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Here were 1 and 2.  And leading up to the sinking in 2014, here are some old photos.

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And then January 16, 2014.  The next few photos by Bjoern Kils, of NYMedia Boat.

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Here was her sonar signature, as her exact location of sinking was marked.  Photo from Bjoern.

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A nameless salt sent in this photo.

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And by early February 2014, the boat was brought back to the air . . . rise again.  Photo below by Orlando Martinez.

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March 2014, and the rehab had begun, if only the preliminaries to rehab.  And a lifesaving award was granted.

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During the summer, there were some articles like this one in Professional Mariner magazine.

And by November 2014, Sea Lion looked like this.  Notice the funnel on the ground.

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In February 2015, the funnel was in place and hull coatings applied.

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By mid March, her externals looked ready to return to the water.

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And then yesterday, about two weeks after she splashed back in, she was at work pushing a barge

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through the Buttermilk Channel.

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If you need a soundtrack, try this.  Bravo, Sea Lion.

Photos not otherwise attributed by Will Van Dorp.

If you’re wanting to see the sixth boro, New York Media Boat is an excellent way to do it.

Here was 2.  Scroll through and you’ll see other posts I’ve done on the vessel in North America.  The photo below shows Half Moon under full sail off Boston earlier this month.

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Here on an AIS grab from yesterday, BigLift MV Traveller scooted across the North Sea from Scotland into the port at the mouth of the IJ River.

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If you scan the icons carefully here, you’ll see MV Traveller in port, near NG 10-Aqua Fauna.

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And here she is at the dock.  Click on the photo to get the original source and discussion in Dutch.  The headline translates as Half Moon has arrived in IJmuiden, the port at the mouth of the IJ River.  Click here and here for more photos.  I’ll translate the text later today when my head comes back above water.

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Click here and here for photos I took of tugs and other vessels on the IJ and other waterways in the Netherlands last year.   Here are some of my other IJmuiden and area photos.

Many thanks to Rene at binnenvaart for these arrival links.    The next and final step will be from IJmuiden to Hoorn.

Thanks to Mike Abegg for the photo of Half Moon under sail in North American waters less than a month ago.

A month ago, I posted some really random tugs here, including the one below in the mysterious Miami River.  Yesterday, thanks to Robert Cremer, the tug below was identified as LT-1970, a Higgins Industries October 1953-delivered tug once known as Okinawa.  Thanks much to Robert.  The photo below is taken by Allan Seymour.

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The next set of photos comes from Mike Abegg, last North American captain of Half Moon, now not-yet arrived in Hoorn.

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These photos were taken over near SUNY Maritime.  The tug tending the barges I thought would look this, but actually Moran has sold it to Norfolk Tug, and the photos below shows its current livery. Sorry if that sounds confusing.

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And the following photos from Brunswick, GA,  come from Dirk van der Doe via Jan.

Here’s Ann Moran,

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Peter G. Turecamo, and

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Mary Loy Turecamo.

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And the final photo today comes from Rich Taylor.   La Dani (1981) illustrates what I enjoy about seeing tugboats from other ports in the watery parts of the world.  I’ve seen no US built tug that looks quite like this.  Here’s a page devoted to the Dunston portion of her builder.

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Many thanks to Robert, Allan, Mike, Dirk, and Rich for photos and information in today’s post.

Get your Miami River rat hat here.

Check out bowsprite’s latest post here . . . yes it was five years ago.

 

Here’s the index to all previous posts in this series.

For today, all come from Jed . .  John Jedrlinic.  Any ideas on the locomotion of the person nearer than Diane Moran, photo taken in Miami in February?

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The Thomas Dann photo is from almost a year ago.

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Ditto . . . Schuylkill, taken in Norfolk last May.

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Ditto . . . Jed took this photo of the 1960 Marion in St. Maarten.

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Mr Chester and

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Miss Niz . . . Miami, February 2015.

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Allie B has been a favorite of mine since I caught photos here and here or her departing for the Black Sea this time eight years ago.

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Finally, the closing shot is Diane Moran without the guy on the jet ski.

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Many thanks to Jed Jedrlinic for these photos.

Thanks to Jonathan Steinman, here’s another tug–Robert Burton–handling the CVA sealed garbage containers.  Given the direction of the tow and absence of freeboard on the barge, the containers are loaded and heading for Howland Hook to be loaded onto trains southbound.

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Here (and scroll) was a post I did almost two years ago when Robert Burton was shifting barges down in the Beaufort Inlet.

Thanks much to Jonathan for sharing his vantage point.

But first, from less than two months ago . . . this photo taken by O. Nonimus Bosch shows Fells Point, Sassafras, and Pocomoke temporarily immobilized.  Here and here are parts of the story.

3 Barges Panorama

Recently in t-shirt weather in the sixth boro . . . it’s a classic, Thomas J. Brown.

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Ellen S. Bouchard,

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Resolute with a Bouchard barge,

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and Evening Star, also with a Bouchard barge.

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Elizabeth McAllister light,

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Robert E. McAllister,

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Ross Sea, 

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Eric McAllister,

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and finally Ellen McAllister shifting

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Cielo di Roma . . .

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Thomas J. Brown . . . enjoy another look at this classic.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.   And in the post above, subtracting the three tugs in the O. Nonimus Bosch photo, you have over 25,000 horsepower, of which 1000 of those ponies are generated by Thomas J.

 

Over six years ago, I did another asphalt post here.  Yesterday I was thrilled to get the following photos below from Jonathan Steinman of this unusual vessel on the middle portion of the East River.

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Asphalt Sailor–a great name–turns out to have a set of siblings ranging from a lot more capacious to somewhat less so.  On names alone, I’d love to see Black Shark.   Given the cargo, I wonder if the deck feels warm.

That’s James Turecamo overtaking on the west side.  Here’s a hydrodynamics problem . . . is the greater amount of froth churned up by James due only to its greater speed, or is hull shape a factor?

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For outatowners, that’s the 59th Street Bridge, and Asphalt Sailor is headed “south,” actually west.

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Unrelated:  Here’s an East River ship photo I posted six years ago.  The conclusion then was that it was “doctored.”  Anyone new thinking on it?

Thanks again to Jonathan for these unusual photos.

 

Geertruida van der Wees  (1979) . . .  with a telescoping wheelhouse . . . I wonder how that six-syllable name gets abridged for radio transmission?

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Kaikoura (2014) seems to have “towing pins.”

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En Avant 7 (1981) and 27  (1960).

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Norne is 2011 built.

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Gepke III, believe it or not, dates from 1957, and is operating with its third name.  I love the elegant lines of the house.

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Now we move to a different watershed . .  that of the mysterious Miami.  And I need some help here.  Anyone know the vintage of Manati I 

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and this looks like Manati II and an unidentified fleet mate.

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Elizabeth H (1962) and Pablo IV (??)

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Jean Ruth (1976) and Atlas (1985)

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OK . .  there’s much about the mighty Miami that I need to go up close to study.

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The Dutch tug photos–taken in “the Rip” aka “het scheur“– come thanks to Jan Oosterboer via Fred Trooster, who says folks are already waiting on the seawall of Hoorn for the arrival of Traveller with its deck load of Half Moon.  And for the Miami photos, thanks to Allan and Sally, who also provided the photos here and elsewhere.

Get your Miami River Rat hat here.

 

Here were the previous ones . . . and I recently corrected a duplicate number.

Salvage Chief, by the first half of its name, is involved in giving second lives to vessels that have seen seen distress.  For photos of many projects she has been involved in, including the Exxon Valdez, click here. For more photos, click here.   Of the over 250 LSMs built in Houston in the mid-1940s, there are not many left.

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She started life afloat as a landing craft . . . LSM-380.

Many thanks to Seth Tane for sending this photo along  . . . a month ago already.

Unrelated but good photos of mostly ships upriver on the Hudson can be seen here on Mark Woods site.

 

 

Hats off and dinner on the table to Rod Smith of Narragansett Bay Shipping who put in a long day yesterday getting photos of the loading process of Half Moon onto the deck on BigLift Traveller.  Also many thanks to the hospitable crew of Traveller for accommodating Rod.

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I’m struck by how diminutive Half Moon looks here.

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Water-level . . . pre lifting straps and

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after.

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And then with hours of careful effort . . .

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like a netted fish after a long fight . . .

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she settles onto the deck.

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Next stop  . . .  Hoorn!

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The two last photos of Rod’s  .  .  . the night scenes . . .  suggest time travel:  imagine what Juet would have written in his journal 406 years ago if a big yellow ship had rendezvoused with them on their return to Europe and lifted them onto the deck for a speedy eastbound trip.  Click here for the never-completed blog version of  Henry Hudson’s 1609 trip . . . which lacks an account of THAT Half Moon‘s return to Europe.

Related photos include . . . ones of sister vessel Happy Dynamic, and here here and here  . . . some sampling of Half Moon photos over the years.

Less related:  click here for another Netherlands-bound vessel with a deck load, and here and  here for photos of the arrival of that deck load from a month earlier.

Again, Rod . . .Hartelijk dank . . . or Dziękuję bardzo.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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