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The first half of January 2013–a decade ago–was one long gallivant, taking in New Orleans to St Louis to Pittsburgh and then back home.  In the spirit of these retro posts, let me start here, shooting right off the Algiers ferry. Barbara E. Bouchard is now Dann M’s Turquoise Coast, which I’ve not seen.

No stroll in the night life of Nola is complete without a stop at Igor’s Checkpoint Charlie, combo bar, music venue, and laundromat!!

Following the river by car, we next stopped in Baton Rouge, and among the dozens of boats, enjoy this one–Ned Ferry–with a sixth boro connection:  It was built in 1959 Pittsburgh for Pennsylvania Railroad, which in 1968 merged with the New York Central to form Penn Central.  In 1974 it was sold to Crescent, which repowered and rebuilt it . . .  Find more in Paul Strubeck’s Diesel Railroad Tugs Vol 1.

The river is quite busy;  here Creole Sun works on a fleeting job.

Richard‘s pushing a set of tank barges. You might imagine I’m toying with a Mississippi River cruise this year.

American Pillar is a good example of a line haul boat:  195′ x 54′ and working with 10500 hp.

Fort Defiance Park in Cairo IL is a good place to see the Ohio and the Mississippi River refuse to mix for a while.  Note the difference in water color.

I never mentioned that my car was broken into in East St Louis in summer 2021;  Malcolm W Martin Park right across the way is the place.  I left a review on tripadvisor in September 2021 here if you scroll through.

Leaving St Louis in 2013 we made a stop in Kampville to catch the ferry across the Illinois River.

 

Then it was a lot of dry until we got to the Monongahela River at Belle Vernon PA, and the port of registry on these boats tell you where the nearest port (to the north) is.

We’ll leave it there.  If you want to peruse the archives for January 2013, click here . . .  they are in reverse chronological order.  There were obviously many many photos.

All photos, WVD.

A big thumbs up to the team for the appearance of this boat.  The livery really pops, especially in the early morning sun.  Silver–if that is the color between the lime green trim lines–this glossy silver is rarely used for tugboats that I know, and I, for one, would love to see it more widely used.

If you’re unfamiliar with the boat:  107′ x 32′ and 3000 hp.  EMD 12-645-E6 x 2.  

Built in 1976 but looking brand new, it used to be called Evening Mist.

See it reflect the early morning almost winter light.

 

All photos and opinions, any errors, WVD.

Twas the day before Thanksgiving, and the Port ‘Liz had ships aplenty, 

but the very next day it was almost empty.  

In a different part of the US, TS Empire State, which just two months ago was alive and lurking beneath Throgs Neck bridge, has delivered itself to the breakers in Brownsville. 

Heading back to the sixth boro . . . go to the infrequently–it seems–updated google map satellite view for the east side of Staten Island, and you ‘ll see this impressive flotilla . . .

ten tugboats and eleven tank barges.  I know some of you might be able to identify some or all of these 21 vessels, now scattered to the seven seas.

While I’m posting about online visuals, I enjoyed Sal’s discussion here yesterday on the current state of piracy around the world but particularly off West Africa.  This reminded me of how long ago already the Maersk Alabama aka Captain Phillips incident happened;  before clicking on the link, guess which year that vessel was held.  USS Bainbridge, which visited the sixth boro in 2016, was involved in retaking the ship.  Here’s a helpful site Sal mentioned that tracks incidents of piracy around the seven seas.

And one more . . .  can you imagine spending 11 days and nights on an open boat at sea?  How about that period of time riding the top of a tanker’s rudder!!?  Read about it here

 

I’m following up here from May, this post.

I won’t tell you the name yet, but here are some hints:  she carried the same name for 40 years and it was changed only in this fall.

More clues:  106′ x 35′ and 5100 hp.

This is a deviation from her new livery, but if you’re not ready to paint, slapping on a sticker might be a quick solution.

Her previous name was used once before in 1952 by her previous company.  That 1952 boat was reefed off NJ in August 1996 after going through a half dozen names here.

And here you have it:  tugster readers, meet The Beatrice.

 

 

All photos, any errors, WVD.

 

I can’t say if more than unusual number of changes are in fact happening these days, or if my radars are set to detect change.  In either case, I privilege novelty on this blog, so here we go, the first of the series.

April 2016 this was Ellen S. Bouchard alongside Bouchard Boys.

Also in 2016,  Ellen S. was in a crowded channel meeting another fleetmate, Evening Light.

From yesterday coming through Hell Gate I saw this. Name the tugboat pushing B. No. 282?

wearing a Centerline livery and now

carrying a new new.

It’s Jeffrey S,

here slowed down because of the work over near Blount-built William Brewster and the Manhattan side 79th Street bridge.

She’ll round the bend at the Battery and head up to Albany.

All photos, Halloween, WVD.

Happy November 2022.

 

Here’s a post I struggled with yesterday.  The photos are not the best to document what I saw:  a convergence of tugboats that all used to wear the same livery but now bearing new names.

Susan Rose used to be Evening Breeze.  Although you can see part of the name plate, the stack has not yet received the blue/gray Rose Cay paint. 

Next in the anchorage was Adeline Rose, now a Centerline boat but formerly Rubia and before that  Denise A. Bouchard.  See the scant but be-shadowed orange forward of the engine room vent.

A bit farther south in the anchorage were two more former Bouchard units. Left to right now are The Beatrice and Jeffrey (or Jeffery) S, with barges B. No. 282 and B. No. 280.

Jeffrey S used to be 

Ellen S. Bouchard.

 

Rhea I. Bouchard is now The Beatrice.  I’m eager to see these two–ex-Rhea and Ellen–light so that I can confirm photographically the name update. 

Jordan Rose is now clearly visible with her blue/gray stack, although I’m not sure the stack color matches that on Lynne M. Rose.

Maybe it’s just the quality of post-fog light.

All photos this week, WVD, who never saw all these changes coming or he’d have invested in marine paint.

 

Anyone know the story of this lobster tug over at Pier 81 Hudson River?  Its current name?

 

Discovery Coast was standing by a tank barge at Pier 8 Red Hook.

 

Next pier south, Pier 9, Evening Tide hibernates. I guess it’s not true that all parts of “time and tide wait for no one.”

Continuing in that direction to the south of Erie Basin, a Dann Ocean fleet waits:  l to r, Captain Willie Landers, Sarah Dann, and Ruby M.

In the anchorage, Susan Rose awaits her next appointment with the RCM 250.

Fells Point heads to the Narrows to retrieve her bunker barge.

Bruce A. McAllister escorts bulker Thor Fortune into Claremont for a load of scrap.

And finally, Everly Mist is the newest renaming I’ve seen.  Ellen S. Bouchard has also been renamed Jeffrey S, but I’ve not caught a photo yet.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here was the the first in this series.

You can’t see the signage, but I have it on good authority that the 1982 Ellen S. Bouchard is now Jeffrey S.  And heading for the sixth boro is the 1982 ex-Rhea I. Bouchard, newly named, The Beatrice.

Also new to the sixth boro and only recently launched . . .  Charles Hughes, a 90′ x 34′ 3000 hp boat.  

Vane had an earlier tug, launched 1975, by the same name, honoring one of the founders.

And still fairly new to the boro, the 1976 Miss Madeline, in her new sporty Haughland livery. 

All photos, WVD, whose recent posts on newest hulls have feted big orange boats, like this one not yet in service.

Here’s a March 2017 photo of Evening Mist, one of many I took over the years, 

her big tugboat lines lessened by this the second upper wheelhouse she had carried.  A previous one she had as Captain Dann. 

She was recently transformed again, and a few days ago I finally caught Evening Mist in her new livery . . . 

H is for the Haughland Group. 

And she looks great for a 1976 tugboat.   I look forward to seeing more of the Haughland Group.

All photos, WVD. 

Years ago [in 2008] I caught a mega-Bouchard tug in the KVK.  It was Danielle M., now Rebekah Rose.

But yesterday I saw the much newer sister of the boat from 2008.  Escorted into the Arthur Kill by Ellen McAllister and another tug,

and pushing RCM 270, a 250,000 bbl barge, it was

the massive 144′ x 44′ and 10,000 hp tugboat

wearing the livery and stack logo of Rose Cay Maritime.

 

Welcome

Lynne M. Rose.  Check the spelling.

According to AIS, she made a six-day eighteen-hour trip to the sixth boro from Corpus Christi, a port I’ve yet to visit, although I will only go there in winter months.

Any errors and all photos, WVD.

While doing this post, I came to realize I’d seen this very boat before, back on December 1, 2021 here

and here at the Bollinger yard in Algiers, LA.

Enjoy this contrasting parting shot.

 

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