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First,  the numbers, as Kai Ryssdal would say on NPR’s Marketplace show.  The numbers I’m referring to are the bids on Grouper yesterday. 

At 0600 yesterday, high bid was $150. That lasted until just after noon. By 1300, high bid was $420. More than 60 bids (out of a total of 104) were tendered in the last hour, some fractions of a second apart. Winning bid was $3100. At this point, I know nothing about the winning bidder or that person’s intention.

This will be a summer of many days away from the sixth boro, so I’m very happy when you send in photos. Great Lakes mariner retired (GLMR) sent in a few. Below is a cool pic, in the snow, of John B, for sale for some time now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a skeletal and unidentified fish tug.

Truckertim has sent a few along;  Little Toot has got to be one of the more common names for a small tugboat.  And it fits.

I like the color scheme.

I’d love to know the breadth here.

From Lewis Cobb, here’s one I’ve not seen in the sixth boro . . . Sea Coast, 60′ x 24′ and it has spent 41 years in Dann Marine colors.

 

Miss Judy, 59′ x 23′, works for a dredging company south of Norfolk, I believe.

A fantastic shot of Joker, here with her colors mimicked in the sunset, but who wore those colors better . . . why, Joker, of course. The 79′ x 25′ Joker used to work in the sixth boro–and out of it–as Taurus.

From Jake Van Reenen, up on the New York portion of the Saint Lawrence River, it’s Ruth Lucille, who’s gone into fresh water of the Great Lakes out of Milwaukee after working in salt water as Ocean Endeavor.

If you’ve never visited Clayton, you’re missing something.  It’s a place I could move to.

And let’s end here with tugboat Hudson.  I took this photo on July 3, 2017.  I’m not answering the following question today. Where is Vane’s Hudson today?

Many thanks to all of you who’ve sent photos in.

Let’s end this post with a number Kai Ryssdal might be interested in :  $11,200.

That’s today’s cost of moving a 40-foot shipping container from Shanghai to New York.

 

Click here for the previous 85 posts with this title.  Lead photos today come from former owner of this push boat in West Burlington, Iowa.

The vessel, then known as Izona, has since traveled the Interstates and two-lanes to Highlands, NJ, towed by the much-loved Peterbilt of John Zook, of Lewisburg, PA.

Maybe you saw them on the roads, or since then, at a marina in Highlands NJ?

“Mister __”  is a common name for tugboats.  Here, from a secret salt is Mister C.  

Hobo has appeared here before, but never with this outstanding fendering created here.  Hobo is a 1953 product of Caddell Dry Dock.  She’s now living the good life, in the hands of Donna and Charlie Costa.

Emery Zidell is a Centerline tugboat, currently in the sixth boro.  She’s the older twin of Barry Silverton, a more frequent visitor to the boro.  Photo comes from Capt. Anon E. Mous. Zidell is married to Dr. Robert J. Beall.

And finally, currently underway in the western center of Lake Erie, it’s Sarah Dann, pushing this huge crane on a barge from Manitowoc WI to Kittery ME, almost 3000 nm.

Get ready to see Sarah Dann and “Big Blue” in the Welland Canal and Saint Lawrence.  You might see them passing Strait of Canso too.

Below, Jeremy Whitman caught a fabulous photo of the unit passing the 10th Street lift bridge in Manitowoc WI.  Thanks much, Jeremy.

Here’s part of the story from John Buellesbach and MKE Marine Reports in “Around Wisconsin”   “Konecranes of Finland partnered with Illinois-based Broadwind to build several large cranes for the U.S. Navy at the Broadwind Heavy Fabrications yard in Manitowoc, former site of Manitowoc Shipbuilding. The first, a portal jib crane for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, was completed in early May. It weighs 2.7 million pounds, has a lifting capacity of 140 tons, and stands about 160 feet tall. This custom designed crane incorporates unique features that allow it to be operated on the multiple rail section sizes, straight or curved, located at the naval base.”

ETA in New Hampshire is around the 18th.  Track them on AIS.

Thanks to Jeremy, John, the Powells and the Costas, Great Lakes mariner, and other nameless contributors.

By the way, does anyone have photos to share here of CMA CGM Marco Polo and from the same day, Kurt J. Crosby?

 

 

Norfolk and its estuary constitute a major US seaport, so let’s linger here for this post.  I’ve been there three times, and only once was it clear.

Besides military docks, it has a number of terminals.  for this latter, here‘s a schedule;  Notice it shows CMA CGM Marco Polo arriving here at 1300 on May 23. 

Clayton W. Moran is a 2016 launched 6000 hp tugboat, just a bit newer than the four 6000s in the sixth boro.

Compared with the sixth boro, notice that you see many of the same companies working in Norfolk, and many of the same vessels, including container ships tugboats.  Choptank is a 2006 Louisiana-built Vane 4200 hp boat.

The sixth boro has quite a Norfolk tugs fleet, but I suspect Ellie J, 1968 and 1800 hp, has never called up here.

I can’t tell you much about Dauntless II.

Emily Anne McAllister is a 2003 4650 hp tugboat.

Gold Coast is a 1967 1000 hp tugboat that has worn Dann Marine colors since 2005.

Captain Mac is a Corman Marine Construction tug built in 1980 and rated at 700 hp.

Steven McAllister is one of a dozen or so McAllister converted YTBs.  Built in 1963 and significantly repowered in 2007, she brings 4000 hp to ship assists.  She’s pretty much identical to Ellen McAllister.

Elizabeth Ann is part of the Norfolk Dredging fleet;  she’s from 1982 and is rated at 3000 hp.

Ocean Endeavor is from 1966, 1000 hp, and has left saltwater for Milwaukee, where she’s now Ruth Lucille.

Paradise Creek (1981) once worked in the sixth boro as Caspian Sea and before that (and before my time) was here as Sea Tiger.  Currently, it has been sold out of the Vane fleet and is known as Emmy Lou.

Maxwell Paul Moran is a 6000 hp, likely quite similar to Clayton W above.

All photos, WVD.

 

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Saving fuel . .  . Foxy3 has Rae alongside and they’re passing a wall of a hull, or is that a hull of a wall….

Coral Coast is usually on a cement barge, but not now . . . .

Can you name that tugboat?

Let’s do regression, with Foxy3 and Rae approaching that tanker hull.

Double Skin 36 is what Coral Coast is pushing.

Name the tugboat pushing DBL 82?

Notice Foxy3 and Rae and SKS Mersey they’ve just passed?  Progression going on here with Mount St. Elias and

Coral Coast, whereas

the Fox boats are regressing.

 

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated, and a bit late, but do you remember the “green boat” below, AQS Tor?  It  was deck cargo lost off a yacht carrier Eemslift Hendrika abandoned off Norway earlier this month.  Click on the image to see the disposition.  More AQS here.

 

Last week I did a lot of driving, to the Outer Banks and back for a project.  I saved some time headed north by crossing from Lewes to Cape May by ferry.  Although it was quite foggy, I did see a few vessels.  Can you identify these?

 

By now, I suspect some of you have identified this tug . . .

Of course, it’s the 2007 tug formerly known as Barbara C and Arabian Sea and now called Saint Emilion.  On the ferry crossing, I caught these photos at 1700;  after an overnight and some work, I was headed home and caught her here at the VZ Bridge, 18 hours later.

So, 18 hours then to run the length of the Jersey coastline, and switching from towing to pushing once at the southern edge of the sixth boro.

After catching these photos of Saint Emilion, I waited a bit longer and caught these photos of Calusa Coast, traveling light, on a voyage from the GoM to the watery boro.

All photos here all foggy, WVD.

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

The other morning was without wind and busy, so this next “hour” is actually 30 minutes, and these are only a few of the photos I took between 0900 and 0930 of this extraordinary morning from my single vantage point.

A team of Dann Marine tugs leave the dock, framing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer dock.

Vane’s Brooklyn leaves her dock;  notice the Moran barn (red with the white M) and Pegasus at the Metropolitan dock.

Charles D heads to job.

Bulker Maina heads for sea, passing Elandra Blu and

Marjorie comes to retrieve the docking pilot.  Do you see four people in the photo below?  Elandra tankers are based in Latvia.

The calm here is barely broken by MSC Korea.

Brendan waits to retrieve the pilot.  Note the scrubber and its effects on emissions?

Over by IMTT  Glory and Potomac sand by with their barges.

And we’ll leave it here, actual 28 minutes elapsed . . .  name that approaching ship?

All photos, WVD.

How about a quick post today, all three photos taken in a two-minute span on March 25, 2011.  The third photo here is set to enlarge when you double click;  let’s see if FB allows a preview with that.

Congestion:  I don’t know what barge Sea Raven is pushing, but the Allied boat and First Coast are headed for the Gate on the East River. Sea Raven became razor blades in 2018.  First Coast began as Morania No. 18.

Into the photo rides HerculesHercules was just off the ways at Washburn & Doughty in Maine, and on its delivery trip to Texas, where I believe she works with G and H.

Then into the photo also crowds Penn No. 4.  Penn No. 4 ended up with Curtin Maritime in Long Beach CA but is currently out of service. 


All photos taken during a busy two minutes, WVD.

Here’s an extraordinarily busy photo;  Nicole Leigh is about to ease right around Shooters.  Beyond that tug, a half dozen or so more tugboats, an antenna, a bridge, a refinery, steam . . .

Gulf Coast waits in front of a 12-pack of IMTT silos.

Navigator continues shuttling around, moving fuel.

Buchanan 5 is not a common visitor here, so I was happy to see her pass.

Brooklyn and Dorothy J  head west although with different goals.

St Andrews moves a barge eastbound.

Ava M. waits for a container ship at sunrise.

Sea Fox moves a loaded recycling scow toward the Arthur Kill, and

Caitlin Ann moves an empty one back.

And finally, C. F. Campbell, first photo here with her upper house, heads west.  Light. 

All photos, WVD.

 

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