You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

I’ve mentioned before that this is my miscellaneous category, although “everything” you pull out of your line locker or junk drawer is important for something, “miscellany” sounds dismissive.

Here’s how this post  works:  I’ll put in no comment until the second time through.  Starting with the one below, see the man face mostly down in the small craft sculling with right hand.  See the “cannon” forward, recoil preventer in place?

 

Someone’s altar?

I’d meant to include this a few weeks ago, but forgot.

And here . . . notice a splash of color where often you’d just read a phrase like “safety first” or “no smoking”?  Ice waters below and

lock walls here.

“Yes!!   I beat the ship,” thought he.   But why’s he blowing the horn so much, a**hole!!@#, thought he.

And finally . . . ever stop into a Wawa for coffee?  I’ll get back to that.

Reprise time.  See the gun there?  I paced it out at about nine feet long.  It’s a punt gun, formerly used by “market hunters” in a host of flyways, including locally along Long Island.  I finally visited the New York State Museum in Albany recently, and this is one of the displays.  Much more about punt guns and sneak boxes here.

Nearby in the Museum, here’s a sixth boro diorama.  Meseck boats came up in the previous line locker post also. And here’s the Carroll Towing post I’d wanted to include that 1946 clipping in.

And the painting on the forward side of the superstructure, here’s more on that CSL project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the creation of an independent Canadian confederation.  And if you ever wonder what the francophone Canadians call the “Canada goose,” it’s a bernache du Canada.

And that SUP racing to cross the river in front  of a ship!  It’s that season, and soon conditions like those that created a near-fatal incident last summer will present themselves again.  Don’t be a statistic!  Here’s James Berman’s article from Workboat magazine with the “wheelhouse perspective.”

And Wawa, I’d read this and let it slip through my fingers.  They are having an ATB unit built.  Nah . . . not to transport coffee, which is sold at their midAtlantic convenience store gas stations. I’m wondering what they’ll call it . . . Wawa One?  Wawa Wanna cuppa?  Watuppa?

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you a happy and peaceful day..

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you want to see what I’ve done with this title in the past, click here.

I’ll reveal this set of photos without explaining what’s going on.  Check out the six people in this photo.  They divide into two groups by “uniform,” but how are they related?

 

I might add that these photos are shown in reverse chronological order.

 

See the two men (or one of them at that moment) atop the superstructure in the photo below?

Now we’re moving forward in time again.

 

So the two groups of six total men in the top photo have nothing to do with each other.  The ship’s crew wearing orange were simply photographing the bridge work, demolition at this point.  I can’t say if they communicated, but my guess is that at their closest they were within 50 feet of each other.

 

All photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

Sixth boro fifth dimension posts are about vintage NYC harbor shipping culture photos.  This very welcome photo I received from frequent commenter/researcher William Lafferty.  This should be an easy question for many of you:  where was this photo taken?

Here’s what William says about the photo above:  “You don’t see classic New York harbor steam tugs in color often.  I acquired this red border slide years ago.  It shows Carroll Towing tugs docked, I’m guessing, in Greenpoint, between 1950 and 1955, very late in their careers.  You should be able to identify the location.  From left to right we have J. F. Carroll, Jr.Sally CarrollRichard S. Carroll, and Anne Carroll.  The J. F. Carroll, Jr. was built at Baltimore in 1911 by Spedden Shipbuilding Company as the Neptune for the Curtis Bay Towing Company there.  The Army Engineering Department got it in 1915 and renamed it San Luis operating it in the New York District.  After World War II Carroll obtained it, and it lasted until 1958, probably ending its days at Witte’s. [Note:  Witte’s today is known as Donjon Recycling.] The Sally Carroll was built by John H. Dialogue at Camden in 1906 as the Haverstraw for the Cornell Steamboat Company but the Lehigh Valley Railroad bought it in 1907 and renamed it Aurora.  After a stint in World War I as a minesweeper and later towing tug for the navy, it was returned to LV in 1919.  Carroll got it in the early ’50s but it, too, disappears by 1960.  The Anne Carroll was another Lehigh Valley carfloat tug, built by the Staten Island Shipbuilding Company at Port Richmond in 1910 as the Auburn, and dismantled at Staten Island in 1960.

My particular interest is the wooden Richard S. Carroll, since it was built on the lakes.  It was launched as Active 4 January 1919 at the Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, yard of the Leathem & Smith Towing & Wrecking Company, one of a number of small yards on the Lakes and East Coast to built standardized 100-foot wooden tugs for the Emergency Fleet Corporation.  Powered by a double cylinder vertical compound steam engine built by Chicago’s Marine Iron Works, it operated for the United States Shipping Board in New York harbor until 1925 when transferred to the navy as USS Active  YT 112.  Decommissioned by the navy in June 1946, Carroll bought it 21 July 1947 and renamed it.  It was dismantled at Staten Island in 1956 and its final document surrendered at New York on 20 February 1957.”

Besides the location question, does anyone have additional photos of any of these Carroll tugs, particularly Richard S.?

Many thanks to William Lafferty for this photo and information.

A photo of Anne Carroll appears in this post about the 1952 Hudson River tugboat race.

I see this tug light so infrequently that I didn’t recognize her at first.  A clue . . . some years ago she was painted red.

That’s Bouchard Boys distancing, but can you name the approaching vessel?

This one may almost be close enough to read.

And this one has the biggest give-away colors . . . .

Evelyn Cutler used to be Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, which I remember as a noisy boat.

Ross Sea I first saw in NYC’s sixth boro as Normandy, not

the current Normandy.

McKinley Sea first appeared here as Annabelle V.

And to round this out, Foxy 3 used to be a fleet mate of Lemmerhirt, mentioned above.

All photos on a windy day last week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Lucy Reinauer, according to Birk’s site–has an interesting history, acquired by one of her owners from lottery winnings.

She came off the ways in 1973, from Jakobson, source of many older boats in the sixth boro.

Franklin is a few years older, built in Louisiana, and formerly called Ocean Tower and Matthew Tibbett‘s, both names now used on other boats.

Meredith C. Reinauer is a 7200 hp behemoth, here pushing

RTC 150.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp

Gracie M. is the newest and fourth of this class of Reinauer boats.  Can you name the other three?

I believe this is my first time to get photos of her light.

 

 

So the other three?

There’s Twins from 2011, Dean from 2013, and Dylan Cooper from 2015.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I airbrushed away the name, but the rest of the gray is undercoating, i.e., original color.  This has to be one of five identical (I’m told) boats.  Guess, if you wish, before you scroll.

 

 

My guess is that she’s having some repairs, upgrades, periodic inspections . . .

Coho is the second of five FIN class boats built for Penn Maritime, one root of which was Morania.  Click here for a candler that went as Morania No. 8.

 

The other FIN class boats now in Kirby livery are Skipjack and Yellowfin, which I’ve never seen, as well as Bluefin and Mako.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Quick.  Name this unit . . . or at least the current and previous operators?

I haven’t seen many Gateway Towing tugs along my usual haunts, but here’s Connecticut.

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Nanticoke, about 10-years-old now, the second of the Patapsco 4200 hp class, pushes a payload enclosed in Doubleskin 305.

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Pacific Reliance, at the dock, is made up to the 650-1, whose capacity is 155,000 bbl.

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So . .  that unit in the top photo is Genesis Vision, formerly Superior Service

pushing GM 6508. Here was a photo of the tug as Superior Service, only four years ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you have not seen it yet, here’s an 18-minute video of the saga of the former Katie G and Colleen McAllister, which I captured the first hours of here as they headed east on the East River on their long journey to western Michigan. Here was my Part 2 of that voyage, with collaboration from colleagues.

Here from eight years ago is Katie G moving petroleum product and remaking a tow right off the Battery.

Chandra B may be small in size,

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but she of the American Petroleum & Transport, Inc., is

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big in personality.

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And Emma Miller and Marine Oil Service, I’d like to know you better.

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Both small tankers here–one for fuel and the other for lube oil–seem often accompanied by birds.  I wonder why . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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