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Type the word training into the search window to the left on this page and you’ll get a variety of posts, as here.  And truth be told, many other options exist for summer training and sea time for ocean academy students;  I met cadets from at least three on my “go west” trip.  Yesterday David Silver got me advance notice of when this training ship would leave port;  thanks to him, I got these photos.

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Kimberly Turecamo assisted, as did Julia Miller and Amy C McAllister.

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By 1230 Friday, she was west of the Brooklyn Bridge and headed for sea,

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for Maine, and by

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this posting, she’s already east of Cape Cod.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to watch David Silver’s 20-minute video of her departure from pier side.

 

Let’s pick it up in Toledo, OH and the century-old GL tug Mississippi.

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“Dieselized” 41 years after its launch, it still steers with a brass tiller in the wheelhouse, as demonstrated here by Captain Stabler.

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Keep good paint and in repair, and a 1929 tug like  Nebraska still has lots of life left.  Compare that boat to its terrestrial counterpart, a 1929 Mack truck.

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Mighty John III is a 1962 tugboat. The bands in the water distinguish sunlight from shadow in the Maumee silt water.

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Sea Eagle II is Louisiana built but now flagged Edmonton, AB.

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Pioneerland dates from 1943.

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Titan, here in the River Rouge, dates from 1940.

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Sheila Kaye is 65′ loa built in 1943.  Was it originally a government boat?

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Here in the St. Clair River is a small unit about which I know nothing.  That’s Canada on the far bank.

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Karen Andrie dates from 1965.

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And finally, from my sister in Frankfort MI, it’s the 1956 Kurt R. Luedtke.

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The last photo comes from my sister;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m reprising this from Troy, and it’s Lisa Ann.  I believe she’s 2012 built.

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Governor Roosevelt is almost a century older, and wears 1928 on her name board now. This is Marcy NY, an Oneida County town between Utica and Rome.

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Also at Lock E20, here’s a clutch of boats and floats including BB152, an unidentified and in the process of being repainted tender, a dredge barge, and BB 142.

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Tug Erie is there too. Anyone know when tug Erie was built?

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Farther along is 1932 tug Seneca, formerly of the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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Inside the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in Oswego, here’s a model of a Catherine Moran.

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Here’s what the label said, but according to birk’s site, she’s still alive and well under the assumed name of  Sherry D.   Anyone have photos of Sherry D out in the SF Bay area?

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On the freshwater sea called Lake Ontario, it’s another tugboat from 1928, Karl E. Luedtke.

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Tucked away in Silo City of Buffalo, it’s Daniel Joncaire II, about a year old.

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In the Outer Harbor of Cleveland, it’s 1954 Duluth and fleet mate

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1956 William C. Gaynor.

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And here approaching the south end of the Detroit river, it’s 1982 tug Michigan pushing barge Great Lakes.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Tugster has been a work in progress, evolving organically, without a foreseen plan.  So I just noticed that although I’ve done many posts on autumn sail, I’ve not used the summer sail title.  Until now.

What better place to start than with SSV Oliver Hazard Perry.  GCaptain calls it a 21st century ship mindful of its historic roots.  It heads to Boston this weekend to pick up its first crew!   I caught the photo here back on June 27, but the prescient bowsprite caught it passing through the sixth boro here over seven years ago.

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Also, in late June near 79th Street, I caught schooner Columbia, another 21st century sailing vessel with vintage lines a la Burgess.

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Sloop Woodie Guthrie is currently undergoing a makeover in Kingston.  You can donate to help here.

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I believe this is OMF Ontario, on the hard over in Lysander, NY. In the background that’s an unidentified tender 1937 tender Dana II (Thx, JD) and  Reliable, the sad (engineless) twin of Syracuse. See more of Reliable and Syracuse here.

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Anyone know why OMF Ontario is still on the hard?  Launched in 1994 at the site of the former Goble yard in Oswego, It purports to be the first Oswego-built schooner since 1879!   I’d love to learn more.

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Here’s OMF Ontario rigged and at the dock in August 2013.

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Here’s Steelwinds, a wind turbine cluster built on part of a former Bethlehem Steel plant south of Buffalo and designed to take advantage of the fetch created by the prevailing SWerlies.

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Here’s 1992 built Spirit of Buffalo.  Does anyone have photos of her transiting through the sixth boro, the Hudson, and Erie Canal back in May 2009?

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Here’s another 21st century sailing ship, also with vintage roots that go back way further than the 19th century, and a close up

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of her figure head.  Click here for a good starting point of this vessel’s construction.

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And finally, here’s Inland Seas, anchored near the Straits of Mackinac.   For more on the ship project and its late founder, click here.

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp, who is back in the sixth boro but unpacking from the Go West trip and planning a Go North trip .

Here was 1 and another I could have called “summer yachts” as well.  And then there are this one and another . . .  again . . .

Pilar is a stunner in so many ways . . .  registered in Key West and originally Elhanor, I believe it was built in Brooklyn one hull BEFORE Hemingway’s Pilar.

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I caught it in Narragansett Bay . . . .

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Off the Bronx, this unnamed unidentified vessel, likely NOT built in the Bronx,  roared past.

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Some interesting boats on the wall at Waterford here include Solar Sal, Manatee, and Little Manatee.

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Manatee is a Kadey Krogen with an unusual paint scheme.

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I took this photo of Solar Sal last September and had intended to get back to it.  Later last fall it distinguished itself by hauling cargo.

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Tjaldur is an unusual

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double-ender.

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Old Glory is an Owens . . . seen in Buffalo on the 4th of July.

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In Mackinac, I saw this 1953 Chris Craft named

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Marion Leigh.

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Here’s another shot of the rare Whiticar Boat Works yacht Elegante pushing back water.

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And sometimes it takes going a long distance to find a Bronx-built yacht like this 1937 Consolidated named

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Sea Spray.  I’d love to see her under way.  For more Bronx built boats, click here.

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Ditto . . . in the same Chicago marina . . . this Chris Craft.

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Continuing with a record of random towing vessels encountered along the “go west” route, let’s pick up with HR Pike, another low air draft tug formerly associated with the GE cleanup.

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I’m not sure what the cargo here is, but this vessel lacks any hint of sheer.

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Here’s what I believe is a fleet mate of HR Otter . . . Helen Laraway.

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See how much has changed about the operation in Coeymans, if my claim of 18 months ago here was correct then.

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Otter and Laraway both operate out of the port of Coeymans, a former brickyard that has become a booming hub for staging shipment of construction materials. Pun intended.

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I’m guessing that it won’t be long before Otter gets painted to match Pike, its older sibling by one year.

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Just north of the port of Coeymans Coral Coast is standing by at the loading facility for the quarries at Ravenna.

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And in this Hudson River shoreline setting that bears resemblance to a jungle, south of Albany, it’s a USACE spud barge and

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pushboat Sentinel II.  Sorry I don’t know any more about its project.

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The banks up north of Catskill are magical, as seen here with morning fog and Olana, the Persian palace of Frederic Church.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to get back this way again later this summer.

Here’s a seldom-seen tugboat, delivered in 1977 by Gladding Hearn, who builds everything from rowboats to pilot boats to tugboats . . .   it’s Tappan Zee II, 

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dedicated to serving the bridges  (for now, plural) and waters called the Tappan Zee.  In the distance is the renowned Left Coast Lifter.

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Here’s a photo of Patriot, which had a mishap the next day from when I took the photo.

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Here’s Fred Johannsen, formerly known as Marco Island.

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Here comes Kimberly Poling with Edwin A. Poling, rounding the bend between West Point and Garrison.   Can anyone identify the yellow/tan house on the ridge line?

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In roughly the same location, it’s Mister Jim with some very deep stone scows.

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And I’ll end today’s post with an unidentified tugboat near Newburgh.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro but recapitulating the trip west . . . a task which could take a month.

I hope to see some of you at the screening of Graves of Arthur Kill at the the Staten Island ferry terminal on August 13.

 

 

Time to recapitulate the “go west” journey and post the many photos of tugboats I’ve omitted . . . .

Passing Senesco, we saw Buckley McAllister approaching us;  I photographed the boat as someone there photographed us.  I’m not sure which Reinauer tug that is in the background.

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In the East river the next morning, we passed Cornell at the Brooklyn Barge, a food and drink venue I need to make time to visit.

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Over by the Circle Line pier, it’s–well–Miss Circle Line, a reinvention of a Matton tug launched in 1955 and previously called Betsy.  Thanks to Paul Strubeck for reading the name board lettering here before it’s applied . . .  That was a joke, but thanks, Paul.

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James William moves stone Mississippi River style down the sixth boro into the gargantuan building site encompassing the other five boros.

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Near 79th Street, this unidentified tug was supporting a pier project.

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Along the Palisades north of the GW Bridge, Comet pushed Eva Leigh Cutler.

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And Miss Yvette moved a scow not far from where

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Carolina Coast waited for her sugar barge to be emptied into the maw of the Domino plant in Yonkers.

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All photos by will Van Dorp, who hopes to see you at the screening of Graves of Arthur Kill at the the Staten Island ferry terminal on August 13.

Let’s start with one that I can’t identify, other than by its name . . . Charlie E, I believe.  I took this photo in Port Colborne.

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I was wrong when I thought McKeil’s Sharon M I was an ex-Candies tug like Na Hoku or Greenland Sea.  It turns out she was built in Japan.

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I can’t ever remember seeing a heaping load of coal like this . . .

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Petite Forte was docked also along the Welland Canal with barge St. Mary’s Cement.

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I’ll put up a pilot boat post soon.  Meanwhile, can you identify this pilot boat?

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Jaclyn is a 41′ tug built in 1967.

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Joncaire, it turns out, is an important name in Niagara history.

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Eagle is a 57′ tugboat built in 1943 and operating out of Cleveland. Here she heads for the outer harbor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is unpacking as quickly as possible, and preparing to repack soon.

Click here for previous posts in this series.  I add these now in response to a reader who says  . . .”but we have ship assist and harbor tugs in the Great Lakes as well.”  And the most iconic of those are the GL tugs, an old fleet that has been not only maintained but also updated.

Here are ones I’ve photographed this month.  Vermont dates from 1914 and Washington from 1925, and they are still on the duty roster.

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These first two photos were taken in Buffalo, said to once have been the 3rd busiest port in the world.

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In the port of Cleveland, much remediated from when the river burned most conspicuously,

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Iowa, dating from 1915, towed Sea Eagle II up river.

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Nebraska, 1929, was coming through a very busy railroad bridge here on the Maumee in Toledo.

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Mississippi dates from 1916.

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Idaho, 1931 and  the last of this series to be built, was behind this fence in Detroit on the Rouge River.

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In previous years, I’ve posted many times about a GL tug stranded in the Erie Canal.

Not all the GL tugs have this profile.  For example there are some converted YTBs like Erie and Huron.  And recently, tugs that were previously only in saltwater have made their ways to the Inland Seas.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Free showing of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Click the image below to order your own copy!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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