You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

This significant piece of floating dock was westbound in the Kills Sunday morning.   It was called in on VHF and via 911.

Even the ducks were distressed.

 

No rudder, no power, not even a captain.

It was a job for Driftmaster,

and she hauled it away.  This reminds me of junk in the harbor waters . . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s the first full day of spring, which means that soon many more small craft will operate on the sixth boro, yet all winter long, many small boats never leave.

If this is a Class A 25′ SAFE Defender boat, it may have entered service in 2002.   I’ll be back with this.

Here are a team of the newer 29′ USCG vessels.

Line and boom boats, patrol boats . . . these small craft operate in the sixth boro all year round.

Ditto survey boats like this one.

Over alongside Rhea‘s stern, that’s certainly a launch from Miller’s.

I’m guessing these are 31′ SAFE boats operated by NYPD, but they’ve been running in threes of late.  They also have larger Vigor (ex-Kvichak)-built boats.

NJ State Police has a few small boats that patrol/train all year round.

NYPD has had a few of these for almost five years now.  When they first arrived, I was astonished by the speed they could make.

USACE Moritz first launched in 2001.

 

So let’s go back to that 25′ Defender in the first photo, but at closer inspection . . . see the logo on the door . . . it’s a DonJon RIB.

USCG checking me out with a long lens? . . . Nah, that’s Bjoern of New York Media Boat.  Check out their blog here, and book a tour here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s again reminded that you’ll see something new each time you go down to the water and look closely.  And in the next few months, in all waters recently ice-bound, be ready to see an influx of recreational boats coming north for the summer.

 

Using the asterisk or not is something I started a few years ago, to distinguish vessels mostly used in salt v. fresh water on this blog.  Ships v. ships *  …. the asterisked set is up to 8 now.

So where might this vessel have been photographed?

For what it’s worth, it was built in Guanabara Bay . . . way back in to a spot I never got to…. in Rio state.  It would have been grand to see this vessel depart north bound past Sugar Loaf.

Last chance to guess here . . . .

Algoma Integrity has been replacing Alice on the aggregates runs from the Canadian maritimes. As of this writing, Alice is on a run between Boston and the Bahamas.

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

All these photos were taken in this order yesterday between 0647 and 0704 EDT.  CMA CGM T. Roosevelt was bound for sea.  As of this moment, she’s off Norfolk waiting to enter the Chesapeake.  If you don’t know, Roosevelt is one of now quite a large number of ULCSs or ULCVs [I’ve read both terms for these behemoths.] calling in NYC’s sixth boro, all 1200′ loa and carrying between 13,000 and 14,500 teu.  By the way, there’s a good graphic of container vessel evolution in that link.

At 0647 she was passing Caddells.  Dawn and dusk shots have lots of lights and their reflections in them.

 

Jonathan C sees her out  . . . .

Imagine the number of tractors needed to move each of these containers out of a port.  Better still, imagine a parking lot of all those tractors parked as close together as you could. I’ll get back to that.

The bow was illuminated by dawn; the stern is quite dark. In the extreme left to the left of Jonathan C, Scott Turecamo had a waiver to move into the KVK to get to her berth with a favorable tide.

 

Note where the docking pilot will exit.

 

When I zoomed all the way out, the camera sees more of what I saw, big picture adjusted for light.  The photo above and below I took just a few seconds apart.

Although the images below relate to Great Lakes shipping, they do illustrate the point I was trying to make with the comment above about tractors needed to move all of these containers all tightly parked in single lot. I’d love to see an illustrator create this image, including the cross county double-decker container train cars.  And I know fuels differ as well.  Of course, an alternative is to make and consume all out machines, tools, toys, etc. aka what we import and export locally.

Again, this is Great Lakes, but I’m guessing this is part of the green oldie-but-goodie deal.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

This light is available for only a few minutes twice a day but then only if the rising or setting sun is not cloud covered.  Humidity existed the other morning too, in advance of the impending rain.  I’m not sure why, but late winter/early spring light seems richer as well, although that may be related to directionality.

Alex McAllister approached from the east end of the KVK, and her illumination and that of her background differs

from that of Amy Moran, approaching from the west end of the strait.

Pokomoke followed Alex, about a minute later, but the light has already changed.

 

Andiamo‘s port bow has caught no rays yet, unlike the west side of the dock where she’s tied up.

Meanwhile, Amy moves past and into the Upper Bay.  Lighting like this is certainly worth getting up and out for.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who linked previous installments of this title here.

For good photos, andiamo one of these pre-dawns.

 

 

like route 66, this gets me kicks . . . although I see no ” St. Louis, Joplin, Missouri, Oklahoma City looks oh-mighty pretty.  You’ll see Amarillo, a-Gallup, New Mexico, Flagstaff, Arizona, don’t forget Winona, Kingman, Barstow, San Bernardino….”

But I digress.  In the distance it’s Glorious Leader and closer up–not much–it’s Bitu Express getting a delivery from Twin Tube.  What is the purpose of that large rectangular structure over the stern of Bitu Express?  My guess would be a heating system of some sort . . .

One a dark, rainy, too-late morning of March 10, it’s good to go back a day and see ONE Minato in morning sunlight, in

homeport registered in Kobe,

Where would Lian Gui Hu be registered do you suppose?

 

Monaco Bridge . . .  yes there are bridges in Monaco, but this ULCV is registered in Panama.

 

You’d maybe expect Maersk Callao to be Peru-flagged, but  . . . hey, maybe Singapore has a Calle Callao or Avenida Callao.   That’s Potomac with a barge lightening alongside.

And Evergreen Ever Loading . . .  London?

Torm Hilde . . .  you’d think Copenhagen or even Aalborg…

Stolt Integrity  . . .  Georgetown!??  Practically every state in the US has a town by that name, and Indiana–in fact–has FOUR!!  An’ dis aint nun a dems!

All the color in this post remind me of a CV I’ve not seen in a while . . . Buffalo Hunter.

All photos and humor–attempted–by Will Van Dorp, who thinks there should be a route 66-parallel song for shipping in the sixth boro.   Enya has one that starts to get at it . . .

Happy short day . . .

 

The Browns tugs do a lot of different jobs, and who knows where James E. was headed this morning a few days ago, but

one of their regular runs is with the car float moving rail cars for the operation now down as the NYNJRR, the last application of what used to be very common across the sixth boro. 

There are no bridge rail crossings of the Hudson south of the Selkirk hurdle, about 140 miles north of Manhattan. So this is how it happens, and I know lots of you reading this know much more about this operation than I do.  For a photo of a train crossing that bridge known as the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, see the end of this post.

One or several crossings are done this way daily between Greenville NJ  and Brooklyn NY.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got the photo below of a train headed east across the Alfred H. Smith Bridge a rainy day in October 2016.

 

To continue on from yesterday’s list . . . I’ve done chugster, jetster, even a gangster . . . though you have to search for it here by scrolling a bit,  but the blog is called tugster, and I’m proud of that some chuckles notwithstanding . . . .

This is a cross section for the 250th time, a random sampling of what tugboats were working in the Upper Bay of NYC aka the sixth boro on a given morning earlier this week.   By the way, the 001 version of this title dates from October 2007.

Vane Brothers boats and barges abound.

Hunting Creek stands by a set of four of them, while

Wye River travels light past the ferry racks.

Franklin Reinauer travels light past the count-defying load of containers on a ULCV over in Global.

ATB Freeport and Chemical Transporter transfer cargo over at the east end of IMTT, at

the same time

Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire do.

CF Campbell stands by with Long Island.

 

And passing an unusual but new landmark along the sixth born margins,

Patrice McAllister makes her way west.  Quick . . . name a larger global garment retailer than H & M, and what the initials H & M expand to?  Answers here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose fingers froze and cold tears flowed while having the float-about, look-about.

 

Here’s a first timer in this livery and in an unusual location . . . on the wall at Battery Park, with the Colgate clock in the background.

Nathan G (1977) no doubt has docked here before, back as part of the McAllister fleet from 1989 until about two years ago.

With WTC1 background above and the Cass Gilbert-designed former Custom House (upper left below) and

the shrine of St. Elizabeth Anne Bayley Seton and adjacent James Watson House below . . .  to

her passing the stern of the massive Monaco Bridge, I’m trying hard to make up for the fact that this is the first appearance of Nathan G in this blog.  By the way, at 73′ loa, Nathan G long is less than half the beam of Monaco Bridge at widest . . . 167′!!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently posted about Nathan G‘s fleet mate Sarah D.

 

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