You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Definitely some sort of military truck, probably FMTV made by Oshkosh.  Some of the numbering is Hebrew.

And there’s a bunch of them, up there

squeezing under

the Bayonne Bridge, as they and the rest of the cargo

aboard the Norddeusche ship

rounds Bergen Point on the way to Port.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has seen military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

What?!@#!!  See the end of this post.

 

For the past few years now, NYC municipal trash has traveled by barge and train to landfills in several states.  Captain D here is pushing this barge with containerized trash from a transfer point in Queens to a rail loading facility in Staten Island. Click here for animated explanation of trash movement overseen by DSNY.

As I understand it, the green containers are covered by a Waste Management contract, whereas the black ones, the older slightly contract, by Covanta.

One constant in the harbor has long been the Staten Island ferry; the new “constant” is these trash containers.

 

 

As a resident of NYC now for almost two decades, I have to say that for all the population density and numbers, NYC’s five terrestrial boros are relatively “tidy.”

You just can’t do what we did in my youth . . . set up a burn barrel at the hedgerow end of the farthest field and stoke it once a week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got photos of the new DSNY container cranes moving to the SW Brooklyn transfer station here.

And the first photo was taken from the mouth of the Bronx River, where the trash barge lined up with the Arthur Ash Stadium with a LaGuardia runway in between. Captain D was coming out of Flushing Bay.

Thanks to Ashley Hutto, here’s a salt ship lightering in the Upper Bay.

The ship–Sadlers Wells–has since departed for Houston.  I took the photo below, and all the others, on Monday.   That’s Mister Jim and barge alongside.  I’m curious about the name, given its association with an English theater opened in 1683 by a Richard Sadler.

I didn’t immediately notice that the blue stack logo was made up of four P’s canted so as to look like blades of a propeller.

Panstellar, a fabulous name, was also here discharging salt.  Click here to see the rest of the “pan-” fleet.

Seaenvoy is less than a year old.  I don’t know if the bow design is an upcoming trend.

 

It has since departed for Amsterdam.

Chemical Hunter–an intriguing namegets around for a smallish chemical tanker.

 

Pacific Jewels arrived here from Venezuela.

Overseas New York, a Jones Act tanker,  was launched in Philadelphia in 2008.

George Washington Bridge, despite a sixth boro sounding name, is a “K” Line vessel. 

Thanks to Ashley for for first photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You see it on vessels, a registry without a commercial port maybe.

But what does it look like?  I’ve often wondered that about Majuro or Vanuatu.

As it turns out, Valletta, Malta is the registry choice for cargo vessels and

yachts above and below  and many others

and turns out to be the largest ship registry in the EU and the sixth largest globally.

Thanks to David Schwartz, here it is.  Not surprisingly, it

has been recognized by UNESCO as a world heritage site.  This harbor has been used by “Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs and the Order of the Knights of St John;”  Besides that there were Ottomans and St. Paul himself.  I need to put it on my list of places to go.

Can you name any Maltese cities besides Valletta?

Many thanks to David Schwartz for sending the photos of Valetta Harbor in Malta.  The five photos above that taken in the sixth boro and Virginia by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, the largest city is Birkirkara.  Valletta is the capital city, with a quarter the population of Birkirkara.

For previous “port of” posts, click here.    And if you have photos of ports obscure, far-flung, and/or unrecognized, I’d love to see them.

 

A different post was scheduled for today, but when good fortune smiles, I smile.  Behold  J. Adams bound for sea, as she could not have a year ago . . . in fact, she may very well not even have been completely fitted out a year ago. As of this writing, I believe that J. Adams and T. Roosevelt are the only two of CMA CGM’s 14,414-teu vessels calling in the sixth boro. CMA CGM has just launched a 20,600 tee vessel, not scheduled to call here.

I’ll smile even more once the walkway on the bridge opens, allowing photos from a different perspective.  Such a change in capacity from the vessel carrying the first containers outbound from the sixth boro back on April 26, 1956!  This tech spec sheet starts out with an interesting graph of vessel capacity since 1980, and much more.

Kirby Moran (6000 hp) looks small here, and notice the two bow thrust symbols on the bow, which–if I interpret this info correctly–operate with 5000 hp.

Captain D and her trash barge provide some sense of scale here.

 

 

 

For cleaner port air, she’s equipped with an HVSC by Wärtsilä , which also provides the propulsion power.

 

Kirby Moran–work on this vessel complete– heads back to sail the next ship out of port.

Following are James D and JRT.

I don’t know the calling ports for the other two 14,414 teu vessels:   A. Lincoln and  T. Jefferson.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Washington,  under 26′, seems to have quite the power, given the froth shooting from her stern.

So is this a political post, you might have wondered . . . .

 

Nah . . . the visual was just too good to pass up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Just to reiterate . . . random in the sixth boro these are.  And the other day, I felt blessed for reasons you’ll understand by the end of this post.  Here Atlantic Enterprise emerges from the Arthur Kill and heads for home in Newark Bay.  That church, “a scaled down copy of the great cathedral at Cologne,” makes this seem quite a European-inflected image.

I took all these photos that weather day last week . . . note how the rain in downtown Elizabeth washes out the Union County Courthouse tower.

A bit later Mister Jim enters the east end of the Kills and then

feigns a ship assist.

The mighty Patricia travels east for a scrap run.

 

as Janet D moves in the direction

of her base.

Why did I feel blessed . . . ?  In the same but of morning, I saw both Atlantic Enterprise and Atlantic Salvor

although not in the same frame, they must have met up in the DonJon yard over in Port Newark.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

A surprising feature of the sixth boro in winter is the fishing, dragging for clams.  And many thanks to Steve Turi for sending along this article about this fishery from north jersey.com.

Here are some previous winters’ posts about these boats.  And right about exactly eight years ago, I saw the greatest concentration of fishing boats here.

Successful fishing relies on knowing habitat;  famous statues have nothing to do with it.

The other day I thought about the irony of fishing here:  might be hazards near a tanker named

for a fierce reptile, Densa Alligator.

But it must have been a productive location.

Next time you enjoy a delicious bowl of clam chowder, think about these fisherman.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders whether there are more crude tankers like D. Alligator coming in this winter than usual.

 

 

Here are the previous weather posts.  Below . . . that’s easy:  it’s a local shower;  Evening Tide and Evening Light were in the rain, and I was not, yet.

But a half hour later at the opposite end of the KVK, the clouds were truly wild.  Is there a word for these conditions?  Again, it wasn’t raining at my location.

Air currents swirled beyond the busy waterway, l to r, Stolt Loyalty, Stone 1, Phoenix Dream, Kimberly Turecamo, and Hoegh Seoul assisted by Bruce A. McAllister.

The Stolt tanker passes Graecia Aeterna before meeting the wild swirl head-on.

Add one more tug to the mix.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d like to know what you call this type of fast-moving dispersal of fog.

 

 

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