I sometimes refer to a golden hour, but recently I heard someone talk about the “blue” hour, when the sun is still or already below the horizon.  The light is dramatic in both, or through that whole continuum, as seen here.

Fort McHenry heads east . . .

as does Amy Moran, who technically is moving later than the blue to gold but still enjoys the subdued light.

RTC 80 is pushed westbound by

Dace Reinauer.

Treasure Coast waits with its barge amidst the industrial landscape of IMTT.

Viking (sometimes pronounced “viking“) moves toward the AK with DBL 134.

Buchanan 12 heads for the fuel dock.

Ruth M. Reinauer  takes her barge to the AK as well.

Evelyn Cutler moves her barge to the west, and

fleet mate Kimberly Poling crosses the strait to tie up at Caddells.

 

 

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Faber Park aka the swimming pool has become one of my favorite places to watch the behemoths pass.The next set of photos I took in about 10 minutes.

I’m in awe of the skills involved . . . navigation and communication.

This is a tight turn.

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Four tugboats–Ellen, Rowan, Capt. Brian, and Eric–keep it in the channel and the track such that two of these ships can negotiate the turn.

 

And they make it look routine.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

According to the archives, tug Syracuse was splashed in late 1933 and completed in spring 1934 in Syracuse Inner Harbor.  The tug was certainly the oldest entity in the Lyons area of the Canal organization.

The clipping below connects the splash to early December 1933.  Some numbers on the boat:  77′ x 20.8′ x 9 with a 6′ 6″ prop.  She was first built with a 250 hp steam engine from the previous tug Syracuse;  in 1970, a Caterpillar 510 D379 8 cylinder was installed.  I don’t know if there was an intermediary power plant.  Her 1933 $40,000 cost would be just over $750,000 in 2018 dollars.

Here’s a photo of Syracuse of Syracuse NY in Oswego in July 2014. The laker in the distance is Capt. Henry Jackman of Sault Ste Marie.

I’ll do another post on Syracuse soon, but for now, let me share my favorite photos of this veteran, which I took in October 2014 as we passed her with Urger.

I don’t believe there’s ever been a tug that looks quite like Syracuse of Syracuse, except maybe Reliable of Utica, now owned and operated by Mr. Davy Jones.  Check out these trains, cars, and even some boats of this same era here.

So . . . eighty-five years working and still looking great!!

Click here for a post about a 90-year-old canal tug.

The top photo by Bob Stopper;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

First, from Kyle Stubbs, three Vane tugs  (Elizabeth Anne, Hudson, and Delaware alongside DoubleSkin 501) which would not be that unusual on this blog, except he took the photo in Seattle over by Terminal 5.  Click here for previous photos from Kyle.

Leaping south to the Mexican port of Manzanillo–north of Lazaro Cardenas–it’s VB Yucatan, in between  CMM Jarocho. and CMM Maguey. 

Not a tugboat, but also in Manzanillo .  . it’s Elizabeth Oldendorff, a gearless differently-geared sister of Alice.

In the center of the photo below, I’m unable to identify this Grupo TMM tug. 

Heading up the Hudson River, here’s an oldie-but-goodie, Ronald J. Dahlke.  Photo was taken about a month ago by Willard Bridgham in Waterford.  Anyone know where she’s gone to now?  She’s a sister of Urger and built in 1903!!

And it is that season, as this photo of Cornell by Paul Strubeck reminds us.

Thanks to Kyle, Maraki, Willard, and Paul for use of these photos.

Quick question:  What is Mexico’s leading port?  How about, several western Mexico ports?  Given all the TV coverage of Mexico, you’d think we would all know these things.  I don’t have a TV and read, but I did not know the name of this port.

Here’s a photo of Mexico’s largest port as seen from sea last week by the Maraki crew.

Mexico’s largest port has an advantage in that ships serving the US heartland from Asia needn’t pass through the Panama Canal.

So here it is, by some accounts . . . Lázaro Cárdenas.  As shipping into the US increases, the major ports become congested, and new routes are sought.  From Lázaro Cárdenas (LC)  to Laredo is about 850 miles.  And you bypass Long Beach, LA, and the Panama Canal.  Since it’s a new port, there’s room to grow.

 

Here’s a closer up of the port layout. Here’s more on LC with a great aerial photo.

By other account, Manzanillo is the largest port.   Maraki tied up there recently and sent these photos along.

 

The skipper poses in front of public art in the port.

So here’s why I brought up TV, and I remember the Lewis, Jhally, and Morgan study from back in 1991.  The conclusion was . . . the more folks watched TV coverage of the Gulf War, the less they knew about causes and potential consequences.

I fear TV still has this type of deficiency.

Thanks to the Maraki crew for these photos.   Previously they sent along Colombian tugs and more.

Back three years ago, I did a whole month of posts on ports. 

The other night in a diner 300 miles from the sixth boro, Jim–holding the remote below and to the left–mentioned his boat models.  His favorite, he said, was Mister Darby.  My interest was piqued, but he went on, describing it as about five feet long and having an automobile battery as a power source.   In fact, he said, one time he sank the model as a result of taking an abrupt turn to port;  the battery wasn’t adequately secured, flipped on its side, dooming the tug.

I met Jim last year in connection with an old boat up on the Saint Lawrence.  I had coffee with him the other day in connection with another boat, one that’s been featured on this blog many times.

Anyhow, when he was finished, I asked if he had a photo of Mister Darby;  sure enough he did.  When I asked what else he knew about Mister Darby, he said it was last in Indonesia.  JMC on the stack expands to Jackson Marine Corporation, a Halliburton company.

So for Jim and everyone else, here’s Mister Darby –now Atlantic Salvor–as she appeared in the September 5, 2010 Great North River Tugboat Race.

 

 

And in late November this year, below she heads west under the Bayonne Bridge.

These days, Atlantic Salvor has a “twin” in the boro also, Atlantic Enterprise, ex-Mister Pete.

The first two come from Jim;  the others by Will Van Dorp, whose favorite Salvor photos were posted here.

By the way, here’s the Mister Darby kit.

It seems most appropriate to juxtapose that building with an ocean-going ship.  The physical aspect of world trade happens thanks to ships.

And the names allude to this, like Mediterranean Shipping Company (aka MSC) Lucy and Mustafa Dayi.

Or Zim Yokohama and Lian Yang Hu.

Atlantic Journey, 

Ever Linking, and

Ocean Pearl:  they almost make a declarative sentence. And Ocean Pearl‘s cargo comes from North Africa.

RHL Agilitas . . .  Her name is Spanish, she’s recently been in ports in Columbia, Guatemala, and Mexico, but the “H” in RHL is Hamburg.

High Tide seems as English as the 4th of July (:)) but the company D’Amico began in Italy. 

I mentioned to someone recently that the harbor is full of secrets hidden in plain sight, and that’s why I keep coming back.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

When the cold makes it less pleasant outside,  it’s heating season in the sixth boro and region far and wide.  I’m not sure all these units are moving heating oil, but they are all moving fuel of one sort or another.

Can it be that Crystal Cutler has been working here for almost 8 years now?!!  Here was my first time seeing her back in 2010.

 

Here’s a larger unit for a different niche than Crystal.

When I was first paying attention, the tug here was called Huron Service.

She’s been Genesis Victory for about five years now.

 

Diane B does some creek work once she leaves the main channels.  Here’s an article I did on Diane B and John Blanche some years back already.

 

All photos and any errors here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes anyone out there to be safe.

 

Mr. Connor has been in the area for a few weeks now, but here’s the first good set I’ve gotten.

The logo on the stack is unmistakeable, Marquette Transportation Company Offshore, one of three companies under the Marquette banner.  Click here for previous Marquette boats on tugster.

She might be working in dredge support.

Holden Marine Towing is also working in dredge support.

Based on the livery, I thought I’d never seen Bayou Babe before.

But a little digging showed that I’d seen her in 2009 as a Weeks boat, Virginia.  Equipment changes hands;  Bayou Babe now operates under Holden Marine, but before she was Virginia, she was Misener Marine’s Bayou Babe, built as such in 1979.

All photos this month by Will Van Dorp.

A friend once took this photo of a wall in San Francisco.  And Manhattan has this street called Wall that was quite ineffective in keeping the originals of Mannahatta out.

But as you can see from the photo below, Manhattan today is a walled city, with a wall made of lego-colored boxes.

[And this is just a space digression so that

 

you can’t see the next photo

 

on your screen.

 

There are more photos below.

 

I wouldn’t want you to make sense of the first photo

 

right away.

OK, enough, with

 

the digression.]

 

Here’s the rest of that shot, two Maersk ships passing just north of the VZ Bridge.

All these photos were taken within a total of less than two minutes

Alex sees Maersk Shenzhen out, then will likely do a 180 and assist Capt. Brian seeing Gunhilde Maersk into the KVK.

And now I have a question:  NYMaritime defines ULCVs and SULCVs (super ultralarge container vessel) basically as follows:  anything larger than 997′ and 140′ beam is considered a ULCV, and anything with beam in excess of 159′ is a SULCV.  Vessel traffic describes ships of Gunhilde‘s class as SULCV but does not do so for Shenzhen.  But now guess the relative dimensions of these two vessels.

Maersk Shenzhen  1062′ x 157’*  10,000 teu.  Previously she was Hyundai Pluto. 

Gunhilde Maersk  1204′ x 138′ *   7000 teu.

Is there some mistake here?

*These numbers come from shipspotting.com.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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