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In July 2010, the 1968 Black Hawk was one of two sister tugs operated by Sound Freight Lines.  Since then, the sister Seminole has been sold foreign, and Black Hawk has been sold to Sause Brothers Ocean Towing.  Sause refurbished her and for an account of Black Hawk towing a barge from San Francisco to Vancouver, click here. Details on Black Hawk are 112′ x 34′ and 3700 hp.

Chief, 1999, is/was one of Crowley’s Harbor class tugs.  She’s 97′ x 36′ and 4800 hp.

James T. Quigg is no doubt now wearing Centerline Logistics colors.  She dates from 1971 and measures in at 98′ x 30′ and 3000 hp.   Since launch, she’s worked the US East Coast, once called Fournier Boys,  and Hawaii, as well as the West Coast.

Alaska Titan came off the ways in 2008.  She’s one of a half dozen “titans” operated by Western Towboat.

Currently following the waterway through the islands of the Alaska panhandle, she measures in at 112′ x 35′ and 5000 hp.

Westrac, 1987, is another Western Towboat vessel, measuring in at 63′ x 28′ and 2500 hp.

This Triton, launched 1965, now goes by Wycliffe.  She’s 115′ x 31′ and 2500 hp.   She’s currently in Ensenada MX.

Dixie, 1951, has a history in towing log rafts on the Columbia River hundreds of miles above Portland OR. She’s 46′ x 15′ and 575 hp.

Pacific Star, launched 2008, now goes by Signet Courageous.  She’s 92′ x 40′ and 6610 hp. She’s currently in the Gulf of Mexico off Corpus Christi.

On Lake Washington, Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain were out sailing.  The two vessels are now outside the Puget Sound in Gray’s Harbor, and Hawaiian Chieftain, as I understand it, has been “laid up.”  The two replica vessels have a waterline length of 72’and 62′, respectively.

Island Packer puzzles me a bit.  It seems not be cost effective to operate the 1943 converted landing craft between here and the Aleutians, where Chernofsky is located.  I suppose it was in Seattle that day for service.  I don’t know.

Katie Ann, launched in Baltimore in 1969, almost 300′ loa and powered by 8000 hp,  is one of six processing/packing/freezing vessels operated by American Seafoods.  She operates with a crew of 75.  As of this writing, according to AIS, she’s in exactly the same location I photographed her in July 2010, but only because she’s between seasons.

Viking has the lines of a converted oiler, like these.  She could be the 120′ crabber/trawler built for crabbing/fishing by Marco in 1975.

All photos, WVD, in July 2010.

 

 

Yes . . . it’s summer enough . . .

to call this summer fishing.  But I was not expecting a vessel like Ocean Venture, 71′ x 30′, which pulled into Gravesend Bay the other day. Here’s more info on the Maine registered vessel and her sister Reliance. This shot gives a clear view of the stern.  I was tied up where I was, so I didn’t round the bend to see where she went.  Just beyond her, that’s the Coney Island light.

Twisted Sister came in, and not long later, departed

having added some gear . . . oyster reef starters?

And here comes Rockfish,

heading out for a morning fishing party.

And speaking of fish and fishing . . .   I’ll be gone fishing for a while myself.

All photos, WVD.

 

The winter fishing boats are gone, likely fishing elsewhere and

replaced by these minimalist

machines.  There must be good fish to be had by the Staten Island side of the VZ Bridge.  They’re around in fall also.

Otherwise, like leaves on the trees and warm temperatures, they emerge.

 

And finally, in spite of all the other covid-19 changes,

snow birds are arriving.

This is a fishing machine,

but this larger boat, Poco Loco, came in the other day, with two days and four hours from Virginia Beach.  Anyone know who the manufacturer is?

Ditto this sportfish, it arrived at the Narrows from Cape May in four hours!

I believe I’m seeing fewer recreational boats like this and they’re arriving later than usual, and if they plan to get to the Great Lakes via the Erie Canal, that won’t be open for a while yet, as winter maintenance has mostly been stopped since mid-March.

Meanwhile, going in the other direction, you might recall seeing this boat on this blog before here . .  scroll.  Lil Diamond III, previously based along the NYS Thruway and doing tours for Erie Canal Cruises out of Herkimer NY, she’s been sold out of the Canal and is heading to a new life with Poseidon Ferry in Miami.  Here Kevin Oldenburg caught her headed south in front of Poughkeepsie being overtaken by a menacing cloud, and

here I caught her yesterday about to leave the sixth boro for a place fluidly connected.

Bon voyage, Lil Diamond III. previously big sister of Lil Diamond II,  as you buck the trend, heading south as a sunbird and meeting all the northbound snowbirds.  More photos from and of Lil Diamond III coming soon, I hope.

All photos, except Kevin’s, by WVD.

 

 

The light has been right the past few times I’ve seen Chele-C.

After seeing these winter draggers in the sixth boro for over a decade, they still amaze me; that it happens is surprising.  Here Chele-C works the water alongside Barney Turecamo and barge Georgia.

 

She’s down by Cass Gilbert’s Brooklyn Army Terminal and alongside RTC 107.

 

 

The many backgrounds like Erie Basin and the Red Hook Grain Terminal behind her . . . all make her a sight to be seen.

All photos, WVD.

 

It’s the sheer diversity of traffic on the sixth boro that keeps me coming back, although diverse does not mean unpredictable.  In summer, mermaids gather, specifically around the very day of the solstice.  In winter, fishing boats come .    In fall, the fishing boats are of a different sort.

Chele-C was fishing on the west side, and

 

Phyllis Ann over on the east

with Dutch Girl and

 

 

this boat I could not identify.

Eastern Welder has been a fixture in winter fishing as far back as I can remember.

 

Osprey are well known for their fishing ability, so I should not

have been surprised to also have seen HSV Osprey out extracting from the depths.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Ships with bird names seem plentiful this year.  Recall One Ibis, ONE Apus, ONE Stork, CM CGM AquilaOyster Catcher, NYK Falcon, NYK Crane… I could go on.   In the past months and not posted here, I’ve seen tankers like BW Raven and Yasa Flamingo, Yasa Hawk and Yasa Swan…,

but this guy, a bufflehead, photographed on November 28, is a sign of winter.

Mergansers, too, show here when the leaves fall.

This was my favorite “attitude bird” from last summer.

Birds like this gull eat well.

Transiting the Canal upstate and navigating the Hudson, I look for these guys.

Both eagles and ospreys announce themselves, and I hear them before I see them.

My favorite birds this year were of herons, like this guy by a Canal dam,

peaceful until we spooked him and he took off.

 

These guys have no manners.

And maybe you can help me identify this unusual bird that swam a river in front of our boat . . ..

This specimen appears to be related to this one . . . with proturberances from his head and swimming in the same waters.

Call this a post showing what else I see when I’m out;  all photos by Will Van Dorp, who rarely goes out sans camera. Why would I when there’s always the possibility of spotting a mermaid . . .

If you love birds and herons, specifically, check out babsje’s page here. On FB, check out tug44’s Fort Edward Wildlife Magazine and find out what Fred’s been up to.

And finally, here‘s a heart-warming NYC land bird story about a rooster found by a good samaritan and named Elizabeth Warhen.

It’s already the second day of a new year, and boats and birds plentiful populate the boro.

 

Here are the previous posts.

And let’s start with unnamed tug, left where the bushes might overwhelm her.

Susie Q, on the other hand, seems to get lots of love. The other day it was docked near the Rogers Street Fishing Village, a piece of Two Rivers on the National Register of Historic Places. More on Rogers Street tomorrow.

 

Closer to the Lake, I saw Iown and Jamie Ark.

And going down the line, it’s the 1937 Bossler Bros,

Avis-J, and

Peter Paul.

Nothing says old-time Great Lakes more than fish tugs.  For the definitive guide, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Anna May is not anime, not matter how much they sound alike.  She’s a cargo boat, sometimes carrying horses over to Mackinac Island. Here she is at the St Ignace dock.

And the 906 Express . . . she’s AF’s

landing craft mail boat, Mackinac Island’s version of the supply boat Ojibway or the mail boat Westcott, aka zip code 48222.

Laura Ann is one of the fish tugs bringing in wild catch for Massey Fish.

 

Farther west and over by Grays Reef, some sort of research boat is at work.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who in real time is hours away from getting back in these waters down bound from Chicago by the time this posts.

 

 

This post picks up at Illion marina, where Gradall #2 and

a scow and Governor Roosevelt  

worked.

 

A scow and a self-propelled scow waited on the dock while tug Seneca

received attentions.

A fishing kayaker demonstrated multi-multi-tasking skills.

Rebecca Ann waited at the dock.  Madison R assisted with breakwater work.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, between Illion and Oswego.

 

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