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Many thanks to Denis O’Callahan for all these photos from up the Manitowoc River.

This RV Spencer F. Baird was launched in 2006.

Anyone know how long she’ll be out of the water?  She replaced the MV Togue.

Also out of the water was the 1937 Dauntless.

 

 

Also from 1937 AND from Burger Boat, it’s J B Nelson.

 

Again, many thanks to Denis for taking these photos.

 

 

1959  Dalzellera (launched in Staten Island in 1915 as CRRJJ Bethlehem) at the Bush terminal.

SS United States at its North River Pier.  Thanks to my “group-sourcing” friends on FB, I’ve learned that tank was part of “the gas regulator at West 45th Street, part of a manufactured gas plant at that site, likely operated by Consolidated Edison. Erected late 1800’s and demolished in 1965. Some “good” stuff in that ground, part of the reason it’s still a parking lot.”  Also, the sign says “gas heats best”,  and after WW2, a large banner hung there proclaiming “welcome home.”

1957 East River looking toward Manhattan, and

farther south and west, showing the McAllister yard.  Interestingly, the Singer Building, the world’s tallest building from 1908 to 1909,  still appears in the photo above, just to the right of the Brooklyn Bridge Towers.

Many thanks to Steve munoz for these photos.  You can see more of Steve’s vintage NYC and sixth boro photos here.

 

Compare the verticality of Evelyn Mae’s “windshield” in the photo below with the rake in the next photos.  The photo was taken in April 1946.

The interior photo below shows the helm and the modified “raked” windshield.

Here Evelyn Mae gets some emergency work done at the floating dry dock at Matton’s in Cohoes in July 1947.

In 1959 Evelyn Mae made a trip to the Champlain Canal.

 

Here’s a closeup of the whole crew.

During that trip, she went up on the marine railway at Velez Marina in Port Henry.

Steve continues with his narrative:  “Circe was a sister boat to Evelyn Mae. She is up on beach in Mill Basin Brooklyn after hurricane of Sept 1944. I was told by my uncle that these pics were taken after hurricane of 1946 or 1947, but apparently no hurricane hit NY in those years as per internet.”

 

“[This was] the last year the yacht club was at Mill Basin because the City of NY condemned the property so a builder could build lots of houses. So the vacant land in background of pic is now all houses. In 1955 the yacht club moved to Paerdegat Basin. My grandfather, Frank, was instrumental in obtaining a 99 year lease from the city as he was working at the NY Dock Company in Brooklyn and “knew” NY City Marine and Aviation people to help with obtaining the land. Midget Squadron Yacht Club is still there today (internet) as well as the Hudson River Yacht Club on the other side of Paerdegat Basin, which was there in the 1950s also.”
Many thanks to Steve for this look to the past, when summer boats” were just gorgeous wood.
More decades-old sixth born photos to come.

There are summer yachts, and then there are summer yachts of yore,  those ones magnificent back then  and then magnified by time.  Evelyn Mae, platform for these posts from last month, is of this second and extraordinary sort.  Photos and reminiscence come from Steve Munoz.

Enjoy the photos and I’ll tell you more later in this post and in subsequent ones.

 

These photos were taken at the Midget Squadron Yacht Club in Canarsie, Brooklyn. 

 

When I asked Steve if he knew the manufacturer, here’s what he said:  “The builder’s plaque at the steering stand said built by Fleetwing, Greenport, LI, NY, built 1928, 5 of them built as sisters. My grandfather bought it (used) after hurricane of 1947 when it was up on the beach.”
I search for “Fleetwing Greenport”  brought up this Motorboating article from November 1928, p. 154.
A few pages farther on 159, I found this unrelated but stunning image for a GarWood advertisement.

Anyhow, a bit of farther searching tells me I’ve been inside the old Fleetwing Shipyard building in Greenport.

More Evelyn Mae to come.  Many thanks to Steve for sharing these stories and images.

 

A few weeks ago I posted photos erroneously identified as Dorothy J, even though plain as day Robert IV was on the bow.   That’s called distraction.  But the photo below, plain as day, is Dorothy J.  Here was Dorothy J on a foggy morning upriver almost two years ago.

Plain as day again . . .  Rebecca Ann in the KVK eastbound, and again

in a photo from Bob Stopper, plain as day way up the Erie Canal just below lock E27 with a barge loaded with reef fodder.  Here are previous photos from Bob.

Frances pushes a loaded scow westbound on the KVK, and

Janet D moves a spud barge over to the westside tower of the VZ Bridge, about to duck behind Sider Miami, previously known as Asian Prosperity.

Tug Ireland (renamed Hoppiness) has left the sixth boro for good

and is currently in the fresh waters of the Erie Canal, where I might see her soon.

Closing this post out, it’s an unnamed (to me) tug pushing a deck barge at the intersection of Hell Gate East River and the Harlem River.   The bridges there are the Triborough and the Hell Gate.

Thanks to Bob for his photo from Lyons;  all other photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be leaving the sixth boro tomorrow for a lot of weeks.

 

All photos in this post come from Paul Strubeck, who has started a blog here called vintagedieseldesign.

Mary H is the right size to serve the fuel storage in Newtown Creek, a renowned location in the sixth boro. Here are previous posts I’ve done there.

The first oil refinery in the US was sited here, and that industry fouled it, given attitudes at that time toward the environment and disposal of chemical waste.

Today a lot of commerce happens there from oil storage to scrap metal processing.

 

 

 

 

The creek has its advocates, these folks and others. At its headwaters lies Bushwick, not for everyone but vibrant in its own way.  Here’s a post I did last fall after a tour on land and on the water of Bushwick.

Again, thanks to Paul for these photos.

 

Here’s my article on Daisy Mae in the August 2019 issue of Professional Mariner magazine.  And as I have often done, this post is mostly images that didn’t make it into the magazine.

All the specifics are in the article, but here’s the SW New Jersey dock where this sand is loaded.  Washed sand from the conveyor in center right of the photo below is falling into the barge CMT Y NOT 2.

Here’s the shore side loading, and

here’s the waterside view.

Once loaded it’s a short but

tricky run out of tidal Salem River when there’s sufficient water.

After arriving in Delaware Bay, the transition is made from push gear to …

[I’ll bet you didn’t expect this front-end loader here.]

… the wire.

 

I know the coastal NJ waters are not always this flat.

Just outside the Narrows, the tow is remade so that

 

 

the last few miles to the Brooklyn dock

can be performed with precision and efficiency.

Many thanks to CMT and the crew for helping me tell their story.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Check out the link to the story here.

 

The first photo here comes thanks to Tony aka Phil.  Shelia Bordelon has been on this blog before;  I believe she has now left the area, mission accomplished.

Fugro Enterprise has been here before also, that time on a day that the red did not photograph well.  This morning she headed out to sea, mission ongoing, i believe.

Neptune (1977) is a first timer on this blog;  the past few days she’s been docked in Bayonne.  Since 1977, she’s had more names than  . . .   Steve Earle has had spouses!!  If you don’t know Earle, sample this.  I enjoy his music and don’t mean to disparage him, but he’s just been married a lot.

And finally, another from Tony aka Phil, Conti (2005) is a platform supply vessel that’s been in the New York Bight for some time now.

Thanks to Phil for sending along these photos.

For more specialized vessels like these featured on this blog, click here.  The exotics category overlaps somewhat here; click here for the exotics appearing on this blog.

 

75 was in Paris, so let’s stay there.  Many thanks to Lew for these photos from Paris.

Moving cargo on European rivers brings with it a very different lifestyle.  For starters, check out the Opel automobile nestled rear starboard abaft the house of Belcanto.  I posted many cars on barges before, as here, second photo.

The live aboard community is well-established in some old boats,

well-maintained but old boats. You too can rent a barge or a bed in one for your stay in Paris . . .   or London .  . . or Toronto . . . or for that matter, Timbuktu.

And Lew points out that the marine fire fighters are considered part of the French military.  I didn’t know that, but here’s corroboration.  Note the logo on the farther red-hulled boat.  Click here to read the resume of the current fire chief of the Paris Fire Brigade (BSPP).  Commandant Beinier appears to be a barracks barge, also called CS la Monnaie. Click here for a photo of the entire vessel.

I said it before, and I’ll repeat . . .

it’s high time I get back to Paris, where this place

would look different.

Thx much, Lew.

 

 

This post was inadvertently launched last week but I re-boxed it.  I received these photos more than a year ago from Jonathan Steinman, who has shared many other photos here.  Can you guess where these photos were taken?   There’s a significant clue in clear view.

 

Titanic might not be an auspicious name for a vessel, but then some people like the excitement.

As Titanic sails toward the next bridge, you might start to get a sense of where this is.    If it helps, the Titanic photos were taken from Passarelle Leopold Sendar Senghor.

 

By now, you’ve probably guessed France, Paris, and maybe even not far from the Louvre.  I’ve been there only once, and that was shamefully long ago . . . 1977!!  gotta go back.

 

I’m eager to see all this commercial traffic on the Seine.

 

 

Here’s more on that first clue . . . the Franprix boxes.

Thanks, Jonathan.  I’d received these just before traveling last year, and it was a pleasure to rediscover them again recently.

 

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