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. . . which sounds like rymoulká ton syrón, which translates as tugboats of Syros.  Syros is an island in the Cyclades, the archipelago SW of Athens. In fact, it’s THE island group that originally gave us the word archipelago.

I’ve never visited the Cyclades, but now I really want to.  Previously I have traveled from Athens west, then north all the way to Norway.

I’m not positive how to pronounce rymoulká, but the transliteration looks a like like remorqueur or remolcador, the words for tugboat in French and Spanish, respectively.

These tugs have classical names–Orpheus and Kerveros–and both operate for the shipyard, a division of Neorion, an old Greek heavy industry company.

 

 

 

Many thanks to Ben Hall for contacting me with these photos.  For more of Ben’s photography, click here.

For more photos of Syros, click here. And more Greek tugs, here.  For more tugs from the Mediterranean, click here.

First there was one, and Mike

got a close up look of the “boss,” the curvaceous raised metal plate on the bow.  I love the vintage “fish” representations on either side of that plate, a throwback to an era when mythological creatures decorated ocean charts.

 

 

Then beginning a week ago, there were two,

stern to bow.

Whatever work is underway on these two vintage vessels at GMD,

I’d say it’s akin to a restoration.

 

Many thanks to Mike Abegg for all these photos.

Previous related posts can be found here and here.

 

Quick . ..  name the oldest (or first) verifiable European settlement in current US territory?  Answer follows. Giovanni da Verrazzano visited the bay that became the sixth boro in 1524 but he didn’t settle.

This is the port of Guaymas, visited and claimed for Spain in 1539 by Francisco de Ulloa.  I can’t tell you anything about the tug here, Tolteca-1.  She looks like she could have been designed up north.  Anyone guess the La Paz BSC port of registry?

Click here for info on this port, and  connections between this port, 200 miles south of the Arizona border, and the US.  Here is an article on hopes for the port from the perspective of a few years back.

Rio Balsas is a crude oil tanker.

I’d love to learn more about Tolteca-1.  BCS is an abbreviation for Baja California Sur. 

Meanwhile, if you want to know more about Guaymas and the following:

-the first* ever aerial bombardment of a naval target,

pearls,

Rey Feo

and NASA . . .

 

click here.

And the answer to the question on the oldest settled current US city . . . . is St. Augustine, 1565!!

Many thanks to the Maraki crew for these photos.  More Maraki here.

 

Apologies for sitting on these photos fo so long, but today’s the day to put them up.  The previous 72 can be found here.

From Mage, long-time reader and commenter . . ..  the sailing vessel below is proclaimed as the “world’s oldest active sailing ship.”  I’d go along with that, since I can’t name one older and although I suspect someone might quibble with some of those adjectives.  Can anyone identify it based on this statement and photo?  Mage posts as frequently as I do, work that you can find here.

I haven’t posted this in a half year because I couldn’t identify the tugs.  Maybe someone can help with that.  Once you get other pieces of info, you will know the location.

From Sean, another long-time reader and commenter . . . these workboats.  From the photo and from names, can you identify the location?  Previous photos by Sean here.

Click here for fuller specs on R/V Palmetto.  Click here for a closer-up photo of USACE Evans.

I’ve seen Candice L as far south as North Carolina, but this photo comes from longtime reader and commenter, Phil.

Phil also sends along a photo of this vessel Irvington, which appears to be a small double-ended ferry.  Anyone know where it works/has worked?  Here are previous photos sent along by Phil.

And finally, here’s a subster photo from Tommy on the Clyde, the Scottish Clyde, not the upstate NY one.  Anyone identify the sub?  Previous photos by Tommy here.  Previous submarines on this blog . . . here.

Starting from the top, the sailing vessel is the 1863 Star of India. According to Tommy, the sub may be this one.   

Many thanks for these photos to Mage Bailey, Sean McQuilken, Phil Porteus, and Tommy Bryceland.

 

 

I’m a bit late with this, but click on the image below for a Professional Mariner article by Will Van Dorp on Middle River Marine, a company that helps take trucks out of the congestion in Chicago.

For a sense of what I mean by CAWS, click on the map below for context.

Beyond that row of buildings is Lake Michigan.  Since CAWS winds all through those buildings, barging allows large structures to get in there without compounding traffic gridlock.

It’s summertime, so barge ops on CAWS means sharing the waterway with an increasing number and diversity of recreational boaters.

Here Gwyneth Anne moves a barge under the Eight Track Bridge.  Click here for an interesting article of this1909 bridge.

Many thanks to Ozinga for use of these photos.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

Many thanks to Robert Simko and Lee Gruzen for sending me some photos and lots of questions yesterday morning.

This large gray vessel–SS Cape Avinoff (AK-5013)–arrived under tow

from, I believe, National Defense Reserve Fleet on the James River, where it has been used for training.

As SS Cape Avinoff is moved stern first closer to GMD Shipyard in Brooklyn, Chris Kunzmann got this photo.

Many thanks to Robert, Lee, and Chris for use of these photos.  Can anyone confirm why she was moved to a NYC shipyard?

Robert publishes The Broadsheet.  Click here and here for info on GMD Shipyard.

Previous posts involving “dead ships” can be found here.

 

Thanks for your patience; this follows up the post from two days ago.  The port is Boston, the date is November 1960, and the fleet tied up at the T wharf.  Luna, pictured below, is still extant; the others . . . I believe are all gone.

Above in the distance and below, that’s Orion.

I have no ID on this gentleman in Orion‘s engine room, or

this gentleman in the wheelhouse of another era.

Allan Seymour went on to a career as a professional photographer, and he sent me these photos.

Here’s how I first saw two of the boats–including Luna–back in 1987.  Here’s a report on the historic value of Luna submitted to the Boston Landmarks Commission in March 1985.

Thanks for your guesses, both here and on FB.  For the Boston Public Library’s trove of T Wharf photos, click here.   And here is the motherlode, at least 150 photos of Boston tugboats from the Digital Commonwealth collection.

 

Here are some previous posts with photos from Jan.

So here’s the tugboat, just out of the shipyard near the Arctic Circle and at work, the last in a series of five identical anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels bringing more than 23000 hp to the job. This job starts in the Princess Arianehaven. 

And what’s the tow?

And how many tugs does it take?  Here’s Maker assisted by Mutratug 32,  quite interesting in her own right as a Carrousel RAVE tug. Click here for more.

But I digress.  Maersk Resilient (2008) is moving out to the Stella Oil/Gas Field with this assistance. The additional tugs are Multratug 5 and FairPlay 27 and 28.

 

And here Bugsier 3 intrudes on the scene.

All photos taken last weekend by Jan Oosterboer and delivered via Jan van der Doe.

You also have one more day to name the port and guess the date in yesterday’s post.

 

For some of you this will be very easy.  Where was this photo taken and approximately what date?

Photo was taken by Allan Seymour.  He sent more, which I’ll post on another day.

Previously I’ve done a series called ports of [the world], which I’m always looking to add to if you wish to collaborate.

Also, coming up soon, a tugboat rated at 23,000 hp . . . what would that look like?

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