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This follows the post where I got to spend four times as long on Long Island Sound, a truly remarkable place.  The trip last week brought sights and surprises enough to warrant a repeat trip soon.  Here, a bait boat (?) passes a renowned Plum Island facility.  Back to this later in the post.

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We’re headed to New London, the name of this RORO/WOWO.

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Here Marjorie McAllister tows RTC 60 past Little Gull Light.

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The only house on Hobbs Island in Groton needed to have a story, and I found one when I learned it was built by the Hays family, who wrote this book a friend gave me for my 45th birthday.

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Here Mary Ellen departs New London for Orient Point, passing New London Light.

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Amistad awaits, for sale at the dock.

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Sea Jet  . . . takes on passengers for Block Island, a place I need to visit soon.

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Since our destination was Blount for the wind farm vessel ribbon cutting, I wanted to get a photo of the newly launched replacement for Capt. Log.   Click here to see the plans and specs.

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Chandra B, coming to the sixth boro soon.

At the dock just south of the I-95 bridge, it’s 100′ scalloper Chief, also for sale.

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Electric Boat 2 does patrols around the pens,

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which enclose a submarine.  Now look closely at the tail vertical stabilizer.  Now look at the one in this “news” story about a submarine getting stuck in Shinnecock Canal.  If not the same sub, then it’s at least the same type.

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But if you start thinking about it, Dan’s is having way too much fun.  This story and this one are clearly boaxes, spoofs about boats.  When I heard the story about Shinecock, I thought maybe the Hamptons PD had gotten ahold of this one, which I spotted on the North fork just a few summer months ago.

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Heading back across to Orient Point, you can line up New London Ledge Light with Race Rock Light, in the distance.   Tours for Ledge are available in the summer, when the ghost is around.

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On a leg between Newport and Oyster Bay, it’s KnickerbockerWisconsin-built by a shipyard that started out doing fish tugs!  If you’re not familiar with fish tugs–of which Urger was one–go to Harvey Hadland‘s site.

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Now here, back near Plum Island, is a surprise.  I figured it was a fishing party boat, but Justin suggested otherwise, and indeed he was right.  M. S. Shahan II IS a government boat, owned by Department of Homeland Security!!

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And a final shot of Plum Island just before we return to the Orient Point dock, of course, it’s Cape Henlopen, former USS LST 510

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By the way, I am still looking for folks with connection to this vessel as LST-510.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

“Black gold”  . . . oil makes power.   You can’t see or smell wind, but it can be used for power . . . and that’s the title of this post.  Yesterday’s photos hinted at the work happening now in the water to eventually harvest that power, and today . . . this records parts of the ribbon-cutting for

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the first North American-built wind farm service vessel.

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Completion for this 70’6″ x 24′ x 4′  vessel is projected for April, although crews will be training on similar vessels in the UK starting this coming winter.

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Hull and superstructure are being worked on separately.

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To the left is Marcia Blount, CEO of Blount, and speaking here is Charles A. Donadio Jr., owner of Rhode Island Fast Ferry.

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Over 150 people attended the event.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here by Kirk Moore for Workboat.

 

I hope it ends soon.  Of course, ice is just a part of the sixth boro cycle.  See the ice photos here from 2009.  Enjoy these shots from the last day of February 2015.  But for the hot days sure to come later this year, how about this tall tale of Meagan Ann traveling through the icebergs of New York.  In her early years, Meagan Ann operated in Alaskan waters.

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APL Coral  . . .  Oakland, CA-registered, must be named for cold water species.

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The Bravest heads out on cold water patrol. See more about Bravest in this article by Peter Marsh.

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M/V Miss Ellis, built by Blount in 1991, has likely used ice before today to scrape growth from its hull.

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North River . . . has sludge to move around the harbor.

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Zim QingDao appeared previously–with a surprise on the bridge wing–here.

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And these ferries keep running despite the ice.

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Molinari sets up the ultimate sixth boro tall tale image, beautifully created by Scott Lobaido.

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I saw the image below on the ferry, and if you want it, you can order it here.  I’ve never met Scott, but I love this lithograph.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Wow!  It’s been quite a few years since I’ve used this title.  The sixth boro has diverse conveyances for folks who want to get out on the water . . . from NYMediaBoat .  . to   CircleLine . . . with many options in between, too many to list here, although if you have a favorite way of getting out onto the water, please add a comment to the blog.

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The red hulled vessel Louisiana-built vessel called The Manhattan (1970) now does tours in the sixth boro;  it used to work out of Cape May taking folks to see whales.

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But the Blount-built passenger vessel below certainly demonstrates the cosmopolitan nature of the sixth boro more clearly than most other vessels.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s still looking for your family photos that relate to the 1950s and 1960s Hudson River National Defense Reserve Fleet.

 

I know vessels are just machines, but I prefer to anthropomorphize them, and thus miss them when they go.  On this transition day, I want to acknowledge some vessels that I’d come to enjoy seeing but will now transition away .

Scotty Sky is a Blount design, launched as L. G. Laduca in 1960.   I took the photo in January 2011.  Click here for a photo of this vessel operating on Lake Erie.

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Patrick Sky is also a Blount design, launched as L. G. LaDuca II in 1966.  Click here for info on her other names and identities. Both were built for West Shore Fuel of Buffalo, NY, and named for the family of company president, Charles G. Laduca. Click here to see a 150′ version of these Blount boats.  Click here to see an interesting but totally unrelated and now scrapped vessel called West Shore . . . fueling a steamer with coal.

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Capt. Log is the smallest and newest of the now timed-out single-hulled tankers in the sixth boro.  Click here for the recent Professional Mariner article on this vessel.

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The three above vessels are still fully functional tonight, phased out notwithstanding.  Crow, seen here in a photo from September 2011, was scrapped this year in the same location where

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Kristin Poling, another single-hulled tanker seen here in a photo I took in March 2010, was scrapped two years ago.  Click here for a number of the posts I did on Kristin.

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Out with the old . . . in with the new, mostly because we have no choice, as time sprints on.

All photos here by Will Van dorp.

Click here for my previous Twin Tube posts,  Note to self . . . I’d like to see the wheelhouse of this work horse if it ever stops working.  Today when I saw the boat, it looked different.  Can you see it?

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No . . . it has not been renamed Butterfly, as appears between the “legs” of the A-frame.

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The boom is missing.  Temporary?

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The builder and designer behind this long-lived vessel and many others –I’m told–is also responsible for the alphanumerics on this disused rail bridge in Wayne County, NY.  Mr Blount painted the date of each year (’50, 55, 91, 97, 03, and 04)  he transited underneath this bridge, the lowest currently between Waterford to Lake Erie.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s my last canal ruins post, this one focusing on vestiges of the corridor as a dynamic industrial hub.  Day Peckinpaugh, delivered as cargo ship Interwaterways 101 in May 1921 is certainly not in ruins, as her younger sister–by two months–

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Interwaterways 105 has been since 1976, here disintegrating in the Arthur Kill.

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Below the photo shows the dock in Rome where Day Peckinpaugh used to offload cement.

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The Mohawk banks in Amsterdam . . . once a major location for carpet and rug making . . . now hold silent factories.

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Not having been up the bank here, I can’t say whether Fownes still makes gloves here.

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On the south side of the Oneida River, docks exist where no supply barges have called in many years.  Anyone help with info on when supplies last arrived in Clay via barge?

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. . . or here not far north of Onandaga Lake?

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I don’t know the number of bridges for pedestrians, trains, or automobiles that cross the canal, but this one clearly remains as scrap and carries no traffic of any sort.

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Which brings us back to the Duluth-built younger sister of Day Peckinpaugh, also depicted near the beginning of this post.  I’d always wondered about Duluth, thinking it an unlikely location for construction of vessels that came to work on the canal.  But maybe it isn’t.  President Wilson created the US Railroad Administration (USRA) in December 1917, federalizing the railroads of the US as well as the Erie Canal.  Wilson placed the USRA in the hands of his son-in-law W. G. McAdoo, who soon thereafter nationalized strategic inland waterways including the Erie Canal and placed them in the hands of a Duluth shipping executive G. A. Tomlinson.

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To reiterate what I said at the beginning, Day Peckinpaugh is not among the ruins along the canal although its future role is under study.  Meanwhile, neither is ship tourism along the canal dead, as evidenced by Grande Caribe approaching from Peckinpaugh‘s stern.  Click here for more pics of Grande Caribe.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Remind me some day to tell the story of Schuyler Meyer, who is credited with starting Urger’s educational program back before 1990.  As of today, the season is over.  Over 4500 NYS fourth graders have experienced the “Urger program” this season.  That number and more have visited the 113-year-old vessel in festivals and other contexts  along the  Canal, now recognized as a very large location on the National Register of Historical Places.

Thanks to Chris Kenyon of Wayne County Tourism for the first and last photo here.  All other photos were taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Whether you carry passengers like Grande Caribe or bulk like Day Peckinpaugh, restrictions of size are the same.

Photos today by Will Van Dorp.

Bergen Point, a 1958 Blount product,  coming through the Narrows last weekend.  Click here for many interesting vessels from Blount that have appeared on this blog.

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And a first timer on this blog . . . John Parrish.

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Penn No. 4 all painted white . . . click here and scroll through to see her in PennMaritime gray.

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Bluefin . .  still in PennMaritime gray . . . or is that primer?

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Maryland . . . with reflections.

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If my search window serves me right, then this is the first appearance of Katie G. McAllister on this blog.

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This is definitely the first appearance of Pelican State here.  The photo of this Great Lakes Dredge & Dock boat is here thanks to Mike and Michele Mcmorrow.

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And thanks to Mage, here’s Esti and

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Cerro Jefe.

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A previous view here  of Emily Ann had her as Solomon Sea.

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Brian Nicholas at work in Great Kills.  Click here (scroll through) to see her as both Banda Sea and Brian Nicholas.

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And finally . . . it’s the mystery tug Elbe when it was Maryland Pilot boat Maryland.  At its stern is its predecessor, Baltimore.  I haven’t found out much about Baltimore.  Any help?  About Maryland, Capt. Brian Hope–who shared this photo, said this, “In 1985 and MARYLAND was donated to Greenpeace.  She was a great boat, but too expensive to operate. She had a crew of 18, plus a chief steward.  The crew worked two weeks on and two weeks off, so that, counting the steward, we had a total of 37 crew.   When we went ashore that was reduced to about 21 and our fuel, repair and food costs dropped dramatically as well.   I am very glad to see that she has been preserved (in Maassluis).  She’s a great boat!”  Thanks to a generous reader, here’s an article about her sea trials.

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When next I post, I hope to share photos Elbe in her restored glory.

Sorry to miss NYC’s fleet week again.

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