

pft1

Trucks like the ones with the white tanks transport stocks of fish from hatcheries to water bodies, in this case Lake Ontario.  Here’s the first time I noticed one of these trucks on the highway.

pft2

Off Oswego, it’s ready, aim,

pft3

swim!

pft4

Elsewhere at sites determined by the DEC . . . fish are brought in.

pft5

and the truck returns to shore for the next load.

stocking

The photos below all come thanks to Cathy Contant, who

ft1

works in the inlet and bay where I learned to swim almost 60 years ago. Back then, when a coal ship came in here, everyone had to get out of the water.  But I digress.

ft2

How could I not recognize the lighthouse AND Chimney Bluffs way in the distance.

ft2b

 

ft3

Here’s what Seaway Marine writes on their FB page:  “We have transported 40 trucks, via 6 port locations stocking over 500,000 fish into Lake Ontario aboard our USCG certified landing craft, Seaway Supplier.”

Many thanks to Jake and Cathy for use of these photos.

 

With a tip of the hat  to Hildegarde Swift and Lynd Ward, the title that came to mind as I shot these, and you’ll see why by the end.  See the road signs up there intended for drivers on the Triboro Bridge?

0hs1

Rewarding my wait, it’s Jaguar towing Highlander Sea into the Gate,

0hs2

past the Ward’s Island Footbridge, and

0hs3

past Archibald Gracie’s cottage on the point. Click here for peers of the 1978 Jaguar.

0hs4

Westbound the tow came at almost slack water and past

0hs5

RTC 104 and

0hs99

the Twins bound for Riverhead.

0hs6

More on the brick building there with romanesque windows and green roof at the end of this post.

0hs88

And here, when they were under the Queensboro Bridge,  the title occurred to me . . . having the same syllabication and cadence as the Swift and Ward title.

0hs7

Now we need a story, one that starts as hundreds could in tiny but huge Essex.  Click here for my previous posts on Essex.

0hs8

Maybe one about a fishing schooner design turned pilot boat turned yacht turned school turned . . .

0hs9

fish market and restaurant/bar in the sixth boro.  I hope they sell monkfish.  These photos are compliments of my brother taken in Zwolle at a

0hs10

pop-up market.

Thanks bro . . .

All other photos here by Will Van Dorp.

So, thanks to identification by Jonathan Steinman, the brick building there is ConEd’s cogeneration plant at East  74th St.  And this is a digression, but 74th Street has long been quite the interesting place.

Back last November, I devoted a whole month to ports and harbors.  As I get new material, I’ll continue that series.   Here Boston’s latest fireboat passes in front of Logan’s control tower.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s her namesake.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Massport has its own fireboat, American United.  Its predecessor–Howard W. Fitzpatrick— was the subject of several tugster posts as it made its way up to Lake Huron to become a dive boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Claire looks like she was based on a hydrofoil design, but I can’t find any evidence to support that.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From my vantage point, I could tell the controls were right up in the bow.  I’d love to get a tour of her wheelhouse.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This Nantucket aka LV-112 moved from Oyster Bay to Boston six years ago, a transit covered by tugster here.  This Nantucket is not to be confused with WLV-612, which frequently appears in the sixth boro.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Angus . . . good to meet you.  Somehow I expected you to look like Brangus.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Can anyone fill in some info on the history of King Triton?  Is it a modified former government vessel?  In the background are the digesters on Deer Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I believe that’s Ocean King, whom I saw in the sixth bork back in 2010.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here, identification thanks to Paul Strubeck are the 1958 Nancy (red), the 1954 Brandywine (green) , and an unnamed Army tug.  And over on the far left side of the pier, it’s

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

the 1940 Brooklyn-built Gaspee.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Over on the fish side of the harbor, here’s David Tonnesen’s 45′ stainless steel sculpture called Cod.  Wind spins the discs on its back, and windspeed determines the color of the eye, s0 it’s a wind speed indicator.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Along both sides of Boston’s Fish Pier,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

boats offload their catch.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

More from the port of Boston tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

All photos today come thanks to John Huntington.  Check out his new site here, one which I mentioned a week and a half ago here.

Here are the basics on what you are looking at, mostly from John’s caption:  “FAR ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY, NY/USA – FEBRUARY 25, 2016: The 24 meter (78 foot) scallop fishing vessel the Carolina Queen III, rests in surf in the Atlantic Ocean off Far Rockaway on the Rockaway peninsula of the borough of Queens in New York City. The boat ran aground at about 2am and all the crew were safely evacuated by the US Coast Guard.”   Of course, there are also the related stories about the USCG 25′ RIB attempting a rescue and capsizing in the 10-12′ seas, and its crew, trained and geared up for such a possibility, safely swimming to shore;  and the rescue of Carolina Queen III crew by helicopter.  Photos here.  A number of the RIBs can be seen here.

0acq1

Salvage plans are underway.  The fishing vessel–to my untrained eye–seems to have held up well, a tribute to its builders as well as to the fact of coming ashore on the sand.  Those builders are responsible for two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro as well.

0acq2

I’m sure the owners and crew of the vessel feel sick right now.

FAR ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY, NY/USA – FEBRUARY 25, 2016: The 24 meter (78 foot) scallop fishing vessel the Carolina Queen III, rests in heavy surf in the Atlantic ocean off Far Rockaway on the Rockaway peninsula of the borough of Queens in New York City. The boat ran aground at about 2am and all the crew were safely evacuated by the US Coast Guard.

 

0acq3

But looking at John’s remarkable photos, I’m struck by their allure.  The calm water, patches of blue sky, reflection of a beautiful machine misplaced on soft sand  . . .  contrast sharply with how the scene must have appeared to the crews Wednesday night when the wind and spray made the decks feel like hell, a time of uncertainty and fear.

0acq4

I’ve previously done a set of posts on a vessel ashore here.  And from South Africa four years ago, these photos from Colin Syndercombe and another fishing boat astrand.

Thanks again to John Huntington for use of these photos.

For a photo of Rodriguez Boatbuilders’ 2015 James E. Brown, click here and scroll.

For a sense of how shipwreck has attracted photographers of four generations of a British family, click here.

 

Remember the logic in this series is . . . the first pic of the month and the last pic of the month . . .

Early September found me still along the Acushnet . . .  Malena–as of this writing–is in Sierra Leone, having bounced around the Caribbean since departing New Bedford.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

By September’s end, Wavertree was slathered in a beautiful red primer.

0aalas9

Early October . . . that’s North Star off the Orient Point, and Plum Gut, with Plum Island in the background.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Late October . . . a conversation led to an invitation to tour iMTT Bayonne and see Marion Moran at the tug fuel station from the waterside.  I still need to post about that.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

November . . . and Med Sea bound for the Sound and beyond.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Joyce D. Brown going back to the kills.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And late in the month, my only view of Patty Nolan, on the hard in Verplanck. Click here for some of many posts on the 1931 Patty.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Early December . . .it’s mild and I decided to experiment with some color separation on Margaret Moran. Click here for a post from seven-plus years ago with Margaret Moran  . . .

0aaret12

And since December has not yet ended, I will post this in its incomplete state, with the promise of a “last December 2015”  post yet to come.

This is my last post for 2015.  Happy New Year.  May it be peaceful and safe.

Picking up this retrospective post with the beginning of May 2015, it’s a nearly 40-year-old and tired Barents Sea, waiting then as now for what’ll likely be a “fish habitat” future.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The end of May saw Quantico Creek move Mary Whalen to its public space over in Atlantic Basin.  Was there a docking pilot calling it out from the drone?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s first glimpse of an early June trip I’ve never reported on via this blog.  More on this vessel will appear soon–currently working in the Dominican Republic.  The red vessel in the distance is F. C. G. Smith, a Canadian Coast Guard survey boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Eastern Dawn pushes Port Chester toward the Kills.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

July opens with the ghost of Lafayette arriving back in the harbor aboard L’Hermione. Click here for the set of posts I did about this person. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m omitting a lot from my account here;

0aajuly

The end of July brought me back to the south bank of the KVK watching Joyce D. Brown go by.   July was a truly trying month . .  is all I’ll say for now.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In early August Wavertree awaited the next step into its rehab, and I

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

made a gallivanting stop in New Bedford, a place I’d not visited in too long.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by will Van Dorp.

The top three photos in this post come thanks to Kyle Stubbs, who has contributed photos here before, not to mention many photos on uglyships, which is how we first met.   He’s not Seabart.

0aawf1

I’ll tell you more about this fishing boat in a bit, but that mud says it has been below the surface of the water, and it ain’t a submarine.

0aawf2

Some claim it’s the most famous fishing boat in the world, although that sounds hyperbolic.   Guesses?

0aawf3

It’s Western Flyer, the boat chartered by John Steinbeck AND Ed Ricketts, which served as the platform for their expedition to the Sea Of Cortez aka Gulf of California.  Click here for an interesting article on how marketing removed Ricketts’ name from the Log from the Sea of Cortez account.  The vessel is currently undergoing a $2 million restoration.

Log from the Sea from Cortez is well-worth reading, although my favorite is Cannery Row, in which Ricketts is portrayed as the marine biologist.  For a portion of Log, click here.  My favorite pages in that excerpt are the second half of p. 6 and all of p. 7,  and the second half of p. 14 onto top of 15.

Tangentially related:  the elusive bowsprite has responded to an updated book on the Sea of Cortez here.

Many thanks to Kyle for these photos, taken in Port Townsend. 

 

And this–believe it or not–is Galilee.  Galilee, Rhode Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s a close up of Tradition.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Amelia Bucolo intrigues me because of what it’s towing to port.  I’ve no context to tell how common this is.  The builder, by the way, is Gladding-Hearn, 1966.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The rig is unlike any fishing rig I can recall seeing, too.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Is it a market boat?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

True American is fiberglass.  See the gloves atop the cabin?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

I stopped in Point Judith only to catch the ferry to Block Island, but I’ll definitely be back.

Here’s a similar port post from six years ago.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,074 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

December 2016
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031