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Steve’s uncle Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985.  That makes for a special connection and lots of vintage photos.  Enjoy these thanks to Steve.  I’ll use his captions.

Dalzelleagle assisting ship in East River in September 1968.

Dalzelleagle heading down Buttermilk Channel-from pier 12 Brooklyn in September 1970.  The tug is interesting, but so are the details in the background.

Cook Ralph Andreason waves from the stern on Dalzelleagle departing 69th St pier Brooklyn in September 1970.

McAllister Bros in North River off Hoboken pier on August 24, 1973.

The is the same time and place, roughly.  The Twin Towers had opened earlier that year.

Tug McAllister Bros leading Atlantic Champagne thru Newark Bay Draw on July 5, 1976. This picture brings to mind a story that my Uncle Bob Munoz told me. Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985. One time he was piloting a ship in Newark Bay toward the Newark Bay Draw Bridge and a woman passenger came over to him on the bridge of the ship and asked him if the ship was going through that little opening in the bridge. Bob said that they were. She then asked how he did that. So he looked at her and said, “When we get real close I just close my eyes.”    Atlantic Champagne, an ACL vessel, was launched in 1969 with a teu capacity of a dazzling 882 teu.

McAllister Bros in Newark Bay from a ship on June 26, 1987.  That CRRNJ bridge was used starting in 1926;  I saw some remaining piers about a decade ago, but it is entirely gone now.  Given the raising of the Bayonne Bridge, keep in mind that vertical clearance here was 136′.  Maybe someone can tell me the width of the channel.

McAllister Bros galley on January 11, 2001,

and her engine room on the same date.

And finally, McAllister Brothers here along with Christine M. McAllister on November 6, 2006.

It’s hard to say good bye.  Many thanks to Steve for use of these photos.

And thanks to Birk Thomas for posting this on FB today, Dalzell Towing.

Steve Munoz took the first three photos in October 1986 from Borenquin.  The tug identified as Kathryne E. McAllister appears to be the one from 1975, now known as Brendan TurecamoBorenquin lived many lives between launching in Vancouver WA in 1945 and scrapping in Beihei CH (near the northeastern border of Vietnam) in 1989. That’s indeed the Bayonne Bridge.

Here the vessels are in Newark Bay heading for Port Elizabeth.  The sun rises over Bayonne.

 

Yesterday, April 8, 2021 I caught the next set.  Eastern Dawn (Toula) was indeed heading east at dawn, pushing a barge with a crane over to Gowanus.

 

A few minutes later, Marjorie B. McAllister followed Eastern Dawn, now visible rounding the bend toward Gowanus.  I believe the tugboat beyond her is Christian Reinauer.

Thanks to Steve for sharing his archives.  The last three photos and any errors . . .  mine, WVD.

 

This is a very mixed bag:  differing locations, times, and type of ships. Installment 1 was from a very different time, two years and a few weeks ago. 

The first three photos come thanks to Steve Munoz. 

1990.  Somewhere on the Hudson . . . I can’t quite place it.  Penhors, launched 1986, is no more.  It last carried the name Anahuac.

1991.  The Red Hook container port.  Beate Oldendorff was launched in 1989 and scrapped in 2017.  In her lifetime she carried a slew of names:  Han Li, Thor Nectar, Beate Oldendorff, Tasman Mariner, Beate Oldendorff, TA Discoverer, after having started out as Beate Oldendorff.  To make searching difficult, at least three vessels have carried this name, somewhat common in companies that name vessels for family members.

1997.  In the port of Baltimore, Dubrovnik Express, a 1987 build.  She’s still afloat and in Egypt as MSC Giovanna.

2019.  Here’s a favorite of mine at the dock in Quebec City.  Arctic is currently between the Azores and Gibraltar on her final voyage  . .  . to the scrappers in Aliağa.

The bow testifies to her special habitat: the Canadian Arctic, since 1978. Her CAC4 rating means that she could move through 4′ of ice at 3 kts., ie, without an icebreaker escort.

Arctic is an OBO (oil, bulk, ore) vessel, not so common these days.  Since 1998, she made 136 voyages into the Arctic and back, mostly for ore.  Her replacement, Arvik 1, has been launched in Japan and is anticipated in Quebec City.  Designed for the same work, she looks similar to Arctic

2009.  Eastbound in the KVK, President Polk, launched in 1988, was scrapped in 2013, along with three other C-10s.

2014. Docked at Tata Steel, just west of Amsterdam. it’s Percival, launched 2010.  At 956′ and with a capacity of 177,065 dwt, she’s a VLBC, very large bulk carrier.  Currently called Springbank, she’s headed for Indonesia from Nantong.

2021.  Hyundai Ulsan, or is it Rickmers Savannah, was launched in 2011.  She was recently anchored in Gravesend Bay.

The first three photos, Steve Munoz;  the others, WVD.  Ships, like trucks, only earn when they move, and although things of beauty, are mostly utilitarian.

OK . . . I’ve got had with the the “vessel demolition” gag.  How embarrassing!   .  Check the comments for part 3;  the problems with the design are real.  Talk about confirmation bias!  Yes, I do not like the structure, a $200 million place to take selfies!  Egads!

Here’s a call to help with a renewed effort to return Lilac to full operation;  I’d say that’s restore and not just preserve.  You might recall the photos I posted in November 2020 that gave the illusion that the lighthouse tender was underway using her own power.   

This is a wish list for parts for getting Lilac back together, and some of these might be quite scarce.  Four of the 13″ port lights are missing.

Here’s a close-up.

Also, a set of 12″ or 14″ ventilation stacks as seen on the bow below

and below.  Ideally, they would be of riveted construction and can pivot.

Details of Lilac can be seen in these two posts I did back in 2007.  In the photos, you see both the port lights and ventilation stacks.

A lot of restoration or preservation projects are getting more difficult by the year as parts and people with the needed skills become more and more rare, but miracles have already happened with Lilac, miracles such as descendants of crew coming forward with stuff.

 

Here were the first two installments of this series.  And what prompts this post is the news yesterday about a $200 million structure in the assembly stages just four years ago.  Click on the image below to see the post I did just four years ago.

It will be scrapped as announced yesterday here.  The physical disassembled parts will be sold as will portions of it non-fungible tokens (NFTs), whatever they are;  I can’t quite understand them even after reading this.  Doesn’t that sound like eating your cake and still having it?

You can’t save everything . . . as the next two photos from Tony A show . . . relative to the 1907 Pegasus. For comparison, check out Paul Strubeck’s thorough cataloging of the many lives of Pegasus through the many years. 

Here’s the engine that powered Pegasus for many years, originally from Landing Ship Tank, LST 121 , which itself lived only three years before being scrapped and the engine transplanted into Pegasus.

The next two photos come thanks to Steve Munoz.  The 1945 USS Sanctuary (AH-17) looked shabby here in Baltimore harbor in 1997;  it last until 2011, when it was scrapped in Brownsville, TX, then ESCO and now SteelCoast. 

Another photo from Steve shows SS Stonewall Jackson, a Waterman LASH vessel in the Upper Bay;  note the Staten Island ferries off the stern.    Scroll through and see Jackson on the beach in Alang in 2002.  Tug Rachel will arrive in Brownsville with Lihue, a very smiliar LASH vessel within a week;  she’s currently approashing the strait between Mexico and western Cuba.

Here’s a photo I took of the beautiful NS Savannah;  a recent MARAD public comment period on what should be done with her ended less than a month ago;  I’m not sure when the results will be publicly commented on.   

Sometimes preserved vessels change hands, as is the case with the 1936 Eagle, another photo from Steve Munoz taken in 1992.  

More on this tomorrow.  Many thanks to Tony and Steve for use of these photos.

Ship preservation is tough and costly.  Turning an almost-new metal structure into NFTs . . . just mind boggling.

 

 

 

Kudos to Allen Baker for catching this boat coming through, and as of Friday morning she’s still in the boro even though she’s headed for Norfolk, I believe.

Have a look at her and see if you can tell any differences between this new boat and a long evolutionary string of Moran boats depicted here and culminating in the 6000s like Kirby Moran….

And the difference is . . .  she’s all different:  shorter (by almost 10′), cleaner (Tier IV), and with an all-different propulsion (Cat/Royce turning 94″ wheels v. EMD/Schottel turning 102″).  It would be interesting to see them side by side as well as from the interior.  There are other differences as well.

Again, kudos to Allen for catching this boat coming through on delivery south. 

Coincidentally, just last week I reread Tugboat: The Moran Story by Eugene F. Moran and Louis Reid, published in 1956.  That book covers 1850 to 1950, and I’d love to see installment two of the Moran story, covering the 65 years since Tugboat came out.  Is anyone writing it?  I’d step up . . . for what that’s worth.

A starting point is here, and in the Towline archives you find there.

The Soo is open, the SL Seaway is open, and now after 6 days, 3 hours, and 38 minutes of blockage . . . the Suez is open.

I’d started this post before Ever Given was freed and intend it as a survey of some of the tugs involved, here from largest to smaller. Obviously dimensions do not tell the whole story;  in fact, dimensions tell only the story of length and width, but most of these are not harbor tugs.  The largest is Alp Guard, 243′ x 69′ and generating just over 24000 hp.

Next are two quite similar Suez Canal Authority tugs, Ezzat Adel (226′ x 52′)

and Baraka 1, same dimensions, built in 1993 one year before Ezzat Adel.

Carlo Magno comes in at 180′ x 49′, still larger than anything in the sixth boro.

Now we’re at the scale of sixth boro tugs, although several in the boro are larger.  Basel 2 measures in at 119′ x 38′.

Salam 8 and 9 were there, coming in at 115′ x 36′

Svitzer Port Said 1 and 2 measure 104′ x 43′ and generate 6772, very similar to the largest sixth boro assist tugs.  For example Capt. Brian and Ava M. generate 6770 hp.

Mosaed 3 comes in at 98′ x 36′.

Of course, tugs weren’t the only factor.  Someone like Resolve or Smit Salvage taking charge is needed to orchestrate the efforts, which include dredging as well. If you’ve not seen this interview with salvage master Nick Sloane, it’s an enlightening listen.

Credit for photos is embedded in the photos;  click on each to see it.

Any errors, WVD.

Was this an event just waiting to happen?  See here.

 

Location 1?  Do you know this tug?

Location 2.  Tug Rachel is with this

unusual looking cargo ship, Lihue.

Viking pushes southbound past Castle Rock and

Comet northbound along the Hudson River.

Near the west end of the East River, it’s C. Angelo and

near the east end, it’s Navigator with GT Bulkmaster heading west and Ellen McAllister, east.

Working near the TZ Bridge some years back, it’s Tappan Zee II.

And finally, on the northern end of Lake Huron, it’s Avenger IV

heading for the Soo.

To answer the first question, that’s Coney Island with the Goethals Bridge and Linden refinery in the background, making this the Elizabeth River in Elizabethport NJ.

And the second question, it’s Seattle.  Photo thanks to Kyle Stubbs. Lihue, ex-President Hoover III, ex-Thomas E. Cuffe, 1971,  may be at the end of Rachel‘s towline along the coast of Oregon, heading for the Panama Canal and then . .  . Texas for scrap.  She’s probably the last of LASH (C8-S-81e) vessels built, along with President Tyler IV and President Grant V, scrapped more than 10 years ago.  She’s been a survivor.

Click on the photo below to learn more about a 1970 container ship still moving boxes, up to 482 teu at a time.  Explorador!

All other photos, WVD, at points in various places since 2017.

Here’s a mystery, a 1919 UK-built tug named G. W. Rogers that sank in Rensselaer in December 1987.  Click on the photo itself to get more info. The mystery is this:  which floating crane raised it and what became of it later?

Next mystery:  what became of the wooden floating drydock that used to be at Caddell’s?  I took this photo of Stephen Scott high and dry before 2009.

Same dry dock, same time frame, different tugboat, Franklin Reinauer. 

Ditto . . . this time Miss New Jersey. 

Again . . .  John B. Caddell

And again . . . the old Kristin Poling, the same wooden floating dry dock.

Hiow about a different dry dock, as seen from shore, but still in a dry dock at Caddell’s.  Question:  which tugboat under rehab might that be?  Answer follows.

And to end this, it’s Mariner III at Caddell’s getting a haul out last summer. 

As of this writing, the 1926 Mariner III is near Palm Beach.

All photos except the top one by WVD.  Top photo by Robert Taylor. 

And the mystery tug is Marjorie B. McAllister.

Question about G. W. Rogers, thanks to tugboathunter.

 

I had something else for today, but  . . . Sea Power . . .changes everything.  No, this is NOT a post about assets of global military hegemony.  Instead, Sea Power is the name

of a huge tug that pushed Sea-Chem 1 into the sixth boro yesterday, and Tony Acabono sent along these photos of the unit arriving in the KVK. 

Here‘s another article on the completion of the barge in Erie PA, stressing the complexity of tank barge construction.

I recall back in 2016 when the tug just launched by BAE Systems Jacksonville FL traveled up the Saint Lawrence to DonJon Shipbuilding in Erie PA to pick up that 185,000 barrel barge. It’s not the largest tank barge or any type of barge, but you have to admit it’s pretty big.   OSG 350 is much larger.  And Presque Isle is bigger yet.  I saw Presque Isle passing Mackinac here a few years back.

12000 hp . . .  there have been a few other tug boats in the sixth boro with that kind of power, OSG has some like Vision and Crowley has some like Courage come to mind. US Shipping Corp. has four 12000 hp tugs as well:  Freeport, Corpus Christi, Brownsville, and Galveston.  Here‘s a 24400 hp tug.

This photo, which I took, shows what her overall length is. Entire profiles of long vessels do not interesting photos make.

Some detail shots of an icy bow unlike what you’d see in Port Everglades . . .

 

 

Anyone know Sea Power’s height of eye?

Many thanks to Tony for some of these photos.  All others . . . WVD, who wonders what crew number on Sea Power is. 

This is my first time to see a Seabulk vesssel in the sixth boro.  For a period of time, Yankee, which I first saw as a K-Sea boat,  was a Seabulk Towing vessel.

She’s still along the KVK as of post time.

 

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