You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Margaret shines “brightly” over by Fort Wadsworth.

Scott Turecamo transfers commodity over at the east end of Bayonne.

I think it is Miss Julia, but I still know nothing about her.

Of the Seaboats fleet absorbed into Kirby, Weddell Sea is the only one I see these days, and here she

gets assistance to the dock from Normandy.

Gracie M. was the newest Reinauer boat at least three boats ago.

With the ongoing renewal in the Reinauer fleet, Morgan must be among the oldest boats they operate.

And I’ll never forget an tempestuous morning when first I heard Evelyn‘s sound, when she was working as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

And that returns us to Margaret.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Part of today’s post follows on yesterday’s, the arrival of NYK Blue Jay.  Although she is no larger than the other ULCVs now serving the sixth boro, the fog obscuring the Staten Island in the background creates an illusion of size. Miniature tugs follow this vessel appearing the largest thing ever to enter the harbor.  If the 1920s launched an era of skyscrapers on boro of Manhattan, then the past year and a half that has ushered in the ULCVs is truly an era of coast scrapers, certainly hoping not bottom scrapers.  Out at the entrance to the Ambrose, pilots climbing from the pilot boat must feel they’re beside a rolling, pitching, yawing skyscraper.

If painted orange, Robbins would look like a traffic cone.

Note the three tugs totaling  combined 18000 hp lined up alongside, and

fog downsizes the heights of the skyscrapers.

Let’s switch gears and embrace the merger of tanker names and popular culture, specifically the villainous organization at the heart of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Since my son has caught me up on Hydra, this seems one of the strangest vessel names I’ve seen…   If you know the reference, it rivals King Barley and Turmoil.

Siirt I’ve seen before.

Undine heads in with Brazilian oil, I believe.  Un-dine . . . has intriguing semantic possibilities, or well, it’s just the name of a type of water fairy.  Since I mentioned popular culture earlier here, Undine would fit right into the Australian show Tidelanders.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you understand the educational and therapeutic benefits he gains from haunting the port.

 

I haven’t used this title in half a decade, but today I couldn’t resist. JRT waited at the Staten Island side of the VZ.

But so were the geese, the brants.

Lots of them.

As well as the gulls.

James D joined JRT as an escort gull whizzed overhead.

Now you see it?

Now?

Jonathan C meets NYK Blue Jay!!

More birds soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

In only ten years, a lot of changes have happened in the sixth boro.  I wish I’d started this blog 30 years ago to document even more, but 1988 predated blogs, the internet, and digital photography.  Wow . . . how did people relate back then?

Joking aside, let’s see some that have moved on.  On January 11, 2009 Kristin Poling, the 1934 tanker, still operated.

January 12.  Sun Right, built 1993 and already dead, moved westbound in the KVK escorted by Eileen McAllister.  What’s remarkable to me is how large the tug looks in compared to the ship in contrast to tugs today looking miniature on the stern of a ULCV.

Five minutes later . . . Odin.  Indeed I was smitten by this unusual vessel, which has since moved to the South and lost her ability to rise up as if on hind legs.  I’ve no sense of what it was like to work on her.

January 15.  Never did I imagine then that this Dean Reinauer would be replaced by this Dean.

January 18  The boro’s big story of January 2009, of course, was the plane crash in the Hudson.  Here the efforts to lift the USAir Flight 1549 out of the water have just begun.  Thomas stands by Weeks 533.

January 29  NYC DEP’s Red Hook had just arrived in the harbor, and it seemed she was escorted everywhere by James Turecamo. Sine then, NYC DEP has added a  whole new generation of sludge tankers aka honey boats.

January 31  Taurus has become Joker, another intriguingly named tugboat operated not in NYC but Philadelphia area by Hays Tug and Launch, with fleet mate names like Purple Hays, High Roller, Grape Ape, and more.

Let’s leave it there.  Happy new year’s greetings still ring in my ears, leaving me with an ongoing inexplicable smile and desire to treat all with respect.  Go out of your way to smile at someone today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose smile gets hidden by a respirator whenever he goes into the archives on Tugster Tower.

 

Whether you’re working or not, January 1 is a transition, a bridge between years.  And that brings me to the handsome bridges below.  The nearest is a rail bridge.  Can you identify the location?

Here you can see parts of all four bridges.  Answer follows, but I’m thinking to float and paddle through here in 2019.

I went out briefly this morning to see who was moving.  Crystal Cutler was the first I saw . . .  at least I saw the lights of.

Bluefin, first in the notch and then light a bit later, was the first tugboat I could photograph.

The bridges photo was taken in Harrisburg two days ago.  The broad river is the Susquehanna.  Anyone interested in joining me in a 80+ mile trip down to Havre de Grace in spring?  Has anyone done it?

The nearest bridge is the Philadelphia & Reading RR Bridge.  Visible beyond it–looking upstream– are Market Street Bridge, Walnut Street Bridge, and the M Harvey Taylor Street Bridge with the blue girders.  I’d thought that was the Route 81 bridge, but it is not.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you transition well into 2019.

“Leaning out” is the layperson term that comes to mind, but I’m supposing a technical and standardized term exists:  indirect towing.

Let’s watch the evolution with Capt. Brian and OOCL Berlin. At 12:01, the line is slack.

12:02. As the tow approaches Bergen Point, line is tightened and

by 12:04, the line lengthened, and the tug appears to be headed in a diametrically opposite direction, in spite of OOCL Berlin‘s much larger mass.

Capt. Brian is now using the hull as a brake.

 

Three other tugs are working alongside the ship.

A different day, Capt. Brian is working on Gjertrud Maersk using the same technique.

 

 

All photos and conjecture on the language by Will Van Dorp.   Here’s one of my sources.  I hope someone corrects or confirms my understanding here.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth born.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

I recognized the lines almost immediately, even though I hadn’t seen Maria J, ex-Jesus Saves, in a very long time.

I’m happy to see her back as Nicholas Vinik.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This was an iconic start to my morning a few days ago;  the Vinik livery looks gorgeous on Liz Vinik, which I’d first seen as Maryland.

Closer up, I noticed she also wore colored lights, a great seasonal touch, subtle enough to avoid confusion with nav lights.

Then later, another surprise .  .  she came by pushing a petro barge, Stoddard Sea!  Wow!  I can’t say how long it’s been since I’ve seen that.  In fact, most of my photos of the boat over the years show her light, possibly because her lines are so  pleasing…

More Vinik surprises soon.

Photos by Will Van Dorp, who adds the never-used photos below from 2009 to contrast with her current look.

 

 

 

Click here for previous installments.

Shift happens!  It appears here the crew secured the tumbled containers as best they could with chains.

 

 

And yet another view.

These were on a vessel that came into the sixth boro yesterday, but I don’t know how long ago this cascade occurred or if any other boxes splashed.   A bit farther astern was another buckled box.

Shift happens, i said.  I just hope that sh*t was not mine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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