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North River entered service in 1974.

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Hunts Point entered the sixth boro sludge trade in February 2014.  My my my . . . how the design has evolved!

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Photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here and here are previous sludge tanker posts.  Here are pics from five years ago when sludge tanker Red Hook began service.

I should rename this post “Time Warp.”  I started it in May 2008 and this morning–in response to some Facebook exchanges–resurrected it.  Maybe I will begin a series called “Time Warp,” though, and any photos no more than 20 years old–to pick an arbitrary boundary and to keep the series from becoming ancient time warp which could be its own thing– . . . any photos you wish to contribute no more than two decades old would be welcome.   Maybe I gave up on this post six years back because I had too many unanswered questions.

Anyhow, to plunge back in . . . Robert Silva and Harold Tartell provided foto of Manhasset from way back, when it sported a flying horse on its stack . . . .  I assumed this vessel was long ago scrapped.  I’m also assuming the location of this shot can be pegged by the two LNG tanks in the background.

 

Here’s another shot of the vessel (1958) (or 1952) in transition, I presume, sent along by Robert Silva.

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Here’s a photo I took in 2008:  a different small tankship Mostank (1950) maneuvers close to a tanker.  I don’t know if Galahad is still in service, and

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Here in Arthur Kill to resupply, I suppose,  Mostank . . . M O S being Marine Oil Service.  Mostank shows up as registered until at least a year ago.  Emma Miller now serves the sixth boro.

Here’s where the time warp impinges on this post.  Great Gull was around still six or seven or eight years ago.  Time flies.  The Gull has flown south.

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Back then, John B. Caddell was still working.  Is she still intact?

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Nathan E. Stewart was still in town and here moving Mary A. Whalen to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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The unique Odin still worked here, and

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Weddell Sea was still known as Scott C.

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All photos here by will Van Dorp unless otherwise attributed.

 

 

Thanks to Les Sonnenmark and Peter Lellow for helping me “see” what I was just looking at.  Last week I got some fotos of Düsseldorf Express leaving the sixth boro via the KVK.  See anything different?

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Watch the vessel . . . .

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There . . . the aftmost starboard container.  What is so special about it?

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Here’s a foto Peter sent me . . . a container ship in port hooked up to shore power.  Cold ironing . . . I’d heard about it but never known what it looked like.  I don’t know if the service already exists in Port Elizabeth . ..  but this vessel is equipped.

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Click here and here for more info on the system to reduce ship emissions in port.

I took the first three fotos.  Thanks much to Les and Peter for directing and educating my eyes.

Lots of images you can try to identify today, but I’ll hold any further info until tomorrow.

First . . .  this vessel will be visible and will be an interesting subject of photographs from many points along the Hudson next month,  February.  Clue:  Note the hull  color.

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Unrelated to the top foto . . . any guesses about this and

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and this from the same vessel and

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this from the same fleet?   Both vessels are occasional visitors in the sixth boro.

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And finally . . . from a secret salt, a foto easy to identify.  My question in whether there’s any news about this incident.

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You’ll have some answers tomorrow.

Finally . . . here are some of my favorite ice pics on the Hudson taken a few years back by Paul Strubeck.

And here’s hat’s off to my Canadian cousins . . . if case you missed this late addition to yesterday’s post.

The link here may show the first glimpse I had of Balder.  Let me share my getting better acquainted, but first . . . the foto below I took 13 months ago.  Note the different colors of salt, reflecting

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different provenances, as explained in Ian Frazier’s New Yorker article below.  Buy a copy to get the rest of the story.

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Without this vessel, all of us who drive the roads or walks the sidewalks and streets within the metropolis surrounding the sixth boro would be at greater risk of slipping and crashing.  Framed that way, Balder could not be better named.   Here’s what Kimberly Turecamo looks like from Balder‘s bridge.

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On the far side of the channel, that’s Dace.

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Here’s what has come forth from Balder‘s belly, a bit of the Atacama Desert on the KVK.   Huge tractors load the trucks that come to a highway department near you today.

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This 246′ arm, reaching nearly to Richmond Terrace, offloads at the relatively slow rate of 8oo tons per hour.

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And here’s the hold just emptied, one hold of five.  Notice the ladders and the tracks at the base of the hold.

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Click here to see the unloading machinery in action.

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Navel, perhaps?

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Here’s what gets even the last pound making up the nearly 50,000-ton payload onto the salt dock.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt and the Balder crew for the tour.

I could have called this a “scale” post, but I wanted to keep the thread.  The next two fotos were taken over a hundred years ago;  I used them back in 1989 in a now out-of-print book called Incomplete Journeys.  It was about shipwrecks in or near the mouth of the Merrimack River in Massachusetts.  The fotos show not salt but sand being loaded onto a schooner.  The vessel would be run onto the “sand pile” bank at high tide, loaded, and then floated off the next high tide.

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These ships were called sand droghers there, although that usage doesn’t seem very widespread.   But I digress.

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Let’s return to Port Newark, United Challenger, and salt.

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61,000 tons of salt arrived on this ship.

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Two men in cranes emptied the ship in about five days.

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That involved an additional eight men driving trucks to the mountain.

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Time lapse photography might be fun.

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Notice the spiral staircase into the hold.  Also, this hatch is midships;  the bridge is quite a distance away.

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Double click to enlarge (most fotos) this foto and just to the left of the Newark Bay Bridge, you’ll see WTC1.

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This is taken from just forward of the first hatch, counting from the bow.

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This is the bridge view.

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This parting shot is from the starboard bridge wing.

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Safe driving on icy roads.

All fotos (except the first two, of course)  by Will Van Dorp.   Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt.

It’s appropriate that this was Salt 6.  You’ll understand as you go through this post and the next one.

Just like it’s appropriate that this Cat is prowling.

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Wonder what’s the relationship between this dark shape arriving and safe driving and even on safe walking on streets in the lit-up Manhattan in the distance?

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Balder is in port with almost 50,000 tons of crystals from the deserts of Chile aka road . . .

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. . .  salt.

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She drifts in silently and crews make her fast.

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Can you imagine doing this in a February or any other cold month sixth boro?

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Well  . . . it happens

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again and again, ship after ship, with utmost concern for safety.

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Balder (2002) features a self-unloading system.

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Once all lines are secured along with customs check and other paperwork,  partial crew change .  . .

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While some of the city sleeps, Balder’s arm stretches forth and the Cats get to work.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is very appreciative for Atlantic Salt terminal manager Brian DeForest’s permission to  be in the yard.

 

Whatzit?!!  in the background with the classy leeboards.  In the foreground, of course, it’s the world-infamous tug44, and in its own lair near the hideaway of Fred, in the north country approximately 200 miles north of the sixth boro.

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It’s the sailing freighter Ceres, a moving cornucopia of all things edible, sixth boro bound

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with auxiliary power for the Canals, where sailing is not an option.

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Here Ceres exits Lock C-7.

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At the tiller, it looks like Steve Schwartz, whose inimitable idea of a figurehead appears in foto 8 here affixed to sloop Woody Guthrie.

Much appreciation to Fred Wehner for all fotos here.   Fair winds to Ceres.

Thanks . . . for the social media sourcing of this vessel.  Nick Massa sent along these fotos of the Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey vessel Shearwater, which he took in another part of the sixth boro while I was clinging along the edge of Manhattan.  Nick does a blog called NYCruiseInfo.com, which I think complements tugster well.

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And in case you missed Xtian Herrou’s comment, he pointed out that Shearwater had an earlier life as a USCG surface effect ship.  Here’s more on that hull technology.  That reminded me of the term, which came up a few years back during the visit of a Norwegian minesweeper (third foto there) in the sixth boro.  Here’s more info on that vessel.   Here’s a post from last year of French vessels, thanks to Xtian.

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What does the track of a survey vessel look like?  Here’s the path Shearwater cut across the Lower Bay yesterday.

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So here’s my next group sourcing project.  I took this foto of Angel’s Share  Saturday but had no time to go to North Cove to get close-ups.  I had planned to do that early this morning, bt it appears she’s sailed off during the night.

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Angel’s Share is a 130′ Wally sailyacht.

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Unfinished group sourcing business . . . did anyone catch Iona McAllister  towing Amavisti into the port early on September 7.

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And finally, last but certainly not least . . .  Bob Stopper has some followups to stories I’ve been following on the Erie Canal.  First, details on that sinking on an otherwise quiet stretch of the Erie Canal . . .  here’s more info.  And a story I heard tug44 Fred mention numerous times while I was at the Roundup . . . Julia Holmes rowing the length of the Erie Canal in the 17′ dory she assembled in her Brooklyn apartment!  She’s more than halfway across the Canal already.

Thanks much for reading.  Special thanks to Nick for sending along the closer-ups of Shearwater and illustrating that social media is  . . . social!

 

 

. . . literally hangs in the balance in the next weeks.  This 1925 Tyne River-built flat-bottomed timber tug needs $150,000 pledged, or  . . .        I’ll come back to the  ” . . . or”    To pledge, click on the image of the tug to the left, click on the contribute button, and follow the prompts.

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Bertha was one of four of these tugs used to move booms of timber to the mill in the Bay of Islands area of western Newfoundland starting in the mid-1920s.  Click here for fotos of that timber operation; particularly appropriate are fotos # 189, 259, and 263.

Darren Vigilant (below) bought Bertha in 1999, drove her to New York, and if you were  paying  attention to the harbor from that time, you might recall seeing it.    Click here to see fotos from then as well as an illustrated history of the vessel and lists of what has been done and remains.  Currently, she’s in a yard in Staten Island.

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I took these fotos last weekend and will

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be adding followups in the weeks to come.

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But the clock is ticking.  Here is the  ” . . . or else” part.

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Time is running out, and Bertha could be scrapped and added to the half million dollar pile of metal chunks.

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Shudder the thought.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to see any fotos you might have of Bertha sailing in New York harbor between 1999 and 2003.   Click on the image below to hear Darren make a plea for the boat.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

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My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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