Aleksandr sent me these photos about a month ago.  He took them on April 20 passing Vlissingen and headed generally northward.   And I’m somewhat stumped.  What does Flintercoral look like to you?

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To me it looks like a new build, going elsewhere for completion.

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Multratug 27 takes the bow and

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Multrasalvor 3 at the stern.

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So I guess here’s the story:  it was completed as a container vessel, and although it has a Flinter- name, Flinter- never took ownership because the yard had gone bankrupt beforehand.  It seems then that some time later, the ship was purchased by Necon, and  converted into a semi-submersible.  Necon, it seems, has only this vessel.  But why it was under tow a month ago is a mystery.

My experience with Flinter is from 2009, when Flinterduin brought the Dutch sailing barges to the sixth boro, and then Flinterborg picked them up in Albany and returned them to Dutch waters.

The same day, Aleksandr caught Smit Sentosa on its arrival from a one-month passage in from Capetown.

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Many thanks to Aleksandr for these photos.  Previously his photos and drawings have appeared here.  Vlissingen (origin of the name of the NYC area called Flushing, settled in 1645) is a quite old port in Zeeland.

So here was 1 and in it I said I would answer a question in a few days and now a few weeks have passed.  The question pertained to the device mounted on the stern of vessel

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Husky.  Congrats to Seth Tane, who guessed correctly.  Here’s what Xtian writes:  “It’s a plough.  In French we talk about “nivelage” [leveling], which means after dredging the bottom of the sea is like a field that has just passed a plow.  This tool cuts the bump to fill the gap.  It’s also used in the rivers where the “alluvium” or the mud stays in always same places because of the current and built like “bottom hill” there.  And it happens also in some harbour (like ferries’ harbour) as because the ferries always doing the same maneuver and raise the mud that still lay at the same place.

With the plough used at the right time, ebb tide for example, the mud is raised and leaves the harbour with tidal current.  In some places the plough is used to feed the hopper dredger –  when the dredger is too large, the plough is used to remove a “bottom hill” when they are close to the bank to give the mud at the place where the hopper dredge is working.   The plough is not only used with mud but also with sand or pebble.  Google with words : Dredge – Plough.

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About Husky, the day I took this picture she was working closely with the dredge Rijndelta at the entrance of Maasvlakte harbor.   I add a picture of her below.”
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More of Xtian’s photos follow, like this closeup of the captain of Smit Cheetah,

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Fairplay 24 and 21,

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Union 11 passing the Mammoet headquarters,

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Smit Schelde,

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SD Rebel,

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Multratug 31, 

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Osprey Fearless, 

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Pieter (?) towing Matador 2,

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and finally the recently completed Noordstroom.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos of another watershed.

Yesterday was National Maritime Day.  At the edges of the Upper Bay, people associated with the maritime industries gather for a memorial.

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at Marisol Escobar’s American Merchant Mariners’ Memorial statue.

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Two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro–Fort Schuyler and Kings Point, named for two area maritime academies–stood off.

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Service and sacrifice were honored.

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Prayers and

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other words were offered by SCI’s Rev. David Rider and Marad’s Paul “Chip” Jaenichen.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first time I used this title.

America II looked resplendent bathed in a last burst of late afternoon sun yesterday.

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She was one of several sail vessels out;  here Pioneer seems headed over to a new loading point.

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On a meteorologically different afternoon a few weeks ago, I caught Lettie G. Howard out headed for the Kills. Here was another spring when I caught Lettie under very bare poles.

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I saw Topaz briefly only once, so far away she was only a tall mast, but Claude Scales caught this from his daily vantage point.  Click here for a close-up of Nantucket WLV-612 from three years ago.

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No words . . . no gilding the lily!

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Pioneer heads back to the dock.

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Anyone know where Mary E is sailing from these days?

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Thanks to Claude Scales for use of his Topaz photo.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who has used the title “autumn sail” much more frequently.  And if you have not yet read my article about sailing to Cuba last winter, you can read it here.

A few years have already passed since I posted the first in this series, which I should have called and I’m still in search of a photo of the ITB Major Vangu back in 1973 and 1974.  But I was thrilled to open my email the other morning and find these photos taken in 1992 by Matt Schoenfelder.  Check out his impressive range of galleries here.

The huge pusher tug in the photo below is Colonel Kokolo, recently refurbished and returned to service on the Congo River.  Click here for a map of key waterways in the Congo;  upper center, I lived west of Basankusu for two years teaching at a high school.

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Matt writes, “I was looking through the web for some images of the Onatra barge from the Congo River and came across your site and read that you had traveled up the Congo River some years ago (my note:  1973-4). In 1992, together with a German man I met in Kisangani, I bought a dugout canoe and the two of us paddled 4 weeks down the Congo River to Kinshasa. Needless to say it was the adventure of a lifetime! Anyway, I have just recently scanned some of the old fuzzy and scratched film and thought you might appreciate a few images. From Kinshasa I wanted to get to Zambia and the “best” option available was to get back on the river and travel by barge to Ilebo, where I could take the train down to Lubumbashi. Well it sounded nice on paper but turned out to be an ordeal (as was ANYTHING in Zaire at that time!!) After the 4 weeks on the canoe I then spent another 13 days moving slowly upstream to Illebo on the river (tug and ) barge, which was supposed to be 5 days. The 3-day train trip from Ilebo to Lubumbashi took 30 days…walking would have been quicker! I added that last bit as I will include a few shots from the river barge I took to Ilebo. The images are far from high quality but you may find them interesting nonetheless.

That (tug and ) barge was called the Wandeka IV. Actually I was only on it for 8 of the 13 days. It broke down somewhere along the Kasai River and I was able to get on a German [vessel] from the company Strabag. I don’t have any images scanned of that barge but should I get around to that I’ll send you a few.
Incidentally, in that image of the Wandeka you will notice a small bag just behind me. This was my “day pack” and all it carried was my money. In Kinshasa (after being robbed at gunpoint by the police) I was able to cash in 200$ of travellers checks – after several days of going from bank to bank and hearing that they simply didn’t have any money. At that time 1 dollar was 2 million Zaires (when I entered the country 1$ = 1,000,000 Zaires – 3 months later when I finally left it was 1$ = 5,000,000 Zaires!). The largest note they had available at the bank was 50,000 Zaires so that 200$ translated to 8,000 bills and it was a huge load to tug around with me! I carried it with me for the next 6 weeks, happy whenever I could pay for something and relieve the load a little.

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I doubt I would ever repeat that journey but it was perhaps the most incredible chapter in my travels. Hardly a pleasure but fascinating and exciting nonetheless.”

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I remember from my experience that riding on the tug was considered first class;  the folks on the barge in the photo above . .  well, they would be traveling second class.

Many thanks to Matt for getting in touch and sharing these photos.

Some of my scratchy old Congo photos can be found here.  And yes, that person below was me as a mere young manster.

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Bokakata, DRC (then Zaire) 1973

Back to the Caloosahatchee Canal and a few miles east of Cowgirl Way . . .

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more traffic, like MV Sea Star and

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Summer Star pushing a Gator Dredging’s Jesse Marie Ellicott 670 dredge and a deck barge and

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the USACE’s Leitner.  And is that a bovine up on the ridge?

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Many thanks to the Caloosahatchee Canal office for these photos.

Secret salts sometimes send along photos, and I appreciate that, since many waterways I’ll never see . . .  and that means boats I’d never encounter, like Reliance, 1979, 127′ x 40;’

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Grand Canyon II, an offshore construction/ROV/IRM vessel, shown in this link getting towed from Romania to Norway for completion; and more.

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Here’s an unidentified Marquette Offshore boat with an unidentified Weeks crane barge,

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Paraclete . . .  look that word up here  and then see the rest of the names in her fleet,

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Gulf Faith, 

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USCGC Cobia

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Gulf Glory and an unidentified Algoma self-unloader,

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and finally a WW2-era tank-landing ship turned dredger and named Columbia, ex-LST-987.

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All interesting stuff from Mobile, Alabama.   Hat’s off to the secret salt.

Tony A sent these first three photos.  What are they?

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Here’s the answer. I like the statement . .  the last one above water!  I wonder what else you can say that about.   Whalebacks have come and gone, except this one. Click here for a historical essay on whalebacks that makes an unexpected connection to Franklin D. Roosevelt. If your appetite is whetted, here’s another.   As the the connection between this style and x-bows, click here.

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Click here to see El Cheapo’s 4-minute video on whalebacks, including one that served as a passenger vessel. 

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Frisia Inn, which was in and out of the sixth boro a week or so ago,  is not a whaleback,

 

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but the bow shares some design features.

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It has the same bow as CSAV Rio de Janiero, Conrad S, and others.

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Turtle back?

For a number of great vintage whaleback images, click here for portions of Neel R. Zoss‘ book, McDougall’s Great Lakes Whalebacks, including a whaleback automobile carrier called . . . South Park.

Many thanks to Tony for the actual whaleback photos.  For a good closing story on a whaleback whose remnants lie 400 feet below the surface of the GOM, click here.   That whaleback, SS City of Everett, would tow barges and its Captain Thomas Fenlon claimed it could have saved RMS Republic from sinking, offers to do so having been refused by the RMS Republic’s captain.

 

Are those dunes beyond Durga Devi?

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Sandy shore and mountains? Durga Devi is a fairly new offshore supply vessel.

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In the same port, here’s Kamanga, a Cambodian-registered reefer from 1977.  But those are two OSVs or AHSVs in the distance.  So what accounts for this collection of speciality, non-cargo per se vessels?

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Another reefer here is about a decade newer .. . Isleman, a name sounding like it needs a preposition.

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Frontier is a Grindrod container vessel.

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But here’s the explanation . . . it’s Seadrill’s West Eclipse, a semi-submersible.

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Here’s an introduction to the company.

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Hilde K is an anchor handling supply tug, 2008, Indonesia-built.

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Topaz Xara is China-built, 2014.   They remind me of what I saw in Guanabara Bay a few years ago.

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Most of this is a tribute to global oil, offshore Namibia.   Here’s more of a picture of the Namibian economy.

Many thanks to Richard Hudson for these photos.  Previous photos by Richard and crew are here.

If I ever get to Namibia, one place I’d like to see is the Skeleton Coast . . . .

If you’re not sure where to place Cuxhaven, the image below may help.  Another clue is that in Cuxhaven inbound, you could choose either to make for Hamburg or for the Kiel Canal. All these photos come thanks to Aleksandr Mariy, whose drawing we featured here recently.

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Wal was launched in 1992.  Dimensions:  101′ x 32.8′ x 17 and Gross Tonnage is 368.

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Luchs, 1991, 95′ x 29.5 x 15.1 and GT 229.

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Wolf, 1993, 105′ x 26.2′ x 17′ and GT 368.

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Bugsier 15, 1991, 92′ x 29.6 x 15.1 and GT 239.

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Bugsier 10, 2009, 108′ x 42.7 x 19.3 and GT 485.

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Steinbock, 1977, 92′ x 26.2′ x 14.1′ and GT 213.

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And Steinbock here is underway through the Kiel Canal.

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Here’s more info on Cuxhaven.

All photos here come thanks to Aleksandr Mariy, to whom I am grateful.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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