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If you hop on a plane today, you might still catch the last two days of this flower parade in the land and specific region of my father;  my mother grew up farther east on the Rhine. Here’s an English version of what’s going on;  Westland is a region connected by waterways, not a town.  Here’s a map, and here’s info on the boats. I’m going to send this blogpost to my friends at the NYS Canals, because I think the integrated boat/bike/camping event is a worthy model for Canals to study.  

With my limited WiFi, I post these for you to enjoy.   Let’s start, of course, with a prime mover, a small tugboat mentioned in an earlier post comments as an opduwer.

I’m guessing this float was sponsored by an automobile dealer who sells US vehicles. 

The range of themes surprises me. Note another small tugboat.

 

I love this one.  

Actually, I love them all. 

And given my current long stay in the bayou, I had to include this.

I have a few dozen more photos, if you indicate interest in seeing more. 

Many thanks to Jan van der Doe for sending these along, more photos of a summer festival in another place, maybe not entirely different than the mermaid parade, which I missed last weekend.  Imagine if NYS coordinated a people’s event of this magnitude in 2025 to fete the 200th anniversary of the year DeWitt Clinton made the 10-day journey from Buffalo to NYC to unite the fresh and salt waters. 

Quick, name that boat.

It’s appeared on this blog before. 

She appeared here before as Charles Burton, but now . . .  meet Helen!

Cape Hatteras (1967) and Eugenie Moran (1966) have recently appeared over by Prall’s Island, regular spot for tugboats being prepared for reefing.   I caught Eugenie in Portsmouth NH over a decade ago here

Now over to the coast 3000 miles away, it’s C-tractor 22.  Thanks to JED, I rode out to sea with a previous generation C-tractor here over a decade ago. 

Many thanks to Tony A for all but the last photo, which was sent along by George Schneider.  Thanks to you both. 

And I’ll keep the lights on in tugster tower to keep juicing up the robots.

 

If I have these dates right, Pieter Boele was built in 1893!  Clearly this hull was built for towing, that  bow  not built for pushing.

Of course, the same would be true of the 1913 Jan de Sterke.

Dockyard IX dates from 1915.  I know the small tug is called Furie, considered a push boat.  I can’t make out the name of the third and fourth steam tugs in this photo, beyond the small pusher.

Noordzee is a 1922 tug.

Roek dates from 1930, built in Vlaardingen, my father’s hometown.  He would have been three when it was launched.

Volharding 1 dates from the same year. 

Dockyard V, as seen here, was built in 1942, although the sparse design suggests it’s older than that.

As with part A, all photos in part B here were sent thanks to Jan van der Doe and taken by Leo Schuitemaker.  Scroll through here for some fabulous photos of the event.  Maybe I’ll go back there again in 2024.

Posting by tugster tower robots at the behest of WVD, who wonders why the Dutch are able to field such a rich field of restored and fully functioning steam tugboats.

 

 

Here was the first in the series.  Below, Great Beds Light looks to be a painting, a timeless and idle morning photo. 

Zim Yokahama first splashed into the protean ocean in 2007, carrying capacity fewer than 4300 teu, but in the morning sun, reflected on still water, she’s beautiful,  like a 21st century version of a dynamic painted ship heading for a painted ocean, or at least the anchorage off Savannah.

Well, it was still water until her wake

came through.

Even so, as far as wakes go, this is not a big one.

Then there’s this mood of the water on an overcast morning off a rocky headland. 

The first photo comes thanks to Capt. Nameless;  all others, WVD.

Tugster tower is still being operated by the robots.

Let’s start with a photo by John “Jed” Jedrlinic, one of Alp Forward, currently off the eastern Scottish coast. She’s a 213′ x 61′ anchor handling tug from 2007  with over 200 tons bollard pull.

From there, let’s go to the Connecticut in US coast and some local boats with 

some Seakite by PanGeo Subsea gear aboard. I’d love to see what this package projects onto a screen. 

Both Berto L. and Josephine K Miller were up at Lew’s port earlier this spring.

GO Pursuit, fleet mate of GO America, called in there also. “GO” expands to Guice Offshore. 

The reminder of photos here come in the past days from Tony A, starting here with Deborah Quinn

He caught her several times in the East River, and here  

with an unidentified covered barge.   In the photo above, the Taco Cina sign intrigues me. 

In roughly the same stretch he passed Brinn Courtney, whom I’ve yet to see.

And finally, he noticed Nicholas Vinik doing the do si do with Sea Monster, moving her over near the Sandy Hook Pilots station.  I’m not sure what that means about Sea Monster.  Anyone know?  

Many thanks to Jed, Lew, and Tony A for sending along these photos. 

Meanwhile, the robots are still doing their unmonitored best at tugster tower while WVD is in the lowland of alligators, shrimp, sugar, fleur de lis and beaucoup de plus for an unspecified time.

 

Eight years ago, I had the opportunity to go to the steam festival on the waterways in Dordrecht NL.  Here, here, and here are posts that came from that.  That festival has just completed again, and thanks to Jan van der Doe, here are photos of some fine restored circa century-old Dutch steam tugs.

Hercules, for example, is 105 years young and new-build shiny. 

By the way, the tower in the photo below is newer than Hercules.  Info can be found here.

Adelaar dates from 1925, and looks brand new.  The name means “eagle” in Dutch. 

Kapitein Anna, a paddle steamer, entered service in 1911. 

Scheelenkuhlen is German-built from 1927.

Furie is over a century old and looks pristine. Farther out, that’s Dockyard IX, 1942, and Maarten, 1926.

Hugo is from 1929.

Elbe, 1959, spent some time in the US as the mother ship Maryland  for Chesapeake Bay pilots as well as Greenpeace vessel Greenpeace.

All photos sent thanks to Jan van der Doe and taken by Leo Schuitemaker.

aka “thanks to Tony A 34” is the best title for this, and I’m sure you’ll agree. 

If you’ve lost track, “exotic” is my term for unusual vessels calling in the sixth boro.  Although the series started with a workboat repurposed as a live aboard, in the past few years the term has evolved to categorize mostly vessels coming here in conjunction with special projects, many of which recently have been related to offshore wind farms.

I’m not sure why this boat is in town, and I believe the location is the CME Co. terminal (excuse me if I’m mistaken), but it truly fits the exotic category.

She’s a 300 class member of the Hornbeck Offshore (HOS) Mexico fleet, and not a new boat. A member the the 250 class was in the boro just over a half year ago here

I’m not sure how the naming convention for HOS works, but say hello to HOS Browning.

Many thanks to Tony A who sent this along by the robotic system some since 1990 have called the World Wide Web. 

Thanks to the robots in tugster tower who reconfigured the queue of scheduled posts.  WVD is sweating away in the land of alligators, shrimp, sugar, and beaucoup de plus.  Tony A is likely sweating away in the sixth boro; thanks to him for this reminder that in the boro which never really stops running, flooding , and ebbing, there truly are a million stories we never notice.  And let’s hear it for the robots who  . . . I don’t even know if they have sweat glands, or glands of any sort.   

June 2012 was pivotal for me.  A photo sent along by a friend alerted me to Canal commerce–Canadian corn– entering the US at Oswego, a place I knew something of from my youth. 

If that was a spark, then the breeze that fanned it was an invitation to do my trial article for Professional Mariner magazine, which led me to Kingston NY, the mouth of the Rondout, and a project involving use of a half century old tug Cornell to do TOAR signoffs.  My most recent article in the magazine came out today and can be seen here.

On that assignment, I was privileged to have a mentor, Brian Gauvin, do the photography.

Other big events for June 2012 included the movement of shuttle Enterprise from JFK airport ,

ultimately to the Intrepid Museum to be

hoisted onto the flight deck as part of the display, now covered.

My daughter went off to Brasil (again) and the Amazon, leading me to go there myself a year later, fearing she’d never return because she loved it so much there.

I’d given her a camera before she went, and was rewarded with some quite interesting photos, like these small motor boats that looked almost like slippers …

with straight shafts coming straight out of air-cooled engines.

During my trip up to the Rondout, I stopped in Newburgh, where replicas of La Niña and Pinta, crafted using traditional techniques on the Una River in Bahia, Brasil, attracted crowds, one of many stops along the great loop route. 

Other festivities on the Hudson that summer . . .

included the sails and music associated with the Clearwater Festival, and of course the small boats moving in some of the venues.

 

Patty Nolan and Augie were the small tugs, and of course the sailboats including Mystic Whaler, Woody Guthrie,

 

and of course the sloop Clearwater.  The Clearwater organization will not be doing a music festival in June 2022.  Mystic Whaler is now working in Oxnard CA at the Channel Islands Museum.

Summer time and the living is easy well, at least it feels that way some days . . . . 

All photos, except the first one, WVD.  That first photo was taken by Allan H. Seymour.

 

Click here for previous Memorial Day posts.

Click on the map below to interact with the purple locations, “foreign burial places of American war dead”. 

Meanwhile, here‘s another perspective from my friend Louis N. Carreras’ post A Sailor’s Prayer

 

Call this the seldom-seen version of RRT.  I love that blue and the name on this 1954 tugboat.

Kenny G …. I caught her tied up on the south side of Hudson River Pier 25, but by the time I got back there, Kenny G

had moved tow elsewhere. 

And here are a few maybe never before seen in the sixth boro from Capt. μηδέν, who sends along the next four shots.   Meet the 1981 Marcella G. Gondran, which autocorrect insists incorrectly must be Honduran.

Also from the peripatetic sailor, here’s H. J. Reinauer and Iron Salvor, the latter certainly being an unusual vessel.  I know some stories, but i’d love to learn more about this global nomad

 Here’s H. J. with the more familiar Diane B in this framing.   H. J. is a 1979 Jakobson-built tug that appears to be headed to a new life in the very far south. 

This version of Little Toot . . .  is another I’ve not seen in ages.  Often that moniker goes to any much-smaller tugboat. This 61′ x 21′ 1977 tug came from the Blount shipyard.

And to close it out, here’s another shot of William F. Fallon Jr. over by the KV buoy.   The the former J. George Betz from 1995.

Unless attributed to Capt. μηδέν, all photos, WVD.

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