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All All but one of the photos in this post come from David Silver, assigned as a cadet this summer on a Maersk vessel going halfway around the world and back.  He departed Port Elizabeth on May 21.  This post follows his voyage, focusing on what someone like me–mostly fixed–doesn’t see.

May 24.  Charleston.  Mark Moran.

May 30. Houston.   Thor.

 

May 31.  Houston.  Wesley A.

June 06.  Norfolk.   Maxwell Paul Moran.

June 08.  Pilot boards in sixth boro of NYC.  JRT Moran.

June 08.  VZ Bridge as seen from the ship and

as seen from my location, at about the same moment.

June 09.  Port  Elizabeth.   Kirby Moran. 

There was a stop in Algeciras–the world’s 10th largest transshipment port– but no photos of assist tugboats.

June 25.  Suez Canal.  It could be one of the Mosaed boats, maybe number 1.

June 26.  Suez Canal.  One of the boats called Salam.

After transiting the Red Sea and stopping in Djibouti, July 9.  Mont Arrey, 

they rounded the peninsula and entered the Gulf.

July 9.  Jebel Ali.  P&O Venture.  That could be P&O Energy off the stern.

 

July 12.  Port Qasim.  SL Hodeida  with pilot boat and other Smit Lamnalco tugs.

July 13.  Port Pipavav.  It appears to be Ocean Supreme and another one of the Ocean Sparkle boats in the distance.

 

I have enjoyed seeing this variety of towing vessels from this trip halfway around the world.  Now I hope the return trip brings more photos and a safe return in late August.

Many thanks, David.

Thanks to Ashley Hutto, I started on this path a month ago.  Notice the equipment just beyond the H-bitt and slightly toward the capstan?

The same equipment can be found on this $161 million stationary vessel on the East River:  the orange ring and net seems to be to the right and several balls can be seen lower left.

Here’s the same on this

ship called Kestrel.  I suppose the ship is named for the backboard?

And notice this one on Ocearch just above and beyond the lighter blue tent?

Here’s another . . . standard version on

this LNG tanker Atlantic bound at the Cocoli locks….

A slight permutation gets us to “bulls on halls…”    Well, we’ve had cows here and here . . .   Has anyone seen livestock vessels in the sixth boro recently?

Thanks to Ashley for the first shot;  the others by Will Van Dorp.   Here are some more hoops.  Remember this “cardiac gym” on Apache?   I enjoy looking, expecting to find surprises everywhere.

 

 

More than half a year ago, Buffalo was auctioned off, and in my circles, no one knew what had become of her.  Some were speculating she had gone for scrap.  She lay against the wall in the dry dock all winter, but when spring came, she disappeared and some thought she had been scrapped.

It turns out she recently headed for Buffalo, and is currently making her way across the state of New York.  These photos from Jason LaDue show her westbound at Lock E28A in Lyons NY.

She ran on her own power at the RoundUp in 2012, but right now her power unit is this crew boat.

 

Here she passes through the center of Newark.  The weather now is so much more comfortable than a week ago.  Can you read the banner atop the deck house  . . .”bringing the Buffalo back to Buffalo.”  Yes!!

Here’s a closer up of the banner showing the Lardon Group web address, and

on the push boat, Union Concrete . . . .

Now on to the next town .  . Palmyra, and the next three photos were taken by Jim Hastings.

 

Tomorrow, I gather, the flotilla continues westbound.

And finally, two more from Jason LaDue.  As to the slogan on Waterford’s logo, I’d raise the point that just as Waterford is a gateway to the New York State Canal System, so is Buffalo, and so are Whitehall, Troy, and Oswego, for that matter. It just depends on your direction and coordinates of entrance.

As attractive as this shot is, my guess is that the boats have already moved west.

Many thanks to Jason and Jim for taking these photos.  I’ll be looking for Buffalo in Buffalo this August or September.

For many more photos of her taken some years back by Fred of tug44, click here.

 

Maybe I should post this under “caption contest,” but here are some photos worth contemplating.  The first comes from Patrick Gallagher.  It seems that this yacht has just come off a container vessel and that’s an automobile of some sort under the tarp on the bow.  I know nothing more, although I’d really like to hear “the rest of the story,” as Paul Harvey used to say.

The next two photos come from Jason LaDue.  I’d put this under the category of “we don’t need no stinking’ tugboat.”

Given the tarp, stool, and head . . .  I’m thinking they need a hot plate in lieu of a full galley.

Many thanks to Patrick and Jason for these photos.

 

 

Thanks to John Paul for this photo of the big crane as seen the land area called Spuyten Duyvil in the Bronx.   The tidal strait–entrance/exit of the Harlem river–is also called Spuyten Duyvil.  That 328′ boom shrinks the swing bridge it’s assisting with the repair of.  Of course the crane is the one that arrived from California 4.5 years ago here to raise components of the new TZ Bridge and lower the old one.

Paul Strubeck caught the crane from the water side, showing relative size of crane and swing bridge.  The higher bridge is Henry Hudson crossing.  For much more info on that bridge, click here.

I got these photos yesterday from Inwood Hill Park.  The railroad swing bridge was opened in 1900, although it was closed for most of the 1980s.  Now it carries 30 trains a day and opens about 1000 times a year, mostly for Circle Line boats.

According to this source, maintenance will focus on mechanical and electrical equipment damaged by Hurricane Sandy.   “Navigation strikes” may be another explanation.

The crane is rated at lifting capacity of 1929 tons, powered by three diesel 601 kW (806 hp) main generators and one 91 kW (122 hp) auxiliary generator provide its lifting power.  It has no propulsion power of its own.

The manufacturer is ZPMC, the same Chinese firm that provides state-of-the-art port gantry cranes here and here.

I’m not sure whose crew boat this is,

but the tugs on the scene are Dorothy J and

Robert.

Maybe I’ll find time to go back up that way tomorrow.

 

Let’s start with a baseline, exactly seven years ago.  I got this photo of Harvey putting on a water display just south of Yonkers on June 12, 2011.

These next photos came from Lisa Kolibabek a few days ago, following up on the post of a week ago where I said “watch this space.”.

Never has a vessel been painted thus!

Note the master plan lower left.

 

The art is in progress . . .

so I hope you’re intrigued enough to continue watching this space.  Once the superstructure is painted, watch the space between the KVK and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Many thanks to Lisa for snapping these photos as she works on W. O. Decker, which you can see at work 39 years ago here.

I seem to recall bowsprite had a similar idea back in 2010.

 

Naming the setting is easy, but can you name this tug?  I thought it was Emerald Coast with a modified paint job.

It’s a newbie in town from the Harley Gulf fleet, appropriately named Lightning, given that sky. .

Iron Salvor I’d seen before, but at the dock.  The other day she loaded some fuel at the IMTT pump.  Her intriguing history was commented on here from two months ago.

I don’t believe I’ve seen Kodi before.

She comes from across Raritan Bay, from Belford.

Let’s mix things up with a photo from about 10 years ago . . . Swift, a 1958 tug out of New Haven.

I’ve never seen Miss Circle Line away from the dock, but getting this photo on a stroll along the Hudson the other day led me to discover (maybe again) that she’s a 1955 product of Matton’s shipyard, although she doesn’t appear on this shipyard list, unless my eyes fail me or the list is incomplete.

To go over to Europe, from Jed . . . it’s Union 5. 

photo date 15 JUNE 2017

And a rare shot from Jed, it’s Japanese tug Azusa.  Since then, she’s been sold to Indian concerns and operates as Ocean Marvel out of the port of Krishnapatnam.  Scroll down on that link to see a drawing of elephants being loaded . . . likely more than a half century ago.

photo date 16 Jan 2008

And in closing, here’s Decker and Matilda, photo I took on May 26, 2008.  Where does the time go?

Thanks to Jed for use of his photos, many more of which are in the hopper.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

She was still self-propelled and earning cargo credit in September 5, 2017, when I saw her near Mackinac Island . . .

 

Ditto two days later in windsor and a bit later

she was running down bound past Wyandotte,

allowing me a close-up of her oxidation.

But today, thanks to Fred Miller II for these photos, she’s down bound again, but behind a tow line of Evans McKeil, with

tail steering provided by the iconic Cheyenne.

Many thanks to Fred for the last two photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

How about some irony:  Evans McKeil, shown here n Montreal in October 2017 with barge Metis,

was built in Balboa, Panama in 1936!!  Algoway‘s keel was laid in 1972 in Collingwood, and she’s headed out for scrapping in Turkey.

Cheyenne has appeared on this blog many, many times, most recently after I caught her in the Oswego River in September 2017 as she headed for Detroit.

 

 

 

What is it?  Well, to take inspiration from billboards,

I’d say “watch this space.”

Or from t-shirts . . . . “keep calm and pay attention.”

I think the red and yellow here belongs to Jane A. Bouchard, seen here almost a decade ago, but

for the alabaster white, stay tuned.  Come on back soon.  Pay attention.  Stay focused.  Be alert.

All photos today thanks to Lisa Kolibabek, whose previous contributions can be seen here.

 

Following on the photos from April 29 and May 19, here is finale for Tender 6 and Reliable of Utica.  As of this posting, they are 2.5 nautical miles off Shinnecock and 80′ down, precisely placed and not sunk.  My guess is that soon this section of this chart will be updated.

Here is the last daylight for

Tender 6.

Here’s the final journey

 

for Reliable

of Utica.

Thanks for use of these photos to a generous gentleman. More photos can be seen here.

 

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