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I took the photo below in spring 2012 on the event of 343‘s arrival in the sixth boro.  It shows (from far to near) FDNY’s John D. McKean, Kevin C. Kane, and Firefighter.  None of these vessels is currently owned by FDNY.  McKean has gone upriver to be converted into a museum, Kane has gone to Wisconsin to become a workboat, and  so far as I know, our whole upriver alliance of traffic watchers–myself included– missed her passage to Troy and then the Erie Canal, even though I traveled on the Erie twice this past November. Did anyone catch photos of Kane and not post them, I wonder?

Firefighter has gone to Greenport on the North Fork to live on as a museum.

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The next four photos were taken by Fireboat Firefighter Museum volunteers.

I saw Firefighter in Greenport on December 31, 2016, but as of today, she’s at Goodison’s Shipyard in Rhode Island,

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where haul out and

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hull inspection and repair and

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 repainting. This work was made possible by grants from the National Parks Service National Maritime Heritage program, as well as the NY State Office of Historic Preservation, and our supporters and benefactors who provided matching donations to allow us to access the grant funds. We’re still taking donations for shipyard work through our donation page on our website, and presently have a benefactor willing to provide a 100% match on any donations up to $50K received for additional yard work.
According to Mike Hibbard, VP and vessel historian at Fireboat Fire Fighter Museum, Firefighter will emerge from the shipyard “no longer be sporting the red coat of paint applied to the FDNY fleet in the 1960’s. We’re taking her back to her 1938 appearance – which means she’ll have a black hull, white topside house, black decks and a buff stack. All the monitors, bitts and nameboards will also be returned to their original polished brass appearance.”

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Click here for photos I took of Firefighter in the KVK, when she still worked for FDNY.  The next three photos come from the Goodison Shipyard FB page.

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Many thanks to Mike Hibbard for contacting me about this story.

For one of many posts featuring another retired FDNY vessel, John J. Harvey, click here.

Thanks to all of you who send me photos.  M & M McMorrow sent this photo taken at Atlantic Highlands just before Christmas.  And yes,

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Delta is the best Christmas red. I can’t seem to find a tugboat in the NMFS.NOAA registry called just “Delta.”   Someone help out?

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Richie Ryden took these photos just before New Year’s, sending them along with the note “I took these pic’s on 12/28/16 on the Hackensack River between Rt 3 east & west Bridges , It looks like they a are rebuilding the marina there !!! I saw Reliable from Coastline Marine Towing out of Belford NJ  switching barges empty for a full one with old pilings on it ! look at your blog all the time keep up the good work !!!! Happy New Year !!!!”

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Happy New Year, Richie!  And I have to admit I can find nothing about previous owners of Reliable also, although the late great John Skelson had a photo of her from a while back sans the upper house here.  Richie’s photos also helped solidify my image of what this vessel looks like compared with another Reliable that languishes up on the Oswego Canal. 

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Jed sent me this photo just after the start of 2017 with the note “Happy New Year from Maryland.  Here is your first tug of 2017, the ten-year-old Belgian Union Grizzly that I saw on the Scheldt in 2012.”   Thx Jed.  And since that time, she’s sent a half dozen more photos of European tugboats, which I’ll post soon.

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And Tyler Jones must be losing his patience:  he sent me this photo back on November 1, and I still have not put it up.  What I love about this photo, Tyler, is the fog giving the impression that Coral Coast pushing a cement barge upriver at Poughkeepsie  is weightless, floating lazily on the clouds.  Thx much, Tyler.

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Jan van der Doe periodically sends me photos from Canadian Lake Ontario ports.  He didn’t identify this boat although I’m wondering if it’s Lac Manitoba, which capsized on the Ottawa River back in June 2015.

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In Hamilton harbor, here’s (l to r) Florence M, Tony Mackay, and James A. Hannah.   Hannah is a sister of Bloxom, the cover model for my documentary about the Arthur Kill graveyard and the most intact tugboat in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

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And finally, on December 12, here are more McKeil boats tied up in Hamilton.

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Thanks much M & M, Richie, Jed, Tyler, and Jan.

 

 

ooops, new pigs, there must have been an incident.

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A little background . . . .  A conductor of the The Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway Marching Band & Chowder Society emailed me yesterday about what they said was “strange small boat activity” just north of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.   Since I was in the area, I thought I’d check it out, and what I saw would be

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considered at very least unorthodox nets on small boats, now that we are in harbor “fishing” season.  Pannaway is dredging for critters, I believe, although I’m puzzled by her New Hampshire registration, if I’m not mistaken.

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See the rig with “sock” skimming the surface?

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These rigs are designed to soak up stuff that should not be in the water, as opposed to critters that find it acceptable habitat.

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Ken’s Marine does a lot of types of work, and

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responding to spills is one of them.

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The news had nothing I could find, but I’m guessing

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there was something under-reported here.  By the way, a flat oil absorbent product is often called a diaper.

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Again, thanks to the good conductor for the tip.

All photos and speculation by Will Van Dorp, whose already taken but too few rides on the Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway.

An added plus of my trip here was to have another look at Soldiers and Sailors Monument, which I’ll feature in an upcoming post.

 

Ken came up with additional photos of his overnight in the transient slip at South Street Seaport Museum many years ago . . .  so here they are.  Note the Twin Towers in the background.  To the right side of the photo, I’m guessing that’s a mastless Lettie G. Howard and Major General William H. Hart, now languishing along the Arthur Kill.

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Here’s a close up of the stick lighter, identified by eastriver as Vernie S. 

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Russell Grinell, among other things, was an owner of schooner Pioneer before she came to SSSM.

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Here’s Black Pearl in the foreground, with a respectable looking eagle’s figurehead.

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And finally, this might be the stern of Anna Christina, which sank in the “perfect storm” as mentioned in this NYTimes article.

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Again, many thanks to Ken Deeley for bringing these photos he took from the transient dock several decades ago to the light.  One of my tugster goals is to publish photos like these, bringing them into the  “creative commons.”

 

 

Many thanks to Ken Deeley for today’s photos.  The vessel with the red house is surely one of the Standard Boat stick lighter fleet, but I can’t read the name on the bow.  A half decade I posted a photo here (scroll) of a decrepit Ollie, the stick lighter that used to tie up at South Street.   He can’t quite put a date on this photo taken at South Street Seaport Museum’s pier.  Can anyone date these photos?  And what was that green/white dome in the background?

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Coming down the Hudson, Ken got this photo of suction dredger Sugar Island.  Currently, Sugar Island is working off Bahrain.

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Many thanks to Ken for sending along these photos.

Click here for a 1992 publication by Robert Foster and Jane Steuerwald called “The Lighterage System in the New York/New Jersey Harbor,” referencing stick lighters and much more.

Click here and here for the first two sets of photos taken by JG.  JG’s photos–of the past–give context for the present and future.

In today’s post, all of the vessels at one point belonged to the same fleet, except one.  All have continued in service, except one.

Volans, photographed here in 2009, is now being reborn as Hannah.

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For a short time, Volans became David McAllister, photo below from 2013.

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Leslie Foss, photo from 2011, is now Simone, and I caught her in the sixth boro here in 2015. Simone trades internationally.

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Leo, taken here in 2007, now works as Bridget McAllister.

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Scorpius, photo from 2008, has worked mostly in the sixth boro as Meagan Ann, who first appeared here in this blog in  . . . 2008.

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Orion, which I visited back in 2008,  became Matthew McAllister.

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And finally, the last one, the one facing left, the only one that is no more.  She was scrapped after sinking in Narragansett Bay in 2008.  The photo below is from 2006.

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All these tugboats except the last one once made up Constellation Maritime, which is no more.

Many thanks to JG for use of these photos.

 

OK, it’s time to reprise this, and admit that once again I’ve learned something . . . by means of my error, my willingness to overgeneralize maybe.

A tolerant reader wrote this in reference to my Flanking, downstream post:

“Not trying to burst your bubble, but those photos indicate the Mike Schmaeng was steering the point,  not backing or flanking!  Also, the river is very low at this time, and there wouldn’t be any reason to flank Algiers Point.”

So let’s just call this River Addyson heading upstream at the Point.  So from this angle, what would you guess about this towboat? flu1

 

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From the view head-on, I’d never have guess there was over 180′ of boat behind those push knees.

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Here are the particulars on this vessel from 1958.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, and keep the corrections coming.

Unrelated:  Does anyone know what Seastreak New York is doing in Florida?   I was looking for something else and noticed here . . .

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There were “all fast” on Marco Island by 2100 yesterday, but this morning are underway, heading for  . .  Tampa?

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I must get back to downstream and upstream tows on the Mississippi soon, but I seriously misread this oncoming vessel.  Some of you might figure out my misread before the end of this post.

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What attracted my eye to Florida Enterprise was the superstructure, specifically the cranes overtop the holds.

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I’d seen structures somewhat like these on a ship in the KVK here … but they were not quite the same.

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Because of poor lighting and large distance relative to my position, I missed the really unusual feature of the vessel

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–or rather vessels–which I should have

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seen here.  See it?

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Florida Enterprise is a barge, and the prime mover here

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is now called Coastal 202.  Below is a photo taken by Barry Andersen, which I got permission to use from Fred Miller II, which shows Coastal 202–then called Jamie A. Baxter–light, an ITB out of the notch. The photo below was taken soon after the tug’s launch in mid-1977 from Peterson Builders in Sturgeon Bay WI.  Here’s another taken when the vessel was out of the notch and then known as Barbara Knessel.  

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Click here for some ITB posts I did back in 2008.   Click here for a better view of Coastal 202 and her cargo barge that shows she is in fact an ITB.

Now I’d love to see Coastal 202 out of the notch from all angles and to see ISH’s rail ferry too.

Truth be told, another surprise was that nola hula was nowhere to be seen  . ..  maybe headed out to sea like that humpback that splashed around the sixth boro last month?

 

Recognize the tugboat below?  Answer follows.

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David McAllister, photo from 2013, has recently changed hands and is currently undergoing “re-power and life extension” as Tradewinds Towing Hannah.

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Draco, photo below taken in 2007, shows the vessel that began life in 1951 as Esso Tug No. 12.  I caught her in the sixth boro as Co here (scroll) back in 2009.

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Pleon, built in 1953, has appeared on this blog several times recently.

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Canal Deluge, shown here in Fournier Towing and Ship Services colors, has since been sold to Trinidad, where she is (somewhat appropriately) know as Boston Lady.

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And finally, originally a steam tug built in the mid-1920s to assist ships and break ice on the Delaware river, the 125′ John Wanamaker claimed the title of the last steam tug operating commercially in the US, but after several stints as a restaurant boat, she was cut up in New Bedford sometime around 2007.   Anyone have photos of her last days or her last decades as a restaurant in at least three different New England locations?  For a great story about her–and many other boats– read Jim Sharp’s With Reckless Abandon It seems that Jim has owned at least half the historic vessels on the East coast at one time or other. His Sail, Power, & Steam Museum will reopen in the spring.

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Again, thanks to JG, these photos from the near but irretrievable past.

Oh, and that mystery tug at the top, she’s of course Pelham, seen in this post (scroll) and many others here.

Know that boat below?  Answer follows.  It’s recently been in the news.  This trove of photos comes from JG, an out-of-towner whom I sometimes meet along the KVK.  This photo was taken between 2001 and 2007.

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Seguin (1972, YTB-816 Campti) has been sold foreign.  Anyone know where? The photo below was taken in 2003.

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Hercules (YTB-766, Wapakoneta) has also gone foreign, to Nigeria, as documented on this blog here.

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Natick (YTB-760, Natick) was completed at Jakobson’s although construction began elsewhere.  The photo below was taken in 2009.

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This photo of Phoenix LT-1975 was taken in 2007 in Constellation Maritime colors.  She’s currently in Maine as Fournier Brothers.

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King Philip, shown here in 2007, currently works as Olon in Panama.

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Chicopee, shown here in 2007, was built in 1952 by Higgins Industries as Army tug LT-1966.  Anyone know where she is today?

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Ludwig E., which became Nathan E. Stewart in 2007, sank in October and was raised earlier this month.  Anyone know if she will be refurbished?

Many thanks to JG for use of these photos.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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