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Yesterday was National Maritime Day.  At the edges of the Upper Bay, people associated with the maritime industries gather for a memorial.

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at Marisol Escobar’s American Merchant Mariners’ Memorial statue.

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Two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro–Fort Schuyler and Kings Point, named for two area maritime academies–stood off.

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Service and sacrifice were honored.

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Prayers and

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other words were offered by SCI’s Rev. David Rider and Marad’s Paul “Chip” Jaenichen.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first time I used this title.

America II looked resplendent bathed in a last burst of late afternoon sun yesterday.

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She was one of several sail vessels out;  here Pioneer seems headed over to a new loading point.

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On a meteorologically different afternoon a few weeks ago, I caught Lettie G. Howard out headed for the Kills. Here was another spring when I caught Lettie under very bare poles.

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I saw Topaz briefly only once, so far away she was only a tall mast, but Claude Scales caught this from his daily vantage point.  Click here for a close-up of Nantucket WLV-612 from three years ago.

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No words . . . no gilding the lily!

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Pioneer heads back to the dock.

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Anyone know where Mary E is sailing from these days?

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Thanks to Claude Scales for use of his Topaz photo.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who has used the title “autumn sail” much more frequently.  And if you have not yet read my article about sailing to Cuba last winter, you can read it here.

I considered calling this “random vessels,” since I haven’t used that title in a while, but here is a tighter focus for a few days:  tugboats.  Here I also randomize the backgrounds and seek out some vessels infrequently seen.  Like the rare and exotic  Shelby Rose and

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Jay Michael and Vicki M and

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Patricia with her racing stripes up against the gantry arms.

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Wye River and James E. Brown here cross the south end of Newark Bay, where

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Sandmaster has been tied up for (?) nearly a year now.

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Sassafras did a circle in Erie Basin recently, and

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Thomas, the Weeks tug, strode into town, picked up a barge and headed straight for Texas!  The first time I saw Thomas was January 2009.  Remember what memorable event splashed into the Hudson around the middle of that month?

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Buchanan 12 here is light and seen from almost her prop wash.  I hadn’t noticed the Boston registry before.

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Quantico Creek stays local a lot, but Severn I don’t see much.

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Here’s Tangier Island behind . .  yes, Gerardi’s Farmers Market. 

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OK . . . that’s it for today.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More random tugs tomorrow.

 

For context, let’s look back here. And last year among some of the great photos shared by Harry Thompson, here (scroll) was a crowded harbor photo I really liked.

Last Saturday saw threatening weather; even so, lots of small boats and crowds braved the possibility of rain to see the races.

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Vigilance prevailed and I heard of no incidents.

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And yes, I paid a lot of attention to the Bath Maine-built 1906 Mary E, but that’s because I haven’t seen her in 9 years . . . obviously I was looking in the wrong places.  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mary E in Greenport almost 9 years ago.

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Harvey was there.  Scroll here for one of my favorite photos of the 1931 Harvey, cutting through the pack at the 2013 tugboat race.

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The 1885 Pioneer was there. Click here for a sail I did on Pioneer a few years back.

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A raft of small boats clustered yet kept orderly.

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The 1935 Enticer  . . . well, enticed, spectators as a platform.

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as did a range of people movers. 

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including the 1983 Arabella.

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The captain of the heavyweight out there, the 2014 Eric McAllister, treaded lightly through the crowd.

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Of course, out in the mist along the Jersey side there are more heavyweights, a Moran tug and its huge NCL gem.

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And as for my ride, Monday morning it was earning money going for a load of scrap.

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Another tall old ship that might have been present–the 1928 Bivalve NJ-based A. J. Meerwald had other missions to perform.

All photos by will Van Dorp.  And for photos of some of the people on the boro who were working during the race, check out NYMediaBoat’s blog post.

 

 

Each year around this time, SUNY Maritime cadets go to sea.  Click here for photos from last year’s departure and here, for ports throughout the summer.  You can track the vessel here.

Here was a clue that a ship was headed this way.

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The next three photos here come from Roger Munoz, high atop the 74th St ConEd plant.

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That’s Roosevelt Island on the other side, at the southern tip of which i waited.

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Here the training ship passes under the 59th Street Bridge,

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and past the Empire State Building . . .

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escorted by a fireboat and

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two McAllister tugboats.

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Some of the cadets who made this journey last summer are already employed as professional mariners today.  And somewhat related, any guesses how long ago this particular T/S Empire State, the VI,  was launched?  Click here for info on her former life.   To see some dramatic shots of the knife edge cutting through the middle of the Atlantic, click here.  If you’re impatient, jump ahead to the 3-minute mark.

Thanks much to Roger Munoz, a SUNY grad,  for the three photos from high atop the East River.

And here is a time lapse gif of ES VI passing, thanks to Rand Miller.

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I could not make the Sunday heats, so here are two more of my photos of the British entry showing how these boats perform . . .

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above the surface with most of the hull.  Approaching shore requires caution . . . but thanks to Frank Hanavan, here is a set of photos showing what happened along the Jersey shoreside, Morris Canalside . . . on Sunday.  The New York race over,

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one by one the boats were hooked and

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lifted above and beyond the watery confines,

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lowered carefully for a landing

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in the parking lot at Liberty Landing Marina, and

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disassembled,

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prepped for the road, and

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loaded into the containers that will likely travel beyond the sixth boro along I-80 and I-90 into Chicago for events starting June 10.  

For these bright Sunday photos, many thanks to Frank Hanavan, whose website here shows what he spends most of his time engaged in.

More photos from the event soon.

Whenever I see something new, it feels like a sunny day, no matter what the meteorologist calls it.  Like this day last week, I was hunkering down keeping these spots from messing with my lens . . .

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It took some seconds to conclude I’d seen this vessel before, (scroll) here and here. It’s the 1953 Sea Dart II, originally T-513.

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I’d love to see her Buda engine, at least not that I know the engine, although my father’s old Allis Chalmers tractors might have had one.

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Anyhow, hat’s off Troop 228.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to be seeing sea darts of another sort today.

Please read the El Faro Relief event notice at the end of this post.  TODAY is the deadline to sign up.

It’s rained most of this week and last . . . and the forecast is the same for next week, but that just means sheltering (and wiping) the lens of the camera, as needed.    I wonder if John Huibers knows something we need to pay attention to . . .  but that’s another story.

For now, I noticed a lot of Reinauer boats the other day, like  . . . the 1971 Matton-built Zachery Reinauer,

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interrupted by the 1960 Blount-built Eric R. Thornton with the best logo in the sixth boro,

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the 1984 Rayco Ship and Main Ironworks Franklin Reinauer,

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the 1983 Cenac Shipyard-built Stephen B,

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the 1967 Main Iron Works Jill Reinauer,

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the 1966 Allied Shipyard Brian Nicholas,

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1973 Jakobson Lucy Reinauer,

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the 2010 G and S Marine Incorporated Crystal Cutler,

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the 2011 Senesco Reinauer Twins.

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and the 1978 Eastern Dawn, though I know not the builder.  And it appears to the the 1947 Harbor II alongside, though I noticed that almost too late.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been evading raindrops.

Anyone have more info on the previous Lucy Reinauer, the 1943 Odenbach Shipbuilding M/T?  Birk has this photo, but I’d love to see some more and to know what became of her.

And here’s a note from the organizers of the El Faro fundraiser event:  “On Sunday,  May 15th from 12-2 at Club Macanudo we will be holding a fundraiser for the families affected by the loss of the El Faro. All proceeds will go to the Seamen’s Church Institute El Faro Relief Fund. Pricing is $75.00 per person with Beer and Wine being served. Email me at Goodwindmaritime@hotmail.com. Please see the attached flier (the link in the first sentence above).
Please send your checks as soon as possible.   Make the checks out to Good Wind Maritime Services and mail to Good Wind Maritime Services 14451 25th Drive, Flushing, NY 11354″

This is a singular image, a 1969 tugboat in a century-and-a-half-old graving dock in Brooklyn.  Some of you maybe saw it on FB, but not everybody wades in FB waters.  What makes this photo so powerful to me is such a combination of composition, subject matter, and light that different people will look at this and see not all the same things.  Some might see beauty, and others defeat . . . or power, or fatigue, expense, challenge . . . .  It strikes me as not unlike this Mark Twain passage on conflicting ways of seeing a river.  And I’ll stop myself here.

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Click here for a favorite I took of the 1969 YTB-803 Nanticoke, now Robert E. McAllister.

Thanks again to Donald Edwards for permission to use this exquisite photo.

And while we’re on a Mark Twain morning, at the end of this post is a clue to my summer/fall employment.

I’ve done posts about the East River, like these, and I’ve done a post at least about canyons, but it’s never struck me as vividly as right now how much this part of the East River is like a canyon.  These too are images of the varied sixth boro.

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HMS Liberty pushes east past the cliffs before entering the terrifyingly-named Hell Gate.  Click here for the youtube video that periodically surfaces about a barge grounding in Hell Gate and then skillfully extricated.  Here and here are some discussions of that name . . . originally “beautiful opening.”

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Sea Lion pushes a recycling barge up toward the Bronx River, I think, with

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Dorothy J alongside, until

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she makes the turn in the direction of the Harlem River, where the E. 91st marine transfer station–I think–is being built.  It’s been a long time since I’ve walked around up there.

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And finally . . . it’s Mister T pushing scows eastbound and under the 59th Street Bridge.  And the aerial tramway to  . . . the sixth boro’s ski slopes?   Here’s the website for the operator . . . Leitner-Poma.    But I digress.

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At the right times of tide, the waterway between Roosevelt Island and Manhattan Island move a lot of cargo.

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All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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