What is that? asked one gentleman standing at beside a lock.  The geese took no chances and scurried as it approached.

From this angle, its ferry origins are quite evident.  Scroll to compare with SS Columbia and SS Astoria.

This is the bow of Ward’s Island;  she’s departing the way she arrived around 1937 but stern first, leaving under duress.

Here the tow departs E-12 for Amsterdam.

That’s E-11 in the distance, and from this vantage point, I see

the hull as a sounding board for an as-yet invented instrument.   I believe that before she goes to the reef, her crane and wheelhouse will be once again mounted.  For show.

From one of her former crew, here’s what a working Ward’s Island looked like late in a season, replacing summer buoys with winter buoys.

The next batch I took near E-10, a lock allowing photos from the sunny side.

As you can see, she was certainly rotund.

 

To close out this post,  . . . to that gentleman who couldn’t identify the blue rotund hulk, I’d say  this reefing plan is obliterating some NYS history that could be repurposed.  Eradicating context destroys a dimension of the Canal. What do you think?

For more about the photo below by Jon Crispin,  click here.

The photo above by Jon Crispin.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

It occurs to me that someone might want to start a website using the slogan above.

Click here for previous canal reef express posts.  For Urger posts responding to and with the same urgency, click here.

 

No, it has nothing to do with dance, but refers to my bird guide which calls “exotic” anything appearing outside of its usual habitat.  Here are the previous exotics posts.

These photos were all taken by Mike Abegg in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

It’s Beverly M I, a McKeil tug.  I quote from the site linked:  “built in 1993 by Imamura Shipbuilding of Japan as the Shek O for Hong Kong Towing and Salvage.”  Remember, Canada has no Jones Act-type origin rules.

 

 

A tug registered in St. John’s . . .  I’d call that exotic.  Anyone know the story?  Since it delivered a barge that went into the graving dock, I’m guessing it was an emergency repair.

I’ve seen her fleet mate–Sharon M I— several times on the Great Lakes.

Many thanks to Mike for getting these photos.  Click here to see his previous catches.

 

New styling for a superstructure?  Ocean7 Projects is an organization I’ve not seen in the sixth boro before.

For a Dutch company, 

it has a great logo with that tulip.

Urk is a small town dating back to medieval times, accustomed to surviving against the sea. I’ll never forget a visit there with cousins on a raw November day, ducking out of the rain into a small bar with nary a straight line anywhere in its construction due to sagging.  The genever warmed otherwise cold bones.

She danced around Bergen Point this morning, seemingly empty from

Haiti.  I’m not sure what she’ll load in Port Newark.

It made my day to see this unusual cargo ship.  As of this posting, she’s southbound along the Delmarva peninsula.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And following up on yesterday’s post, the top AIS screen capture represents many Sunday evenings-into-Monday mornings.  Although Port of NYC/NJ operates non-stop, there’s often a rhythm of emptying-out on the weekend with a surge of new boats at the work week’s start.  The exact  capture was from wee hours of Monday, this week.

More interesting is the followup to the second photo showing Grasp anchored off Fire Island.  Frank Pierson found a news article corroborating what Mike had said . . .  that USNS Grasp (T-ARS-51) was indeed operating at the wreck site of USS San Diego (ACR-6).  Be sure to read the article embedded in his comment. Here’s a video of the ceremony.  Thanks much, Mike and Frank.

Or . .  . what day of the week is it?  There is a logic here.

While we’re looking at AIS, notice this surprise . . . 10 or so nm south of Fire Island, Grasp is (or was)  . . . grasping.

This is not Grasp but her sister Grapple, both product of Peterson Builders of Sturgeon Bay WI, a shipyard now defunct but not far from one currently called Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding, source of many vessels known in the sixth born.   Over beyond Grapple is Apache.

My second question, for which I have no answer, is what project is Grasp doing off Fire Island?

Answer tomorrow to the first question.

Photo and captures by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  And here are the posts I’ve done earlier on the 1929 Ward’s Island, whose builder’s plate photo I took in October 2016.  I was told it was removed some time ago and is in a safe place.  Here was my first post on “Ward’s.”

As a baseline photo of the double-ender ferry entered a second life in 1937 as a derrick boat or “crane ship,” I offer this shot I took in Lyons in March 2018.  That’s snow in the foreground.

In one of her most notable roles, she assisted in the clean up near lock E-12 after the Thruway bridge collapsed into Schoharie Creek, an event I recall vividly because I traversed that bridge just the day before.

Note the bow prop.  I wonder if at one time it had a rudder, as

you see in this photo of the stern prop.

The rest of these photos come from Bob Stopper.  Notice the glass has been removed from the wheelhouse, but the flag still flies.

Little by little, its crane abilities are removed and placed alongside the dry dock.

 

Pulling the shafts proved complicated,

x

but eventually the once crane ship looks more like a curvaceous barge.

Who knows whether these props will be reefed along with the ship . . . .?

 

A tug is expected to arrive in  Lyons imminently to move this vessel from central–almost western New York–to tidewater, then down the Hudson, and out to the designated reefing ground.

And in other news from Lyons, here’s who showed up late Tuesday afternoon . . . with some new signage on the stack and engine cover.  Compare with here from a month ago . . .

 

It’s been a while since the first in this series . . . and to convince you to look at that link, here’s another photo I took the same day below. See the Seatow with a dead houseboat? Midsummer is a state of mind that resists mustering up and focusing energy.  Janis Joplin’s “Summertime” comes to mind.  The photo below I took on June 10, 2011, and yes that’s Blue Marlin in the distance with its cargo of equipment formerly operated by Reinauer.

I recalled midsummer of 2011 when I saw the photo below on Birk Thomas’ FB feed.  Since this triggers today’s post, I’ll let you ponder that shanty boat a bit, and tell more about it at the end of the post.  But if you’re downstream from Kingston NY, you’ll see this vessel head downstream at some point soon.  It’s currently in the Rondout.

Earlier this summer, I was walking along the west side of the island, and I spotted two stone cows’ heads!

Walking in the midsummer zone, I figured a rational explanation existed, it wouldn’t be Bordens, and I’d not panic.  Encounters like these are one of the joys of living in this city, and one of the reasons I usually carry a camera.  Here’s the background story, and here’s a story from June 2018 about incorporating these heads into a post-modern park monument.

So then there are these . . . an army of re-enacters?  A tent revival featuring a successor to Charles G. Finney?

Scouts with only white tents?  A cult?

Nomads?   An apolitical movement? A set for one of the many movies shot in the lands around the sixth boro?

Nope.  It’s actually a glampground.  You know . . . a place to go glamping, a business catering to folks who want to tent out differently, I guess.

So . . . the shanty boat is the vehicle for Wes Modes’ adventures, some of which he records here.

A brief story about an incident from 2004, I think, a day I didn’t carry a camera.  Midmorning I arrived at Pier 16 to see five law-enforcement helicopters circling the Brooklyn Bridge, a dozen of so emergency boats closing in on the Manhattan side bridge pier.  Then a small rowboat broke out of the cordon and made for Pier 17, surrounded by police.  Once tied to the pier, as many police as could board his boat without sinking it, handcuffed the kid in the boat, and started searching the contents of the boat, not much . . . a tarp and some large plastic bags. After grilling him for the better part of an hour, the police undid the cuffs and left him to his boat.

Later I asked him–maybe 20 years old if that– what that had been about.  He said he was from Albany, had built a small dory himself–and it looked it– with a tarp for a sail and wanted to  take it down to the big city and then return, a variation of Huck Finn.  He’d turned in at Spuyten Duyvil, taken the Harlem River to the East River, and as the tide was pushing him under theWilliamsburg and Manhattan Bridges, he decided he was going too fast and thought to tie up to the next bridge if he saw any protrusions.  He noticed some bent steel rods and  . . . grabbed one and tied his boat off to it.  And then the excitement started.  It was 2004 after all.  The theme of the interrogation was terrorism, understandably.

Still, I think he was just a contemporary of Huck Finn, definitely naive and maybe stupid.  It wasn’t, but it could have been my grandkid .  . or my friend’s son.  I wonder whatever became of him.  I wish I’d had a camera that day, but even if I had, the drama might have been elusive.

It’s summertime.  Enjoy it.  And make the world a friendlier place in the process.  Smile at the unfriendly person, but never smirk. I said smile.

One photo here by Birk Thomas;  the others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

 

All All but one of the photos in this post come from David Silver, assigned as a cadet this summer on a Maersk vessel going halfway around the world and back.  He departed Port Elizabeth on May 21.  This post follows his voyage, focusing on what someone like me–mostly fixed–doesn’t see.

May 24.  Charleston.  Mark Moran.

May 30. Houston.   Thor.

 

May 31.  Houston.  Wesley A.

June 06.  Norfolk.   Maxwell Paul Moran.

June 08.  Pilot boards in sixth boro of NYC.  JRT Moran.

June 08.  VZ Bridge as seen from the ship and

as seen from my location, at about the same moment.

June 09.  Port  Elizabeth.   Kirby Moran. 

There was a stop in Algeciras–the world’s 10th largest transshipment port– but no photos of assist tugboats.

June 25.  Suez Canal.  It could be one of the Mosaed boats, maybe number 1.

June 26.  Suez Canal.  One of the boats called Salam.

After transiting the Red Sea and stopping in Djibouti, July 9.  Mont Arrey, 

they rounded the peninsula and entered the Gulf.

July 9.  Jebel Ali.  P&O Venture.  That could be P&O Energy off the stern.

 

July 12.  Port Qasim.  SL Hodeida  with pilot boat and other Smit Lamnalco tugs.

July 13.  Port Pipavav.  It appears to be Ocean Supreme and another one of the Ocean Sparkle boats in the distance.

 

I have enjoyed seeing this variety of towing vessels from this trip halfway around the world.  Now I hope the return trip brings more photos and a safe return in late August.

Many thanks, David.

Since W. O. Decker may soon be seen albeit briefly in the sixth boro, let’s start with this photo from July 2008, as she chugs past the waterfall under the Brooklyn Bridge, thanks to an Icelandic-Danish artist named Olafur Eliasson.

Reinauer had some of the same names as now assigned to different boats here a decade ago but now no more on this side of the Atlantic, like Dean.

Some names have not (yet) been reassigned like John.

Now for some that are still here, though some have different paint and names:  Juliet is now Big Jake.  Matthew Tibbetts is still all the same, externally at least.

Stena Poseidon–a great name– is now Espada Desgagnes, and Donald C may still be laid up as Mediterranean Sea.

The long-lived, many-named Dorothy Elizabeth has been scrapped.

Rowan M. McAllister is still around, but the Jones Act tanker S/R Wilmington has succumbed to scrappers’ tools in Brownsville TX.

Falcon has left the sixth boro for Philly and Vane, and Grand Orion, as of today, is headed for Belgium.

And finally . . . June K here assisting with Bouchard B. No. 295 . . .    she’s still around and hard  at work as Sarah Ann.

All photos by Will Van Dorp in July 2008.

 

Here was Summer Sail 1; and since that dates from almost two years ago.

Clipper City looks great juxtaposed against the skyline, but

ketch Catriona . . . she has Herreshoff pedigree.

No matter . . . larger schooner or smaller and more intimate ketch,

one is pampered moving by sail in the sixth boro. And that includes the option of sailing aboard the oldest harbor schooner of all . . . Pioneer.

 

Above and below, it’s Pioneer, and below the other schooner is one you won’t see in the sixth boro for a few years . . . Lettie G. Howard.  Of course, if you head over to Lake Erie–where I’ll be n a few weeks–you may catch a glimpse, even catch a ride.

And finishing it off, it’s America 2.0.

All photos taken by Will Van Dorp in the past 365 days.

 

Ten years ago, a Rosemary McAllister arrived in the sixth boro.  I took the photo below on July 13, 2008.

That Rosemary is now Audrey, just Audrey.  Among other specs, that 6000 hp tug  is Tier II compliant.

The photo directly above and all those below I took yesterday, as she arrived in the sixth boro.  There was a christening, but elsewhere snagged me.

Let’s compare them:  at 100′ x 40′, this new Rosemary is almost 10′ longer and 4′ wider.

Powered by CAT 3516E Tier VI engines, she generates 6770 hp, compared with 6000 hp for her predecessor.

Today was the day to see her here, as she seems to have headed back to Norfolk right after the christening, and will arrive there by midafternoon.

Click here, here, and here for posts I did about the 2008 Rosemary.   The third link there is of Rosemary‘s christening along with Timothy in September 2008.

As was the case 10 years ago, Rosemary shared the christening yesterday with Capt. Brian A. McAllister, a twin.  Here’s an article from Workboat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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