You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Pathfinder’ tag.

The first boat I saw in the morning fog was buff and green . . .  Meaghan Marie, moving what appeared to be a Cashman spud barge.

Meeting her was Vane’s Philadelphia.  I’m curious . . . do any readers have a photo of a Vane unit operating on thew Great Lakes or arriving there via the Saint Lawrence?

I could hear Shannon Dann‘s EMDs throbbing as she moved Weeks 105

Pathfinder moved light trash containers to a marine transfer station.

A light Treasure Coast headed from Duraport to the Upper Bay.

Seeley pushed sand scow Weeks 250 eastbound.

As the sun started to burn through the morning clouds, Janet D made her way to a job.

Pegasus returned from a job, out ahead of two Moran assist tugs.

St. Andrews got underway from the Centerline dock.

Brendan headed off to an assist.

And just as I needed to leave, Franklin showed up to assist Gracie out of her dock.

All photos, WVD.

Enjoy the photos.  Can you guess which of these tugboats is oldest?

Greetings Rae and hello to the crewman at the railing. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen Rae.  The first time I saw her I was with Bonnie and the tug was then called Miss Bonnie.

Several people have said Matthew Tibbetts is the best looking tug in the harbor.  Who am I to argue with them about that?

Pathfinder cuts a sharp image as it leans into its empty trash containers . . . . and the barge CVA-601.

Some mornings the dawn light enhances everything.  Because I was a NASA fan a long time ago, a tug named Cape Canaveral will always get my attention.  I’m guessing she may be the newest boat among these.

Above, along the left side of the photo, see the barge with GL 54 on it?  Ocean Tower was moving it along,as below.

This light perfectly complements Sarah D‘s lines and colors.

The sun is already rising well after 0600;  I took this photo of Ruby M before 0600.

A very light Frederick E. Bouchard passed me by the other day.

Normandy has the throatiest sound of the boats I know best.

And finally,  well before 0600, Emily Ann was moving a scrap (?) barge westbound.  I believe she was last on this blog back in June.

All photos, WVD.

Oh . . . the oldest?  That would be Rae, launched 1952, same as me.

As you know from some earlier posts, those red morning skies . .  they mark my favorite times.

Here Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300 has just departed the dock with Ruby M‘s assistance.

 

Soon afterward, Sapphire Coast arrived with Cement Transporter 1801, and assisted

by Stephen Dann.

Later in the morning, Sarah Ann pushes scow Michelle D.

Durham moves deck barge Arlene, bound for some work in the East River.

Harry McNeal returns with barge 1962 to IMTT to continue the job there.

Nicole Leigh stands by with RTC 135.

Pathfinder delivers empty garbage containers from the railhead to the marine transfer station.

Charles D. returns from Earle.

And finally, departing IMTT,

Genesis Victory gets an assist from Normandy.

All photos, WVD.

Garth Foss, launched in 1993, is huge: 138′ x 46′ with 8000 hp and 80 tonnes of bollard pull.  Robert Allan says of Garth and sister Lindsey, ““They were really the first true purpose-designed tanker escort tugs in the world.”

Pacific Pride, launched in 1976 and measuring 84′ x 28′ and 2500 hp, is now Panama-registered D Dog.  She’s currently anchored off Callao Peru.

Next to her is Sirius, launched in 1974,  126′ x 38′ and 5750 hp, and currently laid up in Hawaii.

Guardian was launched in 1970, measuring 136′ x 37′ and 5750 hp, and is laid up.   Gladiator dates from 1975, measures in at 129′ x 37′ and  7200 hp.    She’s now Vanuatu-registered Resolve Gladiator, currently in the Irish Sea.

Over in Bremerton, I saw YTB 828 aka Catahecassa   101′ x 31′.  She was launched in 1974 in Marinette WI.  One source says that In 2013, she was sold to Basic Towing and renamed Gina.  Basic does own YTB 827 Chetek now known as Nickelena. Of course, all of this could be out of date.

Western Ranger was launched in 1968 as Oio, a Hawaiian Pineapple, then Dole tugboat.  In 1992 she came to Western Tugboat.  She’s  101′ x 31′ and rated at 3420 hp.  As of now, she’s on a run from Nome to Dutch Harbor.

Flyer was built in 1981.  She’s all of 37′ x 16′ and 400 hp.  Hornet was built in 1966 and the tape says 42′ x 14′ and 360 hp.

Pathfinder was launched in 1970, 136′ x 37′ and 5750 hp.     Now she goes by Island Explorer and is off BC on a run from Seattle to Anchorage.

Valor was launched in 2007 and chartered to Crowley.  She’s  93′ x 40′ and 6772 hp.  Currently she’s in San Francisco Bay.

Andrew Foss was launched in 1982 as Andrew Foss, measuring in at 107′ x 38′ and 4290 hp.

The trip to the Seattle area in July 2010 produced lots of photos I posted here.  Maybe I should get updates on more of the boats I saw there.  I was invited to be there in August 2020 for a wedding, but like so many things . . . that’s not happening.

All photos, WVD.

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

Maybe you saw this in yesterday’s post and wondered why I hadn’t commented.  Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder have appeared on this blog before.

Soon after I got these photos, they departed to Cleveland to discharge a load–as I understand it– that

had been in the hold since last year.  Ice had moved in so quickly that the unit was prevented from offloading.  I don’t know how much ore (?) was in the barge;  her capacity is 21,260 tons.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

What?!@#!!  See the end of this post.

 

For the past few years now, NYC municipal trash has traveled by barge and train to landfills in several states.  Captain D here is pushing this barge with containerized trash from a transfer point in Queens to a rail loading facility in Staten Island. Click here for animated explanation of trash movement overseen by DSNY.

As I understand it, the green containers are covered by a Waste Management contract, whereas the black ones, the older slightly contract, by Covanta.

One constant in the harbor has long been the Staten Island ferry; the new “constant” is these trash containers.

 

 

As a resident of NYC now for almost two decades, I have to say that for all the population density and numbers, NYC’s five terrestrial boros are relatively “tidy.”

You just can’t do what we did in my youth . . . set up a burn barrel at the hedgerow end of the farthest field and stoke it once a week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got photos of the new DSNY container cranes moving to the SW Brooklyn transfer station here.

And the first photo was taken from the mouth of the Bronx River, where the trash barge lined up with the Arthur Ash Stadium with a LaGuardia runway in between. Captain D was coming out of Flushing Bay.

“Motor city” is another name for Detroit, but “detroit” is only part of the name for the waterway given by the French explorer Cadillac when he led the first Europeans to settle “Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit” on a bank of “le détroit du lac Érié,”  the strait of Lake Erie), linking Lake Huron and Lake Erie; historically,  the strait included the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River.

Some time after departing the Cuyahoga, we pass this mysterious site.  Any ideas?  I’ll identify it at the end of this post.

If you’re not at the helm, straits bring the treat of relatively close passage with other traffic, like Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder here.

Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial is a 352′ monument we can all live with, sans controversy.

As we approach the center of the contemporary city of Detroit, traffic and industry intensify.   I’d never noticed GLW’s glowing slag heaps, like crafted flows of lava.

On the Windsor side, Frontenac transfers payload .  . not sure what.  Salt maybe?

On the American side, 1000′ Edwin H. Gott is likely discharging Superior ore or taconite.

Sturgeon Bay-built Sam Laud watches from the Rouge.  Laud, the namesake, moved from shop painter and riveter to CEO of GATX.

Folks on the bridge of Algoma Olympic, Port Weller-built and down bound here just south of the Ambassador Bridge, must be experiencing the frustration of having to worry about devil-may-care recreational boaters.  Recently, a high profile meeting of stake holders was held at Port Huron to deal with difficult small boat operators, one in particular who decided to play chicken with a freighter .

Last year this China-built tug was called Victorious;  now she’s know as Leo A. McArthur, and as then, she pushes hot asphalt contained in John J. Carrick.

Patricia Hoey (built 1949) is a good example of the extended life experienced by freshwater boats.

A McAsphalt unit like Leo A. McDonald, Everlast, matched as always with Norman McLeod, is Japan-built.

I’d love to learn more about this Windsor home, but the name on the facade is that of the Massachusetts-born founder of Canadian Club whisky.

Just north of Belle Isle, SS Ste. Claire, Boblo ferry sister of SS Columbia marks Kean’s Marina.

And with night falling and work for me to do, we’ll leave this post only partway through the strait with Kaye E. Barker, once Benson Ford III.  Notice the GMRenCen in the distance just forward of the front of the self-unloading arm?  GMRenCen was built by Ford.

The return of daylight will find us in Lake Huron.  To see the St. Clair River by daylight, click here.  All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

The sinuous structures in the top photo depict Cedar Point as seen from a few miles out in the lake.

 

 

 

This is the 98th installment of this title.  If you’ve any ideas about what I might do with the 100th, let me know.  Of course, I could just let it pass by . . . randomly.

All these boats have some things in common, like  . ..  they passed through the sixth boro although in all types of weather/light in the past week or so.  I’l let you know what I’m thinking at the end of the post.

Miss Yvette, 1975 built in Houma, Louisiana (LA), here attending to Kraken.

Freddie K Miller, 1966 . . . Madisonville LA.

John P Brown 2002 Morgan City LA

Atlantic Salvor 1976  New Orleans.

James Turecamo 1969, Waterford NY.

Pegasus 2006  Tres Palacios TX

Pathfinder  1972 Houma LA

C. Angelo 1999 Lockport LA

Margaret Moran December 1979 Morgan City LA

Miriam Moran November 1979 Morgan City LA

And another thing they all have in common right now is that

they all work in trades other than directly pushing oil.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to hear ideas about the “Random Tugs 100” post.

Unrelated:  I read this line yesterday about a withdrawn lawsuit between the NY Port Authority and a Canadian steel company:  “The deal means the lawsuit will be dropped and the steel for the [World Trade Center] tower antenna can set sail before Canadian shipping channels freeze over in winter.”  Here’s the rest of the article.  But it made me wonder . . .  by what vessel . . . barge or ship . . . will this steel arrive in the Upper Bay.  Anyone know?  Here’s info on the fabricator of the antenna.

And a Q . . . has anyone seen evidence of construction of the crane(s) to be involved in the Bayonne Bridge raising?  I’ve heard rumors, but not read or heard anything authoritative.

Check out the light exactly two years ago . . .  here.   And my first greetings this morning came from the Easter ducks, who’d heard about an egg hunt, I believe.   Mergansers passed too, but dove each time to hide bright colored bills.

Norwegian Gem, her bow painted like a post-modern Easter ovoid,  sailed into a harbor entirely tinted with the rosy fingers of dawn, ending a passage from Cape Canaveral.

Bavaria made an attempt to get out to sea.

Nor Gem shrinks the closer she gets to Manhattan’s passenger terminal.

Sea Lion (1980) heads Jamaica Bay bound to deliver a crane.

Buchanan 12, (1972) herself made over and painted anew for an Easter parade, enters the east end of the KVK.

Pathfinder charges forward between MOL Express and Overseas Atalmar.  Express left the Panama Canal 12 days ago, and will spend next Sunday in Europe.

A mariner stands watch.  What I’d give to be able to tell you his name, history, and his thoughts as he heads for sea on a Sunday morning . . .

And two last beasts  . . . unicorn and Oliphant . . .  round out our marvelous menagerie

I hope you enjoy this day . . . All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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