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These photos come via Jan van der Doe and were taken by Jan Oosterboer in the Lekhaven area of Rotterdam.

Lingestroom, a Damen Shoalbuster 3512 design and launched in 2017, measures 114′ x 39′ and is powered by triple screw driven by three Caterpillar C32-TTA SCAC.

Unrelated, notice the stack for the Atlanship SA orange juice tanker on the far side of the building?  I’m not sure which tanker that is.

MTS Indus is 82′ x 24.’    More info here.  Just beyond Indus and against the dock is MTS Vanquish, a 2909 Stantug design from Damen.

Sea Bronco is a SeaContractor tug with two Caterpillar 3508B engines.

En Avant 20 is a twin Schottel 5000 hp tug built in 2006.  I like the slogan on the building on the right side of the photo.

 

Union Princess is queen of the dock here:  221′ loa x 51′ and powered by two Wärtsilä 16v32 LND engines for a total of just over 16,000 hp.

Dian Kingdom measures 107′ x 36.’

 

I hope you enjoyed this look around the dock in Lekhaven, thanks to Jan and Jan.  For the first seven in the series, click here.

 

Thanks to Ashley Hutto, here’s a salt ship lightering in the Upper Bay.

The ship–Sadlers Wells–has since departed for Houston.  I took the photo below, and all the others, on Monday.   That’s Mister Jim and barge alongside.  I’m curious about the name, given its association with an English theater opened in 1683 by a Richard Sadler.

I didn’t immediately notice that the blue stack logo was made up of four P’s canted so as to look like blades of a propeller.

Panstellar, a fabulous name, was also here discharging salt.  Click here to see the rest of the “pan-” fleet.

Seaenvoy is less than a year old.  I don’t know if the bow design is an upcoming trend.

 

It has since departed for Amsterdam.

Chemical Hunter–an intriguing namegets around for a smallish chemical tanker.

 

Pacific Jewels arrived here from Venezuela.

Overseas New York, a Jones Act tanker,  was launched in Philadelphia in 2008.

George Washington Bridge, despite a sixth boro sounding name, is a “K” Line vessel. 

Thanks to Ashley for for first photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

You see it on vessels, a registry without a commercial port maybe.

But what does it look like?  I’ve often wondered that about Majuro or Vanuatu.

As it turns out, Valletta, Malta is the registry choice for cargo vessels and

yachts above and below  and many others

and turns out to be the largest ship registry in the EU and the sixth largest globally.

Thanks to David Schwartz, here it is.  Not surprisingly, it

has been recognized by UNESCO as a world heritage site.  This harbor has been used by “Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs and the Order of the Knights of St John;”  Besides that there were Ottomans and St. Paul himself.  I need to put it on my list of places to go.

Can you name any Maltese cities besides Valletta?

Many thanks to David Schwartz for sending the photos of Valetta Harbor in Malta.  The five photos above that taken in the sixth boro and Virginia by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, the largest city is Birkirkara.  Valletta is the capital city, with a quarter the population of Birkirkara.

For previous “port of” posts, click here.    And if you have photos of ports obscure, far-flung, and/or unrecognized, I’d love to see them.

 

Thanks to Marc, I offer this post that could also be called Océan Blue 7.

Arranged chronologically, these photos nicely show the intrusion of ice on the Saint Lawrence.

Starting on October 12, 2017, it would be t-shirt weather on Ocean Duga

taken in port of Sorel-Tracy.  Duga (4000 hp from 2 Wichman 7-cylinder engines) was built in Lansten, Norway in 1977.  Notice laker Tecumseh at the grain dock;  I took photos from the river of Ojibway at that same dock less than a week earlier.

Hercule, taken on November 11, 2017, enjoys autumn warmth here.  Notice the Jamaican flag on her mast just below the conical roof of the silo?  She’s been sold out of the Ocean fleet, but here are all five of her former names, including a stint as a McAllister of Canada vessel.  Here’s more McAllister history.

Ocean Bravo was already scraping some ice on her hull on December 26, 2017.  Built in 1970 right across the river from Quebec City, the 110′ x 28′ tug is powered by 3900 hp.  I photographed her in Trois-Rivieres in October.

Ocean Bertrand Jeansonne is a 5000 hp tug built in PEI for Ocean in 2008.  This photo was

taken the day after Christmas.  Federal Tweed, as of this moment,  is anchored

off Sorel. This jetster photo nicely shows the Richelieu River, the outflow for Lake Champlain.

Ocean Delta is another vessel no longer in the Ocean fleet.  The 136′ 1973 tug is rated at 6464 hp, launched in Ulsteinvik, Norway.  Birk got a photo of her here in 2012.

taken the day after Christmas.  It appears that CCGS Tracy has been converted into a floating office for Ocean Group and renamed Ocean Tracy.  I got a photo of CCGS Tracy when she was for sale in October 2016 here.

On December 30, 2017 Ocean Tundra was heading upstream to help clear the last vessels out of the Seaway before it closed.  Recall the assistance Federal Biscay required to get out?   Note the sea smoke as the 8,046 hp vessel exposes the relatively warmer water to the seriously cooler air.

Imagine what all that ice does to the hull coatings, particularly at the bow.

And finally, we’re up to January 31, 2018, as La Prairie muscles through the ice.

I appreciate these “seasonal change” photos taken by Marc Piché, a glimpse of traffic in winter on the mighty Saint Lawrence.

For context in this series, IS2 is most explicit, but for fun, check them all here.  The photos in this series, all scans of slides,  were all taken after the late 1950s.

#1.  This is called Hudson raft-up.  My questions:  Can anyone identify the tug or at least its company?  Is that a steam crane on the nearest barge?

#2.  Lightship Scotland.  Click here for a great story about bypassing the fishing regulations in the vicinity of the Scotland light, named for a 19th century wreck at that location.   Some questions:  Is that the current Ambrose at South Street Seaport?   Which lighthouse/lightship tender would that have been in the New York Bight?  What might the smaller USCG vessel be?

#3.  USS Saratoga CV-60, launched NY Naval Shipyard in spring 1956, i.e., she was fairly new when this photo was taken. Only two more carriers would be built at New York Naval Shipyard in Brooklyn.  After service until 1994, she was decommissioned and plans were made to transform her into a museum, but those plans collapsed and she has been sent to scrap.   For photos by Birk Thomas of CV-60 departing for the scrapping, click here.

Many thanks to Ingrid Staats for allowing me to publish these photos here, where I hope group sourcing brings more info to light.

 

Marc Piché has photos of St. Lawrence shipping in all seasons, and truth be told, I haven’t had time to look through all these 22,000 + shots, but I will.

Ocean A. Simard recently assisted in getting the last ships out of the Seaway before the end of the season.

Ocean Echo II has appeared on this blog once before.

Ocean Georgie Bain has been here before but without snow cover.

This is what Montreal looks like as the days shorten.  Ocean Jupiter has appeared here before also, but on a rainy fall day.

 

Also from Marc, have you seen this boat before?  He took it while visiting Boston in January 1978!

Here’s my best matching shot, one that I took at the mouth of the Rondout in June 2012.

Why not another . . . I took this along the Troy waterfront park in 2013.

Many thanks to Marc for use of his photos.

 

Here’s another photo shared by Ingrid Staats.  If you’ve been to this blog before, you recognize the bridge, but what are Vega and Altair you might wonder.  The ferries are aptly named, since they are two characters in a Chinese love story, Vega the weaver girl and Altair the cowherd.

Here they operated within the fleet of the Bergen Point Ferry, both built in 1946 and discontinued in 1961. 

The ferries were sold after discontinuation of the service, and both were lost in 1961:  Vega off New Jersey and Altair between Mexico and Cuba deep in the Yucatan Channel.   These are small boats to be going to Mexico:  61′ x 38′ x 8′, but another of the set, Deneb, made it and appeared in the Mexican registry.

To drive along Richmond Terrace these days, you don’t get the same sense crossing Port Richmond Avenue that you would have had 70 or 80 years ago . . .  click on the photo below for a photographic tour of what used to be a crossing into NJ.

I used to have a photo of the sign still hanging near the ferry until quite recently, but when I gallivanted around there a few days ago, it was gone and my photo is as well, victim of one of my misguided cullings to reduce the memory demands on my computer.

In that recent gallivant, I did look along the west side of Port Richmond Avenue at this church and graveyard. 

This is some old NYC history, and

names memorialized in places are reflected here . . . .  Prall’s Island today is uninhabited but known to everyone who travels through the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Ingrid for use of the Vega-Altair photo.  More of her photos to come.

And while you’re at the Reformed Church, go another 100 yards inland and check out Nat’s Men’s Shop and buy some warm work clothes.

 

Jack Ronalds took this photo of Ontario (Jeffrey K. McAllister) and Erie (Missy McAllister) in Canso back in August 2016.

John Jedrlinic took this in the sixth boro in December 2008.

I took the photo below a few months earlier in 2008, as the transfer from Normandy to Ross Sea was happening.

Grouper has been featured here many, many times over the years, but you’ve never seen this much of her out of the water;  it’s “draw-down” time on the Erie Canal near lock E-28A.  These photos come from Bob Stopper a few weeks ago.

 

From Bangkok, Ashley Hutto sends along photos of a decidedly pastel Thai tug

with two barges

on a hawser.

Thanks to Jack, Jed, Bob, and Ashley for these photos.

 

First, bravo to Lee Rust who puzzled out 2 of the 3 photos from IS1.  And I’ll just paste in his concise answers here:  “#1 is Colleen Kehoe passing under the Bear Mountain bridge southbound sometime around the late ’70’s or early ’80’s. Since 1996 this vessel is has been part of the Axel Carlson scuba diving reef off Mantoloking NJ.     And #2. Red, right, returning… Northbound towards Kingston-Rhinecliff bridge under construction… 1956-ish.”

Let me add a bit:  #1, click here to see Coleen–and Budweiser banner– about to be reefed in 1996.  And #2, the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge opened in February 1957.    #3 Paul Strubeck helped me, “That’s the Lester J. Gillen of Gillen Lighterage.” The Gillen company is mentioned in this NYTimes article about a South Street Seaport Museum exhibit from 1977.   Thanks much, Lee and Paul.

Below, that’s Ingrid’s father–the photographer for most of this series–in 1957 sitting on the bollard in front of MV Sunoco.

Mystic Sun and Maumee Sun here raft up to a dock in Port Newark in December 1959. Both date from 1948 and had cargo capacity of roughly 15,000 barrels.  Anyone know who the buyers were when they were sold in 1969 and 1966, respectively?  Mystic Sun appeared in this blog previously here.

Finally, here’s Sunoil, launched in August 1944 as Waxhaws.  The T2-SE-A1 tanker was scrapped in 1972.

Mr. Staats worked on ships for almost 50 years.

Many thanks to Ingrid for sharing these photos.  More to come.

 

Recall that I refer to the sixth boro of NYC as the water, which has served to create and develop the city’s other boros and to connect it via waterways to places near and far.   Also, on this blog, fifth dimension is time, a vehicle to ride backward in it to where the nature is the same but the machines and structures are mostly gone or changed.  “IS” here refers to Ingrid Staats, who has been digitizing her father’s photos and is sharing them here.  Her father worked on a Sun Oil coastal fleet vessel.  So let’s have some fun.  I know a bit more than I’m telling about some of these photos, and will share that tomorrow or soon.  Here’s your chance to identify and/or speculate.

Photo 1:  What tug?  Which location/direction?

Photo 2:  Location?  More?  Date?

Photo 3:  Tug?  Company?  Anything else on any of these photos?

Ok . . .  more soon along with the info I know.

Here’s a link to a book that deals with an aspect of Sun Oil I’d never considered but which has NO relationship with the photos Ingrid has passed along.

Many thanks to Ingrid to sharing these.

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