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I’ve traveled the ICW from Charleston SC to NYC, some parts several times.  This is a “revisit”  focusing solely on tugboats. I’ll start in Charleston with Elizabeth Turecamo in the fog.

Recycling comments on the boats below from Georgetown SC, by George Schneider:  “The little one shows the name Laura , which has one of two possible origins: A 45-foot tug by the Equitable Equipment Company of Louisiana, or a 45-foot Army dredge tender of Army Design 320, mirroring the Equitable design. I’m guessing she’s ON 1060493, originally the Army ST 2051, then the Army Corps Fort  Brooke , and now owned by Sampit Towing of Charleston SC.”

And by William Lafferty: “I’m thinking the larger tug is Susan Richards, built in 1909 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Corporation at Quincy, Massachusetts, as the Gen. R. H. Jackson for the Army Quartermaster Corps and stationed at Jacksonville, Florida, later named Fort Sumter and Three Bros. It’s owned by Richards Marine Towing at McClennanville, South Carolina, and has been a fixture at Charleston for decades, originally run by White Stack Towing there.”

Thx George and William.

Crossing the border north to North Carolina, my next stop is Southport, where Sea Oak was working on a dredge project.

And after that, it’s Wilmington and Cape Henry.

The next batch is from Morehead City NC.  Atlantic Dawn was working on a dredging project there.

Na Hoku was there also, formerly a K-Sea boat. She currently works out of Jacksonville.

Liz Alma was too.  

Morehead City is the deep water export center for potash, mined farther north in Aurora.  Grace Moran then waited at the dock.  Is she still around?

Beaufort Belle, then PSC Phosphate, is now Norfolk tug.  Has she been repainted?

Peter G. Turecamo appears still to be working in Morehead City.

Clearly marked here in Norfolk are Miss Willa, Nancy McAllister, and McAllister Sisters.  Second from the left might be Steven Eileen McAllister.

Jack T. Moran was just a year old back ion 2017.

Thunder is one of a trio of Robbins Maritime small tugs with meteorological names:  Thunder, Lightning, and Storm.

Camie  is also a Robbins Maritime boat.

Anne Jarrett is another Norfolk Tug vessel.  It resembles a Vane tug, and at least two former Vane boats are now with Norfolk Tugs:  ex-Patapsco and Sassafras.

All photos, WVD.  The * denotes that most but not all photos were taken in May 2017.  It’s high time I take another trip along the ICW to see what has changed.  And we still have more from Norfolk to the sixth boro.

 

After I return to CSF with a camera, I’ll pick up part 1 again.   For now, let’s look at another ferry line that crosses the Sound.  By the way, how many ferries do you see in the photo below?

It was a foggy day in Port Jefferson that I chose to walk on for a jaunt across the Sound.

Grand Republic, certainly not the first vessel to carry that name, was getting some maintenance, so her sister vessel, P. T. Barnum, would be my ride. More on a much-earlier Grand Republic and a question at the end of this post.

This Grand Republic and this P. T. Barnum were launched four years apart, in 2003 and 1999, respectively. Mr. P. T. Barnum was a co-founder of the line, creating a ferry route that ran between his hometown of Bridgeport, nicknamed Park City,  and the port in Long Island farm country, Port Jefferson.

We backed out of the dock of a very foggy village of Port Jeff.

Here’s a phenomenon I don’t understand:  on either side of P. T. Barnum, I saw these rainbows.  Why there?

Mid-Sound we passed Park City.  She’s the oldest (1986),  smallest, and greenest of the current fleet.  When Park City was launched in Florida, she apparently made alligators fly;  read about it here.

Back in March, while in Seaside Park, one of the big parks in Bridgeport, I watched Park City sail into the port.

Later that same windy and cold March day, I watched Grand Republic sail in.

Here I’m looking north from just inside Port Jefferson harbor.  It’s worth a glance at a map to see how protected this harbor is.

All photos, WVD.

Related:  I’ve heard there’s a difference between the McAllister family and the McAlister family, the latter referred to here.  Can anyone jog my memory?  Of course, that may be yet another story than the one recounted in the 150 Years of Family Business book, in relation to the tugboat Iona McAlister.   Has anyone been to the Greenpoint bar called Grand Republic?

Mostly unrelated:  Here are two interesting postcards, one featuring the Starin  fleet, which McAllister acquired to form their own ferry business, and second . . . an appropriation of the Statue both from 150 years ago.

If you ride the ferry or just visit Port Jeff, spend a few minutes inside the office for some vintage photos like Nonowantuc (a native name for part of the Port Jeff area) and

Victor.  Info on all the boats can be found here.

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Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Here was T-23 days.  Now, in less than two weeks, the canal will be open.  Some of the vessels operated by NYS Canals to perform maintenance were featured in the T-23 post;  more are in today’s post.

Let’s start with Tender 2, T2, in Utica, nose to nose with tug Erie.

Tender #3 is tied up here just west of the dry dock in Waterford.

Left to right here are a self-propelled scow (SPS 60 maybe? the number) and Lockport.  That land derrick marks this location as Fonda.

Port Jackson is one of the new boats operated by NYS Canals.  The location is just west of lock E-13, and Grande Caribe, as well as her younger sister Grande Mariner powering her way west to Chicago will likely never be seen in the Canal again.

Tied up here in the shade east of Utica is Governor Roosevelt.

At the Utica section yard, it’s Erie again.  Note the NYS Thruway maintenance vehicles in the background.

Just west of lock E-19, the Dragon dredge gets support from Tender #4.

And on another occasion, it’s the same dredge assisted by Tender #5.  I took the photo between locks E-6 and 7.

And closing this out, how about a shot above the culvert of the tugboat that turns 120 years afloat this year, Urger.

All photos, WVD.  If you’re planning to transit the canal beginning on day 1 of the season  . . .  May 21, these are some of the maintenance vessels you’ll see. But don’t postpone a trip along the Canal because some of these could disappear any year now.

WVD is solely responsible for any errors of fact.

With Eastern Dawn in the foreground, the massive scale of these box boats is apparent.

Foreshortening gives the illusion that MSC Lauren cannot possibly avoid a collision.

Although this may be her first arrival in the sixth boro, this 12400 teu vessel has sailed the seas for a decade already.

See the crewman near the port bow quarter?

Now you see him?

 

If I recall correctly, she arrived here from Jamaica;  from here she travels to Italy.

Again . . . Linda L. Miller and the 6000 hp tugs show scale.  MSC Lauren is one of 560 container vessels operated by MSC, the second largest shipping company in the world.  Know the largest?  The third largest?  Answers are here.

So here’s a merger of truckster! and ULCVs, a photo I took last week from a parking lot.  I know what was loaded into that 20′ MSC container.  I invite you to guess.  Answer will be posted tomorrow . . . .

All photos, WVD, who is always happy to collaborate.

 

Let’s start at the Mattituck Inlet . . . and look east.  I’d never had a sense of the bluffs here.

I’d come here to catch a glimpse of the platform, the only deepwater petroleum platform on the US east coast, I’m told.

It was built in the 1960s by Northville Industries,

which in the decade before had built this storage facility. You can find more of that history here.

By the time I got closer, a tanker had arrived.

Kimolos carries the livery of the TEN fleet, like AfroditeKimolos has previously appeared in this blog nine years ago.

I believe those are two Miller’s Launch boats alongside the platform.   Kimolos has since departed for Sint Eustatius. 

All photos, WVD.

See the previous 17 posts off along this tangent here.

Let’s start here.  Name that truck.  Answer follows.

How about this vehicle, with its brand info stripped off?

It should be easier from this angle.

If you were wondering about the context for the top photo, here’s more of the field.  Note the USCG members on either side of the “bridge.”

This “marine highway” shows that the ferry needs to rotate to put stern to at the dock.   Know the ferry line?  This ferry itself?  The ferry in the distance?

On the same run as the top photo, that’s a mighty narrow bridge to the pier.

 

Ditto.  I can’t tell the brand of the red truck above or the blue below, although it would be safe (though not necessarily correct) to say a Peterbilt above and a KW below.

It takes expert judgement to drive onto and off this ferry.

And finally . . .  here’s the top mystery pickup.  The name’s on the tailgate.

All photos, WVD, from the ferry New London.  The red pickup is a 1950 Chevrolet.  The black/gray pickup . . . a 2021 Jeep Gladiator.  The other ferry is Susan Anne. Click here to see the whole Cross Sound fleet, including the ex-Zephyr.

You’ve likely walked in a muddy wilderness area and seen animal tracks and tried to identify then.  Or, you’ve had the same experience with tracks in the snow.  So what would leave these tracks on AIS?

The vessel has been working the Sound for a few weeks.   The two blue vessels here are Cross Sound ferries....

 

Here’s the answer:  Deep Helder, a 2014 vessel conducting sea bed mapping.  Helder is the Dutch word for clear, hence the post title.  In the distance, those are the hills of Connecticut.

Deep Helder is a 213′ by 52′ multipurpose offshore supply vessel, contracted to stay in US waters for a time yet.  More on MMT surveying here.

Note a cable supported from the port stern here.  I got these photos from the Cross Sound New London and never got closer than two nm from the vessel.

I hope to get closer up photos and learn more of who all’s on board . . .

All photos/info and any errors, WVD, who could have called this “exotic,” of course.

Not many Bouchard boats are moving these days;  the 2016 Frederick, 125′ x 38 and 6140 hp, is an exception.

I took this just after sunrise for the backlit effect.

The 1961 Caitlin Ann stays busy;  her 2400 hp moves the 79′ x 24′ hull and whatever the load is.

Note equipment of at least three towing companies here.

Cape Henry, 2018, is one of the newer boats in the boro.  Her 109 x 36′ hull is powered with 5000 hp.

 

Matthew Tibbetts was launched the year I finished high school, 1969.  She’s 92′ x 27′ and powered by 2000 hp.

 

Fells Point, 2014, 90′ x 32′, and one of Vane’s many 3000 hp.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s the source for this photo and info below.  My question is . . . where might it be now.  I have no answer.

This is only a portion of the history you’ll find if you click(ed) on the link in the paragraph above.

A friend just sent this.  Guess the location?  Full Steam‘s the name.

And finally, David once had a very different appearance as a “streamlined tug.”  I posted an image back in Something Different 21 here.

Another friend sent a photo of David in her current profile here.

The last two photos above are mine;  thanks to Isaac and Seth for the others.

Any info on the disposition of Mavret H is appreciated. None of these photos were taken in the sixth boro.

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