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Usually when I see an MSC vessel, it’s a container ship, but as this post shows, that is not always the case.  Melissa, though, IS a container ship.  When she passed the other day, I also saw a lot of people, not surprising on a warm but not torrid summer’s morning.  See the crew in the line boat?

Here’s a closer up showing a deckhand on the bow of Miriam and another crewman at the top of the tanker companionway.

On Mary Turecamo, a crewman gets a line to MSC Melissa.

 

 

MSC Melissa dates back to 2002, and at 6402 teu, she was a large vessel of that time almost two decades ago.

Crew . . . I wonder how long they’ve been aboard.  What was breakfast this morning?  What are nationalities of the crew?  Where all has the vessel called in the past 12 months?  Here‘s a partial answer that may prompt more questions.   And of course, what is in all those containers?  And the crews on the tugboats, what are their stories.

 

All photos, WVD, who has lots of questions sometimes and not many answers, which is the story of my life.

 

The boat had a familiarity to it, but I couldn’t figure it out. 

Since I couldn’t figure it out, I’m letting you see if you can.

What made it unrecognizeable for me were two things:  the passage of time . . . about 10 years, and

some changes of color here and there.  Figure it out yet?

One structure is unique to this vessel, no matter the name.  Another structure here is new.  ICM I didn’t recognize either. The fact that it expands to Intracoastal Marine Incorporated says the stack mark has not kept up. 

Last chance to guess how you might know this 1982 tugboat . . . .

 

Remember Davis Sea?

 

All photos, years apart, WVD.

 

 

“Scarlet Begonias” has a line “the sky was yellow but the sun was blue…”  Well, you may have noticed the sun this morning here was pink and bluish;  the sky was a uniform gray, and 

that made the water gray as well.  Thank the Canadians . . . well, the smoke from wildfires in western Canada.

 

 

See the WTC1?

 

All photos this morning, WVD.

 

Sometimes the photos can speak for themselves….

Needless to say, local fishermen and women brave dangers to get out to where the fish are plentiful.

Snags are quite plentiful also.

All manner of boats go in pursuit.

 

Humans are not the only fishers out there . . .

Some have a minimal gear approach…

 

 

 

And what’s a nearby ULCV when there are fish to be had . . .

You should have seen the bunker I had on the line recently . . .

 

 

 

All photos, except the two of me by bowsprite as I was cranking in a silver landbass, WVD.

Unlike birds, which inhabit the atmosphere as we do, fish aren’t seen very clearly unless you pull them out of their medium.  Recently I enjoyed watching Gotham Fish Tales, on youtube, an hour and 15 well spent.

A new assist boat in town bringing 3800 hp to the job?

Right . . .  I was kidding.  It’s Jones Act non-compliant anyhow. 

Genesis Eagle is a 6140 hp pin boat. 

 

JRT Moran and Capt. Brian McAllister do an assist of an ULCV.

Pegasus gives Mount St. Elias an assist as it moves DBL 82 out of IMTT bound for New Haven. 

Andrea gives HMS Liberty an assist as it delivers a bunker barge to Port Elizabeth. 

Miriam Moran delivers a pilot to the ship. 

Mary Turecamo assists a container ship. 

Doris waits for a job to approach in the Upper Bay, 

and finally, Kirby Moran moves in closer to an incoming ship. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Thanks to Tony A, let’s play “name that ship.”

Photos were taken near the “banana pier” yesterday, and as of this writing this morning, the vessel is still there, but here’s your chance to use your search skills to identify it:  there’s a number, a flag, and of course a color.

 

Many thanks to Tony A for these shots.

And the answer is ORP Wodnick, currently a Polish training ship.  In the past, this 1975 training ship has served, among other missions, as a hospital ship.

I don’t know Polish, but it appears that “wodn” is the root word for “water”, and “wodnick” might mean “waterline.”  ORP expands to Okręt Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej  and translates as “Polish warship.”

 

Swarming is one thing, but 

in a congested waterway,

riding wakes

to feel the surges

 

 . . .  well I gotta wonder ….

All photos, WVD.

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

According to PANYNJ stats, May 2021 saw 396,417 loaded teus arrive in the sixth boro;  May 2020 saw 266,004!    That is an increase of 49%.  Exports of loaded teus in May this year totaled 134,458 versus 95,462 last year, an increase if 40.8%.  So the port is  . . . busy.  So as I’ve done before, I offer a sampling of the ships involved in the moving teus, i.e., container ships.

Check out OOCL Europe, head on . . . launched in 2006, with her 8063 teu capacity.

As you know, CMA CGM Marco Polo  [yes, I missed it] has been the largest container ship to call in port of NYNJ to date, recently she called in Laem Chabang and Vung Tau, and I’ll let you guess where those megaports are.

Ikaria, 2002, and 4492 teu, is the smallest box ship in this batch.   In 1999, I was not blogging about the port, but the record shows the largest container ship in the world then carried 6200 teu. 

There’s not much view of either the box ship, CMA CGM Brazil or the tanker, but check out the bow wave compared with the small trawler just beyond. Of course, foreshortening is involved and the 30+- trawler was in no danger.

CMA CGM Brazil, pictured here, is the newest in this batch, launched in 2020 and has the capacity of 15128 teu.

MSC Tavvishi is the oldest, from 2000, with a 5468 teu capacity.  Launched in 2000, she was not that much smaller than the largest in the world at that time.

And RDO Fortune, a 2012 launch with a 5033 teu capacity

came into the sixth boro appearing to be entirely empty.  Might that be to pick up empty boxes?

All photos, WVD.

Laem Chabang and Vung Tau are ports in Thailand and Vietnam, respectively.

 

Hats off to all the sailboats that SAIL in, like Knotta Yachta here and Serenity in the distance. 

I know there are reasons that sometimes require motoring in, as the beautiful ketch Bellina was here. 

. . . or in drizzle, Adventurer.

But this cutter (?) came in the other day and impressed me.

This boat had four sails set and a fair tide

 

and through the Narrows they came,

 

and sailed in as far as I followed them.  Merry crew, hats off. 

All photos and any errors, WVD.

The two headsails make that a cutter rig, right?

 

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