An unlikely duo, and now separated . . .

Feng Huang Ao had no intention of being here . . . .

but it experienced an engine room fire over a month ago and was towed here for repairs.  Don’t those look like scorch marks?

LSD-51 aka Oak Hill has since left for missions unadvertised.

Ypapanti is a fairly new crude tanker . . .  .

Read this in case you wondered about the name . . .   “presentation of Christ.”  This angle here reminds me of the sentry boxes in San Juan.

Here’s a satellite grab of vessels waiting to be scrapped in Aliaga, Turkey.  See the three self-unloaders?

Ocean Delta is soon to arrive in Aliaga with a soon-to-be scrapped laker . . .

in tow, Manitoba, launched in 1966 in Collingwood ON, seen here a year ago at the Molson plant in Montreal. We in the US associate Molson with beer, but John Molson was the Robert Fulton of Canada.

I wonder if Ocean Delta herself will return . . . from Turkey, given that she flies the Jamaican flag.

At this same moment, Stephen B. Roman is heading under her own power to the breaking yards,

in Spain.  Later today she’ll be passing Gaspe.  What must this last ride be like?

A year ago I got this photo of the 1965-launch entering Oswego NY to discharge cement.

I always loved that logo!!  Here are previous Roman posts.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Wendy Marble took these photos today when her crew was preparing to cast off lines on the Erie Canal.

This is looking forward from wheelhouse of tug Syracuse towing DB6 west from Mays Point, NY.

Then another friend jogged my memory about the date, Nov 16.  The rest of these photos I took on Nov 16, 2015.  It was shirtsleeve weather, tug Syracuse was busy, and so was  . . . .

craneship Wards Island.  Yes, the one that’s currently almost 100′ down north of Long Island;  you can see it here (scroll) and no, it’s not a 115′ barge.

The above shot I got on Nov 17, 2015, but all the rest here are from Nov 16.

Syracuse speeds the crane out into Oneida Lake,

and the crane goes fishing, or buoying, replacing summer buoys with winter spars.

At the end of the day, temperatures dropped along with the sun, and the buoys were craned over to a work barge, where the buoys would be refurbished over the winter.

Syracuse is quite the unique tug.

Thanks to Wendy and Dave for jogging my memory.  Thanks to Wendy for sharing the photos from Mays Point.

 

Although the sixth boro may see its first snowfall today, it’s not winter for over a month yet.  Winter fishing, though, has seen lots of posts on this blog.  But here’s a focus on something new for me.  See the fishing machine in the photo below?

Here’s a closer up, a set of photos I took a month ago.  I’ll call it a hands-free kayak.

Nearby and maybe chasing the same school of fish was another.

And they’re geared out:  high-visibility flag, beach trolley wheels, outrigger, spare paddle, rod holders, landing net . . . and likely electronics. .  .

Has anyone reading this tried out a “hands-free” kayak?

Just the other day I saw so many hands-free fishing kayaks that at first I thought it was a tour, but these fisherfolk seem just follow following the fish, as the folks in the motorboats are.

 

I didn’t see anyone land a fish, but I wonder how much pull a large fish could apply to the kayak.

Below a a view out to sea, with a southbound Tammo and core sampling Seacor Supporter.

I have an ulterior motive in posting this: I’m considering a long kayak trip and wonder if for long trips a pedal kayak would be more efficient than a conventional one.  Can you really pedal for an hour and then switch and paddle, moving for longer periods  of time by alternating the part of the body at work?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who bought his first kayak back in 1987.

Hundreds of tires are moving here, but not one is spinning. Are they really moving?  Where is this?

 

 

Cornelia Maersk is headed for Charleston. Would those then be offloaded there,

or is there a shortage elsewhere?  Unusual uncovered cargoes on container ships always surprise, like here, here, and here.   And then in 2009, there was this deckload of sailboat masts . . . and more.  How about these sixth boro shoes that’ll never see Italian legs?  Vessel parts that’ll never float?

Could you place Kalundborg on a map?  It’s west of Copenhagen.  Draw a map first and then look it up.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

For the previous 22 posts, click here. So what would you call this approaching craft?  What’s your estimate of the height of those “legs?”

 

It’s a liftboat.

Her destination was the VZ Bridge, and sure enough, upon arrival

Seacor Supporter stopped her forward movement

less than a quarter mile from the bridge.

and began lowering her 200′ spuds.

For the specifics on this vessel, click here.

Supporter is one of almost two dozen lifeboats operated by Seacor.  Anyone know the job she’s here to do?

The fishing kayak . . .?

is unrelated to this post, but may appear in a future post.

All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

 

Wel . . . for starters, it’s beautiful.

Paquet V (1982) would not look quite the same if the same form were in fiberglass.  Make sure you look through the gallery here.

She was southbound here.

Shirean looks like she was built almost a century ago, because she was, 1930 by Morton Johnson of Bayhead NJ.  Click here for another Morton Johnson beauty.

 

Rumrunner has a 1949 Hacker design, but

I believe this one was launched in 2006.

But she is beautiful.

In the Erie Canal, I encountered Dolphin, and it turns out that tug44

who claims he went aboard and drank up all her wine.  Whether that’s exaggeration or not, he did take a lot of cool photos.  Thanks, Fred.

Seriously, she’s the real deal, an immaculately maintained 1929 Consolidated Commuter yacht.

I hope you enjoyed this warm look at summer past, summers past, as the temperatures begin to drop.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks . . . cooler temps equals clearer air and sharper pics.  But if you stay inside when it’s cold, here’s a set of wooden yachts associated with City Island rich enough to take you until the spring to go through.

 

I value classification, so here are the previous posts with this title.  And here’s a cadillac of research vessels that’ve called in the sixth boro.  Some others elsewhere have included a NOAA boat, Weatherbird II, and a larger NOAA boat.  I was there for the christening of Kaho.  Michigan has the venerable Neeskay,  Huron has Laurentian, and Superior includes Shenehon.  Here are some more.   Please forgive for all those left out.

Argo is a Dunkirk NY-based fisheries research vessel. I’m guessing she arrived in Lake Erie via some parts of the Erie Canal.

Doing similar work on Lake Superior is Kiyi.   I took this photo back in May.  Kiyi went into service not quite 20 years ago.  For a 9-minute video of her at work over a week-long period, click here.

Departing the sixth boro a few weeks ago, here’s another photo of NOAAS Nancy Foster

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for NYC WW1 memorials.  Hats off for all veterans on Veterans Day.

Here’s an editorial from The Manchester Guardian for Nov 12, 1918.  “If, as a people, we can be wise and tolerant and just in peace as we have been resolute in war, we shall build them the memorial that they have earned in the form of a world set free from military force, national tyrannies and class oppressions, for the pursuit of a wider justice in the spirit of a deeper and more human religion.”

George Schneider regularly sends me photos, comments on posts, and shares lots of info on all manner of vessels.   Here was the first installment.  I owe it to him to catch up a bit on his photos.

Including ITB Groton in the post yesterday prompts me to start here, with ITB Moku Pahu.

When the sugar transport out of Hawaii ended almost two years ago, the future of this vessel became uncertain. Click here for more info on Hawaii’s agricultural state.  She’s currently on a run between Greece and Puerto Rico, ETA mid-next week. I’ve  not found a photo of the tug separate from the barge. I was fortunate to catch a photo of another ITB on its own here in 2007 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Falkor, built in Germany in 1981,  is a research vessel operating for the Schmidt Ocean Institute, a recently created (2009) research group funded by tech money.

About the blue-hulled beauty in the background, George writes:  ” the old yacht ACANIA (230142)  was being overhauled.  She was built [for Arthur E. Wheeler]  by Consolidated in Morris Heights New York in 1930, a steel yacht 137 ft overall.  She served in WWII as Q 200 for the Army, then has haunted both coasts under the names DIXONIA, SOUTHERN SEAS, CAMPANIA, WILDCATTER, LIBERTY, AMERICANA, and back to ACANIA.  She came to San Diego in 2016 under that name, and apparently has been in a bag here, undergoing restoration, ever since.  She’s now named MARIE, and her appearance is breathtaking.  I hope to get a better picture of her, but her hull is one big mirror of deep blue paint, with not a single weld or dent line visible, and her superstructure is an equally stunning ivory-colored mirror.  She’s always been classy, but now she has the unreality of modern yachts, which look like a model in a display case, and also has been restored to all possible detail of a 1930’s yacht in appearance.  I promise a better photo if Its ever possible.”

Another research vessel included here is Bold Horizon.

And rounding out this set is Tussler, which started life in 1944 as an Navy tug. George writes:  ”  She seems to follow yacht races and regattas in the Southern California area.  She’s currently owned by Tussler Maritime LLC, but was built by Everett Pacific Shipyard in 1944 for the U. S. Navy as YTL 424.   She worked with them, first as a tug and later as a diving/salvage tender until sold in 1973, at which time she got her current name and was modified into a yacht.”

I always look forward to reading George’s emails, and I thank him here for sharing these photos.

 

One satisfying thing to me about these retro posts is noticing how much the local fleet has changed.  All these photos I took in November 2008.  Coral Queen was scrapped at least eight or nine years ago.  Maersk Donegal has had two name changes since 2008, now know as Santa Priscila, and no longer calls in the sixth boro.

SPT Guardian, still under the same name, is currently operating out of Lome, Togo.  Note the NJ State Police boat alongside.  I don’t know if they are still using that boat.

ITB Groton is gone as well.

The huge K-Sea fleet in the boro has dispersed.  Solomon Sea is now Emily Ann,

Falcon, I believe, is still Falcon but wears Vane livery,

Davis Sea still has the same name but Kirby colors and operates in the Gulf,

and Aegean Sea carries the same name but works for Burnham Associates in my old stomping grounds north of Boston.  NYK Diana has moved to the Pacific to the US West Coast.

This Rosemary McAllister has been replaced by another Rosemary McAllister, and has spent only part of one day in the sixth boro.

Stapleton Service takes the prize for the greatest number of name changes, three since 2008.  She’s now Michael Miller.

Buchanan 15 has become Dory, although I’ve not seen her in a while.

Coral Queen‘s smaller fleet mate was John B. Caddell, which became a hurricane Sandy victim:  grounded, sheriff auctioned, and scrapped.

I made a jaunt upriver aboard the only and only Half Moon–now sold abroad– in November 2008, and saw

Champion Polar but she’s now

–ice bow and all- dead and likely scrapped,  as well as

a more intact Bannerman’s Castle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp in November 2008.

 

 

Andrew J graced this port I’ve passed many times both by water and highway.  Any guesses where I took this photo?  I watched their July 4 2016 fireworks. Answer follows. That power plant opened in 1950 as well;  it’s shuttered and a plan to repower it from coal to natural gas has fallen through.

Andrew J is a 1950 build, less than 50′ loa. I took a photo of one of Andrew J‘s fleet mates here in 2016, although then West Wind –a boat with a really random history–was working for another company.

Kurt R. Luedtke has been working its way around Lake Ontario this season.  I missed her in Sodus Bay, but

the other day caught her in Fair Haven NY.   Kurt R. has previously appeared on this blog here and here.

Any guesses where Gulf Spray does her work?  I suppose the paint on the light house may be a clue.

Closer up . . .  both these photos come thanks to Justin Zizes.

Gulf Spray, a Nova Scotia 1959 build,  works in Halifax.

And finally, the flags are a clue here.  Spes was built in 1946, and the photo comes thanks to Jan van der Doe.  It’s one of many photos he sent me months ago that I’ve been saving for a rainy–or otherwise distracted– day.

Spes, of course, is a Dutch boat.  These photos were taken in the river town of Dordrecht, where I had gone in 2014 for the steam fest that happens there every other year.

Thanks to Jan and Justin for sharing their photos.

The lead photo here was taken in Dunkirk NY, where I had stopped to look for a fish tug.  No dice on the fish tug, though.

 

 

 

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