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The first half of January 2013–a decade ago–was one long gallivant, taking in New Orleans to St Louis to Pittsburgh and then back home.  In the spirit of these retro posts, let me start here, shooting right off the Algiers ferry. Barbara E. Bouchard is now Dann M’s Turquoise Coast, which I’ve not seen.

No stroll in the night life of Nola is complete without a stop at Igor’s Checkpoint Charlie, combo bar, music venue, and laundromat!!

Following the river by car, we next stopped in Baton Rouge, and among the dozens of boats, enjoy this one–Ned Ferry–with a sixth boro connection:  It was built in 1959 Pittsburgh for Pennsylvania Railroad, which in 1968 merged with the New York Central to form Penn Central.  In 1974 it was sold to Crescent, which repowered and rebuilt it . . .  Find more in Paul Strubeck’s Diesel Railroad Tugs Vol 1.

The river is quite busy;  here Creole Sun works on a fleeting job.

Richard‘s pushing a set of tank barges. You might imagine I’m toying with a Mississippi River cruise this year.

American Pillar is a good example of a line haul boat:  195′ x 54′ and working with 10500 hp.

Fort Defiance Park in Cairo IL is a good place to see the Ohio and the Mississippi River refuse to mix for a while.  Note the difference in water color.

I never mentioned that my car was broken into in East St Louis in summer 2021;  Malcolm W Martin Park right across the way is the place.  I left a review on tripadvisor in September 2021 here if you scroll through.

Leaving St Louis in 2013 we made a stop in Kampville to catch the ferry across the Illinois River.

 

Then it was a lot of dry until we got to the Monongahela River at Belle Vernon PA, and the port of registry on these boats tell you where the nearest port (to the north) is.

We’ll leave it there.  If you want to peruse the archives for January 2013, click here . . .  they are in reverse chronological order.  There were obviously many many photos.

All photos, WVD.

This monthly practice of looking back a decade gives me an opportunity to dust off a specific part of the archive in tugster tower.  Besides sneezing sometimes because of the dust, I also feel amazed about the amount of change, small changes maybe but significant it seems. 

Evening Mist has become Everly Mist, and is in a new endeavor.  Palva is now Laurentia DesGagnes operating on and out of the Saint Lawrence River where I saw her a few years back.  Only Eastern Welder in the background remains.

I made a few trips out to Greenport a decade ago, and walking through a shipyard saw this vessel from Suffolk Count Department of Health and its unusual top deck exhaust.  Is that still around?  I’m guessing it might check water quality on shellfishing areas . . .

Bebedouro (1974) and Atlantic Conveyor (1985), now both dead and scrapped.  Brendan Turecamo still works here all day every day.

Rebel (138′ x 46′) is still on the NJ side of the sixth boro, waiting for an opportunity to get back to work.

Viking (132′ x 34′) has been cut up.

Annabelle Dorothy Moran was on her delivery run, making her way to the Chesapeake/Delaware Bay area, where she still works. Those range markers are no longer in place on the Brooklyn Heights bank of the sixth boro.

John B Caddell was nearing the end of this shore leave, heading for her final one.  Note Sarah Ann tending the crane barge and WTC in the distance not yet completed. 

Commander, a WW1 USN vet as SP-1247, was still showing its rotondity.

Joan Turecamo, a late Matton product, was still in the boro.  Now she winds her way around the curves of the Lower Mississippi. 

Sarah Ann and others of the Donjon fleet kept me up most of the night in December 2012, as she stood by a barge carrying WTC antenna sections that  were lifted onto Manhattan . . .

across a blocked west side highway . . . lowered onto a vehicle with dozens of axles . . .

and trucked inland

In other night photos, quite rare on this blog . . .  it’s Clearwater lifted onto Black Diamond barge with Cornell standing by.

I hope you enjoyed this backward glance as much as I have.  I might have to get out and do some documenting of nighttime events on the sixth boro this December. 

All photos, December 2012, WVD. 

If you’re still wanting a tugster calendar 2023 version, click here for info. You can even order a few or a dozen . . .

I’m following up here from May, this post.

I won’t tell you the name yet, but here are some hints:  she carried the same name for 40 years and it was changed only in this fall.

More clues:  106′ x 35′ and 5100 hp.

This is a deviation from her new livery, but if you’re not ready to paint, slapping on a sticker might be a quick solution.

Her previous name was used once before in 1952 by her previous company.  That 1952 boat was reefed off NJ in August 1996 after going through a half dozen names here.

And here you have it:  tugster readers, meet The Beatrice.

 

 

All photos, any errors, WVD.

 

I can’t say if more than unusual number of changes are in fact happening these days, or if my radars are set to detect change.  In either case, I privilege novelty on this blog, so here we go, the first of the series.

April 2016 this was Ellen S. Bouchard alongside Bouchard Boys.

Also in 2016,  Ellen S. was in a crowded channel meeting another fleetmate, Evening Light.

From yesterday coming through Hell Gate I saw this. Name the tugboat pushing B. No. 282?

wearing a Centerline livery and now

carrying a new new.

It’s Jeffrey S,

here slowed down because of the work over near Blount-built William Brewster and the Manhattan side 79th Street bridge.

She’ll round the bend at the Battery and head up to Albany.

All photos, Halloween, WVD.

Happy November 2022.

 

Here’s a post I struggled with yesterday.  The photos are not the best to document what I saw:  a convergence of tugboats that all used to wear the same livery but now bearing new names.

Susan Rose used to be Evening Breeze.  Although you can see part of the name plate, the stack has not yet received the blue/gray Rose Cay paint. 

Next in the anchorage was Adeline Rose, now a Centerline boat but formerly Rubia and before that  Denise A. Bouchard.  See the scant but be-shadowed orange forward of the engine room vent.

A bit farther south in the anchorage were two more former Bouchard units. Left to right now are The Beatrice and Jeffrey (or Jeffery) S, with barges B. No. 282 and B. No. 280.

Jeffrey S used to be 

Ellen S. Bouchard.

 

Rhea I. Bouchard is now The Beatrice.  I’m eager to see these two–ex-Rhea and Ellen–light so that I can confirm photographically the name update. 

Jordan Rose is now clearly visible with her blue/gray stack, although I’m not sure the stack color matches that on Lynne M. Rose.

Maybe it’s just the quality of post-fog light.

All photos this week, WVD, who never saw all these changes coming or he’d have invested in marine paint.

 

Here’s a March 2017 photo of Evening Mist, one of many I took over the years, 

her big tugboat lines lessened by this the second upper wheelhouse she had carried.  A previous one she had as Captain Dann. 

She was recently transformed again, and a few days ago I finally caught Evening Mist in her new livery . . . 

H is for the Haughland Group. 

And she looks great for a 1976 tugboat.   I look forward to seeing more of the Haughland Group.

All photos, WVD. 

I’ve compartmentalized my photos from the Pioneer sail the other night, in part because in a short two-hour sail there was so much to see.  For starters, Stephanie Dann had earlier just rushed eastward and came back with Cornucopia Destiny, a dance partner on her starboard side.  I can speculate about this, but I don’t know the details.

As we headed into the Buttermilk, we met Susan Rose AND

Jordan Rose, ex- Evening Breeze and Evening Star, respectively.

This sweet downeaster passed.

I suspect Jordan came along to assist 

Susan into the notch.

Meanwhile, a ways down the piers, Stasinos Jimmy and currently still Evening Tide were rafted up for the moment.

Whatever brought Jordan to the Red Hook piers, by the time we had sailed passed the gantries, she was overtaking us.

On the return, as night began to fall, we met Thomas D. Witte and

then her fleetmate Douglas J.

At this point, my photos were pixelating, but I still managed to get Eastern Dawn, heading back to the “barn” at dusk.

All photos, WVD, who has handed the keys to the tower over to the robots again for a while.

 

Years ago [in 2008] I caught a mega-Bouchard tug in the KVK.  It was Danielle M., now Rebekah Rose.

But yesterday I saw the much newer sister of the boat from 2008.  Escorted into the Arthur Kill by Ellen McAllister and another tug,

and pushing RCM 270, a 250,000 bbl barge, it was

the massive 144′ x 44′ and 10,000 hp tugboat

wearing the livery and stack logo of Rose Cay Maritime.

 

Welcome

Lynne M. Rose.  Check the spelling.

According to AIS, she made a six-day eighteen-hour trip to the sixth boro from Corpus Christi, a port I’ve yet to visit, although I will only go there in winter months.

Any errors and all photos, WVD.

While doing this post, I came to realize I’d seen this very boat before, back on December 1, 2021 here

and here at the Bollinger yard in Algiers, LA.

Enjoy this contrasting parting shot.

 

It’s hard settling back into the blog after being in steamy alligatorland for most of the month, and didn’t even expect to be suddenly back.  So my solution, the ether in my air intake, so to speak, is to just somewhat randomly choose and post photos I took in Junes from 2012 through 2016.

Starting with June 2012, behold Sam M and

Buchanan 1.  I recall learning that Sam M made its way to Alaska, and Buchanan 1 . . . to the Rondout.  Would you consider Sam M to be a lugger tug?

June 2013 took me to Philly a few times, where I got photos of  Madeline and Captain Harry in the distance and

Sentry pulling El Rey, San Juan bound.  The two Wilmington Tug vessels still work the Delaware River, whereas Sentry–last I read–flies the Bolivian flag. I should get down to Philly again one of these days.

In 2014 it’s Navigator and

Sabine.   Navigator is still based in the sixth boro and Sabine is in the GOM.

In 2015, it’s Stephen B–still in the sixth boro–and

Evening Star, along with Wavertree during her makeover.  Stephen B still works out of the boro by that name although Evening Star now has started working out of the boro again as Jordan Rose. 

And 2016, it’s Eric McAllister and

a newly arrived Jonathan C Moran.  Jonathan is still here, but Eric is in Baltimore.

All photos in a series of Junes, WVD, who does Junes from 2017 through 2021 tomorrow.

Ten years ago, the WTC was incomplete, no supertalls/superskinnies were up, and Taurus was not yet Joker.

Miriam and the archway at Sailors Snug Harbor are all the same, although that dock is gone from there.

The 1969 Barbara McAllister is now Patsy K, operating out of the Gulf coast of Florida.

The 2003 Jane is now Anna Rose, and I’ve seen her in the boro a few times.

Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Crow was in her last days here, and has been scrapped more than a half decade already.

Charles D. McAllister has now been five and a half decades in service and still working in the sixth boro. 

Gage Paul was lost in transit after being sold overseas.   Note the seaplane on the East River.  

Last I knew, Buchanan 10 was laid up upriver.

In June 2012, I had the opportunity to tour USNS Apache near Norfolk.  A few years later, Apache was the vessel credited with locating the black box of El Faro, after its tragic sinking.

Sharing the dock with Apache that day was USNS Grapple.

All photos, ten years ago, WVD, who is currently traveling again, out of tugster tower for an indefinite period of time, getting more indefinite every day.  I have re-activated the robots, but we’ll see how reliable they are this time.

 

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