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Here was 25.

Read those place names:  Shellsea, Rowboaten, Flushwick, Rikers Reef, and Yankee Aquarium.  Then there are landmasses like CUNY Island.  The map called NY Sea is the creation of Jeffrey Linn, an Urban Planner/Designer, focusing primarily on walkable communities and Safe Routes to School issues. He writes, “I do a lot of mapping and GIS in my career. These maps are a bit of a tangent, but I’ve always focused on how sea level rise will impact cities, so it fits in well with my urbanist background.  What got me interested in creating these maps is a fascination with how landscapes can change over time.”  Jeffrey adds that although it can be “depressing for some to look at the maps . . .  the place names help to lighten the mood.”

Click on the map itself for more of Jeffrey’s work.   I wonder what the sixth boro would look like if there map were extended about 40 miles in either direction.  I know Mount Mitchill (scroll) would be the high point of the area.  And as water levels rise, there may be a day like Seth Tane captures here in the subway . . .

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For a similar treatment of San Francisco, click here.

And vessels currently or recently in the sixth boro . . . I wish I’d gotten a photo of Ernest Hemingway.

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And this one . . . Ice Base, which I noticed the first time bowsprit one day when my imagination was working faster than my eyes, and I saw Ice BABE.    At least I though I did.  Well, previously I had seen and my camera still thinks it saw Surfer Rosa!

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Then last week . .  I saw Charles Oxman venture into the Kills for the first time in ages with destination Casablanca.  Seriously, I thought it had been sold foreign!  In fact it was headed to the newly dubbed Rio Blanco, a fitting moniker for the frozen North River, which appears only briefly some years.

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As I write this from just west of Murky City and Bergen Bar . . . I am grateful to Jeffrey Linn for use of his intriguing maps, another of which you can see here.

 

Two years ago, I wrote about Columbian tugs here, and alluded to reading of some new ones in Colombia here.   Here and here –one more here–are some others from the great river in the Northwest.   Thanks to the Maraki crew, here is some activity from along the northwest corner of South America.  Click here to read Maraki‘s account of conditions in this corner of the Caribbean

The big tug Atlas, built in Japan in 1991, seems to have trolling rods deployed, or am I seeing that wrong.

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Tayrona is from 2014 and Peru built.  Click here for more of the fleet.

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GPC Tesoro is China built in 2013.

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Here they escort Baltic Pride out to sea on a run to the  . . . Baltic.

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Pino, China built 2007.

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And Tortugas, RORO heads for the Canal, where I saw her about three years ago.  I have lots more photos of her there I’ve never used.  I wonder how long before Atlas‘ lines go tight with something huge.

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Colombian Coast Guard interceptor boat?

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All photos compliments of my sister.

A few more Colombian tugs can be seen here.

Technically, I’ve never finished my posts on watersheds 12 and 13 . . .  the troves of photos from those places have simply been preserved by photos that followed and those stories remain to be finished . . . like most things in life.

The photos here, all from Maraki . . .  , offer a focus other than how much ice chills the sixth boro, an interesting enough topic but one that I need to get away from periodically.  Come inside, sip some chocolate, and contemplate the equatorial zones.  Like Rio Magdalena.

I’d seen the Magdalena on maps . . .

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but never imagined what floated there. . . until then photo below led to Impala, an entity I’d never heard of before.

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And that summoned info on where the tugs there come from, a question easily answered  . . . thanks to this internet thing.  Behold Impala  Zambrano and Impala Puerto Wilches.

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Traffic like this coexists with the global economy.

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East of the mouth of the Magdalena a dozen and some miles lies Santa Marta, where Atlantico awaits . . .

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as does Chinook and

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and RM Boreas.

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Atlantico and Chinook are built in China.  I’m not sure about RM Boreas.

Two more from these waters from now . . .. Intergod VII.  Any guesses on place of construction?

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I’m not sure where the Bauprespilotos get their boats like Voyager, but Intergod VII

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was built in Collingwood, Ontario in 1967.

Many thanks to Maraki for creating the desire to explore yet another watershed.  For the latest dispatches from Maraki–above and below the water and during Curaçao’s carnival . . . click here.

 

I believe I took this in summer 2005, my first view of Lincoln Sea from W. O. Decker.  Lincoln Sea is now making its way northward probably along Baja California, if not already along alta California.

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A few days ago and from the crew of Maraki–aka my sister and brother-in-law–it’s Salvatore in Santa Marta, Colombia.

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And in the same port . . . Atlantico assisting Mosel Ace into the dock.

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From Seth Tane . . . Alaska Mariner in Portland on the Columbia . . . river, that is.

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And the next few from Fred Trooster and Jan Oosterboer and taken in Amazonehaven section of the port of Rotterdam less than a week ago . . . the giant Thalassa Elpida assisted into the dock by FairPlay 21.  The two smaller boats are the line handlers.

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Click here for a post I did four years ago showing FairPlay 21 nearly capsizing.

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Tailing the giant is Smit Ebro.

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Rounding today out . . . it’s W. O. Decker, Viking, and Cheyenne . . . before the tugboat race in September 2010.

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Thanks to Fred, Seth, and Maraki for these photos.

With a tip of the hat to Jonathan Steinman for the photo and everyone else for updates, here’s a screen capture I took moments ago.  The destination of the cargo was Charleston Charlestown Navy Yard Drydock 1.  For a photo showing the existing door . . . identical to the one that traversed the East River two days ago, click here.

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Thanks all for your group sourcing efforts.  And greetings to the crew of tug Challenger. What is the life expectancy of a graving dock door?  Click here for a post I did in March 2011on the floating door to the dry dock in Bayonne.  Here’s more about the shipyard.  Also, the dry dock featured in this tugster post from almost two years ago . . . I think it’s no longer used.  ??

And for a closing photo, here’s a phonesnap from Steve Munoz from 48 hours ago, also taken with an intensely urban Manhattan context looking across half the East River toward Roosevelt Island.

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Here was 12.

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Terrapin Island was in the sixth boro during parts of 2012 and 2014, the KVK above and Raritan Bay immediately below.

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I’d wondered what the helm looked like, especially given the shape of the glass

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directly behind that exhaust stack.  Well . . .

our good fortune is that my friend JED, a frequent commenter on this blog, was invited aboard last week.  Although extreme weather might stop the  dredging process up north, it continues apace down his way . . .

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So –thanks to JED, here is that bulge in the glass from inside.  Note the upper and lower seat.  Upper seat controls the vessel movement through the water, whereas the lower seat controls the dredging operations.

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Click here for a great time-lapse youtube shot on Terrapin Island a few years ago in the Lower Bay;  trailing suction arms lower to sculpt the seabed, and at about the one minute mark, you see the hull split at the “hinge” to discharge the spoils.

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Note the port side trailing arm–looks like a vacuum cleaner– in the raised position here.

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Here’s one of the huge pumps that provide suction.  How huge?  Some hint of the diameter of this pump can be gleaned by scrolling through this post I did on another dredge.  Clearly the pump in my photo was disassembled at the time.

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When it’s time to discharge, the

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hull “splits,”

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and then recloses, maintaining a level of water

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at all times.

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According to JED, Terrapin Island operates with a crew of around 20, one of whom is an eco-observer whose role is to record any large marine life caught in cages like the one you see starboard side inside the hopper in the photo above.  Here’s more on that job.

Any errors in reporting are mine.  Many thanks to JED for sharing the photos.  I took the top four photos.

I was about to put up a different post–that’ll be for tomorrow–when Jonathan Steinman sent along these photos.  As I post this, tug Challenger is eastbound on the East River, approaching Hell Gate.  The question on Jonathan’s mind, as well as mine and maybe yours . . . what is that assemblage balanced on the barge?

For outatowners, this photo is taken from the east side of Manhattan, looking over Roosevelt Island in the direction of Queens.  The red-white chimneys are part of the Ravenswood #3 Generating Station aka Big Allis.  And against the sky to the far right, you can see the tops of the towers of the Queensboro Bridge, aka the groovy 59th Street Bridge.

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It looks somewhat like a floating dry dock door, but I’m inclined to guess that it’s a vessel component.

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Here are some previous quite unique photos sent along by Jonathan.   Jonathan . . . thanks much.

And here was Whatzit 24.

 

. . . comes from the same source as Relief Crew 17, Seth Tane, whose most recent work is called Sea Train.  Back in the summer of 2014, Blue Marlin brought in a dry dock named Vigorous–the largest in the US.  It came on the back of Blue Marlin from ZPMC.  That dry dock is now working, and below you see its current load, USNS T-AH-19 Mercy.  Yes, mercy!!  Here are some previous iterations of Mercy.

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Photo by Seth Tane, although I tinkered with it a bit.

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More Mercy here.

Click here (and scroll) to see sister hospital vessel Comfort in a post I did five years ago.

 

This photo of Doris Joan Moran that has been circulating on FB this morning.  Sorry . . . I wish I knew who gets the credit for this unusual shot.  Anyhow, it reminded me of a post I did five years ago here.

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Here’s a Doris photo I took last week . . . uncoated.

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So one reaction to the cold is to bundle up, grit your teeth, plod on, complain a little more . . .

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But you have to admit, winter in the northern latitudes gives us new senses of hulls on snow bases, or

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levitating above it.

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Here’s roughly the same angle . . . as I took it in September 2012.

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Thanks to Bob Stopper for the photo of tug Syracuse and to Erich Amberger for the winter photo of Wendy B.  The others I took, except for the top photo, and I’d still like to know who took that.

Uh . . . I just mis-read the FB info on the frosted over tugboat above.  It was spelled j-o-a-n, and I transferred that as d-o-r-i-s.  I’m sloppy sometimes.  Maybe I need an editor.

First time photo of this tugboat underway . . . Stephen B pushing James Joseph.  AND first time photo on this blog by Glen Dauphin, whose work I have admired on FB.

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If I’m not mistaken, this is the same tug–previous name–and sans upper wheelhouse.  I took the photo on New Years Day.

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Haggerty Girls and  RTC 107, with an assist from Matthews Tibbetts . . . getting underway.

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Franklin Reinauer pushing past . . .

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Kimberly Poling with Edwin A. Poling, no doubt headed up to where the ice is thicker.

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Eric McAllister precedes her.

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And finally Pacific Dawn . . .

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. . . coming in from Gravesend Bay, where . .

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can anyone explain what part of the gas project–if any–they’ve been working on just off Coney Island’s western tip?

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Thanks much to Glen for the first photo above.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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