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George Schneider regularly sends me photos, comments on posts, and shares lots of info on all manner of vessels.   Here was the first installment.  I owe it to him to catch up a bit on his photos.

Including ITB Groton in the post yesterday prompts me to start here, with ITB Moku Pahu.

When the sugar transport out of Hawaii ended almost two years ago, the future of this vessel became uncertain. Click here for more info on Hawaii’s agricultural state.  She’s currently on a run between Greece and Puerto Rico, ETA mid-next week. I’ve  not found a photo of the tug separate from the barge. I was fortunate to catch a photo of another ITB on its own here in 2007 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Falkor, built in Germany in 1981,  is a research vessel operating for the Schmidt Ocean Institute, a recently created (2009) research group funded by tech money.

About the blue-hulled beauty in the background, George writes:  ” the old yacht ACANIA (230142)  was being overhauled.  She was built [for Arthur E. Wheeler]  by Consolidated in Morris Heights New York in 1930, a steel yacht 137 ft overall.  She served in WWII as Q 200 for the Army, then has haunted both coasts under the names DIXONIA, SOUTHERN SEAS, CAMPANIA, WILDCATTER, LIBERTY, AMERICANA, and back to ACANIA.  She came to San Diego in 2016 under that name, and apparently has been in a bag here, undergoing restoration, ever since.  She’s now named MARIE, and her appearance is breathtaking.  I hope to get a better picture of her, but her hull is one big mirror of deep blue paint, with not a single weld or dent line visible, and her superstructure is an equally stunning ivory-colored mirror.  She’s always been classy, but now she has the unreality of modern yachts, which look like a model in a display case, and also has been restored to all possible detail of a 1930’s yacht in appearance.  I promise a better photo if Its ever possible.”

Another research vessel included here is Bold Horizon.

And rounding out this set is Tussler, which started life in 1944 as an Navy tug. George writes:  ”  She seems to follow yacht races and regattas in the Southern California area.  She’s currently owned by Tussler Maritime LLC, but was built by Everett Pacific Shipyard in 1944 for the U. S. Navy as YTL 424.   She worked with them, first as a tug and later as a diving/salvage tender until sold in 1973, at which time she got her current name and was modified into a yacht.”

I always look forward to reading George’s emails, and I thank him here for sharing these photos.

 

Andrew J graced this port I’ve passed many times both by water and highway.  Any guesses where I took this photo?  I watched their July 4 2016 fireworks. Answer follows. That power plant opened in 1950 as well;  it’s shuttered and a plan to repower it from coal to natural gas has fallen through.

Andrew J is a 1950 build, less than 50′ loa. I took a photo of one of Andrew J‘s fleet mates here in 2016, although then West Wind –a boat with a really random history–was working for another company.

Kurt R. Luedtke has been working its way around Lake Ontario this season.  I missed her in Sodus Bay, but

the other day caught her in Fair Haven NY.   Kurt R. has previously appeared on this blog here and here.

Any guesses where Gulf Spray does her work?  I suppose the paint on the light house may be a clue.

Closer up . . .  both these photos come thanks to Justin Zizes.

Gulf Spray, a Nova Scotia 1959 build,  works in Halifax.

And finally, the flags are a clue here.  Spes was built in 1946, and the photo comes thanks to Jan van der Doe.  It’s one of many photos he sent me months ago that I’ve been saving for a rainy–or otherwise distracted– day.

Spes, of course, is a Dutch boat.  These photos were taken in the river town of Dordrecht, where I had gone in 2014 for the steam fest that happens there every other year.

Thanks to Jan and Justin for sharing their photos.

The lead photo here was taken in Dunkirk NY, where I had stopped to look for a fish tug.  No dice on the fish tug, though.

 

 

 

Since you requested it, Glen has sent along some shots of Point Adams, the MLB.  Below the helm and instruments.

This Detroit 471 came from another MLB.  That MLB, as was the case with 200 of 232 MLB 36′ boats, was burned, deliberately destroyed.

Here’s more of the engine room.

The “survivors cabin” has been living quarters for weeks or, as was the case spring and summer 2018,  months on end.  Some creature comforts are provided by benches and a table for fine dining list by the Coleman.   Home sweet boat!

Again, many thanks Glen and Naomi.

 

I’m still working to catch up and photos some of you have sent.

First, from Scotland and Robin Denny, it’s Seal Carr (1983) and

Oxcar, 1978 and looking almost like the USACE colors.  They’re working MV Saga Pearl 11 out of Firth of Forth, port of Edinburgh.

From Port Newark and Phil Porteus, it’s scrap . . .

loading to the right marks on Thor Infinity.

Here from Phil is a mishmash of vessels at Port Newark.

And another from Phil . . . the former Sea Monster and Mars.

And from Brooklyn looking over at Manhattan by Daniel Meeter, it’s Commander.  She has a history going back to in 1917, built by the Beele Wallace Co., Morehead City, NC.  She did patrol work in World War 1.

From Port of Coeymans and Erik Springer, it’s James Turecamo,  a frequently depicted boat on tugster

Thanks Robin, Phil, Daniel, and Erik.

 

 

More of Glen and Naomi’s journey . . . . These photos

are mostly on Lake Michigan, although St Ignace above and the east side of the Mackinac Bridge are in Lake Huron.   This bridge has the third longest span in the US, and the 20th in the world.

Continuing to stop at USCG stations as well as public docks, the crew brought 36391 into Sturgeon Bay.  Click here (and scroll) for another view of those lighthouses at the east end of the Ship Canal.

Sheboygan was a stop.  Here’s a fish tug photo I took in Sheboygan last year.

Milwaukee.  Note Lake Express disappearing off the upper left side of the photo?

Kenosha and 36391 stand ready, always.

In Wilmette, 36391 had the Bahá’í temple in the background. The temple is so prominent a landmark that I had to visit it upclose last summer.

Here’s one of the best of my photos of the temple.

After that, it’s the unmistakeable Chicago skyline.  That 36391 really got around!

Around the southern corner of the Lake and headed east, it’s Calumet station.

Northbound on the east side of the Lake, MLB 36460, a movie star,  leads the way to the Michigan Maritime Museum.

Glen and Naomi made other stops, but let’s conclude this post in Charlevoix, another spot on my yet-to-visit list.

Many thanks to Glen and Naomi for use of these photos to celebrate this story.  If you do FB, check out  The Point Adams – MLB 36391

Here’s an article about the folks who restored MLB 36460.

 

I first mentioned this boat here, and included photos taken from it on the Columbia River here.

The following story and photos are a real treat. They come from Glen Cathers, whose retirement projects include restoring the 36′ motor lifeboat you see below.  This article from an October 2016 issue of the Dalles Chronicle tells you all about the boat and a bit about Glen.  But let me sketch out a bit more, especially about his sixth boro connections:  his father was a surfman-1936-1940 at Point Adams, where Glen was born.  Glen spent four years in the USCG, 3 on icebreaker Westwind, and one running a 40′ boat in the sixth boro.  After three years piloting commercial hydrofoils and two more on B&O RR tugboats, he then worked on the Staten Island ferry for 28 years, retiring in 1996.

In 2006, Glen and his wife Naomi bought MLB 36391 and began a six-year restoration process.  And what would you do once you have a perfectly restored motor lifeboat?  Take it on the road . . . er, the waters, of course.  And after a few years on the Columbia River system and over the bar and along the Oregon and Washington coasts, navigating waters these boats were designed for and visiting active USCG stations, he put it on a Duluth-bound flatbed in spring 2018.  So if you saw this unit while driving northern highways back in May, here’s some of the rest of the story.

The truck had just pulled into a marina yard in Duluth.

This was Glen and Naomi’s planned itinerary.

Once ready, the 36391 Point Adams points toward the Aerial Lift Bridge to head toward the Duluth Ship Canal, the way into the west end of Lake Superior.

Here Glen, to the extreme right, poses with the boat and some USCG crew at Station North Superior, near Grand Marais.  Look that up on the map here, if you don’t offhand know the location.

From Grand Marais, they head across a glassy and clear Lake Superior to Bayfield, a trip you want to do when you trust you boat, your skills, your health, and have a good weather window. This blog was in Bayfield just a few weeks before 36391 was there.

Here’s the placid lake as they leave from Ontonagon for Houghton-Hancock.

These rails beside the dock–on an island NW of Marquette–were built to accommodate MLBs like this.

Here’s a disused small boat station near Munising,

jumping-off point for Pictured Rocks.

Besides stopping at USCG stations, Glen and Naomi stopped at public docks to show the restoration off to more folks.  Here there’re showing their restored vessel off at the Soo on the best day of the year, Engineers Day, when the locks are open to the public.

I’m grateful to Glen and Naomi for these photos and this story.   This is post one of three.  Two more to come.  If you do FB, search for The Point Adams – 36391, and get ahead of this blog.

Check out this article by my friend Peter Marsh in the October 2017 Northwest Yachting starting on pp. 78-79, with great watercolor illustrations by Cory Mendenhall.

For another article on Glen and 36391, read this one in Spring 2014 issue of Freshwater News by my Peter, starting on p. 13.

I would be remiss if I didn’t say  MLB 36391 is one of only three  (?)  fully restored vessels of the type.  One is 36340, which accompanied 36391 for some time this past summer and is based at the Michigan Maritime Museum.  The other is 36500, a newer boat but famous for the 1952 Pendleton rescue, acclaimed in book and movie entitled The Finest Hours.  There may be others we don’t know about.

Check out these shots of Cheyenne –a former staple in the sixth boro–recently in her new ecosystem.

Cheyenne recently assisted this  unit getting out of a waterway in Detroit.

 

Powering the barge to a port on another Lake is Evans McKeil, built in Balboa, Panama, in 1936!  In comparison, Cheyenne (1965, Brooklyn) is a youngster.

The lights from steelmaking in Detroit are truly unique.

 

Niagara Spirit is a large barge . . . 340′ x 78′ with a carrying capacity of almost 8000 metric tons.  In this case, the cargo is just over 6000 tons of coke . . . .  That’s not Coke.

And when the job is done, Cheyenne returns to her berth along the Detroit river, resting up for the next job.

All photos by an anonymous mariner.

Today I caught the stork, one stork.

I had work to do, but I just couldn’t let this big cherry blossom magenta vessel pass unrecorded, especially not on a sunny late October day.  Besides, I could work twice as hard the next few days . . ..

Wait . . . I thought it was one STORK!??

Yup . . . one stork from Tokyo.

No way!  It’s one tug named James D. Moran.

This minimal superstructure probably contributes to fuel economy.

 

She’s a product of Japan Marine United Corporation in Kure shipyard, Hiroshima.

And for some really cool alongside on the dock photos, here are a few from Sean McQuilken in Charleston.

 

It’s more than 100 feet up to the bridge wing!

Thanks to Sean for use of these photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

It’s been a while since I posted any of Jed’s shots, but I hold them to concentrate them rather than posting them one or two  at a time. Anyhow, of the photo below, Jed writes:  “[Atlas 1974] is my first Estonian tug . . . .” although this photo shows her in Dutch waters.

photo date 6 june 2015

Esvagt Connector (2000) is a prime example of a North Sea anchor-handling supply tug.

photo date 12 Jume 2015

The photo below provides a bit more context:  Esvagt Connector is towing a high voltage subsea station for the North Sea wind farm GODE SEA.  Assistance is provided by Esvagt Don and Smit Emoe. Click here for more of the Esvagt fleet, with some interesting names.

photo date 12 june 2015

Smit Emoe is a new boat for me.  Some previous Smit tugs posted on tugster can be found here.

photo date 12 June 2015

FairPlay X and a crewman take a wave while alongside MSC Venice,

photo date 16 sept 2016

here with a bit more context.

photo date 16 sept 2016

MTS Taktow is British built but with a Dutch language name.

photo date 11 june 2015

Let’s end this post with a boat on an entirely different continent:  it’s Yankee in the KVK.  Yankee worked for K-Sea when I first started this blog, but I believe I have no photos of her in that livery.

photo date 2 dec 2016

Many thanks to John Jedrlinic for these photos.

 

Here are previous posts on the vessel.  This past June, Steve Munoz was in Scotland when the training ship traveled up and then later down the Clyde.  All photos come from Steve.

TS ES VI arrived in Scotland after stops in San Juan and around the Mediterranean.

On the Clyde, escort was provided by Svitzer tugs Milford, Anglegarth, and Ayton Cross.

 

They pass checkerboard-patterned Port Glasgow Beacon.

It turns out that near the Beacon, this gentleman–Fergus Monk–has a Clydeside body shop, from which he takes leave to wave banners and take photos whenever a ship passes.  Here the banner greets paddle steamer Waverley.

PS Waverley looks quite inviting here. Want to book?

What surprises me about the Clyde is the relative rural character of the hills alongside.

 

 

Steve’s guide here is none other than tug engineer Tommy Bryceland, occasional contributor on tugster.  Greetings to Tommy.

After a brief sojourn in Glasgow that included meetings with City of Glasgow College, a marine programs partner, the training ship was escorted down the mighty Clyde

and out to sea.

Many thanks to Steve Munoz for these photos and this info.  I hope I’ve interpreted his photos and notes correctly.

 

 

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