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The harbor of NYC . . . the watery parts I call the sixth boro . . . is quite diverse.  Bridgebuilder 22 (2012) I caught in Erie Basin,

where I also saw Miss Aida (2002), formerly known as American Muscle.  Now that’s a name!!

Stephen B has been on the blog before, but this is the first time I had my camera with me as I passed Westchester Creek.

Treasure Coast was at Caddell Dry Dock and Repair earlier this month . . .

as were Evening Mist and Genesis Glory and 

Pearl Coast.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.


On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous weather posts.  Below . . . that’s easy:  it’s a local shower;  Evening Tide and Evening Light were in the rain, and I was not, yet.

But a half hour later at the opposite end of the KVK, the clouds were truly wild.  Is there a word for these conditions?  Again, it wasn’t raining at my location.

Air currents swirled beyond the busy waterway, l to r, Stolt Loyalty, Stone 1, Phoenix Dream, Kimberly Turecamo, and Hoegh Seoul assisted by Bruce A. McAllister.

The Stolt tanker passes Graecia Aeterna before meeting the wild swirl head-on.

Add one more tug to the mix.


All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d like to know what you call this type of fast-moving dispersal of fog.



Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  So what is this?

It’s an ultra deepwater geotechnical drilling vessel.  It’s not drilling in the Upper Bay .  .  .

although it has the gear to do so.

With that helo pad above the wheelhouse, it looks to be what is associated with ports like Rio and Fourchon.

“Fugro”?  The name goes back to 1962:  “On 2 May 1962, Kees Joustra launches his own firm, whose name translates as Engineering Company for Foundation technology and Soil Mechanics, in short ‘Fugro’. ”

Above Fugro Explorer takes on fuel from Emerald Coast.  I was fortunate to get these photos–she’s been in and out of the harbor several times in the past half year–before she made through the East River bound for New Bedford, where she has now arrived.  She would have been a sight to behold on the East River, but omnipresence is not easy to manage, even in our sci-fi 2018 world.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s more on Fugro, “Ingenieursbureau voor Funderingstechniek en Grondmechanica.”  Fugro provided one of the vessels involved in the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370.

And speaking of sci-fi, I’ve recently immersed myself in augmented reality experiences


As this blog evolves, I sometimes try to show what’s up in those hills, as seen from the hills like this one in March 2017, instead of

what you see in instances when then light is unfavorable.

Olana is the hilltop mansion above the Rip Van Winkle Bridge, built by an artist whose commercial success allowed him to travel, become inspired by the 19th century “near east,” and scrap his plans to engage architect Richard Morris Hunt and instead design and build a neo-Persian palace on the site where once he painted with his mentor Thomas Cole, whose home was just across the bridge in Catskill.

The photo below looks down the Hudson Valley toward the south.

This looks along the south side of the house facing west and the town of Catskill.  Kaaterskill Falls is lost somewhere below the front of the jet trail.

Looking out a south side window, there’s a northbound tug/barge just barely visible.

Directly behind me are these treasures.  Mark Twain–see his own house here— once stood on that stage and discoursed on all things wise, hilarious, exotic,  and jaundiced.

I used the word “treasure” above because here’s a closer-up of that unit approaching from the south–it’s Pearl Coast with a cement barge.

And now a more focused view along the south side and toward the Rip . . . Bridge, see the tug/barge there southbound?


It’s Treasure Coast, with another cement barge.  I know there’s a work of Church’s with a steam ship on it, but it’s so far eluded me.

Olana is just one place up on the hilly banks, and so other many places along the river I hope to visit . . . one of these months or years.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted Hudson Valley photos here and here, and in many other places as well.

As to seeing Olana from the river, here’s what morning light does,

and here below, late afternoon.

Go visit Olana some time in 2018, and while you’re there, visit the Cole home across the river..


A week ago or so I did a post called Sarah D moving light;  in the next two photos she has a scow that appears light.   Earlier this year, I caught her at the Narrows at dawn headed for Queens.


Just a little earlier, Jane A. Bouchard heads down bound with B. No. 225, her usual.

Click here for Jane/225 photos from back more than five years ago.


Carolina Coast and Pegasus nose up to a barge at American Sugar in Yonkers on a cold morning,

and Normandy hangs out just north of the passenger terminal with some extraordinary buildings.  For a photo from five+ years ago with Pegasus pre-upper wheelhouse, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who celebrates an anniversary today. Any guesses?


It’s always a joy to be under way on the Hudson.  Enjoy these shots from last week.

Stephanie Dann passes a chimney of what may once have been an ice house.

Click here for previous Stephanie Dann photos.

With the Rip Van Winkle Bridge in the background, Sapphire Coast approaches pushing Cement Transporter 1801.



Near Catskill she passes Coral Coast with another cement barge.


And here my first time to see the rebranded Kristin Poling, moving Eva Leigh Cutler.


All photos by Will Van Dorp.


I’m not shifting the focus of this blog to photography–although it’s always been photo driven–but it’s fun to shoot what the light allows, which in this case somewhat obscures the identification of the tug in the foreground and highlights in profile the construction over by the Goethals Bridge.  Also, I’ve not forgotten a realization of a few weeks back about there being nothing random;  context here is recent sixth boro.

Anyhow, name that tug?

Meanwhile, north of the GW, it’s Joan Moran (1975) with a coal barge, from what I could tell.

Farther downriver, it’s Atlantic Coast (2007) with a dredge scow.

On that same dredge project, Shannon Dann (1971) stands by with GL 602.

Wye River (2008) waits over by the Palisades,

Sea Wolf (1982) holds steady over by –is that?–Edgewater.

Barry Silverton counts down for an appointment with Fight ALS,

Brendan Turecamo (1975) hangs with Connecticut, and

that brings us back to the first photo, now benefitting from a different light and easily identifiable as

Doris Moran (1982).

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

After about 3600 posts and almost 11 years, I’ve concluded my titling is based on a flawed assumption, i.e., nothing is random or generic except such things as our understanding.  Another way of saying that is . . . everything has a specific context.  A better title for this post would be something like tug/barge units between Kingston-Rhinecliff and Bear Mountain Bridges on such/such date with various sceneries related to autumn in the case.  But, I’m not switching so bulky or to re-title everything, so on we go;  life has no first drafts.

Having blabbered all that, I just have to say the Hudson Valley is a beautiful place, and the creations of our work in it serve to complement the natural beauty.

Consider Delaware and DoubleSkin 50.


Or Coral Coast and

Cement Transporter 5300.


Sarah Ann and Cape Wendy.

And Haggerty Girls with

RTC 107, with birds rounding Bear Mountain . . ..


Here’s a closing look.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.


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