You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

A top hat tip to my eagle eyed collaborators in and around the sixth boro . . .

Here are previous “big one” posts.

See those marking on the base portion of that vertical structure behind the RV?

this is a mighty high-reaching crane base painted like a giraffe’s neck.   It’s actually a perfect paint job for these amazing lifts.

Painters in a second lift are applying the giraffe-camouflage.  I wonder where this large faux giraffe will raise its neck?  Anyone know?

Remember this surprising “cruise ship giraffe”?

And speaking of cruise ships–and more in that photo–behold from the cliffs of NJ . . .   Norwegian Encore, a brand spanking new cruise ship.  Christening will be later this month in Miami.  She has about 6000 beds.

What else I see down there is Chandra B, USCGC Campbell, and a bunker barge accompanied by Fort McHenry.

Many thanks to Tony Acabono and Phil Little for these photos.

Thank you.  You know who you are.  Here was the first Veterans Day proclamation.

Not sure if USS Carter Hall (LSD-50) is in town for 11/11, but here’s the water side tribute.  Have any of the others of the Harpers Ferry-class visited NYC’s sixth boro?

Photo by Will Van Dorp, whose previous Veterans Day posts can be found here.

Why today?  It goes back to 1919, a century ago.  Here’s what the silence after the armistice sounded like and the bird songs were again audible.

If you want some veterans’ opinions, click here.

An unrelated question to begin:  Have you kissed or do you know Resusci Anne, aka the most-kissed face of all time?  I’ve kissed her more than once.  Answer at the end of the post.

Some of you can conclude a lot from this shot: the type of vessel, the company, the location the ship, and maybe even what part of an evolution this is.

On the other hand, a lot is unknowable:  who are those three people, their nationalities, their lives, their specific livelihoods…   And those containers, what do they contain, their provenance, age, and destination.  And those initials . . .  in this age of weighty four-letter abbreviations . . . what are these four letters?

How many boxes are on this vessel?  How many places are they headed?  Where are those places, and of what import to their lives is the contents of those containers or the arrival of the containers in terms of what they’ll fill it with in the coming months?

If this vessel draws 40′ through the KVK, what would be the experience of a bottom-dwelling fish as it passes above its habitat?  What would this passage look like from 1000′ directly above?  Would there be a mud swirl visible, stirred up by the turning of the huge prop?

And then, there are questions of scale in the harbor and numbers of vessels that come and go and from how many ports and who these crews are . . ..  Here’s a relatively unknown story about a ship’s cook who visited NYC and left the vessel for a while just over a century ago and if he’d stayed, history might be different . . .

Getting back to scale . . .  part of the story here is foreshortening and proximity.

I’ve been doing this mostly-daily blog for well over a decade now, and although I’ve learned a lot, there’s so much that will just be unknowable, and simultaneously, that fact makes me consider discontinuing the effort and persisting to try to understanding it better.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thanks you for reading these posts and looking at the photos.   I don’t think I would be continuing if the subject matter were NYC roadways and vehicles that use them . . . .

For some certainties on these three ships, here are the numbers:  CMA CGM Aquila  is 1190′ x 159′   Dubai Charm is 820′ x 144′   and Atlantic T is 590′ x 108′;  all three are about 10 years old.

If you’ve ever taken a CPR course, you too have kissed Resusci Anne.  I stumbled upon the story yesterday, then read some accounts here and here, and found it too good NOT to share.   Learn to save a life;  kiss Resusci Anne.

 

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

She’s not pink or blue or green or new, but she’s an ULCV that I saw back out of Bayonne yesterday, and I can imagine all the communications and applications of power to make this happen.

JRT yanked eased under power stern wise, while Mary Turecamo 

and Jonathan C countered that movement just enough to maintain control.

Once far enough out of the docks area, the vectors shifted,

 

and, I’d wager, added bow thruster force to rotate to port,

revealing to me a fourth tugboat–Margaret–that’d been working the obscured side until now.  Seeing three tugs and 15,000 hp arrayed on the bow is a reminder of the days when many tugs would make docking a form of choreography.

 

It was yesterday’s sunny low humidity, but the colors rivaled foliage up in the valleys at peak!  And never have I seen so many figures up on a bridge wing!  I count at least five folks up there.

 

When Monaco Bridge has been pointed safely toward the VZ Bridge, the docking pilot–I presume–departs and

 

 

the ULCV heads for the next port . . . Norfolk in this case.

Using gCaptain’s figure of 48,000 bananas for one 20′ container, Monaco Bridge could carry over 667 million bananas .. . or two bananas for every person living in the country!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who points out that ONE Ibis is currently at the Global Terminal.

More info on Monaco Bridge:  she was launched in 2018 by Imabari Shipyard in Japan. Her 11 cylinder engine generates 65,576 hp at 76 rpm.   See photo of the shipyard here.

Here the previous posts on exotics, vessels not typically seen in the sixth boro.  I take the label from birders, as they use it to classify birds.

Regulus is a 2014 product of Thoma-Sea in conjunction with TAI.

She left to go offshore yesterday, but she’d been at the Bayonne dry dock at least a few weeks.  I believe that red derrick was not mounted on the afterdeck when she arrived, but I’m not certain of that.  Anyone help?

Click here for more specs.  Most likely that derrick is mounted over a moon pool, as would be the case with a DP2 OSV.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who could classify this as a specialized vessel as well.

 

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . as in  boarding party, which might never be pleasant for anyone, but it goes with the enterprise.

YM Evolution was coming in the other day with New Jersey to port, and

 

lots of coasties descending starboard.

 

When I say lots, I mean two

boats

full.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who although unrelated, is recalling that sojourn that a container ship spent in Philly earlier this year.  Meanwhile,  MSC Gayane has been bailed out and is currently in Chile…

Here are some of the rules for boarding.  And no doubt, some of you have seen this dramatic boarding of a sub on the high seas.

Here are the previous installments.

It was the color and shape that caught my eye, and I’m guessing that’s the whole point.  If you were a searcher, you’d want a color and shape or anything else to catch your eye.

It turns out I’ve caught them here before . . . and I’m glad for these drills.

Here are more of these craft hanging from the starboard side of Anthem of the Seas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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