You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘fireboats’ category.

What’s that vessel in light battleship gray primer?

She’s been cleaned right down to the bilge . . .

Recognize this riveted hull?

There’s a William Francis Gibbs design surrounded by that 900-ton travel lift.

Here’s the new look bow,

profile,

and stern.

In new paint and old colors, it’s Fire Fighter.

Here’s a note from Mike Hibbard, Museum VP and Historian, “This work was made possible by grants from the National Parks Service National Maritime Heritage program, as well as the NY State Office of Historic Preservation, and our supporters and benefactors who provided matching donations to allow us to access the grant funds. We’re still taking donations for shipyard work thorough our donation page on our website, and presently have a benefactor willing to provide a 100% match on any donations up to $50K received for additional yard work.
When Fighter emerges from the shipyard, she’ll no longer be sporting the red coat of paint applied to the FDNY fleet in the 1960’s. We’re taking her back to her 1938 appearance – which means she’ll have a black hull, white topside house, black decks and a buff stack. All the monitors, bitts and nameboards will also be returned to their original polished brass appearance.”

Here is the post mentioned I’m updating.  I’m eager to see this resurrected vessel back in Greenport.  According to Museum President, Charlie Ritchie, ETA back in Greenport is before Memorial Day.

Enjoy some more process photos . . . hydroblasting the hull . . .

rivet head welding below the waterline, and

more of those great lines in light battleship gray.

Come see her in Greenport soon.

 

 

Hats off to the small boats that work all year round . . . crew boats,

dscf3316

patrol boats,

dscf3323

fishing boats,

dscf3276

line boats,

pilot boats,

dscf2864

dive boats,

more fishing boats,

more crew boats,

dscf2825

government boats,

more —soon to face major cuts--government boats

more line and boom boats,

and here’s a special . . . a historic life boat, long atop Binghamton, which is still intact as far as I know, and a bit longer ago had

guys in hazmat suits doing the last ever lifeboat drill aboard the 112-year-old condemned ferry.

And finally, of course there’s the New York Media Boat. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who gives a hat tip to all the crews in small boats on the big waters.

 

The name on the bow of the vessel to the left says “Boston Pilot,” but that’s just a name.  The real Boston Pilot Boats are shown in this short youtube video. See more stills here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MV Fintry was originally built for the British Royal Navy.  Since then, she has undergone conversion to an expedition yacht, as seen here.   Click here to see the boats not chosen for this project.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Harbor Fuels delivers fuel around the harbor with a barge pushed by a tug with a great name, Bumper.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now here’s an interesting story, a boat developed by a treasure hunter, who seems to be in a sea of trouble, as described by this article. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is the sub that was to be used to salvage over $1 billion worth of platinum from SS Port Nicholson, if that cargo was actually on board. Sub Sea Research still has a website, here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Face-off . . . well actually Justice is assisting WMEC 903 Harriet Lane out of port.  That’s the Bunker Hill monument in the distance.  Justice is a Tacoma-built 5400 hp tug.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Does anyone know whether Justice traveled to the East Coast under her own power?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the USCG history of the name Harriet Lane.  Ms. Lane was a US First Lady who was NOT married to POTUS.  If you want more info, click here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Freedom is a Justice‘s slightly smaller 4400 hp cousin.  Freedom and her twin–Liberty–were both launched by Washburn & Doughty in the first half of 2003.   For photos of Liberty at work back in 2009, click here and here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Back last November, I devoted a whole month to ports and harbors.  As I get new material, I’ll continue that series.   Here Boston’s latest fireboat passes in front of Logan’s control tower.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s her namesake.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Massport has its own fireboat, American United.  Its predecessor–Howard W. Fitzpatrick— was the subject of several tugster posts as it made its way up to Lake Huron to become a dive boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Claire looks like she was based on a hydrofoil design, but I can’t find any evidence to support that.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From my vantage point, I could tell the controls were right up in the bow.  I’d love to get a tour of her wheelhouse.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This Nantucket aka LV-112 moved from Oyster Bay to Boston six years ago, a transit covered by tugster here.  This Nantucket is not to be confused with WLV-612, which frequently appears in the sixth boro.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Angus . . . good to meet you.  Somehow I expected you to look like Brangus.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Can anyone fill in some info on the history of King Triton?  Is it a modified former government vessel?  In the background are the digesters on Deer Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I believe that’s Ocean King, whom I saw in the sixth boro back in 2010.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here, identification thanks to Paul Strubeck are the 1958 Nancy (red), the 1954 Brandywine (green) , and an unnamed Army tug.  And over on the far left side of the pier, it’s

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

the 1940 Brooklyn-built Gaspee.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Over on the fish side of the harbor, here’s David Tonnesen’s 45′ stainless steel sculpture called Cod.  Wind spins the discs on its back, and windspeed determines the color of the eye, s0 it’s a wind speed indicator.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Along both sides of Boston’s Fish Pier,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

boats offload their catch.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

More from the port of Boston tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a post I did on McClintic and another I did on Cotter.

Today’s post comes out of a response I received yesterday from retired FDNY dispatcher and historian, Al Trojanowicz, who wrote, “The full photo is fire aboard SAUGUS, American Export Lines (1919) with fireboat WILLIAM F GAYNOR (1914) alongside, and a mystery vessel off to left.  Appears to be similar configuration to the quarantine tug, and original print shows and what looks like a government pennant displayed with a circular or ships-wheel design.  The information below is all I have found on this fire, and was the caption pasted to the back of the print.  Those ladders seen on forward well deck may be accessing the hold – or from another vessel rafted on the port side.”

The caption pasted on the back reads:  “10/2/1926 Fire in freighter Saugus. Photo caption READS  “FIREBOATS STAGE SPECTACULAR BATTLE AND SAVE FREIGHTER!”    Fireboats fought a brilliant battle, October 2nd, and saved the freighter Saugus from burning to the water’s edge in the East River, New York. The cause of the fire is unknown, but the rolls of thick black smoke issuing from the hold, attracted passing craft, and fire patrols. This photo shows the ship which was loaded mostly with cotton, removed frantically by the hands, off New York City.”  (10-2-26) [Photo shows fireboat William J. Gaynor alongside Saugus. An unknown launch is rafted outboard of Gaynor, and an unknown vessel to the left.]  

The caption says . . . East River, but the background to me looks like Staten Island seen from mid-Upper Bay.

0at1SAUGUS fire c1923

So here’s a closer up of that unknown vessel.  Is it flying the USPHS flag?

I’d speculate that this is a US PHS cutter.  I’ve been unable to find a listing of these–like McClintic–based in New York.  Also, although today’s FDNY boats have medical response equipment on board and FDNY personnel receive first responder training, back in 1926 they probably did not.  And this raises another whole set of questions like, what was training like in the 1926 FDNY, what medical equipment if any was there on board FDNY vessels, and would USPHS vessels have a role in assisting during fires on the water and along the shores and docks?  It ask strikes me that–given the amount of smoke emanating from the stacks of these steamers made a fire on the water look very different from one today, where all the smoke you see is from the emergency, not the routine use of fuel.   Finally, I’m guessing this fire was not catastrophic consequence given that no story appears in the NYTimes archives and SS Saugus continued in service until 1946, when it as scrapped.

0at2Saugus tug Oct 2 1926

Al also sent along this photo of the Buffalo fireboat Cotter (1900), still in service.  Here is a photo of it in 1924, probably in Buffalo.   At that date it was still known by its original name, William S. Grattan.  In 1928, while fighting a fire on the Buffalo River, it was heavily damaged and rebuilt.

0at3grattan 2 c 1924

Many thanks to Al Trojanowicz for these photos and questions.  Click here and scroll for more information from Al on FDNY Marine division.

Note:  This is day 13 of December, tugster’s classic/historic vessel month.  If you have photos/stories to share that fit the “classic” parameters, please get in touch.

If you’re wondering why December has brought a run on dates, i.e., years and numbers as part of titles, it’s classic and/or antique boat month.

Sarah Elizabeth Banks, below, began life in the UK as SS Fire King.  In fact, it had a mate, SS Fire Queen, now long scrapped.  Today, it’s a yacht owned by the grandson of the manufacturer and based in Seattle.  Many thanks to Kyle Stubbs for this photo, which he sent me months ago and I never figured out how to use.

0aakbseb

And since we’re talking old fireboats, let me add this never-posted photo of Edward M. Cotter, the Elizabeth NJ-built fireboat still in use in Buffalo NY.  As the Buffalo Fire Department says on their website here, Cotter was working Lake Erie’s margins three years before the Wright Brothers made their Kitty Hawk flight!!!   Click here for another photo of Sarah Elizabeth Banks.  Click here for photos/text about another old fireboat named Alki.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Many thanks to Kyle for sending along the top photo.  For other posts with photos from Kyle, click here.

For my previous Seattle area posts, click here.

 

Despite the distance and the fog covering the escutcheon,  I could immediately identify this tug–once a regular on the Hudson and in the sixth boro– on the Mississippi.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Let me end out this series with tugboats and other vessels:  Sydney Ann

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and Brandi,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mary Parker and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Port Ship Service Little Ray

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

David J. Cooper and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Bulk Guatemala with selfie-shooting watch stander,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sonny Ivey and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Connie Z,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Moose, 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jena Marie C, 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Capt CJ, and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

fireboat Gen. Roy S. Kelley,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jo Provel with the 9th steamboat named Natchez.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now all of this has nothing to do with the photo below, which nevertheless deserves recognition . . . interactive art which really seems to have caught on.  Thanks, Candy Chang.

0aaaanb10

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s even now in the cold NYC air plotting a return to

0aaaanolahula

 

Nola.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaaec40aaaaec5

Check out an ancient active duty fireboat in Buffalo . .  Edward M. Cotter, built in Elizabeth, NJ, in 1900.  After I got a few, the rain started and I had to retreat to Swannies for the best-ever buffalo wings, of course.

 

Lots of photos today . . . about just that, DeWitt being a former 1810 NYC mayor (after becoming disgruntled as US Senator from NY state . . . and before going on to other offices)  greatly responsible for up-commercializing the waters around the city so that the other five boros would come into being.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Denizens today, include all manner of critters, plus folks like these McQuaid rowers who come to help others.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Or like Ra to prove something.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Notice the salad growing on the outriggers and elsewhere.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Or to heal, while kayaking 6000 miles.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Folks come to the canal to tootle around on interesting boats like this 1973 Albin 25.  Here’s a similar boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Or this antique.  Sorry I don’t know the manufacturer of Lazy Bones.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Or this Island Packet with an unusual tender.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A Lagoon 43 power cat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A Mark V design.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Boats from distant ends of the US . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and beyond.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In case you don’t recognize the flag there from World Cup play, Zwerver is Dutch.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All manner of denizens travel along the banks whether for shelter or

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

an interest in technological history like this and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

lots like this.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cheap living space with unique roommates can be had too.

0aaaadd13

The canal is a place of work too. …

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0aaaadd16

and commerce past . . . like 127′ Alanson Sumner, built by the Goble yard in 1872; and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

present . . . like the half century young Margot.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Come on up, stick your neck out like Chelydra s. here,  and enjoy  . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos taken in June by Will Van Dorp.

Happy Independence Day . . .

Click here to see why John J. Harvey made this trip to Caddells.  These photos were taken around midday today, as the .org retired fireboat made its way to its home dock.  With new metal covered with absolutely brightest red, nothing but the most brilliant April sunlight would do.  Enjoy these photos!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The trim is not yet finished but there’s some time before her first trip upriver to kick off the season.   Note the sternway wake.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I thought I could jump in my land conveyance and beat them to one of my “offices” along the Kill, but I had to race . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

to catch them here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Yup . . . pass the plate.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s a photo I took September 1, 2013 as Harvey knifed its way between fast-moving boats in last year’s tugboat race.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s putting this Monday morning post up early.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,134 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031