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Here are some previous Sound posts. Recognize those buildings about 30 miles from my location?

How about this tug with a string of scows?

 

Yacht traffic in this location between Huntington and Stamford seemed to be in a hurry.

If you didn’t recognize this tug earlier you can’t miss the name now . . .   Mister T is a Blount built boat from 2001.

 

 

How about this one?  There aren’t many tugs in the area that look like this when the wheelhouse is hydraulically raised.

Here’s the skyline a few hours after the first photo, showing only midtown and up.

All photos from the Sound by WVD.  That tug with raised wheelhouse was Justine McAllister, a 1982 product of Jakobson on Oyster Bay, one bay to the west from my vantage point on Sound Wave out of Huntington Bay.

It’s March 1, and that invites a look back to March 2011.

Vinalines Queen  is where I need to start.  Less than two years after I took this photo, the 2005 bulk carrier was lost on a run between Morowali, Indonesia and China with a cargo of nickel ore, with the loss of all hands (22) except one. 

Morowali has 19 nickel smelters.  Nickel ore is considered the most dangerous bulk commodityTwo other nickel ships were lost in December 2010. Here‘s info about the single survivor of the sinking. 

Assist here is provided by Miriam Moran.

Kongo Star was just off the ways when I took this photo;  and the small tanker (13011 dwt) is still working and currently near Rotterdam, in fact, in the town where my father was born.

Entering the KVK, it’s Ross Sea and Houma, each with a barge. Houma was scrapped a few years ago already.  Ross Sea is currently in Philly.

Heron, here passing CMA CGM Puget, was sold to a Nigerian company in 2012.  The 4404 teu ship dates from 2002 and is currently traveling between Korea and Mexico.

 

Greenland Sea shows her Candies origins.  She may currently be laid up.  Torm Kristina just passed Cape Town, on a run between Asia and South America.  She’s a large handysize crude tanker launched in 1999.

Ron G, now Captain Mark, is docked in Jacksonville.

It was in March 2011 that I first visited Puerto Rico.  In Fajardo, I saw Isla Grande and Cayo Norte.  Both are Blount boats, launched in 1976 and 1995, respectively.   Cayo Norte is still working in Puerto Rico, although I’m not so sure about Isla Grande. 

The 1973 Harvey Gamage is currently near Charleston SC.    Can you recognize the tall ship off her stern?

Of course, it’s Bounty, launched in 1960 and lost over 100 miles SE of Cape Hatteras during Hurricane Sandy.

March 2011 was a busy month.  I’ll post more photos of the month later.

All photos, WVD.

 

I initially thought to repeat some photos of New York Power Authority vessels near the Niagara River, but they’re here already in a post from December 2017.  Ironically, these vessels are based on the Buffalo River,   not the Niagara River, in the warm season. NYPA boats become active when most boats come out of the water at the start of ice season.

Here’s a photo of the ice boom (below shown ashore during the non-ice season) and

of BreakerBreaker, 1962 and 43′ x 14′,  was technically replaced by a new vessel in 2015, Joncaire IIOther boats specifically breaking ice there are Niagara Queen and William H.LathamRead more on Latham here. More on the Queen here.

Currently traveling north on the Hudson making its way to Buffalo via the Erie and Oswego Canals is Breaker II.

 

If you have lots of time and want to read an International Joint Commission report on ice boom usage, click here.

I suspect Breaker II will be westbound in the Erie Canal this weekend.

These photos I took in North Cove, lower west side of Manhattan.

All photos, WVD.

 

There’s nothing new that I know about Twin Tube, but she cuts a unique image as she works year round.  She came off the ways in 1951, and just moves along doing essential and almost invisible work.  Here’s a post I did on her four years ago telling about her previous incarnations.  Here are many others with photos, with or without (as here) her boom.

 

What’s interesting to me is that the port of Philadelphia has (I’m not sure it’s still there.)  a similar Blount-built vessel called Sailor, launched in 1977.  It appears to have the same basic plan but with the orientation reversed, as you can see here.

Here’s something to research:  Sailor had previously been El Paso Sailor.  Where did it work in that iteration?   Surely, it didn’t work here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Bright and early, Kithy P passes Grande Mariner and enters

lock O8.

We followed Kithy P later, and departing lock O5, we met Rebecca Ann, who would enter the lock we had just vacated.

(Note:  as of today, Rebecca Ann is transiting the Welland Canal on the return trip to the sixth boro.)

On our way to Fulton, we passed some exotics.

And on our way to Phoenix, we passed my favorite docks in the system . . . repurposed flatbed trailers, three of them together.

This pontoon vessel had to exit O1 before we could enter, and

River Rose, a former sixth boro excursion boat now relocating to Michigan, had to wait for us.

 

And dead ahead, it’s Three Rivers, Clay NY, where the Oswego and the Erie Canals meet.   We will turn to port . . . east.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Previous posts of Cheyenne can be found here.  But I think she never looked better than she did northbound between Fulton and Minetto the other day.

The Oswego Canal/River might be the narrowest wilds she’ll be in for a bit.

The waterfowl wheeled around to catch glimpses.

I look forward to seeing on the inland seas of the Great Lakes.

x

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The channels –here negotiated by Pride–run close to shore along the southern side of Mackinac Island,

necessitating careful monitoring of navaids, here is Buckthorn.

Near the strait that forms the somewhat undefined boundary between Huron and Michigan,  we meet Sharon M I pushing Huron Spirit, the barge and not the pilot boat by the same name.

The massive bridge spanning the strait here is about 10 miles to the east.  Click here to find out where the Mack Bridge ranks among the longest suspension bridges in the world as of now.

Note the blue color the water.  Here’s how the colors of the Great Lakes look from satellite images.  Earlier this year a Sea Grant scientist told me the new issue on the Lakes, especially the upper ones is oligotrophism related to zebra and quagga mussels.  Erie, however,  tends toward the hypereutrophic with especially serious algae blooms this summer.

Until I’ve a better system for night photos on the dark Lake, I’ll dispense with photos like the one below.

The Budweiser mural on the silos in Manitowoc today is just a mural, artwork, since the silos are now owned by Briess.  No beer–except home brew– is made in this part of this town.  As to the current owners, here’s the Briess Malt & Ingredients site, resident peregrine and all.

SS Badger can withstand anything the Lake can throw at her, but crossing in extreme weather might make for uncomfortable and dangerous conditions for the passengers, as was the case within 24 hours of my taking this photo.

Here’s a fluvial centric map of Chicago.  We docked just south of the area marked 4 here, but I decided to scout out Bubbly Creek, near 1.

Here’s a photo of Bubbly Creek from a century back, along with an explanation of the name.

My actual destination on Bubbly Creek was the Chicago Maritime Museum.  Check them out. If I’d have been there a little later, I could have gone to the presentation on Cap Streeter, a synopsis of which is here.

Once docked, though, I wanted to explore the southern shore water’s edge around to the east, to Indiana.  That’s the Chicago skyline below, and

here, is more of the picture I wanted, the Burn’s Harbor steel making site, part of the manufacturing infrastructure for which much of the Lakes’ traffic exists.

Quite a nice beach, actually.

All photos and sentiments and any inadvertent errors by Will Van Dorp, who will soon return to this area and suspend new blog posts until  reliable wifi is available.

Although I’m a newbie, this being only my second run on Huron, I suspect this view dominates the experience of crossing Huron, possibly Superior also, which I’ve not traversed.  Huron is the inland sea with the longest shoreline, surrounded by sparse population.  Sarnia, the largest city on Huron has about 70,000; Port Huron, 30,000; and Alpena, 10,000.  Of course, Bay City–population 35,000– lies there also, but at more than 50 miles into Saginaw Bay, it’s a city you go to as a destination, which I need to do soon.  I’m eager to visit all the towns along this lake.

Off to starboard, it’s Thunder Bay, China-built, Seawaymax.

To port, it’s barge Menominee pushed by

Olive L. Moore.  If you look at no other link than this one in this post, check this one for the evolution of this tug since the hull was first laid down in Manitowoc in 1928, designed low to fit under the bridges in Chicago.

Arcticus ,Laurentian, a USGS vessel launched in 2014, was working some research project off our starboard.  Here’s a post I did in 2014 on another USGS vessel at its christening in Oswego.

Otherwise, along the shore there are lights  like Thunder Bay Island Light,

(and I’m not sure of the identification here) New Presque Isle Light, and

Spectacle Reef Light.

Near here, we passed tug Michigan pushing barge Great Lakes, which I last saw in Montreal last fall.

 

Martin Reef Light tells us we’re approaching the Straits, as

does the appearance of Kristen D, the ferry between Cheboygan and another Bois Blanc Island–more places to visit some day. Kristen D dates from the late 1980s.

Samuel D. Champlain I could pick out anywhere by its profile, but John C. Munson I had to check on my device. SDC appeared on this blog several times before, with a closeup here, and in a previous iteration here. Last year I caught SDC southbound in roughly the same end of Lake Huron.

And less than a mile from the dock on Mackinac Island, we pass Round Island Light.

Writing this post has clarified one section of where my next road trip will take me.  All photos and sentiments, errors, etc. by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Check out these 10 facts about the Great Lakes.

Unrelated:  The 2017 NYC tugboat race is scheduled for Sunday Sept. 3. 

With digressions behind us, let’s resume the journey.  In part 4 we descended from the level of the Mohawk at Rome NY into Lake Ontario, approximately 248.’  Canadian pilot boat Mrs C meets us not far from the entrance to the Welland Canal at Port Weller, so named for the lead engineer in building of the first iteration of the Welland Canal.

Below lock W1,  Alouette Spirit tied at a dock.  The mover is Wilf Seymour, a Canadian-flagged former Moran-owned Texas-built tug I’ve met on most trips here since 2015. I’ve seen her on locations between Lake Huron and the St Lawrence just up from Quebec City.   Click here to see her being loaded with ingots.

 ITB Presque Isle  occupied the Port Weller Dry Docks.

So that you can get a sense of how ungainly this ITB looks out of the notch, I’m sharing this photo thanks to Jeff Thoreson of Erie Shipping News.  Usually she’s in the notch and considered a 1000-footer.

Exiting lock W1 was China-built  Algoma Mariner, whose bow shows the effect of operating in ice.

Notice how narrow the Welland is here, with less than 100′ between Grande Mariner and Algoma Mariner.

For more info on the Welland, click here.

I drove through Port Colborne–at the 571′ level of Lake Erie–a few years ago, but seeing the names of the shops here, I’d love to stop by and wander.  I’m not fanatical about pies, but Jay the Pie Guy sounds too tasty to pass up.  Check him out on FB.

Four months ago, I posted photos from Clayton NY on the dead ship tow of the former traversier aka ferry Camille Marcoux.  Here’s what she looks like now after the

 

skilled carving tools of the workers at Marine Recycling Corp in  Port Colborne.

See the scrapping in the upper right side of the photo, here the pilot steps off and we enter Lake Erie, turning to port for Buffalo.

After an hour-and-a-half run, the grain elevators of Buffalo welcome us. Seeing the blue G, I can already imagine the smell of the Cheerios plant.

Near the entrance to the Buffalo River, I spot NYPA’s Joncaire II tied up near the merry-go-round.  I’d love to see her at work managing the ice boom.  I don’t see Daniel on the bow, but I believe the full name is Daniel Joncaire II.  ??

Over in Silo City, two older Great Lakes tugs–Washington and Vermont— await between jobs.  Of course, they still work.  The combined age of those two tug is 195 years.  YEARS!!

Silo City may not sound all that exciting, especially for folks who know farms, but this complex made Buffalo and forged a link with another boom city . . . . the six boros of NYC.  I like the quote here that it was grain elevators and the nexus of the Great Lakes and the Erie Canal that led Buffalo to surpass London, Rotterdam, and Crimea as then the #1 grain handling port in the world.  I also recently learned about the influence the grain elevator form had on modern architecture a la Gropius. 

Check out this Gropius design.

A few years ago, I’d never consider exploring Buffalo, and I have so many other photos that I might revisit the city on tugster, but for now, I suggest you go there too and

stop at Buffalo Harbor Museum, Pierce Arrow Museum, and Swannie’s, for starters.  I started from Erie Basin and walked to all of these in the same day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The photo below is not Lake Ontario; it’s Oneida Lake in the early morning as we outrun a storm.  If my numbers are right, Oneida is about 80′ lower than Rome NY.  Hence, the descent into Lake Ontario, which is another 125′ lower than Oneida.

If you thought we were descending–as a diver–into Ontario . . . well, that would be rewarding, but English is just ambiguous sometimes.  Anyhow, Oneida is big, not great, and that’s alright by me.

E-23 has a very friendly lock master, as do almost all the locks.  They’re happy to chat, especially when an ocean liner like Grande Mariner squeezes through.

To digress and use a photo I took near the east end of the Canal three years ago of GM exiting a lock, behold the ocean liner.

At Three Rivers, we leave the Erie, and enter the Oswego Canal, formed by the confluence of the Oneida and the Onondaga, a canal with a slightly different history.   Before lock O-1, we pass the Syracuse (Canal) Maintenance Shops, located in Lysander, another one of those classical names.

In Phoenix adjacent to O-1, we see a dam with Tainter gates, named for a Wisconsin engineer named Tainter.

Below lock O-1 also there’s a drawbridge.

Just above O-2 in Fulton, Fourth Street and Nestle Avenue cross, but the other side of the Nestle plant looks

like this, after a century of production.  Another former product of Fulton–once called the city the Depression missed–was shotguns.

As evening falls we start the first of the descents in Oswego, O-6.

O-8 is the end, and marked by tug Syracuse.

In the morning, we head out early, but not as early as folks fishing, taking part in enterprise valued at over $110 million.

There’s the lighthouse in Sodus, where I learned to swim, in spite of my best efforts to resist it.

Rochester looms beyond the ridge, and we

choose to hold up some hours in the port.

As we tie up at the dock, a charter boat from the Canadian side–we do share the Lake–heads back out.

All photos and focus and any errors attributable to Will Van Dorp.  From here and the rest of the trip, we climb again.

 

 

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