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The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

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Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

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Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

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receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

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The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

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By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

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A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

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water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

With a tip of the hat  to Hildegarde Swift and Lynd Ward, the title that came to mind as I shot these, and you’ll see why by the end.  See the road signs up there intended for drivers on the Triboro Bridge?

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Rewarding my wait, it’s Jaguar towing Highlander Sea into the Gate,

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past the Ward’s Island Footbridge, and

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past Archibald Gracie’s cottage on the point. Click here for peers of the 1978 Jaguar.

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Westbound the tow came at almost slack water and past

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RTC 104 and

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the Twins bound for Riverhead.

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More on the brick building there with romanesque windows and green roof at the end of this post.

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And here, when they were under the Queensboro Bridge,  the title occurred to me . . . having the same syllabication and cadence as the Swift and Ward title.

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Now we need a story, one that starts as hundreds could in tiny but huge Essex.  Click here for my previous posts on Essex.

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Maybe one about a fishing schooner design turned pilot boat turned yacht turned school turned . . .

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fish market and restaurant/bar in the sixth boro.  I hope they sell monkfish.  These photos are compliments of my brother taken in Zwolle at a

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pop-up market.

Thanks bro . . .

All other photos here by Will Van Dorp.

So, thanks to identification by Jonathan Steinman, the brick building there is ConEd’s cogeneration plant at East  74th St.  And this is a digression, but 74th Street has long been quite the interesting place.

The sixth boro tidal strait typical known as the East River, surrounded as it is by impressive urbanity, is nonetheless a significant waterway.  These photos today come from Jonathan Steinman, as did these of Ginga Lion, a 507′ loa vessel.

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But Jonathan was surprised–as was I when I got his photos– to see ATB Freeport travel through the strait last week, even though New London, its destination, is closer by the “inside” route than by the alternative outside of Long Island, which it followed on the return.  The tape says the tug is 144′ loa and the barge–Chemical Transporter— is 521.’  While tug and barge are notched, the combined length of the units exceeds that of similar large units operated on this strait by Kirby, Bouchard, and Reinauer.  For what that’s worth.  Here’s some backstory on Freeport‘s costly construction.

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Thanks to Jonathan for these photos.

Given today’s date, the reference above to Lion, and the beautiful weather outside in NYC, I need to link to this lamb post from a year and a half ago.

Here are the previous installments.

Rare as it is to see a chemical tanker traverse the East River, there’s no mystery about this vessel’s identity…  Ginga Lion.  For outatowners, the bridge goes by Koch Bridge, 59th Street Bridge, or Queensboro Bridge.

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These photos were taken last Wednesday–October 21–by Jonathan Steinman, frequent contributor of photos from along that tidal strait, which is not really a river.

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So here’s the mystery . . . or at least the question.  Given the Jones Act, how can this vessel make the stops it does.  On this run, it was traveling from Bayonne to Port Jeff, and as of this writing, she’s on her way to New Orleans. Prior ports of call and dates are as follows:  10/8 Gibraltar, 9/10 Pasir Gudang Malaysia, 9/4 Kuala Tanjung Indonesia, 8/18 Nantong China, 8/17 Zhangiagang China, 6/22 Houston.

Ginga Lion is clearly a foreign flagged chemical tanker.

I suspect the answer is that she’s not transferring cargo from one US port to another, just loading or offloading at a series of US stops, which I understand would be permissible.   Anyone clarify?

Many thanks to Jonathan for keeping eyes on the East River and sending along the question and photos.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

And this set comes from Mike Abegg, whose photos have been used here previously.   Check this out.  All I know about the yellow vessel is that it looks like a Griffon 1000TD.

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Anyone know the whences and whose . . . inquiring minds wish to know.

Thanks to Mike for sharing these photos.

Somewhat related . . . does anyone you know refer to the East River or any portion of it as the Sound River?

 

See the decorated Dutch bar?  That’s not something you see every day.

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but July 4 is not an ordinary day.  Just look at all those people at the land’s edge:  “water-gazers” Melville called them, as you can read here with the last sentence of the second paragraph and go through the next two paragraphs.   All wanting to see the decorated Dutch bar?

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Brendan Turecamo, showing the Turecamo flag!

Marie J Turecamo brought a barge of pyrotechnics too.

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Marion Moran–like Brendan Turecamo–brought a barge full to midtown, I believe.

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. . . as did Doris Moran. Again, see the water-gazers fill the esplanade.

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Other tugboats brought other gazers . . . sky-gazers soon.

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like Kimberly Poling and .

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Yemitzis, launched as a PRR tug in 1954.   Click here and scroll to see her original look.

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My goal at the fireworks on Pier 16 had been to get shots of Ambrose bathed in pyrotechnical light, but alas . . . without the right orientation of camera to boat to flashes . . . this is the best I got.

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This photo from July 2012 was what I had imagined I could get.  Well . . . it’s all about a lot of things, including location.   See the different version of this shot of the left of this page and please let’s continue the discussion on the future of Pegasus.

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Speaking of sky-gazers . . . from the back of the crowd on Pier 16, this is what I got.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you didn’t see this article in the NYTimes about digital photography and ethics, check it out, even if you just look at the before and after photos.

 

 

I’m not going to count, but there must be dozens of posts here with photos from or some mention of Paul Strubeck.  Here I’m pleased to dedicate a whole post to him in part because these photos make me see the sixth boro with new eyes.  Enjoy.  Cornell . . . by foggy night and compare to my photo from about the same day but at dawn here and scroll to the third photo.  The location is the soon-to-open Brooklyn Barge Bar, where I’m eager to imbibe a sunset beer. Also in Paul’s “roll” of film are

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Pinuccia and Specialist mostly obscured,

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Captain D ,

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Nanticoke passing the East River Seaplane base,

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an unobscured photo of Specialist,

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Sea Robin secured to Sugar Express at the sugar plant in Yonkers,

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James William,

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and Foxy 3 pushing a Thornton barge, which

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brings us back to a great photo of Cornell, which Paul used his special lens for.

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All photos here are used with permission from Paul Strubeck.  Thanks much, Paul.

Unrelated:  Here’s an East River seaplane photo I posted here many years ago. And a photo of Sugar Express towed south by a former fleet mate of Sea Robin.

Put Cornell into the search box and you’ll see how many posts I’ve done on this 1950 Long Island-built vessel.  I even wrote an article for Professional Mariner.  Click here for more info on Cornell.

But this post just raises a question . . .if the sunrises over a calm East River and no one is there to see it,

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is it still pretty?

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I think so.  Photos taken at 0630 this morning by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks to Jonathan Steinman, here’s another tug–Robert Burton–handling the CVA sealed garbage containers.  Given the direction of the tow and absence of freeboard on the barge, the containers are loaded and heading for Howland Hook to be loaded onto trains southbound.

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Here (and scroll) was a post I did almost two years ago when Robert Burton was shifting barges down in the Beaufort Inlet.

Thanks much to Jonathan for sharing his vantage point.

Over six years ago, I did another asphalt post here.  Yesterday I was thrilled to get the following photos below from Jonathan Steinman of this unusual vessel on the middle portion of the East River.

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Asphalt Sailor–a great name–turns out to have a set of siblings ranging from a lot more capacious to somewhat less so.  On names alone, I’d love to see Black Shark.   Given the cargo, I wonder if the deck feels warm.

That’s James Turecamo overtaking on the west side.  Here’s a hydrodynamics problem . . . is the greater amount of froth churned up by James due only to its greater speed, or is hull shape a factor?

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For outatowners, that’s the 59th Street Bridge, and Asphalt Sailor is headed “south,” actually west.

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Unrelated:  Here’s an East River ship photo I posted six years ago.  The conclusion then was that it was “doctored.”  Anyone new thinking on it?

Thanks again to Jonathan for these unusual photos.

 

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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