You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Hundreds of tires are moving here, but not one is spinning. Are they really moving?  Where is this?

 

 

Cornelia Maersk is headed for Charleston. Would those then be offloaded there,

or is there a shortage elsewhere?  Unusual uncovered cargoes on container ships always surprise, like here, here, and here.   And then in 2009, there was this deckload of sailboat masts . . . and more.  How about these sixth boro shoes that’ll never see Italian legs?  Vessel parts that’ll never float?

Could you place Kalundborg on a map?  It’s west of Copenhagen.  Draw a map first and then look it up.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

For the previous 22 posts, click here. So what would you call this approaching craft?  What’s your estimate of the height of those “legs?”

 

It’s a liftboat.

Her destination was the VZ Bridge, and sure enough, upon arrival

Seacor Supporter stopped her forward movement

less than a quarter mile from the bridge.

and began lowering her 200′ spuds.

For the specifics on this vessel, click here.

Supporter is one of almost two dozen lifeboats operated by Seacor.  Anyone know the job she’s here to do?

The fishing kayak . . .?

is unrelated to this post, but may appear in a future post.

All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s where I first saw her in mid September.  At first I thought it was NOAAS Thomas Jefferson (S 222), though I was guessing only by the color and had seen Jefferson here once before, back after Sandy. 

Before that, bowsprite had seen Jefferson.  But NOAA has over a dozen vessels, and the only other two I’d seen were RV Henry B. Bigelow and RV Ferdinand R. Hassler.  Here is info on the fate of the first Hassler.

But in mid October I last saw Foster, likely on her departure from the sixth boro, because the other day I noticed on her FB page that she’s been collecting samples of  invasive dinoflagellates in the Gulf of Maine and now she’s back in her homeport of

Charleston.    So who was Nancy Foster, the namesake?

Click here.  And if you’re wondering why Jefferson has a NOAA vessel named for him, it’s because he authorized the first US coastal survey in 1807.  That survey, by the way, was headed up by Mr. Hassler.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

So who heads up NOAA today?  Click here.

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Today I caught the stork, one stork.

I had work to do, but I just couldn’t let this big cherry blossom magenta vessel pass unrecorded, especially not on a sunny late October day.  Besides, I could work twice as hard the next few days . . ..

Wait . . . I thought it was one STORK!??

Yup . . . one stork from Tokyo.

No way!  It’s one tug named James D. Moran.

This minimal superstructure probably contributes to fuel economy.

 

She’s a product of Japan Marine United Corporation in Kure shipyard, Hiroshima.

And for some really cool alongside on the dock photos, here are a few from Sean McQuilken in Charleston.

 

It’s more than 100 feet up to the bridge wing!

Thanks to Sean for use of these photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Her first steel was laid down almost a decade ago, and here she is pirouetting for New Yorkers.  Carriers tend to have these offset superstructures.  I wonder how it feels to be far-to-starboard in rough seas.  To see the commander in his seat of power, click here.

This ship was christened with a bottle of perfectly good Bowmore whisky, produced by a distillery established not long after US independence.  Of course, today it’s not wholly Scottish owned, if I read this correctly.

Ah . . . the ski jump!  To see F-35 pilots landing and taking off, click here.

Along the port side, the lines are relatively unbroken.

Here, thanks to Michele Fitzgerald McMorrow, is a close-up of the bridge.

Shuttling ship-shore is a passenger vessel I’ve not seen before,

Cosmo, built 1968,

but I know little else about her, although I love the paint scheme.

 

An unobstructed view from the stern shows her size and the sheer of the ski-jump.

 

Comparing the view of her port side to this emphasizes the offset superstructure.

That looks like Gabby Miller supporting the deck barge.

Thanks to Michele for use of her photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Two massive but indistinct enterprises loom offshore while a ketch motors in.  I understand that if I were near to one of those “loomers” . . . they’d be moving faster than I could swim, row, paddle, or walk . . . .

I couldn’t identify the ketch, with the ever-ready bike on deck.

What time is it?

Time to watch the colossal screen?  I’m trying to imagine some applications . . .  circle the boats at the float-in cinema? harbor church service?  a candidate’s debate? a floating classroom?

Only today did I understand that Harvey‘s paint treatment was part of a World War 1 memorial called 14-18 Now.

Click here for 14-18 Now background, leading up to the November 11, 2018 centennial remembrance of the end of the war that was supposed to end all wars . . . .  Even Richard Thompson, one of my favorite singer-songwriters, put out related music.

I NEED to now the story here, this 1930s wrecker on a pier in Red Hook . . . Will that be loaded onto a ship and sent away?  I hope not.  Related . . . I’ve got fodder for another truckster post soon.

Over in Sunset Park (or is this already Bay Ridge??), are these the legs for the Staten Island Wheel that will never stand?

All photos and questions by Will Van Dorp.

As close as this blog has gotten to polar waters can be seen here and here.  And then there was that polar bear question that appeared here back in 2007  . . .

When I saw the vessel above northbound on the Upper Bay on Monday, I had no idea what it was.

It turns out to be one of about a dozen passenger ships operated by Hurtigruten, a cargo and ferry line since 1893 now offering cruises to the latitudes toward the Poles, North and South.

 

Another vessel named Fram–that one made of wood–was an early explorer of the polar seas.

Fram was in the sixth boro for about 24 hours before heading south.   Her port of registry is Tromso, in northern Norway.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Evergreen Marine ships have a unique profile.  Ten of the 30 vessels in this L class have been built in Taiwan, including the one below, Ever Lovely. 

 

Meeting Ever Lovely were Alex and Eric McAllister.

 

 

Inside the Narrows, the docking pilot

came aboard from Alex.

 

As Lovely arrived, Legacy departed.

Only a few years ago, vessels of these dimensions would be the largest container ships calling in NYC.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,253 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

November 2018
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930