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I’m catching up here, with this post from the top west side of Lake Huron, where the skies and

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and waters teemed with people.

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I headed to the high ground where the fort stands,

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From the wall, I saw US-built  Samuel de Champlain pass southbound.

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Schooner Inland Seas was anchored over by the Round Island light.

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Corsair  brought in food trucks, which

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get offloaded onto wagons.

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Teamster, trickster, tugster . .  got it all in this post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

We didn’t make 7  because of delays, but stuff happens and here’s catch-up.

That’s Toronto as seen from the Lake as we head for Port Weller, where

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we take a pilot.

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We wait for a down bound vessel in the first lock, and then

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“record” it as it passes.

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We pass a load of coal between locks 7 and 8.

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Then we drop a pilot at Port Colborne and

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and pass the marine recycling yard before

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turning eastward for Buffalo harbor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

To clarify this title, the first post in the series has a lead photo showing a map of our journey broken into legs marked by pins.  Legs 4 through 6 took us from Waterford, shown below, to Oswego.

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Urger stood by all spiffed up for the steamboat festival.

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Erie Canal Cruises accommodated sightseers eastbound toward lock E18.

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Tender 4, the electric motor vessel, assisted in a dredge project.

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Tug Erie tied up at the end of the work day.

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Here’s the cutterhead of one dredge.

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Lucy H returned light past Rome, NY.

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Never have I seen so

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many bald eagles.  This one is banded.

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And leg 6 ended in Oswego.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again when able.

 

. . .it turns out Horace Greeley might not be the author, and John B. L. Soule, who may have been, had some harsh ideas about people.

I use it as explanation for something new I’m doing.  Today I head over toward the pushpin to the right . . . Narragansett Bay, where I board a small passenger ship that has hired me as onboard lecturer.  By July 12, we expect to be in Chicago via the route indicated.  I am thrilled!  The red dots are overnight stops, and the greenish ones are daytime stops for such tasks as lowering and raising the wheelhouse.

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Here was Grande Mariner along the west side of Manhattan back in May 2016,

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and here are two shots of her sister vessel farther upstate taken in 2013 and 2014.

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The challenge I’m giving myself is to post each day of the westward journey, using photos from that day.  Note that these ships with telescoping wheelhouse are truly Eriemax, designed to carry 100 souls along inland waterways on weeks-long voyages.  My job is to present lectures every other day on topics ranging from wars along these waterways to 19th century canal fever to the storied and obscure cast of characters who lived along the waterways (e.g.., Seeger, Fulton, Rockefeller, Freed, Stanton, Tecumseh, Brock, Hanks) . . .    to –of course–the variety of shipping working there.

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In a way, it’s a 21st century version of the D & C route for which there’s the poster below.

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If you don’t hear from me for a few days, just know I’m hoping to be somewhere along that route.

The sixth boro tidal strait typical known as the East River, surrounded as it is by impressive urbanity, is nonetheless a significant waterway.  These photos today come from Jonathan Steinman, as did these of Ginga Lion, a 507′ loa vessel.

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But Jonathan was surprised–as was I when I got his photos– to see ATB Freeport travel through the strait last week, even though New London, its destination, is closer by the “inside” route than by the alternative outside of Long Island, which it followed on the return.  The tape says the tug is 144′ loa and the barge–Chemical Transporter— is 521.’  While tug and barge are notched, the combined length of the units exceeds that of similar large units operated on this strait by Kirby, Bouchard, and Reinauer.  For what that’s worth.  Here’s some backstory on Freeport‘s costly construction.

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Thanks to Jonathan for these photos.

Given today’s date, the reference above to Lion, and the beautiful weather outside in NYC, I need to link to this lamb post from a year and a half ago.

Here was the previous post.

It was all highlights while taking two ferries to get from Long Island to my destination, but here are some photos.  I left Orient Point along with small fishing boats like Fishy Business, 1995 built.

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North Star, built in 1968 as an offshore supply vessel, was purchased by Cross Sound Ferry in 1984 and converted to an auto/passenger ferry.

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As North Star arrived, the 2007 Plum Island left Orient for its namesake island.

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Hudson River-bound Grande Caribe (1997) cut across the Sound with its unique profile.

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Eventually the destination appears . . . the cliffs off the north side of Block Island.

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The unmistakeable Viking (1976) passes as we round the island toward New Shoreham.

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Interstate Navigation’s Block Island (1997) welcomes us into the old port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You can call this “Capt. Log gone;  Chandra B arrived.”  Log out or log off . . . might work also.  Anyone know if Capt. Log, launched 1979 and retired at 0000 hrs on 1/1/15,  has sold and if so to whom?  Click here for a Professional Mariner article  on the vessel.

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taken September 2013

But the real story here is that a new appropriate-sized double-hulled tanker has taken her place in the sixth boro. Welcome Chandra B.

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Here she fuels up

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Positive Carry, a Feadship,  on the Upper Bay.

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Many thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat for these photos.

This follows the post where I got to spend four times as long on Long Island Sound, a truly remarkable place.  The trip last week brought sights and surprises enough to warrant a repeat trip soon.  Here, a bait boat (?) passes a renowned Plum Island facility.  Back to this later in the post.

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We’re headed to New London, the name of this RORO/WOWO.

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Here Marjorie McAllister tows RTC 60 past Little Gull Light.

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The only house on Hobbs Island in Groton needed to have a story, and I found one when I learned it was built by the Hays family, who wrote this book a friend gave me for my 45th birthday.

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Here Mary Ellen departs New London for Orient Point, passing New London Light.

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Amistad awaits, for sale at the dock.

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Sea Jet  . . . takes on passengers for Block Island, a place I need to visit soon.

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Since our destination was Blount for the wind farm vessel ribbon cutting, I wanted to get a photo of the newly launched replacement for Capt. Log.   Click here to see the plans and specs.

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Chandra B, coming to the sixth boro soon.

At the dock just south of the I-95 bridge, it’s 100′ scalloper Chief, also for sale.

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Electric Boat 2 does patrols around the pens,

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which enclose a submarine.  Now look closely at the tail vertical stabilizer.  Now look at the one in this “news” story about a submarine getting stuck in Shinnecock Canal.  If not the same sub, then it’s at least the same type.

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But if you start thinking about it, Dan’s is having way too much fun.  This story and this one are clearly boaxes, spoofs about boats.  When I heard the story about Shinecock, I thought maybe the Hamptons PD had gotten ahold of this one, which I spotted on the North fork just a few summer months ago.

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Heading back across to Orient Point, you can line up New London Ledge Light with Race Rock Light, in the distance.   Tours for Ledge are available in the summer, when the ghost is around.

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On a leg between Newport and Oyster Bay, it’s KnickerbockerWisconsin-built by a shipyard that started out doing fish tugs!  If you’re not familiar with fish tugs–of which Urger was one–go to Harvey Hadland‘s site.

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Now here, back near Plum Island, is a surprise.  I figured it was a fishing party boat, but Justin suggested otherwise, and indeed he was right.  M. S. Shahan II IS a government boat, owned by Department of Homeland Security!!

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And a final shot of Plum Island just before we return to the Orient Point dock, of course, it’s Cape Henlopen, former USS LST 510

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By the way, I am still looking for folks with connection to this vessel as LST-510.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

“Black gold”  . . . oil makes power.   You can’t see or smell wind, but it can be used for power . . . and that’s the title of this post.  Yesterday’s photos hinted at the work happening now in the water to eventually harvest that power, and today . . . this records parts of the ribbon-cutting for

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the first North American-built wind farm service vessel.

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Completion for this 70’6″ x 24′ x 4′  vessel is projected for April, although crews will be training on similar vessels in the UK starting this coming winter.

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Hull and superstructure are being worked on separately.

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To the left is Marcia Blount, CEO of Blount, and speaking here is Charles A. Donadio Jr., owner of Rhode Island Fast Ferry.

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Over 150 people attended the event.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here by Kirk Moore for Workboat.

 

I hope it ends soon.  Of course, ice is just a part of the sixth boro cycle.  See the ice photos here from 2009.  Enjoy these shots from the last day of February 2015.  But for the hot days sure to come later this year, how about this tall tale of Meagan Ann traveling through the icebergs of New York.  In her early years, Meagan Ann operated in Alaskan waters.

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APL Coral  . . .  Oakland, CA-registered, must be named for cold water species.

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The Bravest heads out on cold water patrol. See more about Bravest in this article by Peter Marsh.

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M/V Miss Ellis, built by Blount in 1991, has likely used ice before today to scrape growth from its hull.

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North River . . . has sludge to move around the harbor.

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Zim QingDao appeared previously–with a surprise on the bridge wing–here.

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And these ferries keep running despite the ice.

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Molinari sets up the ultimate sixth boro tall tale image, beautifully created by Scott Lobaido.

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I saw the image below on the ferry, and if you want it, you can order it here.  I’ve never met Scott, but I love this lithograph.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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