Here comes Jonathan C around the stern of an incoming ship . . .

 

This turn would have been fun to see from the air, from a stable platform like a helicopter or drone.

The container ship is called Athens Express.  And of course that is Kimberley Turecamo.

 

 

She was inbound yesterday from the ancient port of Damietta, 12 days and 19 hours behind her.

All photos, WVD.

 

Here’s a new type of vessel, a TEFC.  Know that abbreviation?  She called in Red Hook about a month ago.  These photos come thanks to Mike Abegg.

A clue is the white/red bundles on the dock.

Here’s a closer up view.  Last opportunity to guess.

TEFC expands to “totally enclosed forests carrier,” a subset of dry bulk transportation.  After Red Hook she called at a number of ports headed south.  She’s currently in Mobile AL.  My guess is that she loaded her lumber cargo in Brasil, but I’m not sure of that.

If you can get FB, here’s a video of Mozu Arrow and her hold.  Here are videos of many other Arrow vessels.

Many thanks to Mike for taking these photos.

I’d wager that more than two thousand cargo ships dock in the sixth boro each year.  This morning as I write this, I count  20 in all, including the second of the 15k ULCVs, CMA CGM Panama.  No, I didn’t get photos because . . . I was workbound. All these photos I took in recent weeks.  The last one here I did not take;  a friend Allan Seymour took it on the body of water called Penobscot Bay.

Erikoussa is a regular in the port.  Click here for posts featuring this tanker going back 12 years already.  Here she was departing;  the taut line angling off her port bow leads to a tug rotating her across the KVK so that she points east rather than west.  As of this morning, she’s in the Gulf of Mexico.

Sea Vine . . . is just the best name.  Right now, she’s in Rotterdam.

Hamburg Bay may have called here before as Zim Hamburg or APL Tokyo, but I’ve no record of that.  At 6350 teu, she’s of the size that I saw many of until about five years ago. Her beam–131′–would prevent her from passing through the old Panama Canal locks.  She’s upbound on the Elbe now.

Speaking size . . .  OOCL Singapore is one of those ULCVs that are becoming the new standard these years in the port.  Launched in 2014, her teu capacity is 13200.  Compare that with the newest record holder . . .  CMA CGM Brazil and the 15000 teu size.  She’s now off Cape Fear bound for the Mediterranean.

CMA CGM A. Lincoln, seen here a few weeks ago, blocked out the sky as she passed by.  Right now she’s shuffling through the southern end of the Red Sea, Malaysia bound.

Ever Lotus . . . I caught her here the first time just over a year ago.  She’s Pacific bound in the Panama Canal.

Pacific Anna, a 2017 crude oil carrier,  has one of those great names, like Surfer Rosa or Surabaya Johnny, which isn’t a ship name but should be.  She’s in the Atlantic, heading for Amsterdam.

Fulmar, named for the seabird,  is one of the tankers that currently shuttles frequently between Point Tupper and Bayway.  Right now, she’s off Port Aransas.

Tanja with Camden Hills in the background is departing Penobscot Bay. As an indicator of trade routes, as of this morning Tanja is currently at the Amazon River port of Belem.

The photo above is thanks to Allan Seymour; all others, WVD, who like these vessels, is not alive unless he’s moving.

 

There’s this below from ancient Roman vineyards in Gaul, near this  monolith church . . .  Also, about 30 miles away in Bordeaux is the repurposed WW2 submarine base . . . repurposed for art. But I started out beyond left field here and have digressed in an even more oblique direction.

Saint Emilion is this tugboat with angles . . . and three rectangular windows, wheelhouse and upper wheelhouse . . .  Note the difference in lines with Joyce D. Brown.

She’s angular indeed, a bit reminiscent of a Nighthawk.  The livery of white with yellow trim accentuates these angles.

To see the time of her transformation from Barbara C to Arabian Sea, click here and scroll a bit.  To see her in many jobs as Arabian Sea, click here.

Anyone know why Apex chose this name?

Compare many points of her random partner on the KVK, above and below.

 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

This is a photo emblematic of our time . . .  two seafarers.  I could even speculate comfortably about their nationality.  The older man to the left has no mask, and the other, with mask, is on his device.  This can only be 2020.

Ditto here . . . the masked seafarer standing watch, leaning back on the rail as the vessel heads out to sea.

This can only be NYC, in the 20 aughts or later.  I took it in September 2020.

Here’s a series of three.  See the two crew?

They were testing/arranging something with the jacob’s ladder.

Then, this crewman saw me taking photos and he posed!

Here both the captain of the tug and the two ship’s crew are watching the pilot step across onto Margaret.

The pilot here stands out on the port bridge wing.

And finally, a crewman on a local boat provides lookout on the barge.

All photos, WVD, who loves summertime  . . . as no doubt so do these crew.

Here are previous posts in this series.  This post is a tribute to the dangerous but vital role pilots play in shipping.

Below, the docking pilot descends onto Marjorie B McAllister.

The transition from the gangway to the jacob’s ladder is tricky.

Here’s a Moran docking pilot, departing the ship after the ship is underway.

This is a small ship, but the distance to the water is still significant.

When assured the adjustment is right,

the docking pilot begins his descent to Jonathan C. Moran.

And finally, see the gangway from this angle . . .

and the pilot about to step across to Ava.

 

All photos, WVD, who wishes all safety.

 

 

This is the last Roundup I’ve attended.  Here’s another shot from the swim platform, where I’m flat on my belly. That’s Mike Byrnes, last year’s “old man of the sea” at the portside of the wheelhouse.

Downbound in the Federal lock, it’s Waterford, Governor Cleveland, and Tender #3.

 

On the northbound trip, the two smaller tugs fell in alongside Grand Erie.  Grand Erie is a 1951 build that first worked for the USACE in the Mississippi system.

Tug Buffalo heads for its berth beyond Pennsy 399 and Lehigh Valley #79, where

David Sharps bugle greets each vessel as it passes.

 

Lisa Ann was a newcomer that year, I believe.  She was built at Marine Inland Fabricators, where the “new” canal tugs like Port Jackson have also been built.

Another newbie in 2015 was Solar Sal, a solar powered newbuild that actually transported cargo later in the season.  Like Ceres the year before, these are prototypes, and  like Ceres, Solar Sal transported this cargo.

Ever so salty, it’s Ben Grudinskas, captain and builder of Atlantic Hunter.

Here Atlantic Hunter faces off against the mighty Tender #3.  By the way, Tender #3 is 43′ x 10′ and came off the ways in 1926!!  1926 . . . . 94 years ago.

It’s currently powered by a 220 hp Detroit Diesel.

In closing, the land activities include line toss, open to all comers, but won by the pros. I failed at the 15′ mark.

And I’ve not attended the Roundup since 2015, but unless I’m employed and on duty, I hope to make the 2021.

 

2014 was the year I was working on Urger.  Here she’s tied up above lock E-2 while Bejamin Elliot steams by, downbound.

Some time later we’d all steamed down to Albany, here (l to r), it’s a Lord Nelson Victory tug yacht, a tender, and C. L. Churchill, a 1964 boat built in Cohasset MA.  Chuchill is the tug that serves to move the 1862 replica canal schooner Lois McClure.

 

The parade here is moving northbound along the Troy wall…

and here above the Federal lock bound for the left turn at Waterford . . . into the canal. The photo below is credited to Jeff Anzevino, and you’ll see your narrator standing along the portside of the wheelhouse.

In 2014, the documentary by Gary Kane and myself was screened in the Pennsy 399 barge to enthusiastic roundup attendees.

Ceres, the cargo schooner was making one of its trips from Lake Champlain to the sixth boro.  Unfortunately, that endeavor has folded.  As of July 2020, the plan was to convert Ceres into a tiny home.  Details can be found at FB under The Vermont Sail Freight Project.

The official Sunday culmination of the Round involves prizes.  Churchill and McClure were the official vessels of 2014, and the

old man of the sea award went to my former crewmate, Mike Byrnes, here being awarded by Roundup director, Tom Beardsley.

All photos, WVD.

 

An omen of the future . . . in 2013, Urger was laid up, sans her problematic prop shaft.  Here she’s nez-a-nez with Day Peckinpaugh.

Gowanus Bay was looking good.

NYS Marine Highway was well represented,

as always.  And following two of the four NYS Marine Highway boats there was Cornell, Frances and Margot‘s senior by the better part of a decade.

If you’ve never attended, trust me when I say the fireworks show is extraordinary!  Here from the bulkhead a dozen or so thousand spectators

and a few on solo craft

are captivated by the show.

I can’t tell you much about Iron Chief,  except that it has nice brass, a working steam engine, and was for sale in 2012.   In that link, you hear it run.  Of course, in the distance that’s ex-Atlantic Hunter, now Little Giant.

For me personally, 2013 was my first time to see the Blount Small Ship Adventures vessels head into a lock.

 

Besides tugboats, you never know what or who you might see.

it’s bowsprite of the blog and the etsy shop on an underwater mission.

Here’s the line up.

All photos, WVD.

Larry J. Hebert has been in the boro a few months, following a GLDD dredging project. She’s from 1981 and rated at 3600 hp.

She headed eastbound in the KVK here with a fair amount of wire out, it seems to me.

Helen Laraway, light, heads west.  She’s the oldster here, 1957, and 2000 hp.

Bergen Point, 1958 and 600 hp,  heads east

and ducks behind an Evergreen ship.

Kristy Ann, the youngster in this batch, launched in 2018, and 4560 hp, left her barge in the anchorage and came in . . . to check in a the yard on Richmond Terrace.

James William, 2007 and 2800 hp,  brings two light scows out of the Kills.

and gave the photographer, I believe, a friendly whistle.

Virginia passes by, the first time in an age that I’ve seen her.  She’s from 1979 and generates 1400 hp.

And Genesis Vision makes an impressive turn in front of Caddells.  She’s a 1981 boat with 3000 hp of push.

All photos, WVD, who is solely responsible for any errors.

 

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