You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

“As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean” is a line from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner 220 years ago.  This ship might be painted, and the ocean and sky nicely colored, but that ship is certainly not idle.

MOL Glide  . . . glided in through the Narrows a few days ago, and has also glided out, heading for Charleston SC.   The approach to the sixth boro is not always that pretty.

When Leda Maersk arrived, the sky was overcast and the colors subdued.

 

Overcast with wispy clouds that allow some reflection from OOCL Berlin.

It was just after 0800, so I’d

call this morning fog.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Angelina Autumn . . . that’s not a common sixth boro boat . . .

so of course I needed to go check her out as she entered the Narrows yesterday with a deck barge headed for Coeymans NY.

Arriving with Angelina Autumn was Shannon Dann,

towing a huge Weeks crane.  I did not get an ID on the crane.  Neptune was in the procession also, but it was miles back and I had other places I needed to be.

Genesis Eagle had GM 11103 alongside a tanker.

Josephine came in from sea with

RTC 83.

Lois Ann L. Moran departed the Narrows

bound for Philly with the barge Philadelphia.

Anacostia headed out as well with

with Double Skin 510A.

I should know but am just guessing . . . Nicole Leigh Reinauer alongside Energy Centaur over by the Sandy Hook Pilots’ station.

All photos, WVD.

 

I suspected something was unusual about this tanker.

It was about the name.

 

 

And here it is . . . when have you ever seen “Austin Texas” as port of registry?  Jones Act tankers, yes, there are a few.  You can read the whole story–how it was almost never completed–here.

All photos, WVD.

The variety is  . .  infinite:a survey boat from Georgia in the KVK,

a NJ State Police RIB in the same waterway,

a sloop heading south crossing Radiant Ray,   [I wonder if that tanker is nicknamed Ray Ray.]

a camouflage boat of unusual design,

a trawler southbound opposing Seaways Guayaquil,

My Way yacht from Charlotte NC in the KVK,

a small fishing boat that must have been over a place with lots of fish,

 Tide Runner all prepped to fish,

a Hinckley,

something colorful, noisy and fast,

a workboat for  Trillion Oyster Project . . .  or maybe that will be the number in a few years . . .

a northbound sloop,

another fishing boat . . .

and finally yet another fishing boat gliding past MOL Glide . .

The sixth boro is enjoyed by lots of folks  in smallest boats.  Flukes, stripers, bluefish . . .  what are these boaters hoping to hook and boat?

All photos recently, WVD.

 

Here comes Jonathan C around the stern of an incoming ship . . .

 

This turn would have been fun to see from the air, from a stable platform like a helicopter or drone.

The container ship is called Athens Express.  And of course that is Kimberley Turecamo.

 

 

She was inbound yesterday from the ancient port of Damietta, 12 days and 19 hours behind her.

All photos, WVD.

 

Here’s a new type of vessel, a TEFC.  Know that abbreviation?  She called in Red Hook about a month ago.  These photos come thanks to Mike Abegg.

A clue is the white/red bundles on the dock.

Here’s a closer up view.  Last opportunity to guess.

TEFC expands to “totally enclosed forests carrier,” a subset of dry bulk transportation.  After Red Hook she called at a number of ports headed south.  She’s currently in Mobile AL.  My guess is that she loaded her lumber cargo in Brasil, but I’m not sure of that.

If you can get FB, here’s a video of Mozu Arrow and her hold.  Here are videos of many other Arrow vessels.

Many thanks to Mike for taking these photos.

I’d wager that more than two thousand cargo ships dock in the sixth boro each year.  This morning as I write this, I count  20 in all, including the second of the 15k ULCVs, CMA CGM Panama.  No, I didn’t get photos because . . . I was workbound. All these photos I took in recent weeks.  The last one here I did not take;  a friend Allan Seymour took it on the body of water called Penobscot Bay.

Erikoussa is a regular in the port.  Click here for posts featuring this tanker going back 12 years already.  Here she was departing;  the taut line angling off her port bow leads to a tug rotating her across the KVK so that she points east rather than west.  As of this morning, she’s in the Gulf of Mexico.

Sea Vine . . . is just the best name.  Right now, she’s in Rotterdam.

Hamburg Bay may have called here before as Zim Hamburg or APL Tokyo, but I’ve no record of that.  At 6350 teu, she’s of the size that I saw many of until about five years ago. Her beam–131′–would prevent her from passing through the old Panama Canal locks.  She’s upbound on the Elbe now.

Speaking size . . .  OOCL Singapore is one of those ULCVs that are becoming the new standard these years in the port.  Launched in 2014, her teu capacity is 13200.  Compare that with the newest record holder . . .  CMA CGM Brazil and the 15000 teu size.  She’s now off Cape Fear bound for the Mediterranean.

CMA CGM A. Lincoln, seen here a few weeks ago, blocked out the sky as she passed by.  Right now she’s shuffling through the southern end of the Red Sea, Malaysia bound.

Ever Lotus . . . I caught her here the first time just over a year ago.  She’s Pacific bound in the Panama Canal.

Pacific Anna, a 2017 crude oil carrier,  has one of those great names, like Surfer Rosa or Surabaya Johnny, which isn’t a ship name but should be.  She’s in the Atlantic, heading for Amsterdam.

Fulmar, named for the seabird,  is one of the tankers that currently shuttles frequently between Point Tupper and Bayway.  Right now, she’s off Port Aransas.

Tanja with Camden Hills in the background is departing Penobscot Bay. As an indicator of trade routes, as of this morning Tanja is currently at the Amazon River port of Belem.

The photo above is thanks to Allan Seymour; all others, WVD, who like these vessels, is not alive unless he’s moving.

 

There’s this below from ancient Roman vineyards in Gaul, near this  monolith church . . .  Also, about 30 miles away in Bordeaux is the repurposed WW2 submarine base . . . repurposed for art. But I started out beyond left field here and have digressed in an even more oblique direction.

Saint Emilion is this tugboat with angles . . . and three rectangular windows, wheelhouse and upper wheelhouse . . .  Note the difference in lines with Joyce D. Brown.

She’s angular indeed, a bit reminiscent of a Nighthawk.  The livery of white with yellow trim accentuates these angles.

To see the time of her transformation from Barbara C to Arabian Sea, click here and scroll a bit.  To see her in many jobs as Arabian Sea, click here.

Anyone know why Apex chose this name?

Compare many points of her random partner on the KVK, above and below.

 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

This is a photo emblematic of our time . . .  two seafarers.  I could even speculate comfortably about their nationality.  The older man to the left has no mask, and the other, with mask, is on his device.  This can only be 2020.

Ditto here . . . the masked seafarer standing watch, leaning back on the rail as the vessel heads out to sea.

This can only be NYC, in the 20 aughts or later.  I took it in September 2020.

Here’s a series of three.  See the two crew?

They were testing/arranging something with the jacob’s ladder.

Then, this crewman saw me taking photos and he posed!

Here both the captain of the tug and the two ship’s crew are watching the pilot step across onto Margaret.

The pilot here stands out on the port bridge wing.

And finally, a crewman on a local boat provides lookout on the barge.

All photos, WVD, who loves summertime  . . . as no doubt so do these crew.

Here are previous posts in this series.  This post is a tribute to the dangerous but vital role pilots play in shipping.

Below, the docking pilot descends onto Marjorie B McAllister.

The transition from the gangway to the jacob’s ladder is tricky.

Here’s a Moran docking pilot, departing the ship after the ship is underway.

This is a small ship, but the distance to the water is still significant.

When assured the adjustment is right,

the docking pilot begins his descent to Jonathan C. Moran.

And finally, see the gangway from this angle . . .

and the pilot about to step across to Ava.

 

All photos, WVD, who wishes all safety.

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,408 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031