Here was 1 and here, 2.  As others of you, I’ve been waiting for the walkway to open;  it’s been closed since August 2013!!

Today’s photos are all from the past six weeks, and my way of saying that workers are still active on this bridge

 

See the same guys above and below?

My son works in a fairly high “man basket,” but I doubt he’s ever

been in one this high.  These must extend to nearly 200′?

The next two photos I took earlier this week.

 

Since the Bayonne Bridge has appeared on every blog post (as header photo) I’ve done, I do know it better than any other bridge locally. Happy holidays from Will Van Dorp.

Here are posts one through five in this series.

 

 

 

 

 

Just a photo essay, Vane tugs and barges in the KVK through all the daylight hours today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I missed her here five years ago, just barely.  At that time, she was delivering TZ Bridge construction components, more of which arrived a month later here.

Given her rare appearance in the sixth boro, I thought to get photos of her with some iconic parts of NYC skyline,

including Hudson Yards and the Edge.  But what vessel might Miss Lis have spent a two-week voyage delivering?

Eh voila!  So given the size and carrying capacity of this barge, I’m wondered what it came up here for.

I’d chosen my location well, since the tug spun off the wire and did the evolution off alongside the far side right in front of me.  Over beyond the dock, notice the big pink ULCV?  She’s now left the western hemisphere for a couple months.

As of posting, Miss Lis is over by the Global Terminal.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts of Tradewinds Towing can be seen here.

And while we’re at exotics, has anyone gotten a photo of Dina Polaris, currently working “just-over-the-horizon” from Jones Beach?  I’d love to see and post some photos.

Prometheus appeared here once before, but that was a different Prometheus.

 

Years ago when Odin departed the sixth boro, someone said there’d likely never be another tug here of that sort.  Well, there is.  Every time I see either CMT Otter or Pike, I recall the unique Odin.

In CMT colors, Otter looks quite sharp.

Also in these sharp colors, it’s Daisy Mae westbound in the KVK a few days ago, pushing CMT Y NOT 2 with a good 8000 tons of southern Jersey sand.

I have an article about the sand run that will be published later this year.

Eastbound at the same point on another day is Mister Jim pushing

a barge deeply laden with aggregates.

And still fresh from a rehab, it’s Helen Laraway, ISO

a barge to load up with aggregates as well.   Here was probably the first photo of Helen Laraway on this blog.

CMT . . . the company had no tugs, actually was no company, just a half decade ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Uh . . .

Other than that the name of the vessel below seems entirely Thai, I don’t know what to say.

Want a list of Stolt tankers?  Click here. Sypress, I believe, is the Norwegian name for the conifer tree spelled differently in English.  For all the ones already posted in tugster, click here.

Battersea Park . . .  is a park south of the Thames.

Low light photos are only sometimes interesting . . .

At first one might think Glovis is the vessel name, but upon closer study,

clearly it’s not and the company is likely Korean, given the text.  Previous Glovis vessels can be found here.

Cariboo is a 2012 scrap-loaded bulk carrier currently most of the way to Egypt;  where it goes from there I don’t know, but  scrapped beams, cars, trucks, and boats end up in the hold of vessels like Cariboo.

And finally, we return to that first vessel, the nameless one.  My suspicion is that it may be between owners.  The IMO number, however, stays with the vessel like a VIN, and the IMO number says that the name might be/have been Energy Trophy, a crude tanker.

All photos and any errors by Will Van Dorp.

Maybe someone can explain this . . .   late last week, six ROROs, of which one was Glovis Comet arrived in the port.   Six!  Is this odd?  Am I missing something?

 

 

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

Thanks for your patience; this follows up the post from two days ago.  The port is Boston, the date is November 1960, and the fleet tied up at the T wharf.  Luna, pictured below, is still extant; the others . . . I believe are all gone.

Above in the distance and below, that’s Orion.

I have no ID on this gentleman in Orion‘s engine room, or

this gentleman in the wheelhouse of another era.

Allan Seymour went on to a career as a professional photographer, and he sent me these photos.

Here’s how I first saw two of the boats–including Luna–back in 1987.  Here’s a report on the historic value of Luna submitted to the Boston Landmarks Commission in March 1985.

Thanks for your guesses, both here and on FB.  For the Boston Public Library’s trove of T Wharf photos, click here.   And here is the motherlode, at least 150 photos of Boston tugboats from the Digital Commonwealth collection.

 

Here are some previous posts with photos from Jan.

So here’s the tugboat, just out of the shipyard near the Arctic Circle and at work, the last in a series of five identical anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels bringing more than 23000 hp to the job. This job starts in the Princess Arianehaven. 

And what’s the tow?

And how many tugs does it take?  Here’s Maker assisted by Mutratug 32,  quite interesting in her own right as a Carrousel RAVE tug. Click here for more.

But I digress.  Maersk Resilient (2008) is moving out to the Stella Oil/Gas Field with this assistance. The additional tugs are Multratug 5 and FairPlay 27 and 28.

 

And here Bugsier 3 intrudes on the scene.

All photos taken last weekend by Jan Oosterboer and delivered via Jan van der Doe.

You also have one more day to name the port and guess the date in yesterday’s post.

 

For some of you this will be very easy.  Where was this photo taken and approximately what date?

Photo was taken by Allan Seymour.  He sent more, which I’ll post on another day.

Previously I’ve done a series called ports of [the world], which I’m always looking to add to if you wish to collaborate.

Also, coming up soon, a tugboat rated at 23,000 hp . . . what would that look like?

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,283 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

April 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930