You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Bouchard’ category.

Here’s a March 2017 photo of Evening Mist, one of many I took over the years, 

her big tugboat lines lessened by this the second upper wheelhouse she had carried.  A previous one she had as Captain Dann. 

She was recently transformed again, and a few days ago I finally caught Evening Mist in her new livery . . . 

H is for the Haughland Group. 

And she looks great for a 1976 tugboat.   I look forward to seeing more of the Haughland Group.

All photos, WVD. 

I’ve compartmentalized my photos from the Pioneer sail the other night, in part because in a short two-hour sail there was so much to see.  For starters, Stephanie Dann had earlier just rushed eastward and came back with Cornucopia Destiny, a dance partner on her starboard side.  I can speculate about this, but I don’t know the details.

As we headed into the Buttermilk, we met Susan Rose AND

Jordan Rose, ex- Evening Breeze and Evening Star, respectively.

This sweet downeaster passed.

I suspect Jordan came along to assist 

Susan into the notch.

Meanwhile, a ways down the piers, Stasinos Jimmy and currently still Evening Tide were rafted up for the moment.

Whatever brought Jordan to the Red Hook piers, by the time we had sailed passed the gantries, she was overtaking us.

On the return, as night began to fall, we met Thomas D. Witte and

then her fleetmate Douglas J.

At this point, my photos were pixelating, but I still managed to get Eastern Dawn, heading back to the “barn” at dusk.

All photos, WVD, who has handed the keys to the tower over to the robots again for a while.

 

Years ago [in 2008] I caught a mega-Bouchard tug in the KVK.  It was Danielle M., now Rebekah Rose.

But yesterday I saw the much newer sister of the boat from 2008.  Escorted into the Arthur Kill by Ellen McAllister and another tug,

and pushing RCM 270, a 250,000 bbl barge, it was

the massive 144′ x 44′ and 10,000 hp tugboat

wearing the livery and stack logo of Rose Cay Maritime.

 

Welcome

Lynne M. Rose.  Check the spelling.

According to AIS, she made a six-day eighteen-hour trip to the sixth boro from Corpus Christi, a port I’ve yet to visit, although I will only go there in winter months.

Any errors and all photos, WVD.

While doing this post, I came to realize I’d seen this very boat before, back on December 1, 2021 here

and here at the Bollinger yard in Algiers, LA.

Enjoy this contrasting parting shot.

 

It’s hard settling back into the blog after being in steamy alligatorland for most of the month, and didn’t even expect to be suddenly back.  So my solution, the ether in my air intake, so to speak, is to just somewhat randomly choose and post photos I took in Junes from 2012 through 2016.

Starting with June 2012, behold Sam M and

Buchanan 1.  I recall learning that Sam M made its way to Alaska, and Buchanan 1 . . . to the Rondout.  Would you consider Sam M to be a lugger tug?

June 2013 took me to Philly a few times, where I got photos of  Madeline and Captain Harry in the distance and

Sentry pulling El Rey, San Juan bound.  The two Wilmington Tug vessels still work the Delaware River, whereas Sentry–last I read–flies the Bolivian flag. I should get down to Philly again one of these days.

In 2014 it’s Navigator and

Sabine.   Navigator is still based in the sixth boro and Sabine is in the GOM.

In 2015, it’s Stephen B–still in the sixth boro–and

Evening Star, along with Wavertree during her makeover.  Stephen B still works out of the boro by that name although Evening Star now has started working out of the boro again as Jordan Rose. 

And 2016, it’s Eric McAllister and

a newly arrived Jonathan C Moran.  Jonathan is still here, but Eric is in Baltimore.

All photos in a series of Junes, WVD, who does Junes from 2017 through 2021 tomorrow.

Ten years ago, the WTC was incomplete, no supertalls/superskinnies were up, and Taurus was not yet Joker.

Miriam and the archway at Sailors Snug Harbor are all the same, although that dock is gone from there.

The 1969 Barbara McAllister is now Patsy K, operating out of the Gulf coast of Florida.

The 2003 Jane is now Anna Rose, and I’ve seen her in the boro a few times.

Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Crow was in her last days here, and has been scrapped more than a half decade already.

Charles D. McAllister has now been five and a half decades in service and still working in the sixth boro. 

Gage Paul was lost in transit after being sold overseas.   Note the seaplane on the East River.  

Last I knew, Buchanan 10 was laid up upriver.

In June 2012, I had the opportunity to tour USNS Apache near Norfolk.  A few years later, Apache was the vessel credited with locating the black box of El Faro, after its tragic sinking.

Sharing the dock with Apache that day was USNS Grapple.

All photos, ten years ago, WVD, who is currently traveling again, out of tugster tower for an indefinite period of time, getting more indefinite every day.  I have re-activated the robots, but we’ll see how reliable they are this time.

 

Not quite half a year ago, I used a variation on this title, but photos I took yesterday necessitate a modification as you see above. 

Imagine my surprise when I saw this nameplate on the most famous–and only–wooden hulled tugboat in the sixth boro.

I’d noticed before on AIS that there was USCG vessel in North Cove, but I never imagined this would be it.  In the background, Mariner III adds an allusion to another time period.

Now does that look like contemporary font the USCG would use?!!  I don’t think so.

And the stack marking and registration board “New York Harbor Patrol” no longer say what it used to . . .  might this be some leasing arrangement.  But hey . . . this is NYC, a movie-making-magnet metropolis, and this just smacks of a made-for-movies-makeover!  Remember this one?  Find a lot more film tugs previously on tugster here.

As to the other part of the title check this out . . .   the name of the barge B. No. 280 follows the Bouchard nomenclature pattern.

Of course, I never imagined Bouchard boats in anything other than their original livery . . .

For now at least the name is the same;  in fact, the name board appears not even to have been refinished.

The stack is unadorned white.

And “Portland OR”  registration on the starboard stern corner of the barge and

on the tug.  Maybe some lion motifs are forthcoming?

All photos, WVD.

 

I’m not going to get into the swamp here, and I’m not inviting you too either, but the dispersal of the Bouchard fleet had many tragic subplots and components. Obviously some people have been able to turn these events into gain, and more power to them.

See the two rusty barges facing the camera here?  Those are B. No. 242 and B. No. 210 Also,

notice the color of the tug on the 242.  They might be Morton S. Bouchard IV, the last of the fleet tugboats to have stayed over near Stapleton until fairly recently.  On the 210, I believe that’s Anna Rose.

So yesterday i was sitting chatting with a friend over at St. George and this barge appeared.  “What old ship is that?” she asked.  She takes no notice of water traffic, either on the sixth boro or anywhere else. But I knew the answer immediately. 

B. No. 260 was likely being moved out of its long-term storage near Stapleton and likely to the shipyard for deferred maintenance and much-needed paint.

Nicholas and Liz Vinik were doing the move. 

 

The next time my friend or I see that barge, it might be looking much better.

All photos, yesterday, WVD.

 

The other day I was on the OBX near Hatteras, and when I checked who was passing by at sea,  I noticed an Adeline Marie.  I had to look at the image because it was an unfamiliar name.

When I saw this boat along the KVK on Saturday, I wondered who it was, since the lion was there but no name boards.

The stern was smooth.

Later she turned and

lo and behold!  Adeline Marie must be the newest name in the sixth boro.

A few months ago here she was clearly Rubia, and below longer ago before she was Denise.

Here’s another shot of Centerline’s renamed J. George Betz. Betz mostly recently appeared on this blog in these posts, still mostly or entirely in Bouchard red.

And finally, here’s the former Evening Star, now Jordan Rose, and floating. See Evening Star‘s transformation in these posts.

All photos, WVD.

Thanks to Tony A and a new contributor, Ray M, here is more on the dispersal of the Bouchard fleet.  One boat has been renamed William F. Fallon Jr.  Know the boat?  Know the reference?  I’d say William F. Fallon Jr. is the newest name in the sixth boro.

Tony A sent the photo above and below, showing Susan Rose and Anna Rose.  Do you know their previous names?

Ray M got some closer up photos of the stern of Anna Rose yesterday. 

The barge used to be the 2012  B. No. 250.  More on that and her 2019 sister 252 here. 

And how new is the paint on that name?  Well . . . isn’t that masking tape beside the letters?

Many thanks to Tony A and Ray M for use of these photos.

Here’s more on William F. Fallon Jr:  the namesake was a Port Authority manager who died on 9/11.  The vessel used to be J. George Betz and has been purchased by Centerline Logistics.

Susan used to be Evening Breeze and Anna used to be Jane A. Bouchard.

Unrelated:  Greenpeace is in the sixth boro, protesting Russian crude deliveries here, allowed by the sanctions.  Here is a Greenpeace tracker that follows some of the tankers that have departed Russian ports with petro cargo since the attack on Ukraine began.

 

Wow!  It’s time to flip the calendar to March 2022 already; that means flashing back to March 2012.  A photo of Bow Chain on the KVK seems a good place to start, for reasons apparent at the end of this post.

Since these “retro” posts highlight what’s no more to be seen, this is a good one, Brendan, a 6140 hp tug that now is Cindy Rose.

Sea-land Racer dominates the foreground, but look at the unmistakable Viking farther back.

Yes, I mean this Eklof-KSea-Kirby 4300 hp Viking, dismantled a few years ago already.

This 3900 hp Brendan still works daily in the boro.

Also passing the Sea-land Racer is this 1900 hp Pegasus, when she looked as she had coming from the shipyard without an upper wheelhouse.  Pegasus is still a busy machine in the port.

2012 was the year I decided to see the Panama Canal before the new sections opened.  In the middle ground here between the Miraflores locks and the ridge, you can see the mounds of dirt on the middle distant ground.  Those mounds represent dirt displaced digging the new channels.

In the farther lane, Pacific-bound it’s Nord Snow Queen and nearer . . .  Atlantic Polaris.  And again in the photo below, see the dirt removed to create the new channel.  As of this writing, Atlantic is at the dock in Houston and Nord between the ancient, now-Russian port of Novorossiysk and wherever she will be able to enter port.

See more dirt on the nearer ridge?  And the traffic, like Chiquita Schweiz and now called Schweiz Reefer, it continues night and day

Tugboats–see many of them here–have a greater role in the new Panama Canal channels, replacing the locomotives evident in some of the photos above and below, but they were already plentiful pre-expansion.  Here Veraguas 1 heads Pacificward…

assisting Bow Summer in accompaniment with

locomotives aka mules, once supplied by GE but now sourced elsewhereEver Dynamic, like the Odfjell parcel tankers whose names begin with “bow” [no doubt named for the renowned bowsprite],

are as likely to be seen in any major port as in the sixth boro. Ever Dynamic had been in the sixth boro just a month earlier than here, making me almost feel like it was welcoming me to Panama, which I found a very hospitable place.  Bow Summer as of this writing waits outside a South African port. Ever Dynamic was dismantled in Alang almost exactly two years ago.

All photos, WVD, in March 2010.

Sea-land Racer and Viking have both been dismantled in the past five years, Racer in Alang and Viking in Texas.

 

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