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Who else greeted Wavertree on the rest of the way home?  John J. Harvey is always in on celebrations.

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Lettie G. Howard was there,

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as was the helicopter.  Feehan presented herself on the far side of Rae.

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Pioneer accounted for

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herself with crew in the crosstrees.

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Pioneer and Lettie teamed up at times.

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Wire showed up.

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New York Harbor School had two boats there, including Privateer and their

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newest vessel Virginia Maitland Sachs, about which I’ll post soon.

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Melvillian throngs came down to the “extremest limit of land” on Pier 15 and 16, for one reason or another, but who were about to be treated to some excellent ship handling.

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Rae took the lead, showing the need for tugboats of all sizes.

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The larger tugs pushed and pulled as needed to ease into the slip

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until all lines were fast and

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and the shoreside work needed doing.

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Bravo to all involved.  If you want to take part in a toast to Wavertree, you can buy tickets here for the September 29 evening.

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If you haven’t read the NYTimes article by James Barron yet, click here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes I left no one out and who as before is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

Often folks ask how one can learn about the harbor or is there a book about the sixth boro.  Volunteering at South Street Seaport Museum is a great way available to all to get access to the water, to learn from like-minded folks, and to start on a journey of reading the harbor and its traffic for yourself.  Each volunteer’s journey will be unique, and willing hands make institutions like this museum survive and thrive.

Almost exactly 16 months ago, Wavertree left Pier 16 for a lot of work at Caddell Dry Dock.    Here was my set of photos from that day, and here,  subsequent ones at several month intervals.  Yesterday she made way, back to Pier 16.

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Here’s looking back west.  Compare the photo below with the third one here to see how much work has been accomplished on the Bayonne Bridge during the same 16 months.

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Yesterday, Rae helped, as did

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Dorothy J and Robert IV.

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The combined age of Rae, Robert IV, and Dorothy J is 139 years, whereas the beautifully restored flagship they escorted in is 131 years old.

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And as the tow approached the Statue, John J. Harvey joined in.

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These photos all by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to the South Street Seaport Museum and the photographers’ boat provided by US Merchant Marine Academy and crewed by a set of dedicated cadets.

For some interesting history on Wavertree and info on a fundraiser on board on September 29, 2016, click here.  For the story of how Wavertree came from Argentina to New York, read Peter & Norma Stanford’s A Dream of Tall Ships, which I reviewed here some time ago.

More photos of the return tomorrow.

Given the glorious sunshine, the transition from summer to fall begs another series.  Let’s start with Maule, 

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2/3s of her escort, and

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a fraction of her crew.

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Following in Maule‘s wake, Helsinki Bridge arrives, here with half its escort.

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McKinley Sea traverses the Upper Bay and passes

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UBC Mobile.

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In the harbor was Cordula Jacob and Seastar, as seen from two angles.

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with some ferries and a Miller’s Launch crew boat.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Miss Lizzy work the AK and in the

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KVK, for the last day, there are two glorious ships with bright futures . . .

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Today’s a good day to return to this series I had going for a few years and now return to.  More Chrononauts in the next few days…

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But first, this vessel bringing in my favorite celebratory drink.

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The fabulous September weather has allowed this project to rush to completion.  Remember, tomorrow

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in early afternoon she goes on a towline back to South Street Seaport through a portion of the sixth boro of this city made great thanks to shipping work and capital.  You can watch from along the KVK, from the Battery, or from South Street Seaport Museum.

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The name paint is on the list of about a thousand “last” things to do before departure.

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Also, enjoying the spectacular equinox weather, the crewman who becomes almost invisible in the bow

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of this 1100′ box ship,  

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tethered to James D. Moran.

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More on Peking as she gets prepared for her home-going.  Doesn’t this look like a shipyard for the ages?

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

Chrononauts here now refers to us, looking at photos from the past.  This summer, in one of my Great Lakes ports, i bought first two prints, then the whole album of over 50 prints, all taken in the sixth boro between the 1930s and the 1950s.  So let’s start with this one, taken in either 1948 or 1949,

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Willard A. Holbrook. 

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How about this one, and you can find the overlap:   S.S. Normandie (1932 –1941), Alice M. Moran (1925–1953), and New York Central Grain Elevator Pier 7 Weehawken  (1884–1962).

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I’d love to learn more about either of these photos.  They are stamped on the back as Gmelin, probably the photographer.

 

 

Of all the project boats, converting work boats into yachts, few get completed to the degree this one has.

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I took these photos last weekend in a cove just off a major portion of the sixth boro, thanks to a tip from MM & MM.

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M. V. Santandrea keeps some elite company, its humble beginnings notwithstanding.  Click here to see her working lines usually submerged.  Now here’s the most important link . . . to see what she looks like inside, thanks to MM.  I have not found photos of her as she looked in 1961.

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Converting a workboat to a yacht seems a common dream and sometimes succeeds, as in the 255′ salvage tug later called Lone Ranger, now called Sea Ranger.  Another success would be the 193′ Sea Wolf, former sister of pilots’ mothership Elbe.   Then there’s the sixth boro’s own Yemitzis.  And there’s Wendy B, which was 1940 built in Owen Sound, ON,  and which generated lots of interest at the 2012 TBRound Up.

 

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There’s no mistaking that rigging.

 

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Meanwhile, Santandrea . . . she’s a beauty.

PS:  Does anyone have updates and/or photos to share of Sea Monster, formerly of Narragansett Bay and once being worked on in Mamaroneck?

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, and thanks again to MM & MM.

 

July 13 saw my first sighting of this intrepid anachronism, here juxtaposed with a 21st century realm of Logi.

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She was then probing the inland seas, seeing how far she could voyage, possibly looking for a passage to the Mississippi and the Gulf via Lake Michigan.  OK, indulge me on that speculation.

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Our paths next crossed on September 1, as she made her way through the Erie Canal,

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with all the modifications that entailed and the use of sunstones to

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avoid getting lost in the meandering rivers.

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And late last week, Bjoern Kils of the New York Media Boat got this fabulous shot of her scoping out the sixth boro before

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she slipped into a Manhattan cove for a spell.

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I missed the display in the Winter Garden and hope I can get there again before the boat moves on.

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Many thanks to Bjoern for use of that photo. For more of Bjoern’s photos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And following up on some info from Conrad Milster, here’s a video on a Viking ship that traveled to Chicago in 1893.  Yes, 1893!!   And the crossing from Bergen NO to New Haven CT with Captain Magnus Andersen and 11 crew took 30 days.  Then the vessel, dubbed Viking, traveled up the Hudson and through the pre-Barge Canal on its way to Chicago with stops in Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Cleveland.  The vessel is still there in Geneva IL.  Here’s another video on the ship.

To pick up on the NY canals’ connection, as we approach the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal, it would be great to seek out and archive any photos–still languishing in local photo troves–of the 1893 passage there of Viking, as well as of any other outstanding vessels that have traversed the Canal throughout its history.

And since my focus these days is on chrononauts, there is this fleet that comes through the sixth boro every few years.  I caught up with them in Newburgh in 2012 and Oswego in 2014.

 

 

I have more Saint Lawrence posts, but with a chrononautical weekend behind us, let me digress and report.  The mood for the first ship was set by the weather;  see what the mist did to my favorite downtown building–70 Pine.  Click here and be treated to a slideshow of views through time of boro Manhattan’s  tall observation cliffs, past present and future.

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Looking eastbound up the East River, I saw her waiting, as

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first one of her entourage arrived and

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and then another.

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The term “haze gray” was certainly demonstrated yesterday,

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as was the vintage of this Liberty ship headed to sea, for a cruise.

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Even the Higgins T-boat in the distance is a whole decade closer to the present–in inception– than Brown, although  yesterday all crowded into 2016.

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It was a moving sight,

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which I beheld,

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only slightly regretting I was not aboard.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Know this New York NY boat?

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How about this one?

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Know this background?

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The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

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I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

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It’s Pegasus and

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Charles A and

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Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

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OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

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And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

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Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Ten days ago I put up a post about multiple load lines on a Torm tanker, and I appreciate that many of you weighed in here and on FB.

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Here’s an explanation of load lines I found online.

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When I saw another Torm tanker leaving today, I thought I’d check.

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And sure enough, this one too had three sets of load lines, although I understand that only the one painted is the valid one.

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Neches dates from 2000, and Mary from 2002.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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