You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

See that lineup . . .   it can mean only one thing, and it’s not the invasion of 300 enemy warships. 

Here are some of those meeting the fleet . . .

And here the fleet, part of the vessels . . ..

Three Forty Three does the honors.

The lead gray ship has a unique appearance, seen on this blog here from about a year ago.

 

LCS-5 will be docked on Staten Island, a tour I might be interested in doing.  For the complete schedule, click here.

 

Ellen McAllister, following her to the dock, is another product of Wisconsin shipbuilding.

 

Following the LCS was DDG-109, USS Jason Dunham.  Please read the story of the namesake here.

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More tomorrow, but here, passing in front of USS Jason Dunham and USS Milwaukee, is the 98-year-old HMCS Oriole, with an interesting bi-national history you can read here.  HMCS Oriole has appeared on this blog twice before, once on the West Coast and once on the Great Lakes.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous fleet week photos can be seen here.

 

Superlatives, like newest, biggest, worst, most sophisticated . . . , will always be temporary designations.  Not long ago, Cape Henry held the distinction of newest tugboat in the boro, but since then, another has arrived.  And in our temporal world, the future will bring another with that uniqueness . . .

Evening Breeze came out of the shipyard in March, so for now, Breeze is probably it.  She’s already appeared here, although it was not a close-up.

Safe and profitable journeys!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The Welland Canal presents a top hat to the captain of the first vessel to transit each year;  ditto the port of Montreal presents a gold-headed cane to the captain of the first saltie arriving at the port each new year.  It seems the sixth boro is a bit parsimonious in ceremony.  And that begs the question, who superintends ceremony in the sixth boro?

 

Imagine seeing this on the Belt Parkway . . .  a Bell helicopter on a trailer doing the speed limit.   Aren’t these things capable of speeds more like 150?

Wait . . . this one is damaged and the flotation bags have been deployed!!   It’s THAT helicopter!

If you watched network news last week, you may have seen this crash on the nightly news . . .  Click on the photo for more on the New York Media Boat and its multiple possibilities.

Never would I have imagined seeing this chopper, but there it was passing me on the Belt, followed by quite the colorful escort truck running interference as needed.

I occurs to me that this chopper, reportedly a Bell 206, blurs the sixth boro/other boros distinction, making it a sort of sea bird:  it typically lands on any of the terrestrial five boros, it flies seamlessly over them and over the sixth boro, which it can also land on.

Unexpected post by Will Van Dorp, who wonders where the aircraft was headed.

 

Ships of all sorts call in the sixth boro.  Quick  post today . . .  showing a range of recent callers.

MSC Zlata R,

Grande Torino,

 

Gerhard Schulte, 

 

Elbeborg,

 

and Adrian Maersk . . . each with a smaller vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For folks who’ve been watching sixth boro traffic much longer than I have, Lyman must conjure up a sense of ressursction that I don’t have whenever I see the profile.  Then called Crusader, she was tripped by her barge and sank just over 30 years ago.  I’ve almost always seen her with

barge Sea Shuttle, towing sections of subs. For a spectacular view of this tow in the East River seven years ago click here.

Rockefeller University’s River Campus makes an unusual backdrop here for Foxy 3.   See the support structure for the campus being lifted from the River here.

Treasure Coast . . .  offhand, do you know the build date?

Carolina Coast,

with sugar barge Jonathan, which you’ve seen some years ago here as Falcon.

Pearl Coast with a cement barge off the Narrows remaking the tow to enter the Upper Bay.

In the rain, it’s Genesis Victory and Scott Turecamo, and their respective barges.

Franklin Reinauer heads out with RTC 28, and heading in it’s

Kimberly Poling with Noelle Cutler.

And let’s stop here with JRT assisting Cosco Faith.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s been inland for a week now and sees Shelia Bordelon on AIS at the Stapleton pier this morning.   Anyone get photos?

 

 

 

Local government boats  . . .  NYPD actually are out all year ’round training, patrolling, for whatever purpose.  If I were differently ambitious, I’d develop a crime fighter television series based on the lives and work of the marine unit of the NYPD.  But one impediment to fulfilling that goal is that I know very little about the marine unit.

This blog is not so much an end result of content research as a starting point for me, so besides putting up recent photos of NYPD boats, here are some facts that I just located:  NYPD employs 55, 304   people, of whom 38,422 were officers in 2018.  They operate 9624 cars.

Here is info on some of the boats in the harbor unit.

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The harbor unit, established in 1858, is made up of 150 officers today, of whom 31 specialize in scuba operations.

Since they cover the 576 miles of water’s edge as well as the 146 square miles of NYC navigable water, I’d call them the sixth boro police.

Here’s a previous government boats post I did.

For more historical info, click here.

Doing this post has given me some ideas for some sort of project.  To be continued . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s a horn.   You could call it a ship’s whistle or audible signaling device.  It’s clearly not a bell, but that would work also.  From three years ago, here’s another one of these devices.

From this photo below, you have no sense of size, though, do you?

 

Nor do you get that from here, unless . . . .

you identify the structure “behind” the horn as a ladder, scaled to a member of a crew.  Now imagine this horn atop the roof of your pickup truck.

Below and to the left . . . you make out the name?

Still see the horn up there?  Can you imagine being on that ladder when the horn sounds?  Can you imagine a seagull that has perched there just before a signal?  Click here if you want to hear it, but first, turn the volume waaaaay up to 11.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders whether both horns blow the same pitch and whether it’s true that some QM equipment has been integrated into the QM2’s whistle.

Here are some sound codes.

And here are lots of Great Lakes sounds.

By now you’ve seen a trend in several posts . . . my showing you what my eyes want to misperceive.  Does this not look like a tug with a heaping deckload on a barge?   I took the shot Sunday in the rain, camera protected by an umbrella.   Precipitation diffuses the subject.

A minute later, what is approaching has become more apparent.

It’s Gargano, which I’ve watched for a spell now on AIS. Built in 2002, she’s been transformed from an OSV to a wind farm construction support vessel.   Read more here.

Her crew was catching some photos from the underside of the VZ Bridge here.

 

For relative size, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister, 

at the Narrows to meet what was not a barge at all.   The “barge” in the top photo was Maersk Kowloon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who just learned that Gargano is the location of a wind farm off the east coast of Italy.

Alternate classification for this post could be under “specialized” or “whatzit“.

 

OK, I know today is blue skies and clear air, but yesterday I stood in the rain at the Narrows waiting for an exotic vessel that I knew wouldn’t arrive for a while.  But around virtual sunrise . . . virtual because the sun never rose or set all day . . . this was in the offing.

Since Mary Alice was involved, I had assumed it would be a floating crane or a dump scow.  Mary Alice is to the right, light blue, DonJon blue.   But along with her are Normandy, Treasure Coast, and Sapphire Coast.

By this time, I’d put together that I’d learned that the “dead ship” that had arrived about two weeks earlier was the first of two coming to GMD Brooklyn.  They were moving “slow bell,” which was fine by me, because the vessel I’d come out to see was still . . . at sea.

Some changing-up took place in the alongside-tow before they came through the Narrows.

I mastered holding an umbrella while framing the shots;  the secret was repurposing a garbage can against the railing, which worked because there was drizzle but no wind.

 

Once I got the photos home, as so often happens,

I could make out the “riding crew” on the dead ship.  Previous dead ship posts on tugster can be found here.

Sapphire Coast (4860 hp) by now has moved to the apparent port side.

Normandy brings 1900 hp and Mary Alice . . . 3000.

Here’s more riding crew.

Scan through here to find context for these vessels . . . C4-S-58a . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks some vessels look just right on rainy days, better than on sunny days.

This is yet again a nautic scene in the Narrows, so I’ll bet you’re wondering why this title.

It doesn’t appear all that exotic either, compared with other posts of this title.   But I’m thinking someone might be reaching way back to an epic if pungent voyage in 1987 and figuring this out.

 

Hang in here with me.  Check out the name.  Break of Dawn came through the Narrows Saturday morning in the rain, quite a few hours beyond the break of dawn.   Recall Mobro Marine?

Remember the Mobro 4000, and the garbage barge hauling Long Island trash for two months, causing states’ conflicts and several near international incidents . . .?  It’s been memorialized in a kids’ book, if you want to help your kids or grandkids familiarize themselves with sixth boro (and beyond)  lore . . ..  I was living in NE Massachusetts in 1987, and I followed this story closely.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got rained on while getting these photos, standing off to a water side while hundreds of runners pounded the esplanade between Owls Head and the VZ Bridge rest area.

 

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