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This next batch were all taken from the deck of tug Dalzellaird. Steve writes:  “Captain Bob Munoz helped us aboard the tug Dalzellaird at 0800 hours. His tug was normally the Dalzellera, but it was out of service for many months because of damage to the variable pitch propeller and awaiting replacement parts from Holland. Looking out across the East River toward Brooklyn, Brooklyn was not to be seen because of the fog. It looked as if the parade wasn’t going to happen. However at about 0900 hours we pulled away from the pier with our portion of the press corps. The Dalzellaird headed down the East River, swung around Governors Island where we should have been able to see the Verrazano Bridge. It was not there.”

Vessels included Bluenose II, currently doing the Great Lakes Challenge 2019.   She recently appeared on tugster here.

Gorch Fock II at anchor.

Sagres musters the crew forward to ready sail,

With crew high in the rigging, USCG Eagle passes USS Randolph-CV15 . . .

. . . with lots of small boats being reviewed as well.

Marie J Turecamo and Mobil 12 make an appearance,

Libertad unfurls sails

Bluenose II moves through the Upper Bay,

Esmeralda gets underway,

 

tug Esso Massachusetts sails with ceremonial flags,

St Lawrence II and Esmeralda and a brace of USCG 40-footers , and we’ll end this series with

Esmeralda passing the NY skyline, such as it was in 1964.

Let’s close the narrative getting back to Steve’s words:  “Toward mid-afternoon it was time to return to pier 8 and let the press return to their offices to make the deadline for their stories in the newspapers. As we were about to come alongside the dock and all of the press were anxious to get off the boat, Capt. Munoz stopped and went full astern with the engine and stopped again. He leaned out the pilothouse window and looked down at the press as they looked up at him. He asked them if they got good pictures, got good stories, had a good lunch and had a good day. They all answered with a resounding yes. He said that he was busy all day making sure that they got their good pictures and he didn’t have time to take one picture. Because the Dalzellaird was a bell boat, he told them his arm was about to fall off from the constant bell ringing to allow them to maneuver in and around the ships-all for them. He asked if any one of them could possibly send him a few photos of the day’s activities.

The overwhelming response was, of course, ‘Cap, give us your address.’ He pulled the Dalzellaird up against the dock and they all rushed off. All these years later, he is still waiting for a few photos.”     Maybe they got his email address wrong?

Thanks much, Steve, for sharing this.

Any errors here are entirely mine.

 

 

Eleven years ago I missed a christening because of work.  Then last year I missed one again for the same reason.  But last night, neither work nor weather could have  kept me away.

Ava (rhymes with “java”) M. McAllister has already been working in the harbor about a month, but time needed to be carved out of her busy schedule to welcome her to the harbor with ceremony.

Since her namesake is an accomplished skater, the tug demonstrated just a modicum of her skills . . . .

including some tug-modified twizzles and axels.  Notice the guests of honor including the namesake waving on the bow?

The pipers came, they played, and then they led the way

to the convivialities.

Welcome, Ava.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who several years back did a review of McAllister’s 150th anniversary book here.

For more of my photos including namesake breaking the bottle, go the McAllister Towing FB page.  

Here are previous installments.

I caught Invictus earlier this week as it came into the boro.  I had no idea then that by midweek, it would become newsworthy, although it would be on Page Six.  Anyone know what I’m talking about?  Answer follows.

I don’t know if this is the Invictus owner driving the tender or wearing the red shirt topside in the photo above, but this tender followed the bigger vessel in.  Invictus is US built by Delta, although it’s not US-flagged.

Lady May IV, tied up over at Chelsea Piers is Dutch built. It’s smaller than Invictus and for sale for about one-third the price of Invictus.

If I’m correct about the larger of two yachts directly below the Empire State Building, that Utopia IV, Italian built. I have seen a Utopia II and III in the boro in previous years, although I’m not sure there’s a connection.

Contina has been here before;  it appears to be Brazil built by Inace yachts of Fortaleza.  I wonder why the CO painted on the bow previously is no longer there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, and here’s the story of Invictus, one that has to do with soccer champions, about half of whom come from California.  The rich and famous used to travel in style on ocean liners.

Again, notice the variety of shoreline backgrounds?

Related:  Here’s a conversion from commercial vessel to motor yacht Voyager I’d love to see when it’s complete.

 

This post, beginning with Miriam Moran juxtaposed with downtown Newark NJ, is intended to demonstrate just how diverse the sixth boro is, in terms of vessels and shorelines. Has Miriam been in the sixth boro all of its 40-year career?

Ernest Campbell is 10 years older than Miriam, and did the better part of a decade up in Alaska.

Sapphire Coast, stemming here in the East River just off Rockefeller University, was launched in 1982.

In the KVK, Stephen B, 1983,  is trying to pass as Hen B.

Pacific Reliance, launched in 2006, was designed for long hauls.

Kenny G, in its distinctive blue livery, has appeared on this blog several times, but I’ve never learned where and when she was built.  Here she’s working on refurbishing to Pier 40.  Check out this link to Pier 40 as a prep to a series I’m starting in a few days.

At one point, C. F. Campbell was in the same fleet as the vessels that became DonJon’s Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.

And finally, it’s Harbor II, as before, in the Harlem River with the 44th precinct NYPD station in the background.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The Canadas and I were attentive, but it was really just another ULCV.  This was was named for Columbus’ detractor.  Ironically, Maersk Columbus will be arriving in the sixth boro today.

It struck me as remarkable that in spite of the number of containers visible–and of course many more are invisible–Vespucci rode fairly high in the water.  My read on the forward draft markings show just over 25′ draft. Maybe you read it the same?

In this article from four years ago, Vespucci would be listed among the top 10 largest classes on container vessels in the world, by teu.

 

 

See the red “fenders” on the stern quarter?  I first noticed them here a few years ago . . . turns out they are anti-pirate gear.  There’s a link to the inventors in  that post, and here’s a link to the manufacturer.

If you’re new to this blog, container ship capacity is rated in a unit called t. e. u. (twenty-foot equivalents).  Most containers are either 20′ or 40′ long, standard dimensions for efficiency’s sake. Containers are used to ship just about anything, but let’s for this conversation’s sake say a container is full of shoe boxes, which themselves can be moved in a shopping cart.  A standard shopping cart is rated at 4.4 cubic feet of volume.  A standard container is 1172 cubic feet, given the dimensions above.  My math then comes up with 267 shopping carts per container.  That adds up to over 3.6 million shopping carts of stuff on Vespucci, rated at 13,830 teu.  End-to-end with no space between the carts . . . that line of carts would stretch farther than NYC to Albuquerque along the roads!!

 

This 2010 vessel carries 20 containers across, and compare that to

CMA CGM Marlin (photo taken in September 2009) with 13 containers across.  Here are some recent posts featuring CMA CGM boats.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who suggests you keep an eye on ONE Stork, currently in Bayonne.

By the way, I was traveling S/V America Vespucci when she was last here in 2017.  Anyone get pics?

 

JM, that’s John McCluskey, sent along these photos yesterday.  I’d planned on doing that same trip yesterday, but time got away from me and today it’s rainy and darker!

This shot greatly resembles one of the first set of photos I ever posted on a blog, my very first post. You can see it here.

Alice and two Oldendorff siblings have been sold to Algoma; hence the name change to Algoma Verity.

As John passed the shipyard in the old Brooklyn Navy yard, he also got photos of some of the other vessels there, like R/V Shearwater and in the graving dock behind her, Cape Avinoff.

 

Waiting her turn in the graving dock is Cape Ann.

Many thanks to John McCluskey for sharing these photos of a short stretch of his float-by on the East River.

 

 

Mermaids are truly political, as you will see in the next few photos.  The partially obscured sign between the two large puppets says:  Manhattan, Next Atlantis.  Frightening!  Their intent to invade and annex coastal cities is nothing short of a land grab.  Would they reef buildings like those in the background?

Even advancing coral appeared this year, arriving with its own entourage, all looking quite healthy and diverse.

 

Some mermaids seem to have very terrestrial concerns, while others

just want to dance to the music, taking advantage of their single day of land-appendage exchange.

Other sea critters have rights on their minds . . .

like these surfsurfsurfragettes.

But mostly this parade is about music, marching, dancing, and welcoming the longest day the year, a leg stretching day.

These photos may capture the color but do not begin to suggest the volume.

Between the buildings, these drums are thunderous.

Green light, red light . . .  they just keep pouring through the intersection.  And remember yesterday’s tuba?  That tuba–like the trumpet–has found its tribe.

 

 

 

Pirates also come ashore, like this band made up of scalawags banned from every continent of dry ground.

A reporter wanting to interview a dancer . . . just has to dance.

 

 

 

We leave it here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is counting the days until the mermaids re-emerge from the deep for their next long day in the sun.

 

 

On the first full day of summer, a trumpet-toting parrot and a tuba-entwined starfish meet on Surf Avenue and 21st.  That can only mean one thing:  mermaids!!  You’d guess that maybe even if the title had been summer solstice at Coney Island.

The unlikely pair–a psittacine gigantus and a forcipulatida musicus– talk and then set off in search of their kin.

I stayed at my location, figuring it might be a portal between the worlds where other fanciful sights would materialize.  And sure enough . . . this wave-energized police car vintage 2910 glided past.

Predictably . . .  Dick “the mayor” Zigun showed to key to welcome all at the portal to his stretch of beach, but is this the first time he’s not beating a bass drum?

 

The parade is many things, but it’s as much music and marching and dancing as anything else.   And all, this is the best shot of Arlo, Coney Island native.  See him in the beach cart just to the left of the staff guy in pink?  Here’s a short song of his you might like.

Some mermaids hitch rides in motorized vehicles.

This amusement park ride–sometimes in the background of my Narrows photos, eg, here and scroll to third photo–is way beyond antique.

More parader pictures tomorrow, and for now I’m out enjoying the second whole day of summer 2019. Know the symbol below on the green flag?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose favorite year at the parade might be illustrated here and here.

Oh . . . the psittacine aka macaw found the trumpet section

 

Compare the bows of two tankers, Silver  Etrema and Alcyone T.

Take a bow for the bow of Bow Performer, 

And note the cascading flushing of

Front Cascade.

Spar Indus gets lightered before heading up the North River . . . with the bow of that barge loaded to the marks first.

Sider Miami and Andrea show their sterns to the camera.

Ditto YM Essence, which on the radio sounds like Y M S Ents.

Elantra Sea passes a berthed Kasos, as does

T Matterhorn, both showing more draft markings showing than Kasos.

We’ll end this post with MSC‘s MSC Mediterranean.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The Narrows is a prime location for me to get photos of vessels coming in from sea if they have AIS because I have several hours notice of arrival for any traffic going anywhere into or through the Upper Bay, eg., on their way to Brooklyn berths, the North River, or the East River.  I can walk around or–in case of rain or cold–sit in my car.

The downside is that it’s a wide spot, so even the zoom can draw in only limited detail.

Having said all that, here’s a shot from Bay Ridge over to the Sandy Hook Pilots station, showing (from far to near) the current black hull-yellow trimmed pilot boat mother ship New York No. 1, its eventual replacement currently with a blue hull, and the smaller boats.  Lop off the thin upper wheelhouse and paint the hull/trim, and make a thousand more modifications . . .  and you’ll have the new mother ship.

My goal was to get photos of Commander Iona, which I did and posted here. Unexpected was the arrival of Dina Polaris, which I’d first seen only a month and a half or so ago.

 

Mister Jim has been a regular on this blog and in the sixth boro surrounding waters since she first arrived a few years ago.

 

The Severn Sailing Association came through the rain with a whole host of sloops . . . from closest to farthest:  Commitment, Intrepid, Valiant, Courage, Invincible, Renaissance, Daring, Brave, Warrior.

Rhea I. Bouchard headed in with her barge, but by this time the rain was falling so hard I couldn’t confirm the name/number on the barge.

Magdalen headed out, passing a sloop and

R/V Heidi Lynn Scuthorpe, a first sighting for me.

Click here for more info on Heidi Lynn and Monmouth University’s Urban Coast Institute. Click here for a more technical article from Workboat on this vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels compensated for staying out in the rain.

I saw Nauvoo (Heidi Lynn‘s previous name) years back and I posted a pic here.  I also saw Beglane.

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