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This is Oswego to Port Colborne, by way of Rochester . . . actually Charlotte on the Genesee.   The whale-watch headed Grande Caribe.  No . . . the Great Lakes have no whales. At the port is Robert S. Pierson, a river-class bulker.

I repeat a variation of this image.  The Erie canal flows under the arched bridge and the Genesee . . . under the longer, flatter bridge.

We take a pilot right outside Port Weller, the Ontario end of the Welland Canal, and then

enter upbound.

 

Nassau-flagged Victory II met us between locks 7 and 8.

From right to left here, that’s Pierson  again, a sailing vessel, and Capt. Henry Jackman.

Now more on that sailing vessel . . . schooner Empire Sandy.  You have to read this link:  she started her life as a tugboat!

HMCS Oriole is a 1921 ketch, whose origins hearken back to both Toronto and Neponset, MA.

 

Capt. Henry Jackman waits in Port Colborne as does

Baie St Paul. Jackman was built in the Collingwood Shipyards, whereas St Paul comes from Jiangsu China.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This will be Rome to Oswego, a downstream run. With a drone, I would have gotten the other boat and our own.

 

Fishing might be good at Three Rivers.

Tug Syracuse waits at the section yard.

 

The Oswego River appears tor teem with fish, sought by man and raptor.

As it’s Saturday, Canal equipment waits at Minetto and

Oswego.

Only lock O-9 divides the river here with the Great Lakes.

All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

After a seiche sped us from Buffalo to Cleveland through the night, morning found us under the Cleveland Memorial Shoreline Bridge, down where the Cuyahoga flows.  Cuyahoga, to most non-Clevelanders of my generation, connotes a many times burning river of the past.

Here’s a reference to that time on a sign inside the Greater Cleveland Aquarium.  I never visited Cleveland in the 1960s or ’70s, and without these opportunities to visit now, I’d have imagined it a possible setting for a Philip K. Dickesque dystopia.  As a caveat, let me say upfront that  I’ve not lived in Cleveland, so this post is based on impressions gleaned from reading and quick visits like this one.  But

this has to be the most unexpected postscript to any predictions made in 1972.

Believe it or not, this working Iowa is 102 years young.

All these photos–except the one directly above which I took on July 4, 2016–were taken in a few-hour period of time in late July 2017.

Restoration indeed, and with the collaboration of Cuyahoga River Restoration, cuyahoga arts & culture, and  ArcelorMittal.

Yet commerce goes on. It does not have to be “either-or-or.” A 634′ Buffalo weaves through what must be a captain’s nightmare to get to the steel plant under the corkscrew path of the Cuyahoga.

 

Simultaneously, a 630′ Manitowoc exits the Old River after having taken on a full load of road salt for Milwaukee from the Cargill Salt mines extending far under Lake Erie.

For both watch standers, this has to be an ordeal of concentration.

 

 

And a waterway already juggling commercial vessels and recreationalists, trains are another factor;  all small vessels lined up as one train after another cross this bridge move expeditiously once the lift rises.

 

My early 1970s self would never have imagined 2017 Cuyahoga’s mouth, although

accidents sometimes happen.

Still, I believe the effort is worth it.

All photos and sentiments by a gallivanting Will Van Dorp.

 

Daylight on leg 10 saw us near the Ontario, Ohio, and Michigan border, where we met GL Ostrander pushing Integrity.

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We pass the abandoned amusement park at Bois Blanc,

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Canadian Coast Guard’s Caribou Isle,

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and ferry Ste. Claire moving cars between the Amherstburg, ON and Bob-lo “island marina community.”

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Here’s the channel looking south.

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Furuholmen heads north to Sarnia,

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and our vessel’s twin, Grande Caribe, meets up in Wyandotte.

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Meanwhile traffic continues down bound–like Sam Laud and John D. Leitch.

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This post closes out with a regular down in the sixth boro . . . Calusa Coast pushing Delaware.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here was the previous post.

It was all highlights while taking two ferries to get from Long Island to my destination, but here are some photos.  I left Orient Point along with small fishing boats like Fishy Business, 1995 built.

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North Star, built in 1968 as an offshore supply vessel, was purchased by Cross Sound Ferry in 1984 and converted to an auto/passenger ferry.

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As North Star arrived, the 2007 Plum Island left Orient for its namesake island.

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Hudson River-bound Grande Caribe (1997) cut across the Sound with its unique profile.

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Eventually the destination appears . . . the cliffs off the north side of Block Island.

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The unmistakeable Viking (1976) passes as we round the island toward New Shoreham.

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Interstate Navigation’s Block Island (1997) welcomes us into the old port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s my last canal ruins post, this one focusing on vestiges of the corridor as a dynamic industrial hub.  Day Peckinpaugh, delivered as cargo ship Interwaterways 101 in May 1921 is certainly not in ruins, as her younger sister–by two months–

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Interwaterways 105 has been since 1976, here disintegrating in the Arthur Kill.

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Below the photo shows the dock in Rome where Day Peckinpaugh used to offload cement.

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The Mohawk banks in Amsterdam . . . once a major location for carpet and rug making . . . now hold silent factories.

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Not having been up the bank here, I can’t say whether Fownes still makes gloves here.

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On the south side of the Oneida River, docks exist where no supply barges have called in many years.  Anyone help with info on when supplies last arrived in Clay via barge?

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. . . or here not far north of Onandaga Lake?

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I don’t know the number of bridges for pedestrians, trains, or automobiles that cross the canal, but this one clearly remains as scrap and carries no traffic of any sort.

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Which brings us back to the Duluth-built younger sister of Day Peckinpaugh, also depicted near the beginning of this post.  I’d always wondered about Duluth, thinking it an unlikely location for construction of vessels that came to work on the canal.  But maybe it isn’t.  President Wilson created the US Railroad Administration (USRA) in December 1917, federalizing the railroads of the US as well as the Erie Canal.  Wilson placed the USRA in the hands of his son-in-law W. G. McAdoo, who soon thereafter nationalized strategic inland waterways including the Erie Canal and placed them in the hands of a Duluth shipping executive G. A. Tomlinson.

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To reiterate what I said at the beginning, Day Peckinpaugh is not among the ruins along the canal although its future role is under study.  Meanwhile, neither is ship tourism along the canal dead, as evidenced by Grande Caribe approaching from Peckinpaugh‘s stern.  Click here for more pics of Grande Caribe.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Whether you carry passengers like Grande Caribe or bulk like Day Peckinpaugh, restrictions of size are the same.

Photos today by Will Van Dorp.

As I scrambled away from the train, Meredith C. Reinauer ruffled the glassy calm of the river at the Rondout  Light.  Here long ago the Delaware and Hudson Canal completed its 108-mile journey from coal country to what was then the fast river transport to sixth boro coal market.

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And here waiting for me was my flesh-and-blood sister and brother-in-law and their Maraki, which they sailed around the world in the 1990s.  See their newly-inaugurated blog here.

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This was an opportunity, to rediscover the Hudson Valley with them, after all we never see or step into the same Hudson twice.  I’ve seen Esopus Meadows light many times before, but

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have never passed the volunteer boat.

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When last I saw this “castle,” it was a Redemptorist retreat center, but now it’s something different.

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It was gratifying to see the pilotboat John E. Flynn on station at Norrie Point.

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The last time I recall seeing this house in Hyde Park I’d not sensed it would rival the other mansions there, like the Vanderbilt and the FDR (currently closed because of the shutdown! !@!@##) homes.

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Maraki and Grande Caribe had last crossed paths on the Erie Canal.   More large sightseeing vessels on the Hudson soon.

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Maraki had sailed under this first bridge when it was still a disused rail structure.

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!@#@!  ?  pirate canoe club?

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OK . .  I had to put up another foto of Patricia.

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The Hudson Valley is a spectacular place.  More soon.  A version of it . . . in print . . . check out T. C. Boyle’s World’s End.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a collage of images as my last roundup 2013 post:

a half dozen working tugboats and a covered barge as seen looking east from the Second Street Bridge,

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a swimmer in the water either doing a northern style Richard Halliburton re-enactment or setting out to do an underwater survey mission as the lock is –unbeknownst to her–about to open,

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(For more complete info on what’s going on here with the swimmer, check this post by bubbling-blowing bowsprite.)

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my possible future employer shoehorning an Eriemax passenger vessel into the first lock in the flight,

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waterdogs go fishing,

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Onrust resplendant,

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a Dutch barge,

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Urger dried out for some emergency surgery along

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with Tappan Zee II,

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Eighth Sea and Bill’s exercise machine,

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Stu’s Dragonfly,

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the pilot’s understanding of the pushoff contest,

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and in Troy, some public art designed to assist memory . . .  the Soldier’s and Sailor’s Monument with goddess Columbia blowing her horn high above Troy, as seen from Tug44.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  See you in Waterford in 2014, I hope.

Late October 2011, Day Peckinpaugh and Frances Turecamo float above Lock 3, post-Irene, seen here through the eyes of the master of Tug44.

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Here’s Day Peckinpaugh last weekend, nose to nose with Urger, the latter here for shaft work.

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It’s unknown when if ever the DP will operate again.  Here and here are previous posts with the Eriemax bulk carrier.

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Blount’s two decade old Grande Caribe applies the same design to contemporary passenger cruising.  Notice the popped-down house;  in this post from three years ago, the house is up. I’d love to hear from someone who’s sailed on one of these “small ship adventures.”  Shipboard romance?  What are the stopping off places for adventuring off the mother ship?

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And compare the tug Frances Turecamo (1957) in the top foto to her incarnation now.  It’s great to see her back at work.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Thanks to Jonathan Boulware , interim president of South Street Seaport  Museum, for passing along  this article and video of salvage of Astrid.

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