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All these photos come from bowsprite, who is known to scale the cliffs and trees of lower Manhattan to photograph and sketch the ships go by.  From auspicious time to time, she shares her photos with me, as she did recently.

Northbound . . . Stad Amsterdam in formation with a sludge tanker.

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This past Sunday she caught Topaz.  Some years back, I caught Skat, a yacht built by the same yard.

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Here and here were photos of Stad Amsterdam I’ve taken in recent years.

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The Intermarine vessel (Industrial Echo taken on April 6) is evidence of expansion of wind power generation upriver.  Thanks to David Silver for identifying the ship.

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In the foreground Gateway tug Bridgeport (Thanks for the help!)  and in the distance the all-knowing, never shrinking from difficult work Michele Jeanne.

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As we move through these photos, bowsprite must have descended the trees or cliffs, because here she’s incorporated early spring arboreal detail into her compositions . . . Gran Couva (with “lower” Jersey City) and

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Afrodite and Stad Amsterdam and

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Voge Freeway.

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For the current tip of bowsprite’s opus, click here.  For the most recent tugster post showing her work, click here.  Her photos clearly show the variety of large vessel traffic northbound between Manhattan and Jersey City/Hoboken.

I am grateful to bowsprite for her permission to use these photos.  To see and buy her work online, click here.

As Harvey (1931) made its way northward from a dry dock visit, Slater (1944) was a hundred miles upriver, making its way south.  The next two photos come from Birk Thomas, taken north of Newburgh NY as sun was lowering onto the hills  in the west.

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Benjamin Elliot (1960) is the assist tug.   Margot (1958) has Slater alongside . .  the other side.

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John Dunn caught this photo of the tow south of Newburgh, after sunset.

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Since Margot cannot be seen in the photos above, here’s her profile as I shot it back in September 2013.

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Many thanks to Birk and John for the photos.

 

It’s the summer station boat and a training platform for pilot apprentices.  Recognize the location?

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The station boat is on the East River just east of Hell Gate.   From near to far, the bridges are the Hell Gate and then the RFK.

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Here she passes the Astoria Generating Station on its way to the channel

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between the Brothers.

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Frequent contributor Ashley Hutto caught the No. 2 westbound later in the day, here passing the bridge I’d be happy to sell you.

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Click here for a story of a visit to the No. 2 station boat by Kristina Fiore.

Thanks to Ashley for the bottom photo.   All others by Will Van Dorp, who took photos of Peacock–an unusual pilot boat here not quite a year ago.

Here’s a range of photos from the present to the unknowable past.  Gage Paul Thornton . . . 1944 equipment working well in adverse 2014 conditions.   Photo by Bjoern Kils of New York Media Boat.

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In 2007, McAllister Responder (1967) moved Peking (1911) across the sixth boro for hull inspection.  Photo by Elizabeth Wood.  That’s me standing on port side Peking adjacent to Responder house.

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1953 Hobo races in Greenport Harbor in 2007.

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A glazed over Gulf Dawn (1966)  inbound from sea passes BlueFin (2010).

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Deborah Quinn (1957) awaits in Oyster Bay in 2010.

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HP-Otter and HR-Beaver . . .  said to be in C-6 Lock in Fort Edward yesterday.  Photo by tug44 Fred.   New equipment chokes on ancient foe but no doubt will be dried off to run again.  Compare this photo with the fourth one here.

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Unidentified tug on Newburgh land’s edge back in 2009.  I’ve been told it’s no longer there.

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Unidentified wooden tug possibly succumbing to time in August  2011.

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Ditto.  Wish there was a connection with a past here.

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Thanks to Bjoern, Elizabeth, and Fred for their photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I should rename this post “Time Warp.”  I started it in May 2008 and this morning–in response to some Facebook exchanges–resurrected it.  Maybe I will begin a series called “Time Warp,” though, and any photos no more than 20 years old–to pick an arbitrary boundary and to keep the series from becoming ancient time warp which could be its own thing– . . . any photos you wish to contribute no more than two decades old would be welcome.   Maybe I gave up on this post six years back because I had too many unanswered questions.

Anyhow, to plunge back in . . . Robert Silva and Harold Tartell provided foto of Manhasset from way back, when it sported a flying horse on its stack . . . .  I assumed this vessel was long ago scrapped.  I’m also assuming the location of this shot can be pegged by the two LNG tanks in the background.

 

Here’s another shot of the vessel (1958) (or 1952) in transition, I presume, sent along by Robert Silva.

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Here’s a photo I took in 2008:  a different small tankship Mostank (1950) maneuvers close to a tanker.  I don’t know if Galahad is still in service, and

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Here in Arthur Kill to resupply, I suppose,  Mostank . . . M O S being Marine Oil Service.  Mostank shows up as registered until at least a year ago.  Emma Miller now serves the sixth boro.

Here’s where the time warp impinges on this post.  Great Gull was around still six or seven or eight years ago.  Time flies.  The Gull has flown south.

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Back then, John B. Caddell was still working.  Is she still intact?

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Nathan E. Stewart was still in town and here moving Mary A. Whalen to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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The unique Odin still worked here, and

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Weddell Sea was still known as Scott C.

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All photos here by will Van Dorp unless otherwise attributed.

 

 

Here was Exotics, the first of this series.   Exotics are the out-of-the-ordinary vessels, ones not common to these waters.

The first four photos here come thanks to Kenny Montz, who had his reasons for watching DSV Joseph Bisso arrive in the sixth boro of NYC.   The church in the background is St. Patricks, not St. Louis.

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I was locked in at work but watching periodically on AIS, wondering whether such a vessel might be here for Tappan Zee Bridge work?

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Click here for info on the addition of Joseph to this Bisso fleet in 2008.  Previous Bisso boats on tugster can be seen here and here.   Maria J is in the background along the wall.

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Kenny, thanks much for sending these along.  Former names for the boat are Thresher, Rapid River, and originally, Kathy Candies.

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This morning through the sprinkles I caught another exotic, Rikki S, a P & L boat.    In the background, it’s Barney Turecamo.

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Again, I’m not sure how long these boats will be in local waters,

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or what jobs brought them here.

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Thanks to Kenny for the first four photos taken yesterday;  the last four by Will Van Dorp this morning.

 

Here was 17, a reminder of what this series is about:  I’m avoiding the word miscellaneous.

First, from Birk Thomas . . . a closer-up of another Blount this week.  Doesn’t it share some spirit of 1960 Ford blue?

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From bowsprit, who wanted to know why a scalloper was headed southbound along Manhattan the other day, the windy day?  Well, I’m resisting the chance to set up an April Fool’s post . . . it was actually in the sixth boro to escape the stormy seas and 30′ PLUS waves out where it normally works.  Endurance is no timid scallop boat . . .

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I’ve been eager to share this assemblage of old calendar, baseball card, and mermaid bottle openers from Greenport, a place with a distinctly New England ship-building history feel.   Are any of these anywhere still extant?  Click here for a photo of a City Island, NY yard that once built them.

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Anyone know which sixth boro regular is a triple screw?  Answer follows.

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Here’s Bayou Dawn getting some new skin a few weeks back.

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I’m putting up this post with my apartment windows open . . . spring has vanquished winter . .  so it’s time for a few photos of winter’s recent oppression.   Ever wonder how the loader gets to the bottom of the hold of a bulker?

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Odigitria came here with salt a few weeks back and those holds that were then filled with gleaming white minerals might now be filled with dull black stone now.

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As summer gets cooer, I’m imagining doing some research on these boats and the larger tenders.  When I see a buoy boat, I imagine an Elco in industrial disguise.

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I took these photos less than six weeks ago, and my finger are only just now thawed out.

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Thanks to Birk and bowsprit for the first two photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Let me know what you think that triple screw is.

Time to clear the decks for spring!

By the way, did anybody catch a photo of DSV Joseph Bisso coming through the KVK this morning?

Oops . . . I “published” this prematurely and unintentionally if you saw it in disarray.  And by the way, today I saw the woodchuck and his shadow;  he saw mine and dove for cover.  I wonder if that means six more weeks of cold weather.  Please, someone advise.

From the wandering eye of Maraki . . . it’s in Nassau and

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called Big Crab.  No further info.   I’ve never been to Nassau, and googling leads to me Nassau tugs on the bottom as well as someimpressive ones one the surface.  Maybe I need to get myself to Nassau.

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And from a secret salt via Ashley Hutto . . . four days I saw Orange Sun depart the sixth boro here, he caught it inbound Tampa.  Thanks . . . salt.

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Finally . .  from the jaunt captain Fred  of tug44, it’s what hibernates at the bottom of Lock 6 of the Champlain Canal . . . front to rear . . . HR Hawk, HR Beaver, HR Otter.  You’d think there’d be a woodchuck there too!

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September 2013 I took this photo of a sibling of the hibernating tugs .  . HR Bass, assisted by Herbert P. Brake.    Interestingly, HR Bass used to be Delta Tiger, HR Hawk . . .  Delta Parrot, HR Otter . . . Delta Ram, and HR Beaver ???

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. ..  Mr Lane.  I’ll bet you thought I’d say . . . Delta Woodchuck.

Many thanks to Maraki crew, secret salt, Ashley, and Fred.

 

First . . . click on the photo below to see its context on Auke Visser’s T-tanker page.

What do you suppose its cargo was as Angelo Petri?    It bore that name from 1957 until 1970, and I believe it entered the Narrows bound for Port Newark many times during that period.

As you ponder this, let me explain the JS reference.  I’m blessed that this blog has readers.  My favorite readers sometimes comment on this blog or on Facebook or send me emails directly to gmail.   I just love the most cryptic notes JS sends.  Years ago he worked on ships that called at NY/NJ ports.  In response to the recent posts on an orange juice tanker and small oil tankers . . . he wrote “Any wine tankers around? I remember passing that baby in the Canal 50 yrs. ago”  The “Canal” was in Panama and “that baby” was Angelo Petri.

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So if you clicked on Auke Visser’s photo, you may have learned that it was a T-2 launched from Swan Island in 1943 as SS Sackett’s Harbor.  While hauling fuel in March 1946, it broke in two 800 miles south of Adak, Alaska.  The bow sank with the loss of two cats.  The bow powered itself, stern first, to Adak.  Later it was towed to Anchorage, where it became a power plant, providing more than half of that city’s power for the next nine years.  Later it was renamed Angelo Petri, fitted with a new bow and stainless steel tanks to transport . . . .

wine, 2.5 million gallons of it per voyage from 1957 until 1972, going through some additional name changes.  Click here for a postcard of it loading in Stockton, CA for the east coast.   Here’s a short bio of the man behind the name.

Click here to see a short video of the vessel after it lost power off San Francisco loaded with wine.  Later the tanker went by SS Californian and Sea Chemist  before it was scrapped in Spain in 1978 in a place called . . . Vinaroz.

Click here for photos of some contemporary wine tankers.

JS . .  thanks for the email that sent me looking for Angelo Petri.   Anyone else have recollections of having seen this baby?

I know some folks refuse to spend time with Facebook.  I entered there in 2008 after figuring out it was the only way to communicate and exchange photos with some people.  Now I’ve joined 14 groups there . .  and checking in has become similar to dropping by the breakroom at a job.

Saturday night I saw this photo.  Actually it’s only a detail of a bigger photo.   Any ideas what it is?

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Here’s the entire shot, an assemblage of mostly tugboats attached to a circular base where a crane is mounted.  Two landing craft travel from left to right and what looks like a few miles distant there’s a beach with mountains not far behind.

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The photo was put up on Saturday afternoon.   Notice the initial comment by Kees (pronounced “case” ) van der Ende.  Of course, I needed to respond as I did.  What amazed me was the thread that followed in less than an hour!

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Less than 24 hours later, the tugs as well as the project had been identified through a textbook case of “group sourcing.” I love it.  Click here for more on Aegean Pelagos.  Click here for some Zouros tugs.   Click here for Arctic Kalvik, although I wonder why such an icebreaker would be in the Med.

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Once Kees had expressed interest in being the CEO, another 20+ posts followed on the topic of logos and such.

Click here for a photo of the completed bridge as well as points along the way to completion.

By the way . .  .  pay a moment or two tribute to Mardi Gras today, even if NYC and the sixth boro is as cold as  . . .  .   You decide how to finish it in some original way . . . not borrowed from J. D. Salinger.    Here was my first mardi gras post from five years ago!

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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