Way back in 2007 I started this series, and I now think I should never have called it “bronze” since it’s more like a golden brown, but no matter, this post is all the same fleet.  Name the fleet and the tug?

Talking fleet renewal . . ., Reinauer has a young fleet.  Janice Ann is not even a year old . . .

Laurie Ann, here with Grace D alongside, is just over a decade old.

Dean is not quite a decade at work.

Curtis came out the same year as Dean.  By the way, I didn’t identify the photo in the top photo yet.  Figured it out?

Morgan is the oldie but goldie . . .

Haggerty Girls is about the same age as Dean and Curtis . . . i.e., a young fleet.

All photos, recently, WVD.

And the tugboat in the first photo is . . . Dylan Cooper.

 

Last week I did a lot of driving, to the Outer Banks and back for a project.  I saved some time headed north by crossing from Lewes to Cape May by ferry.  Although it was quite foggy, I did see a few vessels.  Can you identify these?

 

By now, I suspect some of you have identified this tug . . .

Of course, it’s the 2007 tug formerly known as Barbara C and Arabian Sea and now called Saint Emilion.  On the ferry crossing, I caught these photos at 1700;  after an overnight and some work, I was headed home and caught her here at the VZ Bridge, 18 hours later.

So, 18 hours then to run the length of the Jersey coastline, and switching from towing to pushing once at the southern edge of the sixth boro.

After catching these photos of Saint Emilion, I waited a bit longer and caught these photos of Calusa Coast, traveling light, on a voyage from the GoM to the watery boro.

All photos here all foggy, WVD.

Steve’s uncle Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985.  That makes for a special connection and lots of vintage photos.  Enjoy these thanks to Steve.  I’ll use his captions.

Dalzelleagle assisting ship in East River in September 1968.

Dalzelleagle heading down Buttermilk Channel-from pier 12 Brooklyn in September 1970.  The tug is interesting, but so are the details in the background.

Cook Ralph Andreason waves from the stern on Dalzelleagle departing 69th St pier Brooklyn in September 1970.

McAllister Bros in North River off Hoboken pier on August 24, 1973.

The is the same time and place, roughly.  The Twin Towers had opened earlier that year.

Tug McAllister Bros leading Atlantic Champagne thru Newark Bay Draw on July 5, 1976. This picture brings to mind a story that my Uncle Bob Munoz told me. Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985. One time he was piloting a ship in Newark Bay toward the Newark Bay Draw Bridge and a woman passenger came over to him on the bridge of the ship and asked him if the ship was going through that little opening in the bridge. Bob said that they were. She then asked how he did that. So he looked at her and said, “When we get real close I just close my eyes.”    Atlantic Champagne, an ACL vessel, was launched in 1969 with a teu capacity of a dazzling 882 teu.

McAllister Bros in Newark Bay from a ship on June 26, 1987.  That CRRNJ bridge was used starting in 1926;  I saw some remaining piers about a decade ago, but it is entirely gone now.  Given the raising of the Bayonne Bridge, keep in mind that vertical clearance here was 136′.  Maybe someone can tell me the width of the channel.

McAllister Bros galley on January 11, 2001,

and her engine room on the same date.

And finally, McAllister Brothers here along with Christine M. McAllister on November 6, 2006.

It’s hard to say good bye.  Many thanks to Steve for use of these photos.

And thanks to Birk Thomas for posting this on FB today, Dalzell Towing.

First, see these three photos from 2009 with updates.  I passed by this spot in Seaford DE this past week . . . on a mission, and the former Flagship Nanticoke Queen restaurant is no more.  Only a graded lot remains where the USS McKeever Brothers (SP-683) WW1 patrol and minesweeper vessel and fishing boat both before that and after the war once was. Route 13 has a bit less character.   The wooden hull was likely buried in a landfill.

From 2009, this is the 1958 Jakobson-built Dalzelleagle and then McAllister Brothers.  And yesterday, she was was towed away to be scrapped. At temperatures between 2500 and 2750°F, that steel will puddle and take new shapes.  Tomorrow I’ll post more photos of this 1958 beauty.

Another photo from 2009 of the 1907 Pegasus . . .  now also history and headed for the same high temperatures and red hot puddles.

A photo from 2012 . . . Siberian Sea, still afloat, and currently called Mike Azzolino.

Also still extant, in fact, David Silver took this photo less than a week ago, the May 1921 launched Day Peckinpaugh.  Yes, that is the Erie Canal between Locks E2 and E3.  The canal water level  is drawn down in the winter/spring for maintenance.

May 21, 1921 precisely was the day Interwaterways 101 came off the ways at the McDougall-Duluth Company shipyard.   Shouldn’t we hold a socially distanced party for the freight ship?

Here was the neat and active Eriemax freighter in 1961.

Thanks to David and Craig for use of their Day Peckinpaugh photos;  the others from 2009 and 2012, WVD.

As to the tragedy of 231′ x 71′ Seacor Power, Seacor Supporter, 131′ x 66′ , came to do some work in the sixth boro here a few years ago. Brazos is 145′ x 100′.

 

Two bulk carriers are currently in the sixth boro having come directly from a very salty area in the north of Chile, more than a 1000 miles north of the coastal city of Valparaíso.

One of them is Albatross Island, an ultramax bulker from the huge Pacific Basin fleet.

She was launched in 2010 as Jin Ming.

 

She made an 18-day voyage from Chile, counting the time transiting the Panama Canal, when last these crew were close to land.

Port Osaka, part of the Port Dragon Bulk fleet within Portline Bulk,  is roughly the same size as Albatross Island but much newer, launched in 2019.  She made the voyage from Chile in 15 days.

Yes, I love that logo, which I can’t quite decipher.

If you want a hint of the desert from which our road salt comes, click here for Punta Patache.

All photos, WVD.

…you know. . . superlative like newest, biggest, fastest, most powerful,  most teu. . . it’s a series I should have started long ago, but tugster is a public work-in-progress.  And I’m skeptical of superlatives… since they change regularly.

A quick post today, but this is a story I need to find more out about.   See those orange slings hanging from a buff framework?   I’d noticed it several times recently but never paid attention until yesterday.  It’s not an art installation.

Notice the fine print in blue:  Bayonne Drydock and Repair Corp and Cimolai MBH 1280?  Well, I read that is the current largest mobile boat hoist (aka travel lift) in the world, capable of lifting up to 1280 tons!  That is a big a$$ boat lift!    And Cimolai is building a larger one–a 1500-ton lift– in Florida.

Here’s more on Cimolai, with some NYC projects already completed.  And one more site about Armando and Albina Cimolai  . . . here.

Photos, WVD.

If you’ve never seen one of these lift or splash a boat, here’s a video.

Here are previous installments, and I’m just observing in this post;  although most vessels I see have intact coatings, others really need a trip to the shipyard for some paint.

The stern of Maersk Columbus was fine, but the bow had some extraordinary streaks of rust.

Cosco Istanbul had some

need of some work generally all over.

Ditto this Zim ship.

The surprise was this tugboat, Choptank,

this time on the stern.

Again . . . just observing and taking these photos, WVD.

 

Here’s what the Upper Bay looks like on an overcast but calm dawn . . . with panamax  Torm Elizabeth being lightened by Josephine and her barge.  The tanker is not quite a year old.  There’s a lot going on in that expanse of protected water:  ferries passing, lots of tug/barge units anchored, Nautical Janine anchored, and who knows how much movement sits beneath those buildings in the distance.

Seamagic is slightly larger and dates from 2006.  She’s taking on bunkers from Kings Point and her barge.

Hafnia Lise has half Seamagic‘s carrying capacity, dates from 2016.  Here she heads out for sea.

I just love some of these names, especially the next ones,  although my all-time favorite is still Surfer Rosa.  Maybe that’s because when I saw it I knew a Rosa who surfed.  Meet Solar Katherine at dawn. She’s also from 2020, like Torm Elizabeth.

Pacific Sarah dates from 2017.

Nautical Janine is two years old.

I wonder if these names– Janine, Sarah, Katherine, etc–have namesakes who know they’ve inspired a vessel name?  I know that can be true of tugboats . . . . because I’ve met actual namesakes.

One more before I hit the road . .   Silver Joan, taking on some fuel.

All photos, WVD.

Mackenzie Rose and Paul Andrew are eastbound, and Mary Turecamo, westbound.

 

A light Haggerty Girls westbound,

passing Laurie Ann Reinauer.

Kimberly Poling moves a barge out of the Kills.

 

A bulker in the anchorage gets bunkered by

Kings Point.  Katya Atk needs to repaint the name on the starboard bow.

And Helen Laraway makes her way east.

 

All photos, WVD.

Brazos is in the sixth boro;  I caught her at the east end of Fire Island a few months back here.

R/V Shearwater approached, but that’s likely just because Shearwater appears to survey every square millimeter of the sixth boro and beyond.

A day later I approached Brazos between the raindrops and from a different angle.  A kayaker was checking her out too.

 

 

On yet another day recently and in some different geography, notice the vessel?

I checked the same location a few hours later, and the fog had moved on or just plain dissipated, revealing USCGC Coho. If you’re interested in a tour of the cutter, click here.

All photos, WVD.

If you have a hankering for more boats-in-the-fog photos, do a google image search with the search string “fog tugster.”

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