You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Bouchard’ category.

Here are the previous weather posts.  Below . . . that’s easy:  it’s a local shower;  Evening Tide and Evening Light were in the rain, and I was not, yet.

But a half hour later at the opposite end of the KVK, the clouds were truly wild.  Is there a word for these conditions?  Again, it wasn’t raining at my location.

Air currents swirled beyond the busy waterway, l to r, Stolt Loyalty, Stone 1, Phoenix Dream, Kimberly Turecamo, and Hoegh Seoul assisted by Bruce A. McAllister.

The Stolt tanker passes Graecia Aeterna before meeting the wild swirl head-on.

Add one more tug to the mix.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d like to know what you call this type of fast-moving dispersal of fog.

 

 

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

For the last batch of tugboats for 2017, check out these workhorses of the harbor, run and maintained by devoted crews and owners . . . to whom this post is dedicated.  It’s a random sample for the sixth boro.

Rhea I. Bouchard,

 

Genesis Glory with

GM11105,

 

Eric R. Thornton passing the

monumental former supports of the bridge,

and Bouchard Boys.

 

To all those folks working this frosty day and to all my readers and commenters . . .  happy, safe, peaceful, and prosperous 2018.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Crossing Bear Mountain Bridge the other afternoon–it’s December–I saw this light for the first time.

A bit later on the east side of the River, I pulled off at the “scenic overlook” because I knew this tug and barge were approaching, southbound.  See the same star near the ridge line, directly above the flat snow-covered roof to the right of the lights around the skating rink?

Here the unit–Morton S. Bouchard Jr. and (I think) B. No. 210–pass between Iona Island and the east side of the Hudson.  I’m guessing the buildings on the island date from its time as a US Navy ammunition facility.

 

This angle provides a good view of the barge notch into which the tug fits.

And if I had not yet seen enough lights, a northbound freight came around Jones Point, the edge of Dunderberg Mountain.  Fifty years ago, the Hudson River Reserve Fleet aka ghost ships stretched from there southward.  Here and here are posts I’ve done about the ghost fleet.  Washington Irving also wove the landscape into his tales inspired by that very landscape.

I took the photo below in August 2017 of Perkins Memorial Tower, a CCC project atop Bear Mountain but not visible the other afternoon from my vantage point.

Below is a photo I took of Morton S. Bouchard Jr. last week at the Bayonne Bridge.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As tugster continues its CYPHER series,  this is the 3633nd post, and almost 2.1 million hits.  Thanks for staying with me.

On the other hand, if I were selling calendars, the number 12 would be significant.    So for the next few days, let me offer some diverse dozens chosen quite subjectively, although what the photos have in common–besides subject–is that I like them.

Here’s a November 2016 photo along the Gowanus under the BQE.  This tug looks good in blue, but I’ll never forget her in orange.

Here’s a November 2015 when the upper deck of Bayonne had yet to be assembled, and the lower disassembled.  Amy C last appeared here as she nudged Empire State into her Fort Schuyler dock.

Here’s 2014.  She’s recently worked in the Keys.

Here’s ’13.  Where is Houma today?

’12.  Ellen‘s a regular on this blog.

’11.  Tasman has been doing this work since 1976!

’10.  Is ex-Little Bear in Erie along with Bear?

’09.  She now makes her way around the lower Caribbean .  . . and currently anchored in Trinidad.

’08.  And I’m adding another photo right after Linda (launched in ’08) of

Scott Turecamo (below) launched in 1998 but radically retrofitted in 2005, originally quite similar to Greenland Sea, here see the photos by Robert J. Smith.  How many of these ATBs does Moran now operate?  .

’07.  This was the only time I ever saw Penobscot.  Anyone know where foreign she went?

’06.  Note the size of the yard workers around the wheels on Ralph E. Bouchard.

Again, some of these photos show what has changed in the sixth boro, spawning ground for this blog.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

A week ago or so I did a post called Sarah D moving light;  in the next two photos she has a scow that appears light.   Earlier this year, I caught her at the Narrows at dawn headed for Queens.

 

Just a little earlier, Jane A. Bouchard heads down bound with B. No. 225, her usual.

Click here for Jane/225 photos from back more than five years ago.

 

Carolina Coast and Pegasus nose up to a barge at American Sugar in Yonkers on a cold morning,

and Normandy hangs out just north of the passenger terminal with some extraordinary buildings.  For a photo from five+ years ago with Pegasus pre-upper wheelhouse, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who celebrates an anniversary today. Any guesses?

 

Here are all the previous “pairs” post, a direction I glanced at after seeing Bouchard Boys and Linda Lee Bouchard rafted up last weekend . . .  I’m not sure why the formation, but it certainly showed their relative size.

And once I see a pattern in one place, I start to notice it in others.  Here Otter and Pike almost appear to be in the right lane for Exit 10.   I’m eager to see Muskie and Gar.

Over in Hudson Yards below “the vessel” a pair of Schenectady’s finest EMDs hold a place in the rotation out east.

Between Montreal and Trois-Rivieres lies Lac St. Pierre, where I saw this pair.  To the right, I’ve already commented that Espada used to call in the sixth boro as Stena Poseidon.  Now I look up Laurentian–to the left–and discover she used to call in our watery boro as Palva!   If it’s about the witness protection program, the effort would be foolproof.  I’d never have seen Palva in her new color, suggesting to me that paint and color trump lines.

A report that continues to fascinate me about Lac St. Pierre is that it spawns “ice rocks,” which are rocks that become embedded in the winter ice in the shallow portions of the lake that freeze solid all the way to the lakebed, until these rocks are carried downstream encased in floating ice and become lethal targets for fast spinning propellers.  Ice rocks, what a concept!

Pairs of dug canal banks, as seen in midSeptember west of Rome, show how surveyor straight some parts of the waterway are.

Guard gates are essential canal infrastructure.

And I’ll conclude with a pair of liberty statues, one pointed east and the other west.  A few of you will know immediately where a pair of these “crowns” a building, and I’ll just wait for someone to make the identification.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who asks as treat that you share your favorite tugster post or obsession or vessel  . . . today with some friends.  Be safe.

Oh, and one of my favorites is this post I did about a Halloween-escape trip seven (!!) years ago.

 

I’ve left on another gallivant before “processing” photos from the trip in from Chicago, these being from a portion of the Hudson in various times of day, qualities of light, and types of weather.

Down bound in the port of Albany, we pass Daniel P Beyel, Marie J Turecamo, and –I believe– Comet.

By now, Daniel P is part of the way to Florida.  And I’m intrigued by the units on the dock beyond her stern . . .

…nacelle covers–and I assume the innards–for what looks like 20 wind turbines.  This led me to find out how many wind turbines are currently functional in upstate NY.  I come up with a total of at least 770 as of a year ago: 528 installed since 2006  in the northernmost band from the Adirondacks to the Saint Lawrence Valley, 165 since 2007 in western NY, and 77 since 2000 in central and Southern Tier NY.  Read specifics here.

Treasure Coast loads cement in Albany County, where Lafarge has just dedicated an upgraded facility. 

Pike awaits the next job at Port of Coeymans.

B. No. 225 gets moved northward

by Jane A. Bouchard.

And Tarpon–has to be the only one in the Hudson–moves a fuel barge as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

aka Names 34

What??

Xena, Lady Tara, one of exactly three barges squired in by Foxy3,

Denise A. Bouchard, 

Silver Cindy,

Elbabe . . . El Babe? . .. with Bruce A. minding to port,

Turecamo Girls, and I’ll bet more than just one British Sailor or sailor of any of the seafaring nationalities . . .

along with a high voltage shore connection . . .?!@#!    That can mean only one thing…  there might be a Debbie around soon too . . .

See tomorrow’s post, for which the photos have not even been taken yet, but it’s June fishing time.  All photos taken in the past week by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s a previous Xena reference on tugster.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,199 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

February 2018
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728