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or Go North . . . or up and then down bound.It’s all better than going south ….

Anyhow, in the spirit of the first of series from earlier this past months’ peregrinations, I’ll start with the map.  The red pushpins are overnights and the yellows are shorter stops.  An unexpected jaunt will be from Ogdensburg to Quebec City without stopping at Trois Rivieres or Montreal, where we stop after Quebec City.

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Locks there’ll be plenty–37 total I believe–because the alternative is shown below. You can descend the Lachine Rapids, but in a different type of boat.   Lachine . . . that’s French for what it looks like in English . . . China, as in … the folks like Cartier thought that if only they could get past the rapids, they’d be in China.

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Here’s another way to look at the St Lawrence watershed, care of an USACE diagram.

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Here’s to hoping you read this and to my having wifi.

By the way, I was shocked when I learned the namesake of the St Lawrence, patron saint of the BBQ.  Sizzlicious!!

Know this New York NY boat?

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How about this one?

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Know this background?

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The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

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I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

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It’s Pegasus and

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Charles A and

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Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

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OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

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And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

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Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Ten days ago I put up a post about multiple load lines on a Torm tanker, and I appreciate that many of you weighed in here and on FB.

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Here’s an explanation of load lines I found online.

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When I saw another Torm tanker leaving today, I thought I’d check.

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And sure enough, this one too had three sets of load lines, although I understand that only the one painted is the valid one.

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Neches dates from 2000, and Mary from 2002.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Over half a year ago, I did a series of posts on Atlantic Star, the first of the new ACL c-ships arriving in the sixth boro for the first time.  The other day was my first time to spot the next of the set of five.

And given the location of Wavertree, a 130-year-old  veteran of Atlantic (and all its adjoining waters)  sailing,

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juxtaposing the two seemed an opportunity not to pass up.  imagine this as cover art for a book called Atlantic Sail, Then and Now.   And no, I haven’t written it.

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Here’s a shot.  Now if only I’d had a drone….  I suppose in a few weeks if Peking is docked here, a shot with that barque and this Zim vessel (IMO 9289544) would be the one to get.

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See in the middle distance a Nukahevan craft passing Atlantic Sail?

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No matter.  Let’s study the novel shapes and angles on the CONRO, assisted out here by Eric McAllister.

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That’s the stack offset to port.

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Steel curves like this in superstructure are unusual.

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Sail on,

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Atlantic Sail.  Here’s the report for the week Atlantic Compass went to scrap.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Name that tug?

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Yes, that one on the far side of the outbound

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CMA CGM box ship . . .

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and passing all the steel skyscrapers in the distance.

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Eric R. Thornton has been doing its utmost to make the sixth boro greener. You first saw her here, and then later here.  I’m wondering about the new stack logo, though.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are some posts about Lettie G. Howard.

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Want to join the crew for a sail to Gloucester for the 2016 schooner race, be part of the race crew, or help sail the 1893 schooner back to NYC’s sixth boro?

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You’d be crew in training, integrated into watch-standing along with her professional crew.

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On the return, she stops in New London for the Connecticut Maritime Heritage Festival.  And all the while, you’d be supporting the good work of South Street Seaport Museum, which has many other unparalleled events coming up in the next few weeks.

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Here are the specifics on ticket prices, dates, and itineraries:

NYC to Gloucester | 8/29-9/2: $800.00*
Gloucester Schooner Race | 9/4: $160.00
Gloucester to New London | 9/5-9/9: $800.00
New London to NYC | 9/11-9/13: $480.00
*Sail the first leg and join the race at no additional cost!
To reserve your spot,  email: lettieghoward@seany.org

LettieSailing

 

The first and last photos here come from Hannah Basch-Gould;  all the other have been taken by Will Van Dorp, who on these dates will be gallivanting to francophone Canada in search of Champlain’s dream.

Torm Neches . . . has not much color contrast in the superstructure.

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This ship has clear reminders of hazards.

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Crew here work on re-elevating the antenna after clearing the Bayonne Bridge for sea.

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Ah, the sixth boro has a paddle wheeler with a wheel that never turns, yet the Queen of Hearts moves, as if by magic.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will again be leaving the sixth boro soon.

Know him?  No, he’s not sent me photos.  But I just learned his name, and I’ll introduce you to him after a few photos that I’ve taken.

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What surprised me about the photo above and below is that two sets of markings exist.

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Here’s the more standard quantification system.

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The difference between the waves produced by the ship and the tug appear to be explained by structure below the waterline.

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The next two photos were taken in freshwater where water clarity is substantially better than in the photos above.

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So back to Mr Taylor.  He was a naval architect and engineer working for the US Navy and credited as the creator of an experimental model tank used in navy ship design. According to this paper, the David Taylor Model Basin is where the bulbous bow was invented.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes some of you with naval architecture training respond to this.

As much as this crew boat laboring through the water appears an apt metaphor of my own laboring through the dog days of August this year, pushing so much water seems unproductive.  Am I wrong in thinking this?  Just wondering.

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It did make for some photos I liked though.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Here are the previous “small craft” posts.

 

Here’s a detail I noticed recently that I truly do not understand.  There are three sets of load lines.  does this mean that significant changes have been made to the vessel such that greater load–deepest draft marks here seem to be the current ones–is now legal?  The tanker is 16 years old.

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Thanks.  Photo by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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