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With a tip of the hat  to Hildegarde Swift and Lynd Ward, the title that came to mind as I shot these, and you’ll see why by the end.  See the road signs up there intended for drivers on the Triboro Bridge?

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Rewarding my wait, it’s Jaguar towing Highlander Sea into the Gate,

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past the Ward’s Island Footbridge, and

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past Archibald Gracie’s cottage on the point. Click here for peers of the 1978 Jaguar.

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Westbound the tow came at almost slack water and past

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RTC 104 and

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the Twins bound for Riverhead.

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More on the brick building there with romanesque windows and green roof at the end of this post.

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And here, when they were under the Queensboro Bridge,  the title occurred to me . . . having the same syllabication and cadence as the Swift and Ward title.

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Now we need a story, one that starts as hundreds could in tiny but huge Essex.  Click here for my previous posts on Essex.

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Maybe one about a fishing schooner design turned pilot boat turned yacht turned school turned . . .

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fish market and restaurant/bar in the sixth boro.  I hope they sell monkfish.  These photos are compliments of my brother taken in Zwolle at a

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pop-up market.

Thanks bro . . .

All other photos here by Will Van Dorp.

So, thanks to identification by Jonathan Steinman, the brick building there is ConEd’s cogeneration plant at East  74th St.  And this is a digression, but 74th Street has long been quite the interesting place.

Now this is minimal.  If I had a use for it or lived where I could at least use it every day, I’d want to get it.

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And all you illustrators out there looking for a winsome character . . . listen to me:   if I were an illustrator, here would be my next subject.  It’s modest in size, offers negligible protection from the weather,  and sports those huge old fashioned port lights . . .  as delightful as the eyes of

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an owl or baby parrot or puppy that’ll grow huge.

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To get into the realm of fact, she’s a 1957 Gladding Hearn product and has a 1956 sibling named Brian, which is supposedly still around and I’d love to see also. She’s older relative of lots of pilot boats and small tugboats.    And emergency boats and passenger vessels.

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Anyone have any photos of Heidi and siblings back when she was a Perini?  And is this the same Perini Corporation now?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated and on a sadder note, click here for Rick Spilman’s “old salt blog’s” tribute to Peter Stanford, who passed yesterday at age 89.  Two years ago, I was pleased to review Mr. Stanford’s book, A Dream of Tall Ships, here.

. . . or I could call it “blue friday plus 700-something days.”  Here was “plus 21 days.”  Anyhow, on this day associated with shopping, Hayward and others were out for harbor maintenance,

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Chesapeake Coast and others were out pushing fuel,

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Seastreak New Jersey and others were moving passengers . . . (maybe here),  and

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crews on ship and shore were moving bulk materials like salt here from Key Hunter.

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And if you wonder what it looks like at the base of that tower, whose antenna arrived in the harbor 723 days ago, here’s a photo from Fulton Street I took two weeks ago when the news trucks and lots of others were hoping that two workers would soon be rescued.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For a sense of how the Lower Manhattan skyline looked from New Brighton area of Staten Island about four years ago, click here.

Today’s post relates directly to the very first one in this series.  NYPD’s newest vessel is a Gladding-Hearn gem.  Any guesses on her speed?

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As I watched this morning, she was doing a consistent 40.1 knots . . . heading here in the direction of Jamaica Bay!  For the specifics on her 3200 hp propulsion system, click here.   In the distance, that’s Twin Tube delivering supplies to Voge Paul, a Philippines-built bulker bound for Albany.

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I’m not willing to enumerate all the Gladding-Hearn boats that have appeared on this blog over the years, but many tugs, pilot boats, fast ferries, and government boats are among the +400 vessels turned out by the shipyard in over a half century, but if you wish, scroll through here and see which ones you recognize.    Recently, six of their pilot boats were delivered to the Colombian Navy.

The new NYPD vessel is called 628 Dillon Stewart.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As Harvey (1931) made its way northward from a dry dock visit, Slater (1944) was a hundred miles upriver, making its way south.  The next two photos come from Birk Thomas, taken north of Newburgh NY as sun was lowering onto the hills  in the west.

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Benjamin Elliot (1960) is the assist tug.   Margot (1958) has Slater alongside . .  the other side.

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John Dunn caught this photo of the tow south of Newburgh, after sunset.

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Since Margot cannot be seen in the photos above, here’s her profile as I shot it back in September 2013.

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Many thanks to Birk and John for the photos.

 

Margaret Moran delivered December 1979.  99′ loa.

Miriam Moran, delivered November 1979.  99′ loa.

Amberjack, 1981, 106′ loa


Comet, build in the same shipyard as

Amberjack but 1977.  108′ loa.  I’ve rarely seen her out of the notch.

Jean Turecamo, Matton (New York state) built in 1975 and 107′ loa,   about to be eclipsed by Cosco Boston.

Thomas J. Brown, Gladding-Hearn 1962, 60′ loa

Maurania III, 2004, 101′ loa.  Built in New England as well.   Petrozavodsk, Japan built 2003. 790′ loa.  Hess, called such only since 2006?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

In case you think life has slowed me down in Key West, you’re somewhat right, but it’s been only 97 here, cooler than some places in the US and as cool as it is for my brothers in the snow belt of upstate New York.

A guide here kept referring to this vessel as a “chug” although I thought he said “tug.”  Guess the story?  See end of post.

Chickens roam everywhere and constant need to cross roads here in the Conch Republic, a micronation with its own passport, coin, and more.  For a list of numerous other “micronations,” created as vehicles for agenda self-promotion, click here.    As the so-called mayor of the “sixth boro,”  I find the idea of declaring micronation status for the waters around NYC very exciting.  Feedback?

Foto of Nav/Air 38 for Rod of Narragansett Bay Shipping . . .   here in her usual setting.

Greetings to the crew of Yankee, built 1982 in Atlantic City.  More Key West schooners . . . soon.

Fotos I missed:   sailing on this dreamlike expanse of Gulf of Mexico, we saw scores of flying fish and ballyhoo . . . but nary a one consented to being on a tugster shot.  Imagine that!

Behold Fort Jefferson, 70 miles west of Key West, 900 … east of Brownsville TX, 200 south of Tampa, and less than 100 north of Havana.

Here’s one way to  get there at just under 30 mph.  The Yankee name caught my attention… not because I live in NYC but because I used to live north of Cape Ann, MA, where a whale watching vessel refers to itself as part of the “Yankee fleet.”  Well, same company has operated in both Key West and Gloucester.  Furthermore, this vessel was built by Gladding Hearn of Somerset, MA, and the captain grew up in Hampton Beach, NH . . . where I lived back in the late 80s!!  Gladding Hearn has built numerous ferries, pilot boats, and other vessels for the sixth boro.

Foto for Bonnie of frogma:  you never told me Sebago had boats here!!

And for the unfrazzling bowsprite . . . herself galivanting where time gets forgotten, a foto of  WPG-78 aka USS Mohawk, resplendent in gray and gray and gray, whose story reaffirms the point I tried to make the other day in reference to vessels in Mayport.

So . . . if you are artistically inclined . . . should an eventual “sixth boro” micronation have its own flag?

OK . . . back to the “chug.”   The National Park rangers have decided to house this vessel, which was instrumental in getting Cuban refugees “dry-footed” onto US soil, at Fort Jefferson.  “Chug” derives from the noise the automobile engine makes while the vessel is underway.  chug-chug-chug . . .  Too bad they didn’t keep this 1951 Chevy truckboat.  Maybe Mel Fisher‘s crew will seek it out one of these days.

How’s about this for a once- and future-newspaper ad?  How many years before this service gets re-established?  Here’s a business idea:  trips across the Florida Strait on replicas of Hemingway’s Pilar . . . on converted 1951 Chvy trucks and vintage Buicks?  I bet it’ll happen.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More from the Conch Republic soon.

Oh, also, I hereby claim rights to any and all sixth-boro micronationalistic paraphernalia.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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