You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Overcast midwinter light has its own beauty.

And here in that beauty, Linda L. Miller eases alongside the sulfurous yellow color of this Stolt tanker. 

Minimal gear or not, the approach is the same. 

The crew makes fast. 

Work can begin.  

I’m not sure what the job was. 

All photos, WVD, who’s currently heading north.

 

Cape Canaveral passed me the other day, and it seemed something had changed . . .

Had I previously seen this green/blue symbol, like a flame or a drop?  I suspect it may refer to dual fuel capability or aspiration.  Is this a single boat symbol or the unveiling of a new part of the Kirby logo?

It was not there on this photo of this boat in 2021.

And recently when a fleetmate transited the KVK, it was not on that boat . . . 

 

on either side. 

 

Something to keep track of, I guess. 

All photos, WVD, who has the luxury of not playing in the sea smoke out there today. 

In May 2019, I caught one of the Kirby Capes arrive for the very first time, passing the original Cape at the east end of the KVK here.  My first view of the third Cape, sans that green/blue flame or drop symbol was here in March 2020. 

Unrelated:  Half a decade ago i spent this weekend in Quebec City to see the sporting event of the year . . . ice canoe racing.  It was a mere -8, v. a -30 today.  See my posts from the Saint Lawrence here

These small craft operate all year round in the sixth boro.  

I’ve seen at least two Clean Harbors boats in the harbor, 32 and maybe . . . 33. But the company is hardly local.  I once saw one of their trucks on the NY Thruway west of Syracuse.  Click here for the history of this Massachusetts headquartered business.  

 

Evidenced by the unique Donjon blue, Sea Explorer is one of the sixth boro company’s survey boats. Of course, Donjon certainly doesn’t operate only locally either.

Here the small boat was eastbound in the direction of the Sound. 

Miller’s Launch has a lot of boats, including a handful of launch boats like Nicholas Miller here. 

Axopar is a relatively new Finnish boat manufacturer.  These don’t appear to be work boats like all the others here, but they are certainly workboat design inspired.

Here are two 

separate boats I’ve seen in the boro of late. 

Maybe a reader can comment further about these boats

The first Axopar I saw half a decade ago on the Erie Canal . . . the last one here

NJ State Police has quite a fleet, but their website has not been updated to reflect the vessel below. 

Rounding out this post . . . this Billion Oyster project boat was round the Battery the other day. 

For more on the reefs restored in the sixth boro, click here. In. a few years, might the program be renamed the Trillion Oyster project?  Wasn’t it originally called the “million oyster” project?

All photos, WVD. 

 

Thanks to Justin Zizes for correcting an error about this.  The current claim to the “newest hull” goes to a NYC DEP vessel.

But it’s not Red Hook, which has been in the sixth boro almost exactly 14 years already, as evidenced here.

Nor is it the class of low slung sludge tankers, which have been here almost a decade.

Here was an article I did on these back then.  Nor was it HSV Osprey or Oyster Catcher. . . .

Here it is . . . meet HSV Piping Plover.  The HSV expands to harbor survey vessel, which in this case is a floating lab to test water quality.  

Thanks to Justin for reminding me of this vessel’s recent arrival.  Thanks to Gregory Hanchrow for the photo above.  Gregory writes: “The Harbor Survey Vessel (HSV) PIPING PLOVER just arrived ]mid-January to NYC after delivery on its own bottom by the shipyard who built it (Aluma Marine Corp), eight days portal to portal from Harvey, LA to NYC.  This boat was intended to be a replacement for the current HSV OSPREY, which has been in service since 1993 (Gladding Hearn). But, as fate would have it, we wound up needing to re-power and perform substantial structural work to the hull over the past three years ,resulting in a pretty much renewed boat.  Bottom line is we now have will continue to operate two HSVs so you’ll be seeing them buzzing around for a while!”

Thanks for the updates.

February 2013 saw Patrick Sky still working in the boro. 

The walkway still flanked the west side of the Bayonne Bridge, which allowed images like the ones that follow. Sun Right and Suez Canal Bridge were regulars. Since then the 1993 Sun Right has been scrapped.  The 2002 Suez Canal Bridge continues to work under the name Suez Canal.   Container capacity for the two vessels comes in at 2205 and 5610, respectively. 

Winter 2013 saw these pipelines getting staged and buried across Bergen Point.  I believe they were these for natural gas, somewhat controversial at the time.  If so, it’s interesting to note the message here on “natural gas” compared with a shift in attitude that seems to be gaining traction.

It was the view of vessels rounding Bergen Point in the morning light I enjoyed the most back then. 

Let’s follow Sun Right around, here assisted by Ellen McAllister and Marjorie B. McAllister. Out below, that’s Shooters Island, Port Ivory, and Elizabethport in the distance.

 

The benefit of the lower bridge was 

proximity to the vessel and 

crew.  Obviously, that proximity was also its drawback; the global fleet increased in size and air draft with the obvious impediment to container ship traffic in the boro.  

I recall the crew below seemed eager to have their photos taken.  I wonder where these guys are, a decade on.   See the whole series differently here

All photos in early February 2013. 

I’d never gotten a photo of CMA CGM Marco Polo, although I know she looked very much like CMA CGM Alexander von Humboldt, seen below and here in a photo from about a year ago. 

I was intrigued when I learned that Marco had gotten a nose job, had a “windshield” added to streamline the vessel and thereby reduce fuel consumption.   That intrigue was boosted when I saw the speed she was making between Halifax and the sixth boro this past weekend.   I even checked my friend Mac MacKay’s site, which sometimes features vessels either before or after they appear in the our watery boro. No nothing.  

Behold, westbound on the ConHook Range . . .  CMA CGM Marco Polo, 2.0.  I had thought maybe a modern iteration of a whaleback like here

This was all of that, but with wings as well.  I’m thinking of inspiration from a winged snow plow, the real utilitarian deal or the Mark di Suvero glorification.

The curved metal work had hints of Richard Serra or Alexander Calder

Correct me if I’m wrong, but it seems the concept here really is the same as an air dam incorporated into semi-truck design.  I recall how odd I thought this looked when they were first introduced.   Now they are standard for long haul trucks. 

 

It will be interesting to see if and how this design change takes hold.

Marco is over a decade at work, in case you’re wondering, and even if the “windshield” (or maybe “air plow” might be a better name) provides a 2% fuel cost savings, in the course of a year sailing, that would be a big sum.  Anyone know average daily fuel consumption of a vessel this size under way?

All photos, WVD. 

 

Call this a continuation of yesterday’s post, but this is a model bow set . . . . Given all the features that could be discussed, focus on these for oldest/newest, smallest/largest, and least/most horsepower.  Also, one of these does not fit with the others, although all are tugboats. 

Douglas J

Doris Moran

Philadelphia

Again, identify the oldest/newest, smallest/largest, and least/most horsepower.

James William  Here she appears to be towing a mooring into Erie Basin Brooklyn

Millie B and Louis C.  These two certainly do not fit in with this post, but  . . . I’m posting this photo anyhow.  Previously, Millie B has appeared hereLouis C has appeared here. I hope you’re getting ready with your answers. 

Rowan M McAllister

Adeline Marie

All photos and any errors, WVD.   All info here thanks to Birk Thomas’ invaluable tugboatinformation.

Ready?  No cheating.

Just guesses.

Answers?

Oldest is Rowan M, and newest is Philadelphia. 1981 and 2017.

Smallest considering both length and beam is James William, and longest is Doris Moran although Douglas J is the beamiest. Lengths are 77′ and 118′.  

Least horses is James William, and most is Douglas J.  They range from 2800 hp to 4800 hp.

Besides Millie B, the outlier is James William because she has a push-knee bow–rather than a model bow.  Also, she’s the only triple screw here. 

Call this the push knee set.  And let’s do it this way . . . given all the features that could be discussed, focus of these for oldest/newest, smallest/largest, and least/most horsepower.

CMT Pike.  An aside about CMT Pike is that she was not built with a retractable wheelhouse.  When launched, she had a fixed wheelhouse, the “stalk” of which can be seen directly behind where the raised wheelhouse is now.  I’ve not been able to find a photo of her in that original configuration. 

Shiloh Amon aka Jillian Irene

 

Lightning

Discovery Coast

Miss Madeline

And finally, a photo from January 2013 and showing one that has been sold out of the sixth boro . . . Herbert P. Brake. 

Have you written down your final decisions?

All photos, WVD.  All info here thanks to Birk Thomas’ invaluable tugboatinformation

Ready?  No cheating.

Just guesses.

Oldest is Miss Madeline, and newest is Shiloh aka Jillian Irene. 1976 and 2022.

Smallest considering both length and beam is Herbert P. Brake, and longest is Discovery Coast although both Discovery and Jillian tie at 34′ for beam. Lengths are 60′ and 96′.

Least horses is Brake, and most is Discovery.  They range from 375 hp to 3000 hp.

Kimberly headed out on a mission, as 

did Mary.

They converged alongside Bow Chain, 

where crew mustered. 

As daylight opened between Bow Chain and the dock, 

Kimberly moved to the opposite side

and with guidance

Bow Chain moved slightly forward and toward port and 

 

rotated counterclockwise

with Kimberly helping the bow around while

Mary pushed the stern. 

Pilot and crew directed from the bridge wing

and once sailed, Bow Chain began a voyage to the Gulf of Mexico. 

All photos, WVD. 

 

A couple days ago in the 77 Days post (which I’ve since learned added up to 79 days) I saw a mariner I know on the boro on a Maersk container vessel.

Most of the time though I don’t know the folks I see working on the water.  The folks in yellow and orange coats below are likely longshoremen mustering before ruunning in and driving all the vehicles out that are to be discharged here . . .  in the sixth boro.  

Note the mariners below preparing the messenger line down to the tugboat. 

The deckhand retrieves it, makes it to the tugboat, signals, 

and the ONE crew move forward to standby at the forward mooring area. 

Meanwhile, the deckhand secures the line. 

All photos, WVD.

Hat tip to the people out on the boro in all kinds of weather. 

 

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