Short and sweet, here’s a response to GB 36.  Enjoy this bit of one up-manship from Les Sonnenmark, frequent contributor here.  Les writes, “Maybe this should be several-upmanship.  It’s a government-owned research vessel which I photographed in 2010 at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.  It sports seven 350 hp Yamahas for a total of 2450 hp.  I’m guessing they don’t fill ‘er up at the local marina gas dock.”

LOTS OF OUTBOARDS 1

LOTS OF OUTBOARDS 2

Click here for a photo of a bigger tin boat with even more outboards.

Thanks much, Les.

Here were previous posts in this series.

Sunday morning, though, I went out to see the full moon set, but

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while I was relaxing there, this Dolphin intruded,

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low.

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And then went back and forth . . . above this tanker with stern line dangling and held in location by two tugboats.   And the VHF channel 14 was calling for a slow bell in the KVK.

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If that didn’t call attention to something awry, then a small boat adding wipes to the booms

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called even clearer signs of a problem. Also, on that outboard, is that camouflage paint or grease?

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Meanwhile even more spill response boats and crews arrived.

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When I got home and searched for info on any (oil spill) incident, I learned that the Dolphin itself had experienced some problems and spent the rest of the day and night on a nearby golf course.  Ouch!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the story as told by workingharborcommittee.

Many thanks to Paul for this aerial photo, said to show tugboats idled by the strike that lasted the first half of the February 1946.

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Here’s the verso of the photo, in the case you read Spanish.

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For more context of 1946 NYC, click here for a set of Todd Webb  photos.  If you have time for the 13-minute video at the end of that link, it’s well-worth it also, especially for the quote attributed to O. Henry . . . calling NYC “Baghdad on the subway,” which has a whole different set of connotations in 2015 as in O. Henry’s day.

Click here for more 1946 sixth boro photos by Andreas Feininger.

And since we’re stuck in 1946 for now, check out this Life article with drawings about a 1946 proposal to build a “first-world” airport (my quotes) along Manhattan’s west side covering 9th Avenue to the water and between 24th and 71st!

 

“From the Albert R. Stone Negative Collection, Rochester Museum & Science Center Rochester, N.Y.”

See the added image below the photo of Victor below.

For this photo printed in the Rochester Herald, November 10, 1911, I’ll use text from the collection:  “The “Victor” is a two masted boat with decking in the bow and canvas covering a sheltered space in the stern. She is pictured, with her crew, just off-shore from the roller coaster at Ontario Beach Park. The boat is moving toward the bank of the river. According to the newspaper article, “The Victor is 37 feet over all, has a displacement of about nine tons and is equipped with a six-cylinder Holmes engine. Built in [Bayonne] New Jersey, she is…the latest model lifesaving boat…of the self-righting and self-bailing variety and will make twelve miles an hour under favorable conditions.”

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I generally do not modify published posts, except with self-deprecating cross-outs.  But here I’m adding the “plans” sent along by William Lafferty that clearly show the “mis-read” of the 1911 caption writer.  Here was a link I had intended to put with this post as well.  A further contradiction of the “misread” of the orientation of the boat is provided by the rake of the masts.  Thanks all for your corrections;  contemporary captions on any archival photos can be wrong.

McLellan E side elev

So this one is a mystery, and it deepens when you find there is Inspector I and Inspector II, and I don’t know which this is.  This photo is identified as taken in 1919 or 1920, but since the only person identified is Governor Miller, I’m thinking the photo was taken in 1921 or 1922.

 

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My questions:  Is this the yacht built by Consolidated in 1909, 80′ loa?  Are there photos of Governor FD Roosevelt using it?  Did it once belong to a Rochester NY radio station?  Does anyone have facts about it being used in the Mariel Boatlift and ultimately sinking in the Caribbean?

Today there are still annual canal inspections, but one of the vessels used is Grand Erie, a very different creature.

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September 2013

The photo above was taken by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to learn the rest of the story of motor yacht Inspector.

 

Given the hold shots from Wavertree in yesterday’s post, can you guess the vessels?  Answers at the end of this post.

While under construction . . . looking aft.

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During dormancy and along the port side looking aft?

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During restoration and looking aft . . . .

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During rejuvenation and looking forward . . . Sept. 2009.  The rest of the photos, starting with the one below, all show parts of the same vessel.

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A closeup taken from the photo above.

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Outside same vessel showing corner of a hatch cover.

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Day-Peckinpaugh in the sixth boro in September 2009.

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Day-Peckinpaugh between Locks 2 and 3 in Waterford in September 2014

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Day-Peckinpaugh is expected to be towed to Buffalo at some point in August 2015.   If you live within reach of the Erie Canal, you might want to get shots of her making a highly unusual transit.  Here’s more on the first (2005) phase of D-P’s second life.

Holds shown above were 1) Onrust, 2) SS United States, and 3) Wavertree.  Thanks to all who’ve helped arrange access.

Here’s another interior shot from last year.

And this is a self-indulgent set of photos.

Here are posts about Wavertree’s trip to the dry dock and before.  And below are two photos I hadn’t used in those posts.

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May 21, 2015

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May 21, 2015

In the past 10 weeks, prep for the actual dry docking has resulted in loss of at least a foot and a half of draft.  Mussels once submerged have lost their habitat.

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July 30, 2015

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July 30, 2015

Let’s descend into through the forward cargo hatch to see where a cavernous hold is getting even more cavernous.

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from the ‘tween decks looking up and …

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… down …

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and all the way down

Note the ladder beyond the foremast, as seen from standing to starboard of the keelson.

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Looking to the stern from the ‘tween decks.  As Mike Weiss said, “a cathedral of cargo.”

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For scale, note the worker wearing a white hard hat on the keelson beyond the mast

Looking astern from atop a makeshift block of ballast on the port side of vessel.  That’s the main cargo hatch prominent in the center of the photo.   My response to Mike’s quote is “an ark of angled wrought iron.”

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This is how the skeleton of a 130-year-old vessel looks.

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Looking toward the rudder post from the ‘tween decks.

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Returned to the main deck looking forward at the cargo hatches.

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Removal of extraneous and/or non-original weight has included belgian block and large concrete block ballast.  This water tank may be original

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And here are the credits.

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Many thanks to Mike Weiss and  South Street Seaport Museum for the tour; click on that link for membership info.  August promises to be more prep work for dry docking.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for CSM article about the 1983 initial and partial restoration of Wavertree.

Here are previous posts in this series.

And this set comes from Mike Abegg, whose photos have been used here previously.   Check this out.  All I know about the yellow vessel is that it looks like a Griffon 1000TD.

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Anyone know the whences and whose . . . inquiring minds wish to know.

Thanks to Mike for sharing these photos.

Somewhat related . . . does anyone you know refer to the East River or any portion of it as the Sound River?

 

I’m not entirely sure where the land story here starts and stops, but three and a half years ago, I posted this when the tower went up because it intruded into a lot of photos I took.  I took these next two photos in January 2012, right after erection but six months before it went on line.

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from the Upper Bay

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from Lower Newark Bay

And here are two I took last month.

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from right across the KVK

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from the Con Hook range

Here’s the news:  the turbine is fritzed and needs repair or replacement after just three years in spite of an expected life span of 20 years!  Here’s a full range of speculation. Of the hundreds of thousands of wind turbines operating in the world, why does this one fritz out?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to WS for passing this story along.

 

 

 

 

 

Here were parts a,  b and c.   These photos taken over three decades ago capture a simpler sixth boro.

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Here the magical dory is tied to Philip T. Feeney, which now languishes in a tug purgatory.   The shore of lower Manhattan also looked quite different then.  That low-slung but stately building on the other side of the river is the Custom House aka Museum of the American Indian.

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Reef points and baggy wrinkle . . . this is a classy sailing dory not timid

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when navigating past a tanker of yore.

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All photos by Pamela Hepburn of Pegasus Preservation Project.

I went quite close to the source of the Hudson four years ago . . . here.   But earlier this summer I stopped in Glens Falls, just because I wanted to see the falls.

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Glens Falls as seen from the Route 9 bridge

Here’s more . . .

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and more.

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Glens Falls as seen from below the Route 9 bridge

And here’s looking down the Hudson from below the bridge, with Finch Paper to the left and SCA Tissue to the right.

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Back to the Route 9 bridge, here’s the old central office, and click here for an interesting Finch Paper history.

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But here’s the real nugget . . . the really interesting piece of history, and it’s UNDER the bridge.  Charles Reed Bishop, local boy orphaned by age 4, who tagged along with a friend with connections–William Little Lee.  At age 24, the two of them headed for San Francisco, and since this was 1846, that meant sailing around Cape Horn and stopping in Hawaii along the way.  Bishop stayed, became a citizen of the Kingdom of Hawaii, and the rest of the story is here.

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How’s that for an unlikely trajectory for a Hudson river boy AND information found under a bridge?   And about 50 miles south of here, in Troy, along the river’s edge is another plaque celebrating another Hudson river boy with an unlikely trajectory into the Pacific.

Photos by Will Van Dorp.

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