You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mister T’ tag.

If you’ve never hung out at any of the public places on the KVK and you’re interested in tugboats or shipping in general, you are missing something.

The Upper Bay is a busy place also.

M

Faber Park is a great place when it’s open.

You get views of the Bayonne Bridge and the east side of city of Elizabeth from Faber Park.

Shooters Island, once a major shipbuilding site, shows up like a jungle now.   Pres. Theo Roosevelt went there to shake hands with a foreign monarch who had a yacht built on Shooters.

 

Beyond Shooters, major port facilities can be seen.

For the past 22 years, Schuykill has been a Vane Brothers boat.  When I saw the name on AIS, I assumed it was a new Vane boat.

 

 

Welcome to the sixth boro.

All photos in the past week, WVD.

Here are some previous Sound posts. Recognize those buildings about 30 miles from my location?

How about this tug with a string of scows?

 

Yacht traffic in this location between Huntington and Stamford seemed to be in a hurry.

If you didn’t recognize this tug earlier you can’t miss the name now . . .   Mister T is a Blount built boat from 2001.

 

 

How about this one?  There aren’t many tugs in the area that look like this when the wheelhouse is hydraulically raised.

Here’s the skyline a few hours after the first photo, showing only midtown and up.

All photos from the Sound by WVD.  That tug with raised wheelhouse was Justine McAllister, a 1982 product of Jakobson on Oyster Bay, one bay to the west from my vantage point on Sound Wave out of Huntington Bay.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

I’m still not over how large these vessels are.  Note the two Moran tugs off the stern of ONE Minato.

As for numbers, she’s 1200′ x 167′.  They’re all approximately this length, which is roughly what the Empire State Building is without its spire.  She has capacity of 13,900 teu.  She was built near Hiroshima in 2018.  Currently she’s off Algeria and heading for the sixth boro, eta August 21.

CS Jasmine is the same length as ONE Minato, but at 157′ is 10 feet less broad.

Her capacity is 13,500 teu.  She was built in Shanghai in 2018.  Currently she’s eastbound in the Pacific, expected to arrive at the Panama Canal on August 22.

CS Rose is basically identical to CS Jasmine.  She’s expected to arrive in her sixth boro berth on August 19, ie, next week.

 

Hyundai Pride has the same dimensions as CS Jasmine and Rose.

Pride is currently in Busan, not far from where she was built in 2014.   Her capacity is 13,500 teu.

There are more to come, but for now we end with YM Witness.  By the numbers, she’s 1207′ x 167′, carrying capacity of 13,800 teu.  She was built in 2015 in Ulsan, not far north of Busan on South Korea’s SE coast.

She’s currently heading for Vietnam from China, passing Hong Kong.

These are not the largest container ships currently afloat.  HMM Dublin, appearing quite similar to Hyundai Pride,  is 1312′ x 200′ and has a carrying capacity of 23000 teu and is currently underway between Rotterdam and Singapore around Cape of Good Hope, a 24-day voyage.

All photos and reported numbers, WVD.

Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

in the sixth boro and visible from my location . . . and that I saw.  Those are all the qualifications I need to make to that title.  That’s yesterday’s dawn in the background at 0817, light has just begun to allow clear photos, and I’m on Staten Island looking toward Brooklyn.  Name that tug?

Here’s another shot.

Three tugs appear in this shot.  Name the closest one?

 

It’s obvious now.  Getting these shots was part of my goal yesterday morning, the first light of winter 2019, and this part was done by 0835.  Days can get longer now.

More tomorrow.  Notice that in salt water-surrounded industrial landscape, there’s little sign of snow or ice.

And the tugs were Pegasus above and Mister T farther above.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who visited the local post office this morning and mailed off HALF of the calendar run.  Get your order in and you’ll likely still have your calendar before 2020.

 

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

It’s been a few months since number 265, so let’s catch up.

Kimberly Poling had brought product upriver via Noelle Cutler, and you can tell some time has passed since I took this photo by the foliage.

Edna A was assisting a crane barge working on the power lines near Hudson NY.

Challenger came in through the Narrows yesterday, delivering a crane barge.  A few years back she delivered what was initially a mystery cargo here.

Eli stood by as salt was transshipped from scow to large truck.

Mister T was westbound for the Upper Bay with four scow to be filled.

Pokomoke brought petroleum upriver.

Memory Motel, the original exotic,  . . . I wondered where she had gone until I saw her high and dry up by Scarano.

Betty D and Mary Kay . . .  they were docked just south of Albany.

Mary Turecamo brought container barge New York from Red Hook to Port Elizabeth . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more saved up from the summer and early fall.

Resolute rotates into the sixth boro now and again;  her truly best and bushiest fendering make her a welcome sight whenever.  I believe this is the last time I saw her here almost two years ago.

Janet D first appeared on this blog here, three years ago.  And here’s something I never realized (or if I did, I’ve forgotten) . . .  she comes out of the same yard the same approximate time as James E. Brown, a slight larger hull but with less horsepower.

Labrador Sea Brooklyn  is a Warren, RI-built tug that I’ve seen wearing four different liveries and initially had no upper wheelhouse. 

Mister T was built at the same yard at roughly the same time as Brooklyn above. Mister T is older by a year and less broad by a foot.  Both 2400hp, a difference is that Brooklyn has pins.

Quenames has worked here for over a decade…

and was more recently joined by Pinuccia.

Unlike Brooklyn above, Elizabeth appears to have carried Weeks ownership and livery for about 35 years now!!  Here’s what her bow looks like out of the water.

All photos and other observations by Will Van Dorp, who has to leave the never-ending story here today and attend to other duties on tugster tower.

 

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

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