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Summer gallivants, mine and those of others, have lots of pleasures, but one of them has to be to see the old trucks gathering more rust than dust.  Attempts might be made to stave off the effects, but they are enough of a joy to look at, even if they don’t run, that I’m willing to go off script. 

Here in the rainy almost northwesternmost part of the lower 48, a 1950s Chevy guards a corner of the The Bike Ranch.

I stepped out on a rainy morning to get a photo of waterfalls on one side of the road, and as I ran back to the shelter of the car, on the opposite side of the road were these two classics.

I can’t quite make out the logo on the radiator.   Had it not been raining so hard, I might have zoomed in with another photo.

In a different part of the southern tier of NYS, this Chevy panel from the same era as the two Chevys above waited for repairs that might never happen.  If it got moved out of the rain and weeds and beaucoup $$ were spent, it might look like this.

Not old, but as a testimony to this time period, I needed to preserve this vehicle for posterity, this near the southern tip of a large island in the NYC archipelago.

Along the access road to a parkway and waiting at a light, these two trucks frame a delightful old Pontiac car,  likely from the early 1950, 1955 probably with a few frills like the roof racks.

While waiting for some work at a Toyota dealer in eastern Long Island, I happened upon this beauty, a 1980 Toyota Land Cruiser diesel pickup from the Australian desert. The restoration was so good it did not look out of place in the showroom.

And as promised, a few more from Lewis Cobb, Jr.  . . .

a 1940s (1946?) housed out of the rain in a garage that looks like it’s as much a survivor as the truck is.

Maybe I should do an apprenticeship in body work . . .

From the North Country of NYS, it’s a 1950s (split screen windshield) Willys pickup with an alternative power plant . . .

like I said . . . power plant.  Just add water . . .  maybe some manure?

Some photos of mine from July 2011 . . . from the southernmost corner of a state in the lower 48, a disintegrating old GMC, mid-1940s (maybe 1946) model. 

And since this is mostly a water (including water of oxidation) blog, the long-unseen-in-sixth-boro Grey Shark with a load of trucks and whatever else leaving the KVK for points south.  Anyone know if this Grey Shark still plies the oceans?

Thanks to Lucy, Lewis, and Fred for these photos; all others mine.

For a classier version of cars and trucks on a ship, click here to see civilian vehicles of USS Theodore Roosevelt!

I just love driving the backroads, keeping two eyes on the roads, and my third eye or two scanning for the unusual and interesting.

It seems that I’m not the only one, Lewis Cobb Jr. spotted this starved figurehead on a late model Freightliner Cascadia?

Early 1950s Studebaker towtruck?

1953 Chevrolet Suburban?

 

This one was so nice I did a walk around.  Also, it was parked along a public street.

How about this 16-passenger monster truck?  Help me out here with the year and manufacturer?

And this made me think of the 1956 Invasion of the Body Snatchers, but

when I passed, it was only cabbages towed behind an empty pickup, heading for the kraut plant. Phelps even has a Sauerkraut Festival coming up in a few weeks.

I guess if I had a box truck in the five boros, I’d paint it up also.  Would this be fusion MesoAmerican East Asian?

Top photo thanks to Lewis, with more of his to come.  All others by WVD, as I gallivanted the countryside.  Here’s a truckadvertising a brew pub I saw but had no camera or designated driver!!

 

 

Many thanks to Trucker Tim Powell for sending along these photos taken in Superior WI back in May 2008.  She was launched in 1944 as ST 7067, later transferred to the USACE.  Given the timing, Forney had already changed owners and would soon be painted in Heritage Marine’s gold livery, and renamed Edward H.

She looked quite good in USACE livery.

 

 

She’s still ST 707 gray inside.

I believe Forney, now Edward H, has been repowered, so this Enterprise DMG-38 engine is likely no longer in the boat.   Does anyone know what she currently has for power, and what became of the Enterprise engine?

It turns out I saw Edward H from the air back in June 2017, although I was unable to identify her (I believe from bottom to top here we have Edward, Helen, and Nels.) 

Here’s a similar shot from the other direction.  More of this flight I posted here. The pilot had all the skills.

From Ingrid Staats . . . the most famous tugboat, Theodore Two, at least the most famous tugboat that isn’t really a tug boat.  Bowsprite caught this famous non-tug here in the sixth boro, a decade ago. Ingrid took these photos in Toronto very recently. 

Theodore Two has made quite a few meet-greet stops along its month-long journey from Halifax to Hamilton, salt to fresh water.  Notice the bark canoe as tender?

Photos I saw from various Canadian stops (The pandemic prevented her from calling at US stops along the way.) show as many folks coming to meet-greet as used to appear whenever Urger stopped at towns along the Erie Canal.

From eastriver,  enter the The Black Belt along the lower Mississippi.

And finally . . . a research question from Eric Wiberg:  where is 1945 Bushey tug Chaplain?  See text below for more info.  Eric has even more info.

Many thanks to Tim, Ingrid, eastriver, and Eric for these photos. 

From Eric:  “This tug was at the last U-boat attack ever and is believed afloat in US or Bahamas. In May of 1945 a tug named CHAPLAIN crewed by Louis Alfred Coley, Jr. and others was used by U-853 under Oberleutnant zur See Helmut Frömsdorf of Germany as a disguise to hide under and sink the US merchant ship BLACK POINT, off Point Judith, RI, with the loss of 12 US sailors and naval gunners. Because the tug crew carried on towards New York with a light scow, history missed her, until 2018 and Capt. Colley described the events days before his death. Now, a Bahamian / US maritime historian is seeking anyone has any information on this tugboat, completed in Brooklyn NY in early 1945 by Ira S. Bushey & Sons, steam-powered with a Fairbanks-Morse engine of 1,000 horsepower.

Owned by Red Star Companies and Spentonbush Fuel Transport Service; Bushey affiliates. Sold to Farrell Ocean Services, then McKie Marine Co., and Russell Tripp (Bay State Towing Co.), retaining name CHAPLAIN in all three sales. Russell Tripp sold her to Constellation Tug Co. of Beverly and Boston, MA, who renamed her CARINA. She was sold to a company in the Bahamas in 2005 as CARINA. Names: CARINA believed to be in Bahamas 2009-present, owned by Kermitt Waters, Liberty Oil & Gas exploration, Las Vegas, NV and West Palm Beach, FL, aggregate trades Arawak Cay Nassau. Ex-OCEAN KING, Jeffries Point East Boston, Jan. 1951 to July 2004, ex-MARGARET SHERIDAN (New York), Jan. 1946 to  Jan. 1951, ex-CHAPLAIN (New York) early 1945- Jan. 1946. Specs: IMO: 5260382, GRT: 179, LOA: 95’ X beam of 25.25’. The author is from Bahamas and has been scouring the waterfronts there since c.2015 to no avail and have contacted Liberty Oil & aggregate traders there to no avail. It is possible she has changed names again. Believed to still be US-flagged, she is probably in northern Bahamas or Caribbean, east Florida or US Gulf.” 

She may have been renamed.

 

 

Thanks to Tony A, let’s play “name that ship.”

Photos were taken near the “banana pier” yesterday, and as of this writing this morning, the vessel is still there, but here’s your chance to use your search skills to identify it:  there’s a number, a flag, and of course a color.

 

Many thanks to Tony A for these shots.

And the answer is ORP Wodnick, currently a Polish training ship.  In the past, this 1975 training ship has served, among other missions, as a hospital ship.

I don’t know Polish, but it appears that “wodn” is the root word for “water”, and “wodnick” might mean “waterline.”  ORP expands to Okręt Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej  and translates as “Polish warship.”

 

See the caption on the photo from 1963.  Eugenia Moran is in the foreground.  Off its stern is a tugboat that looks a lot like Urger, but has the name Seneca on it.  Which Seneca was that?

Eugenia herself is quite interesting.  She would be wearing Moran colors for only a year here.  She’s from 1938, Jakobson, Brooklyn.

Many thanks to Jason LaDue for the photo.

Here’s the Seneca I know . . .

And talking about the Erie Canal, central NYS has seen a lot of rain the past few days, draining it all through the Mohawk Valley, making some current (understatement) and resulting in string of locks being closed. Check the notices and alerts.  Cohoes Falls might be looking mighty these days. 

Sleepboot . . .?  it’s Dutch for tugboat.  It’s pronounced more like “slape boat”

See the tricolor courtesy flag between the lower and upper wheelhouse?  The photos were taken Monday (July 5)  by Jan Oosterboer, in Het Scheur, aka “the rip”, a section of the Rhine-Maas-Scheldt delta near Rotterdam.

And those certainly are not buoys you’d see in the US.

Weeks tug Thomas recently arrived in Rotterdam area.

It’s just off the Nieuwe Maas in the Delfshaven section of Waalhaven.  The Plymouth pilgrims ended their Dutch sojourn by departing from the port of Delfshaven.  It’s not too far from all these kinds of sights.

Thomas towed barge Oslo and had an assist from Dutch telescoping-house tug Walvis

Thomas may be doing crew change in Rotterdam;  a few months back they were working off Ascension Island!

Many thanks to Jan and Jan for sending along these photos.  Evidently, a US tugboat in the Netherlands draws attention!  I’d love to hear more of the story.

 

 

First,  the numbers, as Kai Ryssdal would say on NPR’s Marketplace show.  The numbers I’m referring to are the bids on Grouper yesterday. 

At 0600 yesterday, high bid was $150. That lasted until just after noon. By 1300, high bid was $420. More than 60 bids (out of a total of 104) were tendered in the last hour, some fractions of a second apart. Winning bid was $3100. At this point, I know nothing about the winning bidder or that person’s intention.

This will be a summer of many days away from the sixth boro, so I’m very happy when you send in photos. Great Lakes mariner retired (GLMR) sent in a few. Below is a cool pic, in the snow, of John B, for sale for some time now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a skeletal and unidentified fish tug.

Truckertim has sent a few along;  Little Toot has got to be one of the more common names for a small tugboat.  And it fits.

I like the color scheme.

I’d love to know the breadth here.

From Lewis Cobb, here’s one I’ve not seen in the sixth boro . . . Sea Coast, 60′ x 24′ and it has spent 41 years in Dann Marine colors.

 

Miss Judy, 59′ x 23′, works for a dredging company south of Norfolk, I believe.

A fantastic shot of Joker, here with her colors mimicked in the sunset, but who wore those colors better . . . why, Joker, of course. The 79′ x 25′ Joker used to work in the sixth boro–and out of it–as Taurus.

From Jake Van Reenen, up on the New York portion of the Saint Lawrence River, it’s Ruth Lucille, who’s gone into fresh water of the Great Lakes out of Milwaukee after working in salt water as Ocean Endeavor.

If you’ve never visited Clayton, you’re missing something.  It’s a place I could move to.

And let’s end here with tugboat Hudson.  I took this photo on July 3, 2017.  I’m not answering the following question today. Where is Vane’s Hudson today?

Many thanks to all of you who’ve sent photos in.

Let’s end this post with a number Kai Ryssdal might be interested in :  $11,200.

That’s today’s cost of moving a 40-foot shipping container from Shanghai to New York.

 

Excuse the duplication here, but since this was a long voyage, I’ll repeat some of the early shots and add new ones farther down the page.  A Great Lakes mariner took this is Manitowoc on May 29. 

Jeremy Whitman got these as the tow left Manitowoc on May 30.

 

Jake Van Reenen got this in Clayton NY.  Note that the tail boat above, Candace Elise, has been switched out.  Now below it’s Molly M I.

René Beauchamp got this in the South Shore Canal, near Montreal.

A week later almost, Jack Ronalds got the next three shots at the Strait of Canso and its lock, separating Cape Breton from the mainland of Nova Scotia.

Many more of Jack’s photos can be seen here.

The tail boat here is Svitzer Montreal.

And finally, posted yesterday on St. Lawrence Seaway Ship Watchers FB by Stephen Graves, who stated the photo was not his, the tow arrives in Kittery ME, home of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. 

Bravo to all the crews and pilots and photographers!

Jeremy Whitman took this photo of the big blue Konecranes #38 crane.  Tail boat is Candace Elise, prior to 2015 known as Stephen Dann, as hereOXBO is managing the transport.

They departed Manitowoc a week or so ago and are now in a very wide portion of the Saint Lawrence, downstream from Gaspé Peninsula.  Manitowoc, among other things, is the western terminus of SS Badger. 

Jake Van Reenen took this photo as they passed Clayton.  Molly M I has replaced Candace Elise.  The barge supporting the barge is Cashman Equipment Corp.’s JMC 253, with dimensions of 250′ x72′ x16′ deck barge.

René Beauchamp got this shot –and more on FB Seaway News-Voie maritime Infos–of the tow.  His vantage point over the South Shore Canal portion of the Saint Lawrewnce Seaway  was the Cartier Bridge.  ETA for the tow at the mouth of the Piscataqua and Kittery ME is June 17.  I look forward to photos from there.

Harry McNeal moved deck barge 1962 with crane away from the IMTT docks the other day, 

Face on, the crane appeared to be straight up.

Allan Seymour caught this Denali with tank barge DBL 104 upbound on Penobscot Bay yesterday.  If I have the right number, DBL 104 has a capacity is just over 105,000 barrels.

I spotted Paul Andrew with the recycling scow DS 171 heading for the Arthur Kill.

The destination for this is PS&S/Visy Paper.

Erich A. caught Emery Zidell up the Hudson in the notch of 83,000 bbl tank barge Dr. Robert J. Beall.

James Turecamo meets the Centerline unit up in the scenic Hudson River below Albany.

And I saw Eastern Dawn aka Toula pushing two

mini-barges.

The minis, one at a time, carry dredge spoils from the depths of Gowanus Canal.  Prior to this project, I’d never seen mini barges, or scows.

All photos, as credited: Jeremy, Jake, René , Erich, and WVD.

Unrelated, the highest bid for tug Grouper as of this morning is $26.00.

 

Click here for the previous 85 posts with this title.  Lead photos today come from former owner of this push boat in West Burlington, Iowa.

The vessel, then known as Izona, has since traveled the Interstates and two-lanes to Highlands, NJ, towed by the much-loved Peterbilt of John Zook, of Lewisburg, PA.

Maybe you saw them on the roads, or since then, at a marina in Highlands NJ?

“Mister __”  is a common name for tugboats.  Here, from a secret salt is Mister C.  

Hobo has appeared here before, but never with this outstanding fendering created here.  Hobo is a 1953 product of Caddell Dry Dock.  She’s now living the good life, in the hands of Donna and Charlie Costa.

Emery Zidell is a Centerline tugboat, currently in the sixth boro.  She’s the older twin of Barry Silverton, a more frequent visitor to the boro.  Photo comes from Capt. Anon E. Mous. Zidell is married to Dr. Robert J. Beall.

And finally, currently underway in the western center of Lake Erie, it’s Sarah Dann, pushing this huge crane on a barge from Manitowoc WI to Kittery ME, almost 3000 nm.

Get ready to see Sarah Dann and “Big Blue” in the Welland Canal and Saint Lawrence.  You might see them passing Strait of Canso too.

Below, Jeremy Whitman caught a fabulous photo of the unit passing the 10th Street lift bridge in Manitowoc WI.  Thanks much, Jeremy.

Here’s part of the story from John Buellesbach and MKE Marine Reports in “Around Wisconsin”   “Konecranes of Finland partnered with Illinois-based Broadwind to build several large cranes for the U.S. Navy at the Broadwind Heavy Fabrications yard in Manitowoc, former site of Manitowoc Shipbuilding. The first, a portal jib crane for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, was completed in early May. It weighs 2.7 million pounds, has a lifting capacity of 140 tons, and stands about 160 feet tall. This custom designed crane incorporates unique features that allow it to be operated on the multiple rail section sizes, straight or curved, located at the naval base.”

ETA in New Hampshire is around the 18th.  Track them on AIS.

Thanks to Jeremy, John, the Powells and the Costas, Great Lakes mariner, and other nameless contributors.

By the way, does anyone have photos to share here of CMA CGM Marco Polo and from the same day, Kurt J. Crosby?

 

 

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