You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Here was Summer Sail 1; and since that dates from almost two years ago.

Clipper City looks great juxtaposed against the skyline, but

ketch Catriona . . . she has Herreshoff pedigree.

No matter . . . larger schooner or smaller and more intimate ketch,

one is pampered moving by sail in the sixth boro. And that includes the option of sailing aboard the oldest harbor schooner of all . . . Pioneer.

 

Above and below, it’s Pioneer, and below the other schooner is one you won’t see in the sixth boro for a few years . . . Lettie G. Howard.  Of course, if you head over to Lake Erie–where I’ll be n a few weeks–you may catch a glimpse, even catch a ride.

And finishing it off, it’s America 2.0.

All photos taken by Will Van Dorp in the past 365 days.

 

Growing up in a beautiful rural place, I never imagined some day living in the largest megalopolis on the US.  But here we are; I live in a concentration with over 50 million others.  That many people and consumers together has implications.  Click on the map to see source.

Here’s how a plethora of goods comes in . . . .

Ten years ago, single vessels this large never transited the sixth boro…

Just yesterday, no fewer than three of these ULCS found themselves in port, and they’ll soon push today’s limits.

So I have my own word for them:  megaboxforus.  Megaboxforuses . . . could be the plural.

 

 

 

And they change hands . . . Edison not long ago was Maersk Edison.  Maersk possibly traded in a 1200′ for a 1300′.

See the paint outs?

 

This morning Cosco Shipping Peony–the first of its class–arrived just before adequate light for photos.  I hope some one gets photos during its first sixth boro stay.

And once the boxes leave the ULCS, they go into the hinterland on steel rails or–less efficiently–on a single chassis pulled by a tractor.

These statistics are quickly becoming obsolete.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

There’s an expression about the excitement of watching paint dry.  Recording a large construction project is about as interesting unless you do a form of time lapse, which I’ve inadvertently done with the Bayonne Bridge. Change is happening all over the city, but here’s what I’ve watched since way before the raising began.

In August 2017, I rode over the new span for the first time.

 

I next got down to look what was happening at the Bridge in December,  the 16th.

Here’s January.  Notice above the old lower roadbed still spanned to the third arches inside Bayonne, and below, three arches (I’ll call them 4–6) remained without roadbed.

That’s Doris Moran, and notice that #6 arch has seen some erosive work.

In mid-February, #6 arch is gone, and work is happening

(here’s a closeup) on #5.

By 24 April, #4 is gone and #3 previously supporting a roadbed is now “freestanding”, as Joyce passes.

And on May 10, roadbed only linked the grid box with one of the arches, and the current inland most arch is only half its former size.

Here’s a closer up.

On June 20, this is what remained of arch #1.

Here’s a closeup.  I’m wondering if the workers in the lift basket held a camera so that the extension jack hammer could see what he was doing.

Then I noticed . . . about where arch #4 had been a new column was being erected in sections.

The tall crane does the lifting, and workers in two lift baskets–an orange and a green–guided the section into place, fitting the guide rods–it seems–into slots in the section being lowered.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any mis-reading of the process.

 

More of the Great Race soon . . . but a bit of back story.

When I moved to our fair metropolis in 2000 and started paying attention, I was taken by the Bayonne Bridge, so enamored in fact that I choose it as the header image for this blog in 2006, and now out of stubbornness– or something– have kept the old view.

I renewed my focus on the Bridge in 2011, “turning” became the key word in the titles.  Click here to see posts I did for its 80th, 84th, and 86th anniversary of initial construction, and here I marked the 80 mark again twice.   Over 10 years ago I alluded to the raising for the first time here.

Here’s a single post that looks at the change from 2011 until 2017.

For a baseline, let’s use sunrise April 24, 2008, looking from the west, those two boats are Justine McAllister and Huron Service, now Genesis Victory.

And from the east, December 2011, and that boat was Barents Sea, currently known as Atlantic Enterprise.   As to the bridge, note the box-grid work (not a technical term) on the Bayonne side of the arch.

From Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) perspective, here’s the bridge in February 2012.

By September 13, the box grid was covered, possibly to allow sand blasting.

By January 2014, the cover was off the box grid.  Yes, that’s Specialist.

By October 2015, the box grid was being extended upward, as

the vertical supports were being erected farther into Bayonne.

Here’s a December 15 view, showing the symmetry of the construction.

Here’s March 2016, and you can begin to see the location of the raised roadbed.

Here’s a view from May 2016 from the west side of the Bayonne shore.

By August 2016, the new span has been completely defined.

Here’s a closer up, showing the old level–still poet traffic–and the new level, along with the device used to place pre-cast portions of the new road bed.   The tug is Taft Beach.

Here, as seen from the west side, is most of the bridge in September 2016.  Note the gap still remaining on the Staten Island side.

By March 23,  2017, the upper deck was open to wheeled traffic, and the lower deck was ready to be dismantled.

Here’s a closer-up of that opening.

By April 2, a gap existed, and

by April 11, 2017, ships that might have scrapped  year before were shooting through the opening that grew wider by the week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will continue this progression soon.

More Great Race tomorrow.

Let’s finish up  Whatzit 38, which started here with a plain white canvas.  Below is a photo I took during the tugboat race in September 2015 of John J. Harvey, an FDNY fireboat in commission between 1931 and 1995.

And here’s one I took in April 2010, making an up-to 18,000 gpm water display to welcome the 343 into the sixth boro. Pumping water, which makes these designs in the sky,  is the whole point of a fireboat.   So . . .

check out her summer 2018 look.

This is a thorough

 

thorough dazzle paint job, white spray all over the boat, including the decks.

 

 

From this angle below, she  really looks like a WW1 Norman Wilkinson production.

I can’t wait to see her in glass calm water . . .  to enjoy the reflections.

I believe this is the current John J. Harvey website.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Remember tug Hackensack about ten years ago?  I’ve read some negative opining about the paint job on FB . . . here’s the concept.

 

It’s Cornell, westbound under the Bayonne Bridge.  Now that’s a sight not often seen.  Cornell (1949) occupies a niche likely quite unexpected, as documented here.  In this post (scroll), you see Cornell in 1978!  Hear her inimitable whistles (wait for it) here.

Ivory Coast has truly an unusual name, but I’d never call her Côte d’Ivoire.  That’s been her name now for 20 years;  previously she was Crusader for over 30 years.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer is the first (of three? ) Atlantic II class tug.

Her dimensions and design are similar if not identical to Lincoln Sea, but Nicole has CAT engines instead of EMDs.   This class of ATB is the product of Bob Hill, whose boyhood home in Troy NY  gave him a front row seat to an earlier generation of tugs and barges.

Looking very similar to Nicole Leigh Reinauer, it’s the newest ATB in the boro . . .  Bert Reinauer, photo thanks to Lisa Kolibabek.  Bert,  almost two decades newer, has the same dimensions as Nicole Leigh, but with GEs generating 8400 hp, versus CATs at 7200.

Viking has operated out of the sixth boro since 1992.  Before that, she spent 20 years in the fleet of Nolty J. Theriot, whose rise and fall is documented in Woody Falgoux’s excellent book, Rise of the Cajun Mariners.

For various Viking appearances on tugster over the years, click here.

Discovery Coast spent a lot of time in the sixth boro a few years ago, but these days she’s rarely here.  Here’s her first appearance in this blog, in 2012.

And the newest ship assist tug in the boro is Capt. Brian A. McAllister.  Here’s a Professional Mariner story about the tug.

The photo of Bert Reinauer thanks to Lisa Kolibabek.  All other photos here in the past week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Wrangell, Alaska is almost 7000 sea miles from New York.

Harley does have a number of fleets, but the Olympic fleet

seems to have arrived in the sixth boro this month.   Ernest Campbell (1969) is one of several tugs that have retained the last name of the previous owner.

C. F. Campbell (1975) is another.

The other day they cooperated to get Long Island into a dock at IMTT.

Has this 60,000 bbl barge been sold out of Moran’s fleet?  If so, when did that happen?

 

Then last week I caught the 2012 Lighning in the boro,

a 2000-hp tug of the Gulf fleet.

 

The 1999 andrea (3000 hp) has been here for almost three years, if my recall is correct.

 

They’re all Harleys, along with Dr. Milton Waner, St. AndrewsHMS Liberty, and more.   And thanks to Kyle Stubbs, here and here are a set of Harleys from the Pacific Northwest.  And here’s one more . . . from San Francisco.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with a baseline, exactly seven years ago.  I got this photo of Harvey putting on a water display just south of Yonkers on June 12, 2011.

These next photos came from Lisa Kolibabek a few days ago, following up on the post of a week ago where I said “watch this space.”.

Never has a vessel been painted thus!

Note the master plan lower left.

 

The art is in progress . . .

so I hope you’re intrigued enough to continue watching this space.  Once the superstructure is painted, watch the space between the KVK and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Many thanks to Lisa for snapping these photos as she works on W. O. Decker, which you can see at work 39 years ago here.

I seem to recall bowsprite had a similar idea back in 2010.

 

OK, if old songs make for “classic rock,” then old photos of tugboats could be called classic roll or pitch, yaw, or some such.

Let’s start with one from March 2008 . . .  American Patriot over NW of Shooters Island as seen from the Port Elizabeth shoreline.  I’ve no idea why she was here and have never seen her again.

Given recycling of names, check out Dean Reinauer of June 2008 over by Gracie Mansion.

Same time period, here’s the Curtis Reinauer of that era.

Labrador Sea . . . she’s the first boat in this post that’s still around here.

Emma M. Roehrig  has changed colors twice since 2008 and has not been in the sixth boro for at least five years, maybe longer.

Great Gull still around back then.  She’s gone down to Panama.

And finally, June 2008 saw the transition from the Roehrig fleet into the K-Sea one.  Note the new name on the nearer tug although the colors were still Roehrig.  Aegean Sea had been Francis E. Roehrig.  The farther tug had been Vivian L. Roehrig, renamed Caribbean Sea under K-Sea, and now still works in the boro as Emily Ann.   Did Aegean NOT have a mast?

All photos from a decade ago by Will Van Dorp.

 

Rt Hon Paul E. Martin called here before a month over three years ago, that time carrying the same type of cargo.

I took these photos yesterday, and believe it or not, I felt only a few drops of rain.

The Martin is the second self-unloader to call in the sixth boro in three days, which must be some sort of a record.

Eric and Bruce did a magnificent job of spinning the bulker around.

Once spun around, foot by foot she was moved with precision to the dock.

 

To get this cargo here, Martin traveled three weeks and transited the Panama Canal.

 

Can anyone tell me the meaning of the “10H VOID” marking just below the name and CSL class of the freighter and the “VOID7” marking just above the water line?

And where is Morro Redondo, you ask?  It’s on the island of Cedros, a bit over 300 miles SSE of San Diego, CA.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Until an hour before posting, there were two Canadian self-unloaders in our harbor, which is truly remarkable.  Algoma Integrity, as of posting, is not even 10 nm outside the Narrows.

 

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