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As of six days ago, that gap was all that seemed to remain for a complete span.  Who knows . . . by now, that may be bridged as well.  Here are some of the posts that show the project of modifying the soon-to-be 85 year-old icon I’ve had on my blog since day 1.  Here were a set of posts I did when the bridge turned 80.

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Once the higher span is complete and open for traffic, the lower span will be dismantled.  I wonder what the arches are feeling.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

or “whatz dem”?

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I really am clueless here.  At first I thought fendering, but the location makes no sense.

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Help?

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I know I’ve read Guy de Maupassant, but I can’t remember anything of that either.  I guess I’m a mess today.  Even the time evaded me.

All photos I do recall taking, though.

Ten days ago I put up a post about multiple load lines on a Torm tanker, and I appreciate that many of you weighed in here and on FB.

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Here’s an explanation of load lines I found online.

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When I saw another Torm tanker leaving today, I thought I’d check.

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And sure enough, this one too had three sets of load lines, although I understand that only the one painted is the valid one.

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Neches dates from 2000, and Mary from 2002.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Know him?  No, he’s not sent me photos.  But I just learned his name, and I’ll introduce you to him after a few photos that I’ve taken.

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What surprised me about the photo above and below is that two sets of markings exist.

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Here’s the more standard quantification system.

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The difference between the waves produced by the ship and the tug appear to be explained by structure below the waterline.

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The next two photos were taken in freshwater where water clarity is substantially better than in the photos above.

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So back to Mr Taylor.  He was a naval architect and engineer working for the US Navy and credited as the creator of an experimental model tank used in navy ship design. According to this paper, the David Taylor Model Basin is where the bulbous bow was invented.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes some of you with naval architecture training respond to this.

Here are the previous posts I’ve done on the wind farm southeast of Block Island.  I took the photo below on June 27, as blades to spin the turbines arrived in Narragansett Bay.

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Rod Smith took the rest of these photos in late July and early August.

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It shows Brave Tern as it prepared to sail out to the farm, deploy its sea legs . .  aka spuds  . .

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and put the caps atop the columns onto the bases.

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For the specs on Brave Tern, you can check them out here,

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or here,

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or

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here.

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And check out the froth from her stern!

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To keep up with construction off Block Island, check out the Deepwater Water site.  Or for even more updates, friend them on FB.

Many thanks to Rod Smith for all these photos except the first one.

I hope to get out that way in October.

Here and here are the predecessors to this title.

So what’s this?

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Let’s zoom

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out.

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The photo above shows the stalk as I saw it Sunday, and the photo below shows the lifting gear near its base.  Let’s hope this means it’ll be making current with April breezes or before.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I wonder what kids now 12 or 13 imagine as part of their future, their 2050s, 60s,  and beyond.  I expected the beginning of the 20th century to bring flying cars, routine trips among the planets, and a whole different looking fleet than what we have.  Of course, who knows if what we have and will have is what we need.  But I digress.  Hydrofoils just have not evolved as expected a half century ago.  Previous posts I’ve done on the subject are here.

Actually hydrofoil history goes back more than 100 years and Alexander Graham Bell was a pioneer.  Another key developer seems to be Helmut Kock (or Koch).   The entire 20th century brought all kinds of research and craft.  All the following photos and clippings come compliments of Capt. Ray Graham, US Navy vet and former hydrofoil captain in his native New York City’s sixth boro as well as in Florida and  Vermont.  The photo below shows the original Albatross in Shelburne (Burlington) in 1966.   I realize this is 20/20 hindsight, but it seems risky to hang that name on any innovation.

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After driving hydrofoils in New York and Vermont, Ray went to Miami,

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where the next few photos were taken.

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Here are Ray’s words:  [Later] “I left hydrofoils in Miami because I could see the end coming.  I hired on as a Captain running a double decker sightseeing boat out of Haulover Docks on the Intracoastal Waterway.  When an opening came I applied for and got a job with the City of Miami as an Assistant Dockmaster at one of their Marinas.”

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Here are undated images of prototypes clipped from various magazines and newspapers.  Click on this photo gallery from the International Hydrofoil Society for many, many more photos.

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Click here for more on Grumman’s Denison.   Click here for an early 1970s paper on the perceived future on hydrofoils on the open ocean.

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Left to right here . . . Miss USA 1966, a hydrofoil “stewardess,”  and Capt. Ray Graham, after an exciting tour of the harbor on then-“the latest” in transportation.

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Click here for a range of info on hydrofoils and hydroplanes.   Click here for an “I don’t know what it is” vessel that visited the sixth boro back in 2007 . . . and I missed it, heard about it the next day.

Seriously, what astounds me about this technology is how thoroughly it has disappeared, at least from the US Northeast, my perspective.  As I looked for info on hydrofoils on Lake Champlain, e.g., this (about halfway through the article) new use of “hydrofoil” come up.

When I asked Capt. Graham why hydrofoils have mostly disappeared here, he opined that “they all died of the same disease, mismanagement.” He added, “starting off carrying passengers was a mistake;  it might have been better carrying light freight across the Sound and up and down the Hudson.”

I asked if he thought today’s catamarans were an evolution of this generation of hydrofoils, he said, “They’re a horse of a different color entirely, in my opinion.  When I worked testing the air cushion vehicle (ACV) for General Dynamics, we had a smaller boat (16′) configured like a catamaran, known to us as “hard walled” or “hard sided” which had to be rigged with a lift engine.   [But after a year] General Dynamics dumped the whole project . . .  we were all laid off,  returned to jobs in the Electric Boat division.  In my opinion, today’s catamaran ferries are more offspring of ACVs than hydrofoils.”

Many thanks to Ray for sharing these photos, stories, and opinions.

Click here for a post I did a few years back with a photo showing the ignominious end of Plainview AGEH-1.

 

Here are previous posts in the series.

The next two photos come from Tugbitts vol. 16-1 Winter/Spring 2005 issue, pages 12 and 13.  In the accompanying article, “From Flash Gordon to Handsome,” Capt. Harold Rudd describes how he bought David (1936) as she looked below in 1968 in West Palm Beach, FL, and delivered her to Long Island and then rebuilt/transformed her into a conventional looking tug.

I’d love to find more photos of her–either in Louisiana, Florida, or New York–when she had this visibility-limiting appearance.  Anyone help?

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Photo by Harold Rudd

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Photo by Harold Rudd

The next two photos are the result of research by William Lafferty, much appreciated commenter on this blog.

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The image below comes from Ripley’s Believe it or Not.

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Dimensions on David were 54.4′ x 15.5.’  In Rudd’s 2005 report, he said that at that time, the tug had been sold to BAC Inc.  Does anyone know if she still exists and if so under what name?

Art deco streamlining, which –IMHO– did nothing to enhance the performance of the tug, had its manifestations in other boats like Kalakala and SS Admiral and certainly in land vehicles, some extreme examples can be seen here and here.

As I said above, some of these photos appeared in Tugbitts over 10 years ago.  Tugbitts recently announced it has decided to cease publication.  I think its demise is a great loss, but I have to admit I did very little to help sustain it, which I regret.  Click here for the announcement about the closing of the journal.

How about cold pics today, like these first two of Line.   For the story, click here, an article that never got paper published.

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What floats in the Hudson here is like what floats in my tea all day.   I recall that the crew I interviewed here told me I should try to see one of these in dry dock to understand how the design of the hull makes these small tugs great for breaking ice.  “It has an ice pick,” one person said.

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Well, finally I got to see Swivel high and dry.  Swivel is no longer owned by the USCG.  It may belong to an entity called GIPEC.

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Anyhow, this is about WYTL design.  See the ice pick?  The bow rides up on the ice and the perpendicular notch saws through.

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I’m glad I finally got to see this, and I hope you too are chilled by thinking of icebreakers and the beautiful season shaping us a half year from now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Do you want to do the Great Loop, all 5000+ miles of it?  And you don’t have more than–say–a few days?  How about a few hours on a weekend when the weather’s inhospitable?  Now you can do it . . . and click on the photo below to see what it looks like to do the circumnavigation at warp speed . . .  from Sandy Hook to Liberty Landing in . ..  just over a minute.

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That video of one of over a hundred now available on Youtube.  Try this one . ..  Liberty Landing to Croton Point Half Moon Bay in just over two minutes in the rain.  The videos were produced by ActiveCaptain. The vessel, a DeFever 53RPH Trawler,  below is the ActiveCaptain’s version of the google camera car.  Read Bob Stopper’s article on the project here.  Bob also took all the photos in this post.

01A Capella squeaked under Leach Road Bridge in Lyons on  Erie Canal

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04A Capella at dock  in Lyons NY (1024x768)

05Karen and Jeff on board a Capella at Lyons dock  (1024x768)-2

03A Capella entering Lock 27 (1024x768)

Many thanks to Bob for info about these videos and these photos.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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