Georgetown is South Carolina’s second largest port.  More on that in a moment, but for now, here’s an intriguing photo from the South Carolina Maritime Museum in town.  Where in New York was this steam houseboat built, I wonder.  In the Santee Gun Club notes, it reports that it took four months to deliver Happy Days from NY to Santee.  And, are they standing on ice here?

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Here’s what I saw of commercial vessels in port.  In the background is

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the now-shuttered ArcelorMittal steel plant.  Beyond the steel plant is International Paper mill, clearly quite busy. The mill grew out of the Atlantic Coast Lumber Company.

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I mentioned the maritime museum:  it’s worth a stop.  Also, check out the Gullah Museum.

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This intriguing artifact is outside, with the story

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here and below.   What’s misleading about the photo below is that the propeller is from the Norwegian freighter Eriksson, which at 285′ was smaller than the whaleback Everett, 346′.

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From Auke Visser, here are many more photos of City of Everett.

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One thing I found surprising about the history of Georgetown is its connections with Maine shipbuilders.

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You can guess how this encounter between the 168′ 506 ton four-master and the 403′ 6026 ton steamer turned out.  Read about the findings of the court in reference to the collision here. Click here for more info on SS Prinz Oskar, which became Orion after the US seized it.

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Will Van Dorp, who’s heading back to Georgetown in the spring, took the photos here both inside the museum and along the boardwalk.

*** Click here for the archive of the “early history of the Santee Club


		

Another day I went out and lots of Reinauer boats were around, like Gracie M., which I’d not seen up close.  Launched in the second half of 2016, she’s the fourth of their Twins series and the newest vessel in  the fleet.   Here’s the first Twins post I did and here’s another where she appears.

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Curtis has slightly less hp than Gracie M and follows the B. Franklin line.  

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Christian came by;  at 7200 hp  and dimensions of 118′ x 40′, she’s a big boat.

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Here’s Christian in profile.

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Zachery is one of the oldest in the fleet, built at Matton up near the Canal, and formerly a Mobil tug.

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Now that we have a few different classes already in this post, you can see that Dean, like Gracie M, follows the Twins class.

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B. Franklin, mentioned earlier, spawned Curtis, so to speak.

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And here’s another slightly different angle on Gracie M. 

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The photo below I took in Auguast 2006.  Subtle differences are visible in the background, like the color of the cranes over in Erie Basin.  The slightly different shade of bronze and red may be due to the fact that I used a different camera.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Ellen McAllister first appeared on this blog almost 10 years ago here.  At the time I knew nothing about an entire category of navy tugs repurposed for civilian life.  Here were the two previous posts in this series.

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For a vessel that turns a half century this spring, to my outsider eyes, she’s as good as ever.

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Here she delivers the docking pilot

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before serving as escort to the dock.  By the way, while ROROs like Boheme are underway, is there a panel the seals off this area?

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Here are a few photos of her in Lake Michigan, off Scotland, and then as a single-engine McAllister tug.  I’d love to see more….

Anyone identify the YTB below?  There’s a spoiler if you scroll past, so guess before proceeding.

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taken by Will Van Dorp  January 1, 2012

It’s YTB-786, which did its Navy service in Rota Spain,

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and is now based as Margaret McAllister in Wilmington NC.

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All photos by Will Van  Dorp.

One of the joys about living in the sixth boro is its size and dynamism.  There are three bridges in this photo below that will not be the same if I take this shot again in three or four years;  this is my first notice of the stays already in place at the new Goethals. Will the new bridge still honor an engineer who worked on the Panama and then the PANYNJ?   I was interested in the ship because a friend had assisted docking when she arrived . . .

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Overseas Long Beach last had a strange paint job, too.  AIS showed that Erin McAllister was on the bow, which I took possibly being a misspelling of Eric, pictured a bit farther below.

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To my astonishment, when the escort emerged around the stern, it was

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Erin, not Eric.  After the pilot was retrieved,

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she spun

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to port and

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returned to base, allowing me to get a closeup and

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compare the two boats, Erin from 1996, although I believe her bow has been modified since then, and

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Eric from 2014.  And the differences are clear.

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Erin actually originates from the same time, design, and shipyard as this tug, Z-One.

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Photo by Will Van Dorp, San Juan, PR, March 2013

 

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For more comparisons, click on this “Tale of the Tape” post from a year and a half ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I’m doing a short post today, but it may be big in questions.  First of all, Goat Locker?  It’s a name rich in tradition.  Click here and make sure to read the reference by Mark D. Faram.

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So, 1200 hp on the stern of large RIB .  .  . That’s impressive.

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And then there’s this, the ONLY boat in North Cove.  Here’s what the website says it’s for.  Read what it says here about the use of this 25′ SAFE, i.e.,  “Plan B maintains your Military RHIB boat and keeps it fueled, maintained and ready to go. Then, in the event evacuation is required, you simply proceed to your boat’s Westside location.”  Wow . . . James Bond?

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Some six hundred miles farther south in Southport, NC . . . No Wake dwells in a wholly different climate.  It’s a nice boat, although I know nothing about it.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts in this series go back almost seven years.

 

I do not try to group tugboats in posts by company, but in the past week I’ve noticed an inordinate number of Weeks boats in the sixth boro.  Let’s start with this shot of Trevor, which I caught yesterday.   Here are some previous Trevor shots.

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Earlier I’d caught Trevor tailing a tow pull by Alexandra.  I might have to dig in the archives to 2009 and 2008 to find my previous photo of Alexandra.

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Here was that tow, the Weeks 533, the flagship of the Weeks fleet.   The 1965 crane also has tragedy associated with it now.

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A few days ago I caught Thomas and

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Shelby over on the KVK.  Beyond Shelby here are Jill Reinauer and Brooke Chapman.   This was a first to see Brooke Chapman in the sixth boro.  Will she become a regular?

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All photos in the past week by Will Van Dorp.  And speaking of Weeks tugs, I’d be happy to see Candace again.

My favorite Shelby photos have her towing the Starship Enterprise. and tailing here.

I took the photo below in spring 2012 on the event of 343‘s arrival in the sixth boro.  It shows (from far to near) FDNY’s John D. McKean, Kevin C. Kane, and Firefighter.  None of these vessels is currently owned by FDNY.  McKean has gone upriver to be converted into a museum, Kane has gone to Wisconsin to become a workboat, and  so far as I know, our whole upriver alliance of traffic watchers–myself included– missed her passage to Troy and then the Erie Canal, even though I traveled on the Erie twice this past November. Did anyone catch photos of Kane and not post them, I wonder?

Firefighter has gone to Greenport on the North Fork to live on as a museum.

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The next four photos were taken by Fireboat Firefighter Museum volunteers.

I saw Firefighter in Greenport on December 31, 2016, but as of today, she’s at Goodison’s Shipyard in Rhode Island,

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where haul out and

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hull inspection and repair and

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 repainting. This work was made possible by grants from the National Parks Service National Maritime Heritage program, as well as the NY State Office of Historic Preservation, and our supporters and benefactors who provided matching donations to allow us to access the grant funds. We’re still taking donations for shipyard work through our donation page on our website, and presently have a benefactor willing to provide a 100% match on any donations up to $50K received for additional yard work.
According to Mike Hibbard, VP and vessel historian at Fireboat Fire Fighter Museum, Firefighter will emerge from the shipyard “no longer be sporting the red coat of paint applied to the FDNY fleet in the 1960’s. We’re taking her back to her 1938 appearance – which means she’ll have a black hull, white topside house, black decks and a buff stack. All the monitors, bitts and nameboards will also be returned to their original polished brass appearance.”

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Click here for photos I took of Firefighter in the KVK, when she still worked for FDNY.  The next three photos come from the Goodison Shipyard FB page.

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Many thanks to Mike Hibbard for contacting me about this story.

For one of many posts featuring another retired FDNY vessel, John J. Harvey, click here.

I love the drawing and the name on the flag.  You know the artist, of course?

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That Essomarine stuff and staff must be magical.    Sam I Am?  Nope, Suess he was an oilman.  

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Got $1000 for a copy of his rare Secrets of the Deep?  Here’s another rare one –at least I’d never heard of it until today–for under $18, and the power boat drawing comes from it.

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No naval architect was Suess, but I’ve liked it for well over half a century.

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It’s good stuff though.  You can find these images at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton NY.

Click here for SD posts 1 — 22.

Thanks to all of you who send me photos.  M & M McMorrow sent this photo taken at Atlantic Highlands just before Christmas.  And yes,

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Delta is the best Christmas red. I can’t seem to find a tugboat in the NMFS.NOAA registry called just “Delta.”   Someone help out?

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Richie Ryden took these photos just before New Year’s, sending them along with the note “I took these pic’s on 12/28/16 on the Hackensack River between Rt 3 east & west Bridges , It looks like they a are rebuilding the marina there !!! I saw Reliable from Coastline Marine Towing out of Belford NJ  switching barges empty for a full one with old pilings on it ! look at your blog all the time keep up the good work !!!! Happy New Year !!!!”

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Happy New Year, Richie!  And I have to admit I can find nothing about previous owners of Reliable also, although the late great John Skelson had a photo of her from a while back sans the upper house here.  Richie’s photos also helped solidify my image of what this vessel looks like compared with another Reliable that languishes up on the Oswego Canal. 

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Jed sent me this photo just after the start of 2017 with the note “Happy New Year from Maryland.  Here is your first tug of 2017, the ten-year-old Belgian Union Grizzly that I saw on the Scheldt in 2012.”   Thx Jed.  And since that time, she’s sent a half dozen more photos of European tugboats, which I’ll post soon.

photo date 6 SEPT 2012

And Tyler Jones must be losing his patience:  he sent me this photo back on November 1, and I still have not put it up.  What I love about this photo, Tyler, is the fog giving the impression that Coral Coast pushing a cement barge upriver at Poughkeepsie  is weightless, floating lazily on the clouds.  Thx much, Tyler.

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Jan van der Doe periodically sends me photos from Canadian Lake Ontario ports.  He didn’t identify this boat although I’m wondering if it’s Lac Manitoba, which capsized on the Ottawa River back in June 2015.

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In Hamilton harbor, here’s (l to r) Florence M, Tony Mackay, and James A. Hannah.   Hannah is a sister of Bloxom, the cover model for my documentary about the Arthur Kill graveyard and the most intact tugboat in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

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And finally, on December 12, here are more McKeil boats tied up in Hamilton.

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Thanks much M & M, Richie, Jed, Tyler, and Jan.

 

 

I realize that snow days occur here every year, even though not as frequently as they might farther north, but the movement of a squall across the boros rewards with interesting photos in spite of the cold.

At 0925 the other day, Maersk Edgar was in the clear although a squall concealed the lower Manhattan skyline.

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Here’s zoomed in closer because I hoped to confirm the unit to the left as Kirby’s Rebel, which I’ve not seen in ages. I hope I see her close up before she leaves town.

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Corpus Christi was clear.

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At 10:00 Weeks’ tugs Thomas and Shelby moved in to retrieve a crane as soon as they completed the salt pile job.  That’s Dreggen in the background. Nearly eight years ago Thomas and a crane were involved in a job that involved fishing out a certain geese-ingesting aircraft  from a forgiving North River.

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Red Hook moves a barge past a snow-cloaked IMTT.

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Emerald Coast heads out at 11:37.

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Peking appears from the edge of space.

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And here by noon, I was disappointed in my hopes to get a photo of Hyundai Pluto, entirely invisible beyond ACL Atlantic Cartier.  The port may have been closed around this time because Hyundai Pluto had arrived inside the Upper Bay, then spun around–not a lightly undertaken feat–and headed out to the Long Beach anchorage.  Atlantic Cartier anchored in Gravesend, and Atlantic Conveyer did the same off Stapleton, not a common occurrence for a containership.  Or maybe I just misunderstood what what going on, my perception beshrouded from myself.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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