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Here’s a new type of vessel, a TEFC.  Know that abbreviation?  She called in Red Hook about a month ago.  These photos come thanks to Mike Abegg.

A clue is the white/red bundles on the dock.

Here’s a closer up view.  Last opportunity to guess.

TEFC expands to “totally enclosed forests carrier,” a subset of dry bulk transportation.  After Red Hook she called at a number of ports headed south.  She’s currently in Mobile AL.  My guess is that she loaded her lumber cargo in Brasil, but I’m not sure of that.

If you can get FB, here’s a video of Mozu Arrow and her hold.  Here are videos of many other Arrow vessels.

Many thanks to Mike for taking these photos.

I’d wager that more than two thousand cargo ships dock in the sixth boro each year.  This morning as I write this, I count  20 in all, including the second of the 15k ULCVs, CMA CGM Panama.  No, I didn’t get photos because . . . I was workbound. All these photos I took in recent weeks.  The last one here I did not take;  a friend Allan Seymour took it on the body of water called Penobscot Bay.

Erikoussa is a regular in the port.  Click here for posts featuring this tanker going back 12 years already.  Here she was departing;  the taut line angling off her port bow leads to a tug rotating her across the KVK so that she points east rather than west.  As of this morning, she’s in the Gulf of Mexico.

Sea Vine . . . is just the best name.  Right now, she’s in Rotterdam.

Hamburg Bay may have called here before as Zim Hamburg or APL Tokyo, but I’ve no record of that.  At 6350 teu, she’s of the size that I saw many of until about five years ago. Her beam–131′–would prevent her from passing through the old Panama Canal locks.  She’s upbound on the Elbe now.

Speaking size . . .  OOCL Singapore is one of those ULCVs that are becoming the new standard these years in the port.  Launched in 2014, her teu capacity is 13200.  Compare that with the newest record holder . . .  CMA CGM Brazil and the 15000 teu size.  She’s now off Cape Fear bound for the Mediterranean.

CMA CGM A. Lincoln, seen here a few weeks ago, blocked out the sky as she passed by.  Right now she’s shuffling through the southern end of the Red Sea, Malaysia bound.

Ever Lotus . . . I caught her here the first time just over a year ago.  She’s Pacific bound in the Panama Canal.

Pacific Anna, a 2017 crude oil carrier,  has one of those great names, like Surfer Rosa or Surabaya Johnny, which isn’t a ship name but should be.  She’s in the Atlantic, heading for Amsterdam.

Fulmar, named for the seabird,  is one of the tankers that currently shuttles frequently between Point Tupper and Bayway.  Right now, she’s off Port Aransas.

Tanja with Camden Hills in the background is departing Penobscot Bay. As an indicator of trade routes, as of this morning Tanja is currently at the Amazon River port of Belem.

The photo above is thanks to Allan Seymour; all others, WVD, who like these vessels, is not alive unless he’s moving.

 

Call this “thanks to Steve Munoz 20:  the 9th Annual North River Tugboat Race September 2, 2001.”   As Steve writes,  “The tug race on 9/2/2001 was  nine days before 9/11/2001. I was on board the tug Janet M McAllister for the race. My son was on board a Seabulk oil tanker docked in Bayonne and he could see the Twin Towers from his cabin porthole. As the tug headed up the Upper Bay I was going to take a picture of the Twin Towers and decided not to since I had so many already. Little did I, or anyone else, know that they would not exist nine days later. I wish I had taken a picture.

[Participating] include tugs McAllister Bros, Janet M McAllister, Empire State, J George Betz, Mary L McAllister, Irish Sea, Dory Barker, Powhatan, Dace Reinauer, Beaufort Sea, Resolute, Growler, Z-TWO, Janice Ann Reinauer, Katherine, Amy C McAllister, James Turecamo, Kathleen Turecamo, Emil P Johannsen;  also, includes fireboats John D McKean, John J Harvey.

I’ll not identify all the boats here.  As you know, some of these boats, like Dace Reinauer, look quite different now. Also, many boats here, like Janet D. McAllister and Powhatan,  are no longer in the sixth boro,

Z-Two is now Erin McAllister, and in Providence RI.

Emil P. Johannsen is laid up, I believe,

in Verplanck NY.

 

Beaufort Sea has been scrapped.

There were tugboats to port and

tugboats PLUS a fireboat to starboard.  Two things here:  I love the water thrusters deployed from Z-Two.  And Powhatan is now a commissioned Turkish naval vessel known as TCG Inebolu;  as such it was involved a month ago in the tow of a Bangladeshi corvette, BNS Bijoy, which had been damaged in the explosion in Beirut harbor.

 

 

 

Again, many thanks to Steve Munoz for taking us back to September 2, 2001 with these photos.

A different series of tugboat races happened decades earlier, as attested here.  An indicator of how different the world then was is the fact that back then, a rowing contest was included, and crews of ships in port took part.  Those days of break-bulk cargo had ships in port for much longer periods of time,  and “port” included places along the Hudson.

 

Here’s a photo from a friend who works for a naval architecture firm.  Guess the function of the completed vessel below.

Here’s a rendering.

To the gentleman from New Zealand from the William C. Daldy Preservation Society who recently inquired about functioning steam tugboats in the US, I can’t think of any.  Can any reader here?  Here and here can get you info on steamer Daldy.  And all that smoke was photoshopped in, I was told.

Christiaan Brunings was built in 1900 as an icebreaker home-ported in Dordrecht NL, in the Rhine delta.  She survived two world wars that happened all around her.  I took this photo in Dordrecht in 2014.  For more photos of smoky Dutch steam tugs, click here.

If coal was the fuel of the past, then wind will make up a share of an increasingly harnessed renewable sources of energy.  Susie S was at the the Damen Den Helder yard back in 2014, same trip.

Even more variety is  here, the reason I put this post in the “line locker” group . . .   tugs on the highway . . .

and the boat ramp, and

sometimes nearly getting away . . .  once they enthusiastically take to water.  Well that tug, formerly know as Atlantic Hunter has changed hands and is now Little Giant.  Neptune himself was consulted about the deal and he approved.  Keep your eyes peeled.

And further rounding out this post . . .  On July 14, 2017, Peking was floated out of Caddells by the tagteam of Dorothy J and Robert IV to

be slipped onto the back of Combi-Dock III for transit over the Atlantic.  See the full story here.  Today, September 7, 2020, it arrives fully restored at its new museum in the port of Hamburg.

After more than three years of work, Peking will be arriving here today.  The FB site is shown there. If you don’t do FB, I have permission to copy some pics and paste them in a future blog post.  To the Hafenmuseum, where I wanted to be today . . .  Herzlichen Glückwunsch zur schönen Restaurierung!

Back to those first two images, that is a state-of-the-art Russian factory trawler called Captain Sokolov, one of six identical vessels being built at the St. Petersburg Northern Shipyard.  Here’s more on the design of these vessels with a capsule hull.  Dimensions are 268′ x 51′ with a cold storage capacity of 1200 metric tons. Here’s more on Norebo.  The design is by Knarr Maritime Consortium of Iceland.

The first two images thanks to Aleks, number 3 is from seapixonline, and the others, WVD.  Many thanks to Rembert for reminding me that today is the day Peking in Hamburg goes public.

Finally . . . it’s Labor Day, which I learned is a good day to work.  But if you want to stream some good music on a Labor Day theme, try this from Bread and Roses, where I used to go when I lived in the Merrimack Valley of MA.

 

 

Many thanks to Josh Watts for sending along these photos taken in western Monroe County, at Adams Basin.  You may recall that Adams Basin has appeared here before in the westbound end of the virtual Erie Canal tour.  Sure enough there was an Adams involved . . . way back at the time the first canal iteration was dug.

Joncaire?

Messieurs les Joncaires established themselves in what is now Buffalo, back before the Revolution.

Canal tug Joncaire appeared here once before a little over a year ago, along with DonJon tug Rebecca Ann;  in that photo, Joncaire is half blue and half red.   The Adams Basin lift bridge is one of 16 in the NYS Canals systems.

Joncaire used to be all red, as in this photo below from about four years ago, when it was on the Buffalo River and still painted in NYPA red.

In close proximity to Joncaire was Elizabeth Cady Stanton, one of the new 25′ tugs that have been coming into the NYS Canals system since 2018.

 

Gradall #4  was tied up there also, with

an unnamed (not yet named) small tug alongside.

Here’s the first new one I saw back in August 2018;  I believe this one has since been named Port Jackson.

Many thanks to Josh for sending along these photo;  Future Port Jackson and the red Joncaire are mine.

The first installment of this title can be seen here.

As of this morning, USS Slater is back to Albany again, after its latest shipyard visit.

Below, thanks to Tim Rizzuto, are some photos from exactly 27 years ago, showing two McAllister tugboats assisting the large Russian, now Ukrainian, tugboat Gepard, which successfully delivered Slater from the Mediterranean to the sixth boro. I know this is a digression, but Gepard has an “exciting” history.  It’s still working, currently in the Black Sea.

Maybe someone can assist in identifying the two McAllister tugs.  This photo shows the significant difference in beam:  Gepard 66′ and Slater 37’…

 

From 1993, let’s jump to 1997.  Jeff Anzevino got the following photos as the destroyer escort made its initial trip up the Hudson to Albany.  Jeff has contributed many photos to this blog, going back almost to the beginning.  The tug pictured her is Rainbow, currently called Patriotic, which has been in the Morris Canal for quite a long time.  Patriotic is a 1937 Bushey build.

Also assisting in the 1997 tow were Benjamin Elliot and Mame Faye!

Jeff also caught the tow back in 2014.  And  . . . is that Margot on starboard?  That IS Benjamin Elliot on port.

Many thanks to Tim Rizzuto and Jeff Anzevino for use of these photos.  If you’re interested in donating to USS Slater.org to help defray expenses, click here.

I’d really appreciate identification of the McAllister tugs above.

My previous Slater posts can be found here.

 

With apologies to folks who aren’t familiar with the sixth boro, here’s a puzzler.  If you have been around here for decades, there’s an enormous clue in the second photo.  The question . . . where it this?

The two photos come from Jim Murray, retired FDNY and a tremendous asset when Gary Kane and I were doing the documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.

As I understand it, the first photo is the head of a long train of barges, and

this is the tail end, three tugboats and a total of 18 barges.

Jim writes:  “I bought a load of old photos many years back and these two were in there. Naturally most of the photos are unmarked, but some are.  I believe these photos were taken from another boat.”

But the question is  . . . location.

 

On the back of the second photo the following text:  “3 Philadelphia and Reading tugs head to NY going through the B&O bridge at Bayway. PATIENCE (?) on head ASHBURN on left and BERN (?) on right. 18 loaded coal barges for NY from Port Reading”.  I can’t vouch for correct spelling.

It’s the B&O bridge between Staten Island (Howland Hook) and Elizabeth.  Old steam tug and line of coal barges headed to NYC.  I bought a load of old photos many years back and that was one of them.  Naturally most of the photos are unmarked bus some are.

So in the second photo, the now-gone Goethals Bridge is in the foreground.  The swivel bridge stood from 1889 until around 1959.  Here‘s more, including a photo of the swivel and the current lift bridge there together.

Many thanks to Jim for passing the photos and info along.

Now i said there was a big clue in photo #2 above.  It was the bridge supports.  In my photo from September 2016 below, you see the same Goethals Bridge supports.

 

Today will be a two-post day.  Here’s the first one, and it follows on this May update.  These photos come thanks to Kevin Oldenburg.  The next post will come in an hour.

She was headed up to Feeney’s Shipyard in the Rondout for a continuation of the conversion from oil spill response vessel to pilot boat mother ship.  Atone point, she was identical to New Jersey Responder or Deep Blue Responder.

Unlike her move back in May, only a few miles, this time she traveled under her own power.  And travel she did . . . . 13 knots worth.

Hat tip to Kevin.  Previous photos attributed to Kevin can be found here.

 

Guess the usage?

Avalon Sea is an AHTS vessel of the sort I’ve not seen call in the sixth boro.  Any guesses on usage, age, and dimensions of the unit?

 

If it reminds you of the various semi-submersible vessels that’ve called here, great, because that’s what Boabarge 37 is.  It measures 499′ x 125′  with a draft of 30′.  She’s on long-term lease to the Irving Shipyard in Halifax.  Avalon Sea is one of seven vessels operating for Secunda Canada, self-described as “a harsh weather fleet vessels serving Canada’s offshore gas and oil projects.”   Avalon Sea measures in at 300’x 66′ and propelled by 15,500 hp.  To see how Irving Shipyard uses Boabarge 37, check this out.

Point Chebucto is based in the Strait of Canso, but out behind her are two transients:

Behind her are Bylgia, a Heerema tug measuring 236′ x 59′ with 202 tons bollard pull, and Maersk Mobiliser, launched in late fall 2018 and 311′ x 82′ and currently tending craneship Thialf out by Sable island.

 

Here Bylgia is hooking up to 400′ x 125′ cargo barge H-407.  For specifics on Heerema equipment, click here.

All photos thanks to Jack Ronalds.  As I’ve said before, if you want to see some of them right now, click here  for his Marine Traffic snaps and here for his general photos, not limited to maritime shots.  The connection between the Strait of Canso and NYC’s sixth boro was highlighted in this post from a few days ago.

 

 

You saw a different version of this photo last week, NS Leader being assisted into Bayway.  This begs the question . . .  from where did NS Leader come?  Where did it take on the cargo discharged at Bayway?

The answer for NS Leader and lots more crude tankers is Point Tupper NS, where there’s a NuStar Terminal.  Maybe you’ve seen that on AIS.

Sailing a tanker from there looks a lot like here, although the Strait of Canso is quite a bit deeper than the Kills.  That’s Eagle Varna, a VLCC,  at the dock.  Smaller Eagle tankers (AET) used to call in the sixth boro, as in here and here, although I don’t recall seeing them recently.

Here Point Chebucto and Point Valiant assist Suezmax tanker Eagle San Antonio.

Here London Spirit departs the dock

with Point Chebucto and Svitzer Montreal to port and Svitzer Bedford to starboard.  NYK “Spirit” tankers used to call regularly in the sixth boro as in herehere and here, and maybe they still do.

Stena Weco tankers call in the sixth boro frequently as well:  Stena Concert, Stena Contest . . .  come to mind.

Here Switzer Bedford and Point Chebucto assist Stena Conquest

out to sea via the Strait.  Svitzer Canada is a towing branch of Maersk with a network of hundreds of boats.

Many thanks to Jack Ronalds for these photos.  More of Jack’s photos soon.  If you want to see some of them right now, click here  for his Marine Traffic snaps and here for his general photos, not limited to maritime shots.

Once US citizens are again welcome in Canada, I hope to make many trips, including one up his way.

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