You want novelty?  Something new is always happening in the sixth boro, machines and people bringing goods from unimaginable places on the planet.

Full like the 2006 Palena and empty like below.   The 1998 Mississauga Express likely came in to gather up empty boxes.

 

Denak Voyager seems to run a shuttle of scrap between here and Turkey.  I wonder how many such runs she’s made since her launch in 1996, a quarter century ago.  Will she herself be scrapped there?

BW Kobe, a bulk carrier, was launched in 2019.

MSC Branka looks like the giant of this post at 9400 teu, but old style

yet newer MSC Giulia carries a nominal few teu more, by some accounts.

And over in Port Elizabeth, an OOCL and an Evergreen illustrate why specialized gantry cranes of a certain height are a prerequisite for transferring boxes. Today’s behemoths are OOCL Brussels from 2013 and at 13,208 teu and Ever Forward, a 2020 ship with an 11,850 teu capacity.

So i have a certain amount of time, a trove of photos, and my self-imposed daily deadline.  If you’re wondering how I decide what to post daily, I waver and follow whims.  I post these photos today because this morning I watched this video on YouTube, having noticed it while looking something else (fandango!! it was) up.  With the title “A day in the life of a container ship in middle of the ocean,” this 10-minute video should be of interest.  The title is somewhat misleading since some scenes show NYC and the ocean actually has no middle.

All photos, errors, and snarkiness, WVD.

 

Assisting on the stern is a recent transplant to the sixth boro.  The 2008 4000 hp and 77′ x 34′ Gregg McAllister appears to be substituted in while the newer, more powerful, and larger Capt. Brian is temporarily benched.

Notice the bit of tugboat stern to lower left on the photo above?  Assisting nearer the bow is Ava M McAllister

Jonathan C. has a line running up to the bow of the  MSC ship.

No line here, but James D. follows closely on the stern of a tanker.

With a lione to the stern, Kirby assists

Cosco Hope as it heads out with a destination given as Savannah.  Pick a number in Savannah and get in line.

And finally, here’s another shot of Gregg McAllister.  Note in the photo below, the eye of the line is just going up, as

crew of the ship haul it up in order to make it fast.

All photos, WVD, who wants to point out that these assists happen 24/7/365, no matter the weather, temperature, wind force, or hour.

In several hours yesterday, a diverse set of vessels came by.  I could begin with Chemical Pioneer, a 1968 vessel that’s been calling here in some form for half a century.  She first called here as a container ship, until  her big fire.

As Chemical Pioneer was assisted into a berth in Bayonne, an MSC vessel came in,

MSC Vittoria.

She was followed by a tanker, Hellespont Promise, about the same vintage as the MSC ship.

A 2012 ULCV was next, the 13k teu Cosco Hope.

 

As Hope departed, two other vessels came in, each a different sort from what has preceded in this post. 

Here Grimaldi’s 2017 Grande Torino passes Chemical Pioneer,

followed by 2014 bulk carrier Genco Weatherly, under a beautiful sky.

Two months ago, Weatherly was in Turkey, no doubt discharging scrap metal and she’s likely here to reload.

All photos, WVD, who feels fortunate to have a chance to see this variety in just a few hours sitting by the dock of the bay.

Posts focusing on the tugboats to follow.

Just photos will appear here today, and I realize I’m contradicting that statement by writing this sentence and the others.  However,  inspiration was failing me, so I decided this post should be not photo-driven, but photo-dominated.  Names are provided in the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday started sunny, but then clouds moved in.

The recent period of extended summer in the boro means crew are out, enjoying fresh air, like these guys.  I always wonder who these seafarers are, where  they are from, how seafaring has shaped their lives and families, as well as how long they’ve been at sea, both on this voyage and over the course of their lives.  Last year I saw masks, but none are here to be seen.  Are most seafarers vaccinated, I wonder.  Have they received boosters?

This crane operator is bringing the companionway aboard to be stowed

for sea, as two additional crew ensure that it seats properly and can be locked down.  When were these guys last ashore outside a port?

Similarly, as the vessel approaches the terminal crew need to deploy the companionway safely before they shift stations to the mooring lines.  Once moored, the companionway can be used without additional delay.

Forward of the breakwater, this crewman serves as eyes.  A perennial question is what a seafarer thinking of the life and people–like me–on the banks.  During the 1960s and 1970s, there were instances of crew from countries jumping ship, sometimes literally,  to defect.

Local vessels use the balmy weather for training, and

other monitoring activity.

Making up a tow is an activity performed no matter the weather, as are many other duties on the boro.

 

 

All photos, WVD, who is mindful that this period of warm, sunny fall can become icy blasts in a week or a month . . ..

 

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Sometimes I’m conflicted about what to post, like today with too many competing stories, and we’ll start with news, and Cisne Branco, which translates as “white swan.”  The photo below shows Cisne Branco, a Brazilian Navy training vessel,  in the sixth boro in May 2012 for a sixth boro OpSail event.  Earlier this week, the 1998 vessel got swept downstream the Rio Guayas in Guayaquil, Ecuador and came to rest against a pedestrian bridge.  See it and hear about it here.

Here’s another shot of Cisne Branco in Gravesend Bay.

In other news, the 1967 83′ steel schooner Mystic Whaler, a regular in the sixth boro, has been sold to a party on the West Coast.  The Egintons have owned it since 1995. 

A few weeks ago now, the 1943 laker Mississagi was towed to the scrapyard in Sault Ste Marie.  I caught these two photos of her in summer 2016 in Lake Michigan below and

along the Saint Lawrence River below.  Other photos can be seen here.

While looking up my May 2012 photos of Cisne Branco, I saw this photo of Taurus in the North River.  She’s now Joker, featured here several times recently.  In May 2012, the K-Sea fleet had just been sold to Kirby, and in the photo below, the red K-Sea visor was painted blue, the K-Sea logo was removed from the stack, but the Kirby logo had not yet replaced it.  Also, in the background, it’s Harvey and Frying Pan at Pier 66.

This photo also from May 2012 shows Ellen McAllister coming alongside Dewarucci, an Indonesian training ship.  Between the two, it’s Scotty Sky, the small bunker tanker now sold somewhere in the Cabibbean.

Since there’s a lot of media attention on the congestion in SOME US ports, have a look at what’s off Savannah.  This was a screen grab from VesselFinder almost a week ago, and it’s not much different today.  A personal frustration is the outermost vessel shown, CMA CGM Marco Polo.  I missed getting a photo of her in the sixth boro on Saturday, October 9 because I was out of town;  in the wee hours of Monday, she departed for Norfolk and then Savannah.  She’s now been anchored, about 60 miles out from Savannah’s container terminals since the 15th.  Earlier this year she was setting a new record in US/Canada ports, and now she’s stuck in a jam.

And finally, two photos from April 2018 showing Mon Lei getting towed to a marina just north of the GW Bridge, where it stayed for some time.  Question:  Where is Mon Lei today . . .  asking for a friend.

This red/white junk was once quite the fixture in the sixth boro, and although I was never aboard, I’m told the interior was sumptuous!  Click here for posts I’ve done on the boat.  I talked with one of the owners once on the phone. 

That’s some news from my desk in Queens.  All photos, WVD.

I’d really like to know what became of Mon Lei.

 

Some names might be terrifying, like “This is Conqueror, approaching the Narrows.”  By the way, this vessel was here some years back as Energy Conqueror.  It seems sights and ambitions have broadened. 

Equally chilling though oxymoronic might be this one:  “Big Bang has anchored.”

A lot of vessels are named for birds, like ONE Stork and

Endelo Swan.  With a name like Swan, I’d expect a white hull.

Grand Eagle is hardly aquiline;  the bow might be more aquiline if they’d have consulted the folks at Ulstein.

Then there’s the occurrence of serial multiple names.  Can you make out the raised letter name that’s been painted over here?

Above is on the stern and below is high on the starboard bow.

Previously it was NYK Aphrodite.  Well . . . there once were temples to Greek goddess Aphrodite east of the Dardanelles, although I’m sure that has not an iota to do with the choice of new name.

Many thanks to eastriver for Big Bang.  All other photos and any lame jokes . . .  WVD.

I knew some of what was arriving there, just not everything.  How it was configured I didn’t know, and this fata morgana version from a half dozen miles out didn’t help, especially since it looked a bit like a sea monster.

It had rained twice already this afternoon, and with a long rain the day before,  even more moisture stretched the lines of the illusion. 

HOS Mystique came into the boro yesterday for the first time ever, I believe. In that link, you’ll see specifics on the entire fleet of Hornbeck Offshore support vessels.

Some specifics on HOS Mystique include launch date  2008, offering 49 berths, sporting a 100t knuckle boom crane, and  measuring 250′ loa x 54′ x 14′ .  That crane can connect to a host of applications “dangling” in the water column.  I’m not sure what application(s) she has recently worked with.

She came into the boro late yesterday afternoon and

headed over to Elizabethport.  Currently she’s there, no doubt, to refuel, resupply, shift crew, discharge any physical samples, or do a host of other shoreside activities.

All photos, WVD, who was first introduced to Hornbeck in the sixth boro when they had a petroleum transportation fleet. That fleet is now operated by Genesis Energy.  A few years back, I saw lots of HOS vessels was along Bayou Lafourche.

 

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