You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Haggerty Girls’ tag.

After about 3600 posts and almost 11 years, I’ve concluded my titling is based on a flawed assumption, i.e., nothing is random or generic except such things as our understanding.  Another way of saying that is . . . everything has a specific context.  A better title for this post would be something like tug/barge units between Kingston-Rhinecliff and Bear Mountain Bridges on such/such date with various sceneries related to autumn in the case.  But, I’m not switching so bulky or to re-title everything, so on we go;  life has no first drafts.

Having blabbered all that, I just have to say the Hudson Valley is a beautiful place, and the creations of our work in it serve to complement the natural beauty.

Consider Delaware and DoubleSkin 50.

 

Or Coral Coast and

Cement Transporter 5300.

 

Sarah Ann and Cape Wendy.

And Haggerty Girls with

RTC 107, with birds rounding Bear Mountain . . ..

 

Here’s a closing look.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

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What gives the location away . . . if you’ve never seen Albany, is the prolate spheroid along the right side of the photo.   Prolate spheroid?  Think football.  But actually that one is called the egg.  It’s a performing arts center, and I’ve never been inside. Albany is the new home of Marie J. Turecamo.

You’ll often see a Reinauer unit parked here, this time it was Haggerty Girls with RTC 107.

Two of these Liebherr Mobile Harbor Cranes serve to transfer heavy cargoes.

 

Although Albany is over 120 miles from the Atlantic, ocean-going vessels call here regularly.

Road salt was the

cargo delivered by Siirt.

Mary Kay stands by;  she previously appeared here as Mary Loy Turecamo.

Closing out this look at the port of Albany, a common barge cargo out of Albany is scrap metal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again after finding reliable wifi.

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

If you depart at 0400, there’s not much to photograph.  Light beckoned as we approached Newburgh/Beacon.

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I saw Mt. Beacon as I never had before;

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ditto Storm King in sunrise that even dappled

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the wave tops.

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Once around Gee Point, we saw the statue (to the left on the ridge)

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of Kościuszko’s, fortifier of West Point.

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Once south of the Bear Mountain Bridge, passengers traveled upstream

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for seasonal seesighting.

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Scrap was sought.

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Sloops sailed and

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work boats waited their time.

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More statues sighted, and

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vessels waited their time.

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And we had arrived at a place where at least two boros approached each other.

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Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, is back in the boros for a while.

The first two photos–showing the newest and fastest (??) ATB to arrive in the sixth boro– were taken by Randall Fahry.

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Tina Pyne is one immense mover, and Kirby 185-02 is one of two 578′ ocean going tank barges with 185,000-barrel capacity built by Gunderson Marine for Kirby.   See her christening here.

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Zachery Reinauer is a Hudson River-built tug from 1971 one of the last 10 built at Matton, and she looks as good today as new!

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This was taken a few seconds later, and this

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as she stands by, while Haggerty Girls finesses RTC 107 into position.

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An occasional sixth boro visitor, it’s Rhea I. Bouchard with B. No. 284.

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As I began this post with another photographer’s photo, so I’ll end.  Thanks to Gerard Thornton for this rare catch of Ticonderoga assisting Pleon (?) into the Kills, possibly the last float for Pleon.     That’s also Barry Silverton in the distance.

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Thanks to Randall and Gerard for use their photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Bear with me here.  Let’s go back to 1999.  Nicole Leigh Reinauer was built in Alabama Shipyard to push a 135,000 brl barge.  Look at the lines of this 118′ x 40 tug working with 7200 hp.

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Ruth M. Reinauer is Senesco hull # 202, 112′ x 35′ and 4000 hp. She is the first of the “facet tugs.”  As you can read in the link in the previous sentence, the design change was driven by easing the construction process of both tugs and double-skin barges.   If the shape of the reminder of tugboats in this post seem odd to you, read this interesting article by Casey Conley with a title that alludes to the (now retired) F-117 fighter.

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Laurie Ann Reinauer followed, same dimensions and power and hull # 203.

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Reinauer Twins came out in September 2011, same basic dimensions by greater horsepower . .  4720.

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I’m not sure what happened with hull#205, but #206 is B. Franklin Reinauer, 110′ x 33′ and 4000 hp.

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By the way, there’s a LOT going on in the background of this photo, including what appears to be dredge Atchafalaya in dry dock.

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Curtis is hull# 207, same numbers.

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Haggerty Girls is hull# 208, same numbers.

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Dean Reinauer is hull# 210, 112.2′ x 35′ and 4720 hp.

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And that brings us up to date with respect to Reinauer facet tugs . ..  it’s Dylan Cooper, operating less than a full year now, with the same numbers as Dean Reinauer.

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Note that it was exactly five years ago that we were following the trials and tribulations of loading the previous Curtis and Dean Reinauer  onto the heavy lift ship for West African waters.   I’d love to see photos of those tugs five years on and working out of Nigeria.  Does anyone out there have access to such?

For extensive documentation of many of these facet tugs during the building process, click here for the bulging albums created by Rod Smith at Narragansett Bay Shipping.

All photos of the handsome set of workhorses by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Given that “154” number, I had to check when I started this series.  Although there’s a search window on this wordpress blog, it’s not always the most efficient.  It took a while, but I started the series in October 2007 with this prototype,  this post.  A couple of things I notice right away include that photos don’t “enlarge” themselves when you click on them, I tended to use fewer photos back then, and IMHO the photo and text standards were just lower than now.

One of the goals of this series is to spotlight any new boats in town, from a very subjective PoV, but here’s one.  It’s Pops, which I saw from a distance in the 8th photo in this post from two months ago.  It seems Pops was built in 1961 and is registered south of Savannah GA.

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Charles A used to be Lucinda Smith, but I can’t tell if she used to be THIS Lucinda Smith.   I think so, but they’ve modified her a bit.

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Here’s an example of a photo which would have sent me down the road to the west if I’d seen the background.  Capt. Willie Landers . . . have seen her before, prominent mast, but in the background beyond HMS Liberty is the sixth boro’s latest triple screw .  .. . Andrea.  I only noticed that third tug in the background when I was home looking at it on the computer screen.

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Can you identify this Reinauer ATB from this angle?

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I guessed wrong . . . it’s Haggerty Girls with RTC 107.

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Eastern Dawn . . . heads east with a fuel barge, and I forgot the barge she was pushing.

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Larry J. Hebert works up here with various dredge projects.

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And here’s my first photo of Vane’s Fort Schuyler with Double Skin 29.  For outatowners, Fort Schuyler is currently part of the SUNY Maritime campus.

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And finally . .  it’s another shot of Pops.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

or I can call this Port of Albany 2, or better still Ports of Albany and Rensselaer.  Albany’s fireboat Marine 1 has been on this blog here.  Anyone know where it was built?

The port has not one but . . .

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but two large cranes.

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And bulk cargo is transferred through the port in both directions, whether it be solid or

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dusty.

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Over on the Rensselaer side, scrap seems to be a huge mover.

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North of Port Albany is USS Slater, about which lots of posts can be found here.  But it’s never occurred to me until now that the colors used by Slater camouflage and NYS Marine Highway are a very similar gray and blue!

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Kathleen Turecamo (1968) has been in this port–135 miles inland–for as long as I’ve been paying attention, which is only a little over a decade.

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This September, NYS Canal Corp’s Tender #3, which probably dates from the 1930s, traveled south to the ports of Albany and Rensselaer.

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The port is also a vital petroleum center, both inbound and out.

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With the container train traffic along the the Hudson and the Erie Canal, I’m only less surprised than otherwise that Albany-Rensselaer currently is not a container port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s general info about the Port of Albany, although a lot of info there seems a bit out of date.  For a blog that visits visits the ports of Albany and Rensselaer more regularly, check here.   Here’s the port of Albany website.

And last but not least, check Mark Woody Woods’ broad sampling of ships heading to and from Albany-Rensselaer.

 

Yesterday’s post led with Jared S aka Cheyenne II, and so I’m grateful to Jason LaDue for sending along a photo he took before she sank into the Genesee River, where she still lies.

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This next photo was taken by Renee Lutz Stanley, recently, as Pelham assisted the dead but lively Frying Pan to Caddell for some work.  This is my first time seeing Frying Pan away from her berth at Pier 66.  Previous posts with Frying Pan include this, this, and notably this;  in the fifth photo of the “notable” third link there, you get a little background on Frying Pan and its name, as well as see the location the lightship MIGHT have ended up at as mainstay of a North Carolina maritime museum, which would have put it much closer to Frying Pan Shoal.  Here and here are some recent posts with Pelham.

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The next five photos I took on a recent gallivant down east.  Little Toot, who works at Washburn & Doughty ( W & D) of East Boothbay, ME, appears to be a pristine-looking 1953 product of Roamer Boat company of Holland, MI.

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On the opposite side of the big blue shed at W & D is one of East Boothbay’s newest almost completed tugs, likely the JRT Moran.

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I saw Dorothy L (1965) twice while I was in the area inland from Monhegan, this time and once later but at about 0600 h and the light and motion of my ride didn’t lend itself to a good photo.

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And here are some from the sixth boro, Haggerty Girls in the notch of RTC 107, and

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And finally, a veteran . ..  it’s Freddie K Miller inside the water and

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out.  For a wide range of photos of this boat’s life, click here.

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Thanks to Jason and Renee for use of their photos.  For more of Renee’s photos of the Frying Pan move, click here.

And here, verbatim, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

First time photo of this tugboat underway . . . Stephen B pushing James Joseph.  AND first time photo on this blog by Glen Dauphin, whose work I have admired on FB.

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If I’m not mistaken, this is the same tug–previous name–and sans upper wheelhouse.  I took the photo on New Years Day.

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Haggerty Girls and  RTC 107, with an assist from Matthews Tibbetts . . . getting underway.

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Franklin Reinauer pushing past . . .

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Kimberly Poling with Edwin A. Poling, no doubt headed up to where the ice is thicker.

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Eric McAllister precedes her.

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And finally Pacific Dawn . . .

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. . . coming in from Gravesend Bay, where . .

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can anyone explain what part of the gas project–if any–they’ve been working on just off Coney Island’s western tip?

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Thanks much to Glen for the first photo above.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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