It should be no secret that I’m an early riser, have always been one to get up in the “o’dark” hours for the morning golden hour, the best time of day.  Here are two Miller’s Launch OSVs, possibly Rana and Rosemary.

 

A bit later on a different day, I caught Dylan Cooper westbound, with another Reinauer unit off in the distance.

 

Janet D headed into that  same morning, here eastbound.

Ditto . . .  Charles D McAllister and

Mary Turecamo.  In fact, in the photo below, you see all three.   Did you get the golden hour this morning?

All photos, WVD, who thinks this morning’s overcast skies here blocked any gold.

 

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

Not far from the East River yesterday and at an intersection checking for oncoming traffic,  I spotted this half a bock away from my intended path:  round fenders, distressed paint, and chrome stacks too?

I found the nearest parking spot and walked back, with spring to my step.  What is it?  The chrome spikes where trim pieces once attached revealed some attitude.  Hey, it must stem from pride, right?

The owner happened to be right there, so we talked.

News stories notwithstanding, you see vehicles like this all over the five boros surrounding the sixth, right?  So any identification?

 

And the ID is . . .

1949 Plymouth Business Coupe with a 1950s Willys pickup box molded into the trunk, making this . . .  what else . . .  a TRUCK. And besides the original-but-modified body and front clip, everything else makes this a throbbing epitome of speed.

All photos, WVD, who thanks to road miles recently logged has another Truckster! post already in the pipeline.   Always keep your camera ready!

 

Is this a miniature replica of a tugboat posed beside a green wall?

Not really.  But besides ULCVs like Thalassa Pistis (sea of faith?), even 100′ x 40′ tugboats seem to shrink.

 

Enlarge this photo and you’ll see the folks here heading out to fish implausibly turn their backs to the huge ship not that far away.

She’s has capacity of just under 14,000 teu, 

although she appears to have fewer than that aboard.

The 106′ x 32′ Brendan Turecamo, like the other tugs, appears to be shrunk.

She arrived here from Savannah and Colon Panama before that;  as of dawn Saturday, she’s still in port here. 

All photos, WVD.

I’ve done dense traffic posts, and actually this is one.

The 3-mile strait can get quite busy.

 

Petroleum and all other goods, manufactured and raw, transit.

Key word here is busy.

 

Sometimes large vessels seem to be on a collision course, but that’s just trompe-l’œil ….

Yesterday, at one point it was unusually busy.  Count the tugs and larger vessels here? I count three ships and at least six identifiable tugboats when I blow this photo up.

There’s plenty of room in that 1000′ waterway.

All photos, WVD.

Have you read or heard references to a “trackless sea” or “trackless deep”?  Last night I was looking a “whole ocean” views of traffic.  Notice the magenta stream?  Recall that the magenta arrowheads show recreational vessels.  The green (cargo ships) and red (tanker) arrowheads seem much more random, but the magenta . . . pink . . . ones, they are totally following a track.

Ditto here; notice the magenta stream showing the “coconut milk run” on the tradewinds to the west to the Marquesas, French Polynesia, and beyond from Panama.

If we look at the Indian Ocean, the red icons heading east out of the Persian/Arab Gulf and the green ones heading both ways around southern Africa . . .  does rush hour on highways around any major metropolitan center come to mind?  It does for me.

Given all the sea shanties dating from the 19th century and references to Cape Horn, how about a shanty or two about the Cape of Good Hope?

Tracks in the southern Atlantic form an X. Try it out yourself.  Without AIS, we’d still talk of “trackless seas.”

A “little sister” Statue of Liberty will be displayed on a sixth boro island later this month and next.  Note the photo credit;  I wonder if the half-ton statue will arrive by CMA CGM water cargo or air cargo.

And finally . . . thanks to a Great Lakes mariner for this page from the Detroit Marine Historian Newsletter.  Grouper was a name yet to be when that publication hit the stands. The auction info is here.

I use the term “line locker” where some might say “miscellaneous.”  That’s the bright red hull of Issuma a decade ago as it encountered a local mammal while transiting the Northwest Passage.  You might wonder what became of Richard Hudson and his boat.  The good news is that he’s still sailing, and the better news is that he’s creating a rich offering of sailing videos on YouTube.  Check them out here

Screen grabs, WVD.

 

Jeremy Whitman took this photo of the big blue Konecranes #38 crane.  Tail boat is Candace Elise, prior to 2015 known as Stephen Dann, as hereOXBO is managing the transport.

They departed Manitowoc a week or so ago and are now in a very wide portion of the Saint Lawrence, downstream from Gaspé Peninsula.  Manitowoc, among other things, is the western terminus of SS Badger. 

Jake Van Reenen took this photo as they passed Clayton.  Molly M I has replaced Candace Elise.  The barge supporting the barge is Cashman Equipment Corp.’s JMC 253, with dimensions of 250′ x72′ x16′ deck barge.

René Beauchamp got this shot –and more on FB Seaway News-Voie maritime Infos–of the tow.  His vantage point over the South Shore Canal portion of the Saint Lawrewnce Seaway  was the Cartier Bridge.  ETA for the tow at the mouth of the Piscataqua and Kittery ME is June 17.  I look forward to photos from there.

Harry McNeal moved deck barge 1962 with crane away from the IMTT docks the other day, 

Face on, the crane appeared to be straight up.

Allan Seymour caught this Denali with tank barge DBL 104 upbound on Penobscot Bay yesterday.  If I have the right number, DBL 104 has a capacity is just over 105,000 barrels.

I spotted Paul Andrew with the recycling scow DS 171 heading for the Arthur Kill.

The destination for this is PS&S/Visy Paper.

Erich A. caught Emery Zidell up the Hudson in the notch of 83,000 bbl tank barge Dr. Robert J. Beall.

James Turecamo meets the Centerline unit up in the scenic Hudson River below Albany.

And I saw Eastern Dawn aka Toula pushing two

mini-barges.

The minis, one at a time, carry dredge spoils from the depths of Gowanus Canal.  Prior to this project, I’d never seen mini barges, or scows.

All photos, as credited: Jeremy, Jake, René , Erich, and WVD.

Unrelated, the highest bid for tug Grouper as of this morning is $26.00.

 

The other day I caught Marine Spill Response Corp.’s  New Jersey Responder in the KVK out for training run. Click here for a list of MSRC’s assets around North America.  Of those assets, the sixteen 208′ x 43′ boats like the one below are the largest and most costly.  Previously I’ve posted photos of Delaware Responder and Deep Blue Responder.

Click here for an example of the 47′ class.

As I said, this Responder is one of sixteen that were built, all not quite 30 years ago.  New Jersey Responder was hull #K008;  hull #K009 was launched the same month, April 1993, as Caribbean Responder, which along with Maine Responder, makes up two of sixteen sold out of the fleet. 

From my understanding, this article is generally accurate concerning the operations and funding of MSRC. 

To get back to Caribbean Responder . . . she’s been sold twice, changed name twice, and is currently on the other side of the world.   Where and by what name?

She’s in the Arabian Sea off Oman somewhere, or last was when recorded by AIS two months ago, which means she could be anywhere on the watery planet.

She was renamed Mamola Responder and then Sophia.

All photos, WVD. 

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

I’m always thrilled to see these specialized vessels in the sixth boro.  I’d seen Regulus before, but see how her deck machinery back in November 2019 was different than it is now.  Versatility is key.

That red T identifies her as a Tidewater boat, a PSV (platform supply vessel), one of hundreds of speciality vessels operated around the world.  The link in the previous sentence provides lot of information about the company, its history back to the mid-1950s, and its boats.  Most Tidewater boats have a two-word name, the second being “Tide”, eg., Desoto Tide or Ebb Tide, which launched the company in 1956.  See a photo of Ebb Tide here

The fact that Regulus does not indicates she came from the Gulfmark fleet, which Tidewater absorbed.

 

I’m out of my depth here, but I’d wager there’s a “moon pool” directly beneath the red tower, an opening in the hull though which subsea equipment can safely be lowered or retrieved.  Scroll through this link to see a great photo through the moon pool and into the deeps.

The A-frame on the stern can also be used to lower/retrieve instrumentation, here inside the yellow frame.

 

 

If you didn’t notice in the links above, the dimensions here are 272′ x 58′ and powered by a total of 10250 hp.

As is true of many of the “exotics” in this blog, the impending wind farm construction explains their presence here. 

As of sunrise this morning, the Jones Act Regulus has headed back to sea.

All photos, WVD. 

 

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