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As mid-autumn displays her beauty at the approach to the Beauharnois Canal in the Seaway, my excitement spiked upon seeing MV Sinaa.

Sister ship to Nunalik, Sinaa was certain to be carrying specialized cargo delivery gear.  Here’s the rest of the NEAS fleet.  NEAS expands to Nunavut Eastern Arctic Shipping. For the difference between Nunavut and Nunavik, click here.  My first post with an NEAS vessel was here.

As we passed I saw I would not be disappointed.

The barges like Kangirsuk I and  II and the small tugs–I can’t quite make out the names. Anyone help?–are lowered into the waters near the Arctic destination so that they can shuttle cargo ashore.

Pangnirtung I and II make up the rest of the discharging equipment.

I’m hoping someone can help with the names of the small tugs and any additional info about them.  These NEAS tugs appeared previously on tugster here.   For a post I did on Inuit language, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who might be in a wifi dead zone the next few days.

 

Let’smstart with a boat I’d imagined had to be fiberglass, but no . . .

it’s a wooden 1959 Century Coronado.

She’s got looks and speed.

Steaming in front of Bonnie Castle . . . that has to be a Steelcraft, like this one on the blog last year.

This one I saw only on a trailer . . .  but 224 mph!!!

And these . . .  they almost completely blocked the Erie Canal channel at Sylvan Beach.

And how’s this for two Corbin 39 pilothouse sailboats . . .

Does anyone have experience with this model?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is still gallivanting in foreign waters . . .

Now two more, one from me and another from an inquiring mind.

A above is mine, and B below is from Neil.  And the question is . . . are both these schooner rigs?

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Some more eye candy today . . . Portofino . . . Italian made?

 

Miss St. Lawrence is a beauty.

Is there an echo in the blog software maybe  . . . ?

Elusive is a Hacker beauty based on a 1920s design, I believe.

Another Italian bella passes us, or maybe it’s the same one traveling at speeds not permitted in the lagoon.

Legend is a beauty.  There’s a definite echo.  Let me say “exquisite.”

To avoid the echo, I’ll call Rumrunner just plain elegant!

 

I hope you’ve had your fix of post-summer summer refined craft.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ll get back to pretty wooden boats, but first . . . what’s this?  I missed its first pass, but the sound led me to check AIS, where I saw it was doing 33 kts . . .

Does Sipu Muin mean anything to you?

But here she is . . .CCGS Sipu Muin, an icebreaker/search&rescue hovercraft.

On her return she was doing 35 kts.

Her dimensions .  .  93′ x 40, roughly.   Click here for more info.

Click here for previous hovercraft on tugster.  Here’s more on this 70-ton vessel.

All otitis by Will Van Dorp.

Behold a 90-year-young boat!

Drool if you like.  Click here for more info on the classic Elco cruisettes.

 

Click here for the specifics on KaRat!

Here’s another . . .

but

all I can say about Flox of Montreal is that she is la tres belle Flox of Montreal.

Ditto this beauty.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows on a similar one based on St. Clair River traffic .  . here.

Would the captain below qualify as a “back seat” driver?

He with his attractive runabout was taking part in this event . . .

Wood like this truly makes attractive vessels.

Zipper is a beaut,

as is Glacier Girl.  Look closely at her stern . . . I should have taken more pics after she passed.

G4 below is 1993 built Riot, a 25′ Clarion boat powered by a 585 hp Mercruiser.

She’s a beauty at speed or slower . . .

Pardon Me has the claim to being the world’s largest mahogany runabout, consuming 100 gallons/hour, and she’s spawned another . . .

Pardon Me Too is Hacker built, 1956.

that even golden retrievers approve of.

I’m redundant and say . . .  no boats are prettier than wooden ones, whether they’re varnished like Karen Ann below or

painted….

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

With momentum gaining for more offshore wind farms, a raft of seldom-seen type vessels make port calls in the sixth boro.  This photo from Tony Acabono is an excellent example:  Geosea is not new, but she’s surely exotic.

Another from Tony, Berto L. Miller is new in town, joining two other Miller OSVs sometimes here, Rana and Josephine K.

And yet another set from Tony . . .  recognize this vessel?

Look at the design on the stack . .. .

It’s the return of Bear, as I first knew her, although she’s also been Catherine M. Brown and Elizabeth Anna.

And finally . . . here’s a photo of a vessel--Lois Ann L. Moran and barge Philadelphia–as seen from the “vessel,” the whatever-it-is in Hudson Yards. Those are LIRR trains in the foreground.  Thanks to my sister for this photo.

Thanks to Tony and my sister for these photos.  No photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is again off across the border.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  Here’s the complete A. de Saint-Exupery quote:  “If you want to build a ship [crew a ship], don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work , and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.”

I was thrilled to see Sea Dart II this past weekend, and then not far behind

Sea Horse!!

I was fortunate to see them;  I know the scouts know how fortunate they are to have this opportunity.  Sail on!

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

Dutch frigates have called here before, almost exactly 10 years ago . . .  The last photo in that link is the best . . .  two designs of Dutch fighting vessels separated by 400 years!

 

 

DeRuyter was here in connection with NATO exercises, I believe.  The reputation of the DeRuyter namesake can be compared to a Perry or a Jones in the US Navy.

Maybe someone can help me with all these flags.  All I recognize is the red/white lower flag . . .  signifying a pilot’s aboard.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes the crew a welcome to the former New Amsterdam.  Other vessels of the HNLMS can be found here.

Here’s a biographical account of the namesake.

This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

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