You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Here’s the index of previous “names.”

I love surprises, but some pass almost unnoticed to most.  For example, did you know Ernest Hemingway visited the sixth boro a few weeks ago?  The Hemingway IMO 9295177.  Ditto Charles Dickens, earlier this spring.  Now I wish Thomas Pynchon would visit, given that he wrote about it . . . and tell me about it in advance.  Orange Ocean is in town, but please, no more orange rivers.  Alpine Mary is here now, but please no typhoid Mary.  YM Unicorn, yes . . . they exist.  And a really crazy one, a tug on Lake Ontario yesterday, Radium Yellowknife!  Wow!

When I saw on AIS that Buffalo Hunter was bound for sea, my tired brain thought Bob Marley and wondered which of his songs would be emblazoned on a bow and stern soon . . . Stir It Up, maybe?

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Then I realized the second word was “hunter” and not “soldier,” and the paint job looked neo-dazzle.

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Strange . . .

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So let’s get out front and look the vessel over again.  Unusual paint-on figurehead.

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What’s that around the upper railings of the house?

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Barbed wire!  Coils and coils of it.  Has the sixth boro gotten a nasty reputation?

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Seriously, I’m guessing it’s for some pirate-infected waterways elsewhere.  Anyone care to share more about the story?

Here was barbed wire mustache on a vessel in Cape Town a few years back.  Maybe this is a cheap-fix for better internet?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

See that tug over there?   This photo comes from Asher Peltz, and I’m very grateful . . .

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because I was seeing the tow from this angle, quite backlit, but

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fascinated nonetheless, given the load

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on Marmac 300 . . . parts of the turbine bases for units 3, 4, and 5 of 5.   See the base for unit 1 here.  At the pace the tow is moving, it’s barely to Montauk as of this posting.  By the way, for scale, the tug is 97.7 ‘ loa.

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Here’s Stephen B in a logical though unlikely location.

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nestled between Manhattan Elite and Celestial.

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Dean Reinauer sidled over to my part of the Kills, and I got a good look.  Thanks.

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This Dean has been at work for just over two years.  Click here to see–along with some other departed vessels– the previous Dean Reinauer, currently in Nigeria under different ownership.

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Bluefin appears to have just been painted, as the lettered Kirby logo has not  been applied.

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The last time–I think–Bluefin was on this blog she was still gray.

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Here’s Robert Burton in yesterday’s strange pre-rain light and here

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at dawn yesterday interestingly backlit though not quite.  A couple of years ago, I caught her down in Morehead City.

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All photos taken yesterday.  Thanks to Asher for the lead photo here.

Jay Michael  comes thanks to Bjoern Kils of NY Media Boat.  I’m not sure why I’ve “deep freezed” these photos since April.

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I caught this photo of Lynx leaving for the Commonwealth a few weeks ago.

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Notice the curved panel atop the front of the wheelhouse?

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It’s an open upper nag station.  Check out the controls.  Ever used?

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Her tow had an interesting name for a barge.

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Recognize this boat from the mast?

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For something really different, here are two clips from youtube.

First, on Chrysler Sea Mules . . . anyone have experience with them?  Are there any restored versions?

And second, on Kettenschleppers, toueurs or chain tugs  . . .  the video is not English but you can get the drift in two minutes or less.  They’re used in long unventilated tunnels which would fill with fumes if combustion engines were used.

 

 

For as multipurpose as sixth boro waterways are in summertime, my perception is that safety prevails.  RORO, barge on a short wire, and canoe stay well apart.

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Ditto here with spacing.

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PWCs . .  I’ll never be a fan.

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Foreshortening masks the fact that from a vantage point like Fort Wadsworth . . . I can see over 10 miles.

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The traditional ship here was launched in 1997;  the tug beyond  . . . in 2001.

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My only question is where that classy yellow sand is going.  TZ Bridge?

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

The first photo comes via Fred Trooster, HHL Fremantle leaving Waalhaven for Port Said on 4 August, with RT Zoe, RT Stephanie, and RT Claire, for new lives there . . . .

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All the rest I’ve taken recently in the sixth boro  . . .  Gracious Ace (a fun name) left Yokohama on June 30.

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Ellen McAllister and McAllister Sisters escort GA under the Bayonne Bridge

Palmerton follows the Ambrose Channel into the Narrows.

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Anyone recognize the cargo?

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Glovis Crown and CMA CGM Vivaldi cross on the Ambrose Channel.

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Juliette Rickmers heads for sea with Margaret Moran alongside.

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Here crabbing across the Hudson is Sightseer XII, built in 1933!!  Click here for more info on this vessel originally built to enforce Prohibition!

And finally . . . Destiny, a new one for me, a sixth boro version of a lobster boat.   A Maine lobster boat has evolved into something quite different.

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Thanks to Fred for the top photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here were previous posts in this series.

Sunday morning, though, I went out to see the full moon set, but

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while I was relaxing there, this Dolphin intruded,

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low.

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And then went back and forth . . . above this tanker with stern line dangling and held in location by two tugboats.   And the VHF channel 14 was calling for a slow bell in the KVK.

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Another USCG asset came around, and

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if all that didn’t call attention to something awry, then a small boat adding wipes to the booms

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called even clearer signs of a problem. Also, on that outboard, is that camouflage paint or grease?

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Meanwhile even more spill response boats and crews arrived.

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When I got home and searched for info on any (oil spill) incident, I learned that the Dolphin itself had experienced some problems and spent the rest of the day and night on a nearby golf course.  Ouch!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the story as told by workingharborcommittee.

Many thanks to Paul for this aerial photo, said to show tugboats idled by the strike that lasted the first half of the February 1946.

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Here’s the verso of the photo, in the case you read Spanish.

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For more context of 1946 NYC, click here for a set of Todd Webb  photos.  If you have time for the 13-minute video at the end of that link, it’s well-worth it also, especially for the quote attributed to O. Henry . . . calling NYC “Baghdad on the subway,” which has a whole different set of connotations in 2015 as in O. Henry’s day.

Click here for more 1946 sixth boro photos by Andreas Feininger.

And since we’re stuck in 1946 for now, check out this Life article with drawings about a 1946 proposal to build a “first-world” airport (my quotes) along Manhattan’s west side covering 9th Avenue to the water and between 24th and 71st!

 

This is partly inspired by the first 18 posts of this series and partly by the Apple ad campaign called “shot on iPhone 6.”  I have an older iPhone, but if you ever get a message from me, you’ll see a note “sent by talking drum” instead of the default advertisement.  OK, I’m contrarian.  But all the shots in this post have been taken by my talking drum, and therefore of a different quality.

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I need to carry a mini tripod for the talking drum (TD) camera . . . in lower light, although

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this one is crisp.

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I certainly need a tripod for a “pano” shot.

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Sometimes you get a pano via composition.

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A TD cam IS handy when you find yourself facing a once-in-a-lifetime perspective.

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This bus has fascinated me for the past two weeks, so today, having carved out time to stop, I chatted with the owner . . . my age, who had the bus painted by graffiti artists in honor of his late son.  When the weather chills, he will cast off his lines and head south.

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Final shot for this beautiful day . . . everyone takes these, an autofoto or a narcis  . .  read the comments.

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All these reps by Will Van Dorp.

Wow!  When I typed “wall” into the search window, I came up with this somewhat silly post from 2007!  But one of the photos shows Barents Sea when I first saw her in the sixth boro.

What I was thinking with the word “wall” today is that the hull of a vessel walls out any info about the crew, the cargo, the human climate on board!  By looking at  this image of a section of the hull, you can tell what it carries, where it came from, its age .  .  I could go on.  Actually, all those patches notwithstanding, the vessel is four years old.  Anyhow, my point is

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two thirds of the planet is inhabited by “worlds” walled off like this and more often moving throughout the latitudes and longitudes and climate zones and political regions and hot spots . . . .

and if you missed Ian Urbina’s articles recently in the NYTimes called “The Outlaw Ocean,”  check them out and the comments here.   I’m still stuffed with the food for thought presented there.

Photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was the first in the series.  That one ended on a “back-to-work” note.

This one . . . probably will not have a happy ending, unless of course you’re a fish looking for structure or a diver wanting to explore.  Here’s a view of the vessel pre-sixth boro days. And here’s the last time I saw her run.   Call Barents Sea high . . . and potentially wetter and wetter.

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Have a look while you can.

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When she gets reefed, I’d love photos.

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Thanks to Birk, here’s her history.

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Click here for a guide to fishing and diving on New Jersey reefs.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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