You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

The sixth boro, like any location, offers infinite perspectives, compounded by equally countless nuance of season, hour, weather, and activity variation.  This view of Kimberly in the stalls at Caddells the other day differs considerably from the dynamic ones of the past 18 months.

Kust a few days different but quite different location and atmospherics . . .  Weddell Sea came into the Narrows the other day as we began feeling the effects of Fay.   She had Penn No. 90 on a wire.

Further to the west in another spot, Discovery Coast was on the outside, mostly blocking Brooklyn, who’s been in here for a few months already.

In clear weather, land would be visible beyond the tug, but Fay changed that for a while.

Dace Reinauer was high and dry in Dry Dock No. 7.

 

And finally, just west of Dry Dock No. 7, stacked up were at least seven Bouchard boats, sadly waiting.

All photos, WVD, who’s starting to think about random tugs three hundred.  If you have a photo of a tug never depicted on this blog, send it along. The big three hundred COULD be all never-here-before tugboats.

What’s visible for now is Pegasus and Maersk Seletar, but behind the container ship and soon to emerge

is Mukaddes Kalkavan.  A few hours later, I saw Seletar doing 22 kts heading south along the Jersey coast.  Seletar is an area in Singapore.

Ava escorts Mukaddes Kalkavan into the port from the starboard bow.

Scot Munchen is a relatively small tanker ( 383′ x 59′) with an unusual superstructure design. Here‘s the fleet of this Istanbul-based company, all incorporating the same stack design.

 

Here’s a photo from about 0500, Ava is assisting Hyundai Smart into Bayonne.  The name Hyundai Smart connotes automotive to me.

 

Ever Liberal heads out to sea.

with Jonathan Moran assisting past the Bouchard flock.

And finally, this is the Laura Maersk that back already a month ago was towed into the sixth boro as a fully loaded dead ship due to an engine explosion.

Light in the water, this container ship shows a different profile.

All photos, WVD.

The whole trip, dock to dock, lasted almost exactly 24 hours, although given some delays, it could have been a few hours shorter.  Call this post “day and night,” or more accurately, “day, night, and day.” Here was part a.

Let’s start some hours later on day 1.  Most river traffic does not draw spectators like this did.

 

Even the family dog came out.

Twelve or so hours after that, a blistering summer sun had given way to the Thunder moon, here lighting a path northeastward from Staten Island.  I took this photo before 0500.

 

After biding time for a few hours here,

Nathan G let go lines and Slater began the  final leg of the trip to the yard;  Sarah D is over there, but the illusion is almost that Slater is underway on her own power,

watchman mimicking deck gun, pointing the way.

Once in the KVK, a blazing summer sun returned, replacing the Thunder moon.

Pier assignment received, the tugs eased the destroyer escort into the dock.

Many thanks to Bill Stolfi and Steve Munoz for the first three photos;  the sixth boro harbor photos by WVD.

For more info on USS Slater, click here and here.

This is not your typical sixth boro scene.

Back in January 2018, I posted photos of Fugro Explorer.  I recall it was cold cold, and my fingers hurt holding the camera.  Now you can sense the heat by the amount of moisture in the air already just before 0700.

She’s not a new vessel at all, launched in Singapore in 1999 and refitted just three years later.

 

She was in port for about 12 hours; I can relate to someone wanting to profit from this wifi.

I’m re-inserting the link from above, in case you didn’t look at it then, to show what all she has for equipment.

I did notice that since the January 2018 photos, she’s had more telecom external gear added.  My guess is that she’s working on the wind farms offshore, as is Royal, who was in the sixth boro briefly this week, and I missed her too.  Did anyone catch photos of her?

All photos, WVD, who is chasing the “spectacular warship” today, and of course alternating between 101.5 and 90.9 . . . and 93.9.

 

 

Serendipity is as scintillating as any fireworks. And I hope today’s post is an illustration . . . .  Can you make sense of the photo below?

A car carrier came into the sixth boro less than a week ago, and I happened to be in a place that afforded this perspective.  Just luck.  It reminded me of the question about the tree falling in the woods when now one’s around.  If I’d not been at my location when Liberty Promise steamed by, would it really have happened?  What a name, too, Liberty Promise, and a Jones Act RORO with a registry given as NY NY!* This is unicorn-rare, folks.

*Someone got a waiver to make this a Jones Act RORO, built 2010.

I keep most kinds of politics (eg, partisan) off this blog, but celebrating as profound a political holiday as Independence Day . . . the foundation day, is paramount. The oldest magazine in the world, The Scots Magazine, had this reaction in August 1776  to the Philadelphia signing:  “these gentlemen ‘assume to themselves an unalienable right of talking nonsense’.”  That’s some wit!

Take some time in the next few days to think about a country of over 331 million celebrating liberty’s promise, and how that promise gets fulfilled.  My vantage point, my perspective for taking this photo was entirely unique;  no one was within a 100′ of me when I took it; similarly, remember that your perspective on July 4 in the USA is personal, unique, and that means 331 million folks have a different perspective on everything, including liberty’s promise.

By the way, as of this posting, Liberty Promise has just entered Jacksonville FL.

All photos, WVD, whose previous independence day posts can be found here. I plan to spend the day/weekend working,  chasing a “spectacular warship” down the Hudson.

Happy 245th!

 

 

Here are the previous 5 installments.

What’s this below?  Double click on it before continuing.

An ULCV named Peony

passed by a cloudy day recently and the water turned so blue

I could feel it.

Just the color was cooling, relaxing.

All photos, WVD, who for a moment heard the low throb of the diesel and felt this otherwise quiet, massive machine slide by.

 

I hope you all enjoy looking at these retro posts as much as I do putting them together.  I’m seeing that 2010 was the year I started to gallivant extensively, so the division for July 2010 retrospective is part a is for local, and part b will be for away.

Count the boats in the photo below!  Greenland Sea is prominent, but in the distance, find a Staten Island ferry, QM2, Susan (?) Miller, a dredge operation where I see Rae, and a Reinauer tug (Ruth?) beyond that!  Greenland Sea is now on the hard in Houma LA, the SI ferries run regularly but with fewer passengers due to the covid catastophes, QM2 is in Southampton, the Miller boats are still busy, Rae is kept in reserve for special projects designed for a 46′ tug, navigation dredging is over for now, and the Reinauer tugs have proliferated and keep busy.

Navigation dredging has created deeper channels, and the Bayonne Bridge has been raised.  Miss Gill is now in Jacksonville FL, and GL 55, the dumper scow, is wherever work may require her.

The formerly-yellow submarine is located at the entrance to Coney Island Creek, a place I’ve not been to in almost a decade.

I never did identify the wrecks at the mouth of said Creek, which seemed then to have an abundance of blue-clawed crabs.

Jane A. Bouchard languishes along with the rest of the fleet, and Cape Cod, with one of the intra-port SSS barges here,  has moved to Philly, last I knew.

Barbara McAllister pushes B. No. 262 with an assist from Ron G.  Barbara has not been in the sixth boro in quite a while, the 262 is laid up, and Ron G has been sold south.

Cape Race arrives here in Atlantic Basin, with a much-changed lower Manhattan skyline.  The former fishing trawler/now expedition yacht is currently on the Elbe, south of Hamburg.

Margot still “keeps on pushing,” although I’ve not seen her down in the sixth boro of late.

And here, Patty Nolan passes a wreck–I’ve not yet identified it . . .  maybe you have–inside Sommerville Basin in coastal Queens. Patty Nolan has been on the hard a few years.

And here’s a photo taken exactly a decade ago today . . .  an unnamed houseboat being towed from Peekskill to Queens, not a view you see every day.  It’s Patty Nolan towing with gatelines.  Here and here she tows other houseboats.

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health and patience in this difficult time.  Also, these “retro sixth boro” posts take us back only one decade.  It’d be great to locate more photos of identifiable locations going back 50 or so years, the fifth dimension of time photos.

 

Yes . . . it’s summer enough . . .

to call this summer fishing.  But I was not expecting a vessel like Ocean Venture, 71′ x 30′, which pulled into Gravesend Bay the other day. Here’s more info on the Maine registered vessel and her sister Reliance. This shot gives a clear view of the stern.  I was tied up where I was, so I didn’t round the bend to see where she went.  Just beyond her, that’s the Coney Island light.

Twisted Sister came in, and not long later, departed

having added some gear . . . oyster reef starters?

And here comes Rockfish,

heading out for a morning fishing party.

And speaking of fish and fishing . . .   I’ll be gone fishing for a while myself.

All photos, WVD.

 

Atina was spinning to starboard before heading out to sea on a sixth boro ebb as a boost to the next port . . . in the Bahamas.

YM Witness, a great name, was

doing the same . . . the milk run down the East Coast.

Höegh Transporter had been pacing and anchoring and pacing some more off Long Island for the longest time, but just came in one morning, likely for fuel and supplies

Seatrade Blue finished its business here and headed for the next port, Jamaica, and then the big Canal.

Stream Pacific is a new name for me.  She was in, then out and after another stop, is heading back to the Gulf of Mexico.

Atlantic Sail is making its way eastbound across the Atlantic, as currently is

Constellation.

Nautical Sarah is long gone . . . to Indonesia.

Stolt Norland is heading for the Gulf of Mexico.

Mila is a 2018 ultramax bulk carrier.

Orange Victoria is still in town, as of this writing.

And more will come and go  . . . .  Some will never return, others will with the same name or another . . .

All photos, each a moment in time, WVD, who is seeking a moment canoeing up along NY, NJ, and PA.

Shooting into the sun never works.

On the other hand, what got highlighted was the spray both hawse rinse and  . . . cooling from bow thruster (?).

But what caught my attention later was all the print on forward side of the superstructure.  Going clockwise from lower left, we read no smoking, overfill alarm, high level alarm, wind hi, wind hi hi, overfill alarm, fo overfill alarm, safety first.  Most of those labels are accompanied by a light.  The consumer of this info would be anyone on the deck, either at sea or at docks.

 

 

I’m aware of the many light patterns and what they mean, and so I suppose you need this number to be prepared.  Regular checks are needed.

 

I was also curious about this break in the walkway between the superstructure and the stack area.

Stern design has variety.  For more photos of this 2017 tanker, see my friend Jack’s neck of the woods.

All photos, WVD, who’s letting you know I won’t be re-posting on FB the next few because I’m either on the road or up a river or creek . . . away from wifi.

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