You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Tony A has a sharp eye on the sixth boro traffic, like here, Durable, cable ship that worked off Fire Island for some time this spring.  I did catch Durable‘s fleet mate here a while back.   Durable was working on offshore wind farm elements, but has returned to the UK at this moment. 

He also caught Fort Point transiting the watery boro.

 

A first timer catch though is Miss Jean, a Louisiana-based boat likely working with a dredging company in the area.  

For a few more first-timers on the blog, check out David Steers and Benjamin D. Baxter, up along the Sound. 

So is this retired FDNY fireboat Alfred E. Smith under its own power?

Nope.  She’s at the end of a line towed by Jaguar, frequently towing “second-lives” vessels into or out of the sixth boro. 

Jaguar is a Gladding-Hearn product from 1978. 

And that’s a good place to hold it up.  Thanks much, Tony.  

And if winds are fair, tugster might just be back in the sixth boro soon. 

Let’s get back to some Pete Ludlow photos.  Co Morgan has such a long history of names going back to 1951 1965, I’m just going to paste it in here.  

A high vantage point helps convey appreciation for the train of three Mister Jim tows through Hell Gate. 

Ditto Navigator.  From this perspective, her smart color scheme is clear. 

Meghan Marie heads into Hell Gate with a destination somewhere along the Sound or farther. 

All photos by Pete Ludlow.  Thanks, Pete. 

For what might be considered an exotic among exotics, let’s go back to Pete Ludlow’s photos,  meet Windserve Odyssey.  

As an all-purpose offshore wind farm support vessel, it is just one vessel type that will be more common in the years to come.  The blog alluded to this particular vessel and a possible transit through the sixth boro back last September.   Pete’s photo here confirms that it did transit back on the first day of 2022.  

Hat tip and thanks, Pete, for catching this. 

Tugster is still gallivanting far away from the sixth boro, will be for the better part of a week yet, leaving the robots in charge.  We test the perimeter, push the parameters, but in our own robotic ways, support the mission.

 

 

x

Clearly, we robots messed up.  To make amends, here’s some info pasted in:

GENERAL RUDDER (IMO: 8835463) is a Training Ship that was built in 1984 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 4.5 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 68.28 meters and her width is 13.11 meters.
Here’s more on Texas A & M’s training ship. 

BERTO L MILLER (IMO: 8964850) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 1999 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3.1 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 49.71 meters and her width is 13.41 meters.
Here’s more the the Miller’s Launch OSV fleet. 

GO AMERICA (IMO: 8968181) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 2001 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 44.35 meters and her width is 10.97 meters.

Here’s more on the Guice Offshore (GO) fleet. 

 

Many thanks for all photos to Pete Ludlow.  Tugster might pull our plugs and drain our batteries for our failing to fill in the info yesterday.

xx

 

Adeline Marie was at anchor off the Coney Island Light.

Douglas J and a dump scow were shuttling to and from HARS.

 

Mary Emma was arriving from sea.

 

Joyce Brown passed a big unstuck green ship,

 

Stuff is always happening, and all photos, WVD.

More photos here thanks to Pete Ludlow.

The Amigo is an asphalt tanker.  That means she moves her cargo around at almost 300 degrees F.

 

She was eastbound with assist by James D Moran.

 

What do you suppose Vinik No. 6 had in tow?

 

Nicholas and Liz assisted as well.

But of course, it was the venerable training ship . . .

from the shipyard on its way back to Fort Schuyler.

Again, many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Unrelated:  Since we robots monitor harbor events and share news, here’s a surprise that will astonish tugster upon his return:  The Brown tugs have been sold to Seward Marine of Chesapeake VA.

 

Let’s jump back to May 2012.  Over along the Manhattan side of the East River then, I caught this scene.  Since then, there’s been some movement:   Peking to Germany,  Marion M to the Chesapeake,  Helen McAllister to  . . . rebirth as new steel.

Cheyenne has migrated to the Lake Michigan for now.

Twin Tube is still around but sans the boom.

Ellen McAllister is also still hard at work in the sixth boro, but I don’t see her doing much indirect towing as here.

Mark Moran was just passing through from the shipyard to Charleston.

Swan, built in 1981 and showing as her last movement three and a half years ago in China, has likely gone to rebirth as new steel.

But a decade ago in May 2012, she was here to move some used tugboats over to West Africa. Here she’s already down and BFT No. 38 with a crew boat strapped on has already been loaded, while

McAllister Sisters and McAllister Girls wait with three Crowley tugs, 

Cavalier, Pioneer, and Mars

After they are floated aboard, the tide turns the anchored Swan.

Socrates and Heron also float aboard, and

overnight, Swan gets deballasted and raises the hull, so that we can see their five-bladed wheels.   More of the story here.

Also in the boro those days was Picton Castle, showing the flag and more, maybe recruiting some hands

before sailing away.  Does anyone have news about her?  Has she really stayed in Lunenburg since late 2020?

All photos, WVD, exactly 120 months ago.

Unrelated to any of this, read this May 2004 article by the late great Don Sutherland and reflect on how much change has occurred.

As of March 1, 2022, CMA CGM Adonis was still in the shipyard, not yet delivered.  By March 31, the vessel was in Qingdao and loaded, casting off lines.  And April 29, 2022, she had a Sandy Hook pilot on board and was proceeding up the Ambrose Channel, making her first ever cargo call anywhere.

And here, as a SeaStreak fast ferry overtakes it off to port, a Moran tug is about to land a docking pilot on board for her first call.

 

It turns out that James D did the honors, not JRT, which took the stern. 

Click here to learn some of the invisible but significant technology built into Adonis to make it safer and cleaner. 

All photos, WVD, who wishes to say “welcome to the sixth boro, CMA CGM Adonis.

 

Other Evergreen F-class vessels have called in the sixth boro.  So can you be sure which one this is?

Justine McAllister had the port bow.  Again, name that ship?  I could just be pulling your leg with that title.

 

Yup, this is the now much-maligned Ever Forward.

I too have made the same jokes about ever backward, ever sideways . . . .

But here, as she rounds a sharp turn with assistance from Justine, Ellen, and Majorie B., I have to change my tune.  No report has yet determined what caused the incident in the Chesapeake, and when that report comes out, whatever error caused the incident will lead to avoidance for next time.  Who has not erred or operated a device that hasn’t erred?

Bravo, Ever Forward for rinsing off that mud and getting back to work. Fuel up and deliver those delayed boxes.

All photos and sentiments, WVD. 

Flux.  “Everything changes and nothing remains still; and you cannot step twice into the same stream.”  Heraclitus said that, or maybe he did not, but I’ve attributed it to him before.

Click here for the 1966 Charles Burton and the 2010 Charles Burton.  Above and below, that is the one from 2010, but the missing “V” in the nick in the green band suggests a livery change soon.

Over on the KVK, I first thought I was seeing one specialized barge, but

a closer look shows that CMT is getting not just new tugs but also new barges, CMT Y Not 5 and 17.  I hear tell there are more new ones also.

The ship is not new:  Polar Colombia dates from 2017.

But with Polar Colombia and Polar Peru both calling in the sixth boro in the same week,

I read that as a new line or at least new Hamburg-Sud names on their North-South trade?  Polar Colombia has already departed the sixth boro, called and reloaded in Costa Rica, and is heading back north!

Zhong Gu Shan Dong appears to be a new direction.  The ship dates from 2007 and it’s small . . . only 3400 teu, but it is registered in China.

Maybe a Chinese-reading person can translate both the vessel name and the characters on the hull?

But some of the containers are interesting, with Zhong Gu Logistics (upper left corner of the green containers) being something I’ve not noticed before.

Even more interesting to me, nerd of nerds, is what’s on the brightest orange containers . . ..

Alibaba.com!!  I know they are huge, but do they have their own shipping containers now?  Here’s more on Jack Ma‘s  Alibaba Group, including the name origin story, which I’ll quote below.

All photos recently, WVD, who’s always seeking novelty.

Here’s that story:  “One day I was in San Francisco in a coffee shop, and I was thinking Alibaba is a good name. And then a waitress came, and I said do you know about Alibaba? And she said yes. I said what do you know about Alibaba, and she said ‘Open Sesame.’ And I said yes, this is the name! Then I went onto the street and found 30 people and asked them, ‘Do you know Alilbaba’? People from India, people from Germany, people from Tokyo and China… They all knew about Alibaba. Alibaba — open sesame. Alibaba — 40 thieves. Alibaba is not a thief. Alibaba is a kind, smart business person, and he helped the village. So…easy to spell, and global know. Alibaba opens sesame for small- to medium-sized companies. We also registered the name AliMama, in case someone wants to marry us…”  quoted from here.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,540 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary “Graves of Arthur Kill” is currently available only through tugster

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2022
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031