You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Way back in 2007 I started this series, and I now think I should never have called it “bronze” since it’s more like a golden brown, but no matter, this post is all the same fleet.  Name the fleet and the tug?

Talking fleet renewal . . ., Reinauer has a young fleet.  Janice Ann is not even a year old . . .

Laurie Ann, here with Grace D alongside, is just over a decade old.

Dean is not quite a decade at work.

Curtis came out the same year as Dean.  By the way, I didn’t identify the photo in the top photo yet.  Figured it out?

Morgan is the oldie but goldie . . .

Haggerty Girls is about the same age as Dean and Curtis . . . i.e., a young fleet.

All photos, recently, WVD.

And the tugboat in the first photo is . . . Dylan Cooper.

 

…you know. . . superlative like newest, biggest, fastest, most powerful,  most teu. . . it’s a series I should have started long ago, but tugster is a public work-in-progress.  And I’m skeptical of superlatives… since they change regularly.

A quick post today, but this is a story I need to find more out about.   See those orange slings hanging from a buff framework?   I’d noticed it several times recently but never paid attention until yesterday.  It’s not an art installation.

Notice the fine print in blue:  Bayonne Drydock and Repair Corp and Cimolai MBH 1280?  Well, I read that is the current largest mobile boat hoist (aka travel lift) in the world, capable of lifting up to 1280 tons!  That is a big a$$ boat lift!    And Cimolai is building a larger one–a 1500-ton lift– in Florida.

Here’s more on Cimolai, with some NYC projects already completed.  And one more site about Armando and Albina Cimolai  . . . here.

Photos, WVD.

If you’ve never seen one of these lift or splash a boat, here’s a video.

Here are previous installments, and I’m just observing in this post;  although most vessels I see have intact coatings, others really need a trip to the shipyard for some paint.

The stern of Maersk Columbus was fine, but the bow had some extraordinary streaks of rust.

Cosco Istanbul had some

need of some work generally all over.

Ditto this Zim ship.

The surprise was this tugboat, Choptank,

this time on the stern.

Again . . . just observing and taking these photos, WVD.

 

Here’s what the Upper Bay looks like on an overcast but calm dawn . . . with panamax  Torm Elizabeth being lightened by Josephine and her barge.  The tanker is not quite a year old.  There’s a lot going on in that expanse of protected water:  ferries passing, lots of tug/barge units anchored, Nautical Janine anchored, and who knows how much movement sits beneath those buildings in the distance.

Seamagic is slightly larger and dates from 2006.  She’s taking on bunkers from Kings Point and her barge.

Hafnia Lise has half Seamagic‘s carrying capacity, dates from 2016.  Here she heads out for sea.

I just love some of these names, especially the next ones,  although my all-time favorite is still Surfer Rosa.  Maybe that’s because when I saw it I knew a Rosa who surfed.  Meet Solar Katherine at dawn. She’s also from 2020, like Torm Elizabeth.

Pacific Sarah dates from 2017.

Nautical Janine is two years old.

I wonder if these names– Janine, Sarah, Katherine, etc–have namesakes who know they’ve inspired a vessel name?  I know that can be true of tugboats . . . . because I’ve met actual namesakes.

One more before I hit the road . .   Silver Joan, taking on some fuel.

All photos, WVD.

Mackenzie Rose and Paul Andrew are eastbound, and Mary Turecamo, westbound.

 

A light Haggerty Girls westbound,

passing Laurie Ann Reinauer.

Kimberly Poling moves a barge out of the Kills.

 

A bulker in the anchorage gets bunkered by

Kings Point.  Katya Atk needs to repaint the name on the starboard bow.

And Helen Laraway makes her way east.

 

All photos, WVD.

Where’s there’s a “1”, a “2” must follow, right?  Let’s start with Brendan Turecamo on the starboard side of APL Dublin.

Enter a Maersk ship with Bruce tendering the port side.

APL Dublin has Kirby on the stern.

Gerda has Capt. Brian A. on her stern, and

Patrice and

Ava.  That makes a total of four tugboats on Gerda Maersk.

Note the rust stains on Maersk Columbus, a US-flagged ship.

Yet, no tugboats work the port side of Columbus,

 

but on her starboard side, Margaret has been all along, and Kirby has left APL Dublin to assist Columbus as they head for the bridge and Bergen Point.

All photos and interpretation by WVD, who’ll never see this identical concatenation repeated.  Hat tip to all the crews who make this happen.

Can anyone explain the story of the rust stains on Maersk Columbus?

Looking back a year, here‘s where April 11, 2020 found us.

 

Steve Munoz took the first three photos in October 1986 from Borenquin.  The tug identified as Kathryne E. McAllister appears to be the one from 1975, now known as Brendan TurecamoBorenquin lived many lives between launching in Vancouver WA in 1945 and scrapping in Beihei CH (near the northeastern border of Vietnam) in 1989. That’s indeed the Bayonne Bridge.

Here the vessels are in Newark Bay heading for Port Elizabeth.  The sun rises over Bayonne.

 

Yesterday, April 8, 2021 I caught the next set.  Eastern Dawn (Toula) was indeed heading east at dawn, pushing a barge with a crane over to Gowanus.

 

A few minutes later, Marjorie B. McAllister followed Eastern Dawn, now visible rounding the bend toward Gowanus.  I believe the tugboat beyond her is Christian Reinauer.

Thanks to Steve for sharing his archives.  The last three photos and any errors . . .  mine, WVD.

 

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

This photo is out out order in this sequence, just to show scale.

Before a tanker leaves, the boom gets removed by these small boats, which

also help handle the lines.

Miriam came in to deliver the pilot(s).  She then gets a line toward the stern to pull the tanker off the dock.

Marie J. gets a line on the bow to pull it away from the dock for the turning.

The top photo would come here; once the bow has moved off the dock sufficiently for Marie J to get behind the bulb, she does so . .  and pushes the bow around while Miriam holds the stern.

 

 

She’s now more than 90 degrees off the starting point, and turning into a flood tide, if I remember correctly.

 

Once the tanker’s turned 180 and pointed into her desired course, Marie J. speeds ahead to get onto the port side of the tanker.

All photos, WVD.

Kudos to Allen Baker for catching this boat coming through, and as of Friday morning she’s still in the boro even though she’s headed for Norfolk, I believe.

Have a look at her and see if you can tell any differences between this new boat and a long evolutionary string of Moran boats depicted here and culminating in the 6000s like Kirby Moran….

And the difference is . . .  she’s all different:  shorter (by almost 10′), cleaner (Tier IV), and with an all-different propulsion (Cat/Royce turning 94″ wheels v. EMD/Schottel turning 102″).  It would be interesting to see them side by side as well as from the interior.  There are other differences as well.

Again, kudos to Allen for catching this boat coming through on delivery south. 

Coincidentally, just last week I reread Tugboat: The Moran Story by Eugene F. Moran and Louis Reid, published in 1956.  That book covers 1850 to 1950, and I’d love to see installment two of the Moran story, covering the 65 years since Tugboat came out.  Is anyone writing it?  I’d step up . . . for what that’s worth.

A starting point is here, and in the Towline archives you find there.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,462 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

April 2021
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930