You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Grande Caribe’ tag.

As a reminder, CB here expands to Chicago-bound, our journey.

Dean Marine and Excavating are continuing work on the breakwaters in Oswego.

Madison R stands by as the barge is loaded with boulders brought in by train.

The ubiquitous Rebecca Ann waits along the wall in preparation to head for the Welland Canal.

 

 

 

As we follow Rebecca Ann, we pass Madison high and dry and waiting for deployment.

H. Lee White’s Eleanor D stands as a reminder of the commercial fishing that once happened here.

Over in Rochester, a party boat fishing vessel enters the Genesee River.

The fast ferry fiasco that ran two seasons or so 15 years ago has resulted in this Australia-built Lake Ontario boat now the object of derision in  . . . . ready for it . . .  Venezuela!!

During the first half of the 20th century, Rochester was a coal-export port using these two boats.

Today tug Seaway Patricia operates here to provide bulkhead reinforcement for the high-water-level-afflicted shorelines.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, and taken in Oswego and Rochester.

 

This post, beginning in the hamlet of Jacksonburg NY,  overlaps a portion of the canal represented in yesterday’s post.  Notice our vessel to the left below;  the cattails beside the road to the road are growing in the original canal bed from 1825.

Our tender ferries folks back from shore excursions.

I believe this is tug Lockport in Herkimer.

Gradall #2 and tug Governor Roosevelt conduct dredging at Illion marina.

 

Tug Seneca undergoes shore work at Lysander.

Juice is generated in Fulton.

 

And as we approach Oswego, a sentinel watches our progress.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who needed to reduce file size to enable this post to load.

 

This post picks up at Illion marina, where Gradall #2 and

a scow and Governor Roosevelt  

worked.

 

A scow and a self-propelled scow waited on the dock while tug Seneca

received attentions.

A fishing kayaker demonstrated multi-multi-tasking skills.

Rebecca Ann waited at the dock.  Madison R assisted with breakwater work.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, between Illion and Oswego.

 

Now in the Erie Canal, Tender #3 was above E3,

BB 109 encountered an unidentified SPS,

Dragon dredge worked over in Crescent Lake,

an unidentified tender worked with two barges, one was QB #14,

Tuulen Tupa intrigued and I’ll tell you my understanding of that name at the end of this post,

At Fonda on the wall stood an SPS and

tug Lockport.

Will Van Dorp took these photos, and this is the end of this post.

And Tuulen Tupa is an excellent name for a sail boat, since in Finnish–at least–it means “wind hut.”

And this was Waterford to Fonda, NY.

CB is obviously “Chicago bound.”

Neither Thomas D. Witte nor Clearwater here off Mount Beacon is that, but we were.

Meagan Ann headed south with

used and abused cars on

SMM 157 for the start of their last trip.

James William pushed several loads of building materials southbound.

Rebecca Ann turned around for her next trip.

Lisa Ann worked on the bulk heading project in Troy.

Frances moved a scow south, and

Ancient Mariner too moved on.

All photos by will Van Dorp, and this was Newburgh to Troy.

 

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

Several minutes ago astronomical summer began in the sixth boro, and that means tomorrow the mermaids arrive, which means I may or may not post . . . . on time.

Locations here will remain unnamed, unless you try to guess, but photo 1 here to number 4 represents an approximated 15 miles of central New York, where

time warps can be fallen into.

 

Geographical discontinuities  . .

exist as well.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who will identify the locations and then do the mileage calculations afterward if needed.

This is Oswego to Port Colborne, by way of Rochester . . . actually Charlotte on the Genesee.   The whale-watch headed Grande Caribe.  No . . . the Great Lakes have no whales. At the port is Robert S. Pierson, a river-class bulker.

I repeat a variation of this image.  The Erie canal flows under the arched bridge and the Genesee . . . under the longer, flatter bridge.

We take a pilot right outside Port Weller, the Ontario end of the Welland Canal, and then

enter upbound.

 

Nassau-flagged Victory II met us between locks 7 and 8.

From right to left here, that’s Pierson  again, a sailing vessel, and Capt. Henry Jackman.

Now more on that sailing vessel . . . schooner Empire Sandy.  You have to read this link:  she started her life as a tugboat!

HMCS Oriole is a 1921 ketch, whose origins hearken back to both Toronto and Neponset, MA.

 

Capt. Henry Jackman waits in Port Colborne as does

Baie St Paul. Jackman was built in the Collingwood Shipyards, whereas St Paul comes from Jiangsu China.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This will be Rome to Oswego, a downstream run. With a drone, I would have gotten the other boat and our own.

 

Fishing might be good at Three Rivers.

Tug Syracuse waits at the section yard.

 

The Oswego River appears tor teem with fish, sought by man and raptor.

As it’s Saturday, Canal equipment waits at Minetto and

Oswego.

Only lock O-9 divides the river here with the Great Lakes.

All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

After a seiche sped us from Buffalo to Cleveland through the night, morning found us under the Cleveland Memorial Shoreline Bridge, down where the Cuyahoga flows.  Cuyahoga, to most non-Clevelanders of my generation, connotes a many times burning river of the past.

Here’s a reference to that time on a sign inside the Greater Cleveland Aquarium.  I never visited Cleveland in the 1960s or ’70s, and without these opportunities to visit now, I’d have imagined it a possible setting for a Philip K. Dickesque dystopia.  As a caveat, let me say upfront that  I’ve not lived in Cleveland, so this post is based on impressions gleaned from reading and quick visits like this one.  But

this has to be the most unexpected postscript to any predictions made in 1972.

Believe it or not, this working Iowa is 102 years young.

All these photos–except the one directly above which I took on July 4, 2016–were taken in a few-hour period of time in late July 2017.

Restoration indeed, and with the collaboration of Cuyahoga River Restoration, cuyahoga arts & culture, and  ArcelorMittal.

Yet commerce goes on. It does not have to be “either-or-or.” A 634′ Buffalo weaves through what must be a captain’s nightmare to get to the steel plant under the corkscrew path of the Cuyahoga.

 

Simultaneously, a 630′ Manitowoc exits the Old River after having taken on a full load of road salt for Milwaukee from the Cargill Salt mines extending far under Lake Erie.

For both watch standers, this has to be an ordeal of concentration.

 

 

And a waterway already juggling commercial vessels and recreationalists, trains are another factor;  all small vessels lined up as one train after another cross this bridge move expeditiously once the lift rises.

 

My early 1970s self would never have imagined 2017 Cuyahoga’s mouth, although

accidents sometimes happen.

Still, I believe the effort is worth it.

All photos and sentiments by a gallivanting Will Van Dorp.

 

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