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I see this tug light so infrequently that I didn’t recognize her at first.  A clue . . . some years ago she was painted red.

That’s Bouchard Boys distancing, but can you name the approaching vessel?

This one may almost be close enough to read.

And this one has the biggest give-away colors . . . .

Evelyn Cutler used to be Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, which I remember as a noisy boat.

Ross Sea I first saw in NYC’s sixth boro as Normandy, not

the current Normandy.

McKinley Sea first appeared here as Annabelle V.

And to round this out, Foxy 3 used to be a fleet mate of Lemmerhirt, mentioned above.

All photos on a windy day last week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

Thanks to Jonathan Steinman, who once a week has a moment to look out his window at work, here’s an angle on Kimberly Poling showing a weight bench just behind the wheelhouse.   In pleasant weather, that must make a great gym.rt.jpg

Chandra B meets Morton Bouchard Jr with the Goethals Bridge–old and new–as backdrop.

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Ditto Ellen S. and Erin McAllister, with added details of the Linden refinery.

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A closeup of Erin, as she plows eastward.

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Ellen S.  and Evening Light meet near the salt pile.

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And to close out today’s post, it’s the too long absent Vulcan III passing Gracie M.

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How about a flashback to June 2009.  Cheyenne looks different today, but so does the shoreline of Manhattan, now that Pier 15 has institutionalized itself over on the far side of where Wavertree rests.

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The first photo by Jonathan Steinman;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And then it was a sunny but cold day, the coldest so far in the sixth boro.  ut the light was great.

B.Franklin Reinauer headed for the fuel stop,

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followed by a group that included

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Zachery Reinauer,

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Arabian Sea,

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and Doubleskin 40 pushed by a mostly self-effacing Fort McHenry.  

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Later Tarpon raced past, as

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did Mister T and

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Chesapeake moved her barge eastward.

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Out in Gravesend Bay, Ruth M. Reinauer and Linda Lee Bouchard swung on the hook.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

A random gallivant around the sixth boro the other day showed these boats, starting with Iron Mike (1977) under the Williamsburg Bridge.

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a trio of Navigator (1981), Susan Miller (1981) , and Quantico Creek (2010) over by Con Hook,

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Robert IV (1975) a little farther north and east,

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Scott Turecamo (1998) headed for the Kills,

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HMS Liberty (1978) in the anchorage,

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Amberjack (1981) facing Yonkers,

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Barry Silverton (2015) swinging toward the Palisades, and

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Rhea I. Bouchard (1982) making way for a point up north.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you depart at 0400, there’s not much to photograph.  Light beckoned as we approached Newburgh/Beacon.

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I saw Mt. Beacon as I never had before;

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ditto Storm King in sunrise that even dappled

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the wave tops.

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Once around Gee Point, we saw the statue (to the left on the ridge)

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of Kościuszko’s, fortifier of West Point.

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Once south of the Bear Mountain Bridge, passengers traveled upstream

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for seasonal seesighting.

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Scrap was sought.

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Sloops sailed and

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work boats waited their time.

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More statues sighted, and

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vessels waited their time.

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And we had arrived at a place where at least two boros approached each other.

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Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, is back in the boros for a while.

The first two photos–showing the newest and fastest (??) ATB to arrive in the sixth boro– were taken by Randall Fahry.

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Tina Pyne is one immense mover, and Kirby 185-02 is one of two 578′ ocean going tank barges with 185,000-barrel capacity built by Gunderson Marine for Kirby.   See her christening here.

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Zachery Reinauer is a Hudson River-built tug from 1971 one of the last 10 built at Matton, and she looks as good today as new!

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This was taken a few seconds later, and this

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as she stands by, while Haggerty Girls finesses RTC 107 into position.

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An occasional sixth boro visitor, it’s Rhea I. Bouchard with B. No. 284.

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As I began this post with another photographer’s photo, so I’ll end.  Thanks to Gerard Thornton for this rare catch of Ticonderoga assisting Pleon (?) into the Kills, possibly the last float for Pleon.     That’s also Barry Silverton in the distance.

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Thanks to Randall and Gerard for use their photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

We’ve seen James D., Kirby, and JRT.  And now . .  welcome Jonathan C Moran.  Another photo of the 6000 hp newest in the port later in the post.

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For now, also resplendent in the June dawn . . . Jane A. Bouchard,

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the unique B. Franklin Reinauer,

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and so let’s add another of this facet tug,

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Evening Light (the former Frederick E. ), 

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the lean, green James E. Brown, 

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the age-defying Durham,

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the indefatigable James Turecamo,

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and finally another shot of Jonathan C Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who needs to get back to work.

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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