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Notice a few cranes near the TZ Bridge,  as seen from MetroNorth train.  Click here for the project website including cameras.

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A passenger in my car took the next two.

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The one above and the next three were taken from a southbound boat.

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Here’s a link to info mostly on the existing TZ Bridge.  Here’s a link to the old borough of Tappan.

And here’s the news in this post . . . December 22 Left Coast Lifter (LCL) finally departed San Francisco Bay bound for the Hudson River.  Here‘s video of the towed  LCL departing SFB.

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Will it be renamed TZ Lifter?  .  Towing it were Lauren and Iver Foss.    And before it reaches the Panama Canal, no doubt Miss Lis (scroll thru) will arrive in the sixth boro with its TZ barge.

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Click here for an article in the Journal News about the crane.   And from May 2013 San Jose Mercury News, more info . . . including a line that says New yorkers are free to rename the crane/barge.

Many thanks to my friend David Hindin for coordinating the SF views.   Join me in wishing David a prosperous 2014.

You know the colors and organization, but can you name the vessel?  And as to the organization, do you know all the foreign countries where they operate?  I didn’t. 

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Anyhow, all these fotos come from Oregon compliments of Michael Bogoger of Doryman fame.  Actual photographer is Jamie Orr of Bristol Channel cutter Baggywrinkle, returning from sea.

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The vessel is USACE dredge Yaquina, here at the entrance to its namesake river.

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Michael’s searched tirelessly for this dredge ever since last October, when I posted these fotos of McFarland.  That post also generated this impressive list of USACE vessels from the esteemed Harold Tartell . . . a veritable encyclopedia of USACE newbuilds from 1855 until 2012 . . . including the 1981 Yaquina.

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Previously, the latest dredge in a distant location I’ve been looking at was Xin Hai Liu, in Rio.

For these fotos, many thanks to Michael and Jamie.

There was a time when I was a boy . . . I thought that hydrofoils would dominate the future.  They didn’t.  My question is:  does anyone recall a hydrofoil operating in the waters around greater NYC?  This just in from a jolly tar, a British film clip that alludes to but seems not to show a hydrofoil on Long Island Sound . . .  ??

The foto below taken in heavy rain just east of the Astoria-Megler Bridge–north side–shows the remains of Plainview AGEH-1.   Here’s a video of AGEH-1 under way.

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Here’s a year’s worth of links on hydrofoils.  And some more . . .

Foto by Will Van Dorp.

I’m not confusing the Columbia with Colombia, but here’s what I found when I mistyped, on purpose.  Colombia seems to be getting some new vessels.

But on the Columbia, Sommer S seems to be the most powerful vessel of the Shaver fleet.

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Here’s the land office with Willamette and Columbia at the dock, as well

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as Vancouver and Lassen.

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On the far side of Sommer S are Deschutes and Tidewater’s Betty Lou (1950).  Closeup, it’s Mary B.

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Kathryn B is Bernert Barge Line’s sister to Mary B.

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Click here for Bernert Barge Line’s plea to save the dams that make the Columbia navigable for as far as it is.

Foss recently announced it was withdrawing from the Columbia.  A few days ago, Betsy L, Pacific Escort, and PJ Brix were parked at the dock on the Willamette.

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Betsy L

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Lindy Marie (1952) has unusual house lines.  Note in the background the bow of the black mystery tug to the left and USACE’s Redlinger, maybe the fastest survey vessel on the seven seas.

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This is an escort tug built in 1947 with obsolete technology just because it was effective.

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When Portland II was service, it was operated by Shaver.  Click here for a narrative of its operation and transformation to museum vessel.  Click here for a foto of the vessel Shaver replaced the steam vessel with in 1981.

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Yup, I gotta see the movie.

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Parting shot, it’s part of the Brusco fleet.  Nearer vessel is Sharon Brusco.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Catching up on old business . . . the vintage sixth boro NYC fotos in yesterday’s post come compliments of Seth Tane, currently living in Portland, Oregon but a working resident on New York waters 30 years ago.  Tugster will feature more of those fotos in upcoming posts to illustrate the dramatic change that three decades have brought both on the water and along its margins.

I hope that anyone having similar images of waters and waterfronts will volunteer them into the public domain, either on tugster or on any other site.

Click here for Seth’s site–also linked below to the left–and here for a Portland media review of a show his work participated in recently.

Below is reserve Portland fireboat Campbell, launched 1927.

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The next few fotos show vessels on the only recent rainless day at Swan Island on the Willamette.  In the drydock is USNS John Ericsson T-AO-194, named for the one-time NYC engineer and inventor.

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Nearby were DoD vessels Pacific Collector  (in its third life after launch in 1970) and Pacific Tracker (in its third life after launch in 1965).

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I’d like to know more about this drydock, but it’s clearly built on three re-purposed identical hulls.  I couldn’t identify the tug in the drydock.

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Backing up the channel here is CS Tyco Dependable, a cable ship.

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Later, Dependable was ensconced beside Global Sentinel, another cable ship.   Click here for Tyco’s fleet.

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And here’s a mystery vessel looking for identification . . . at least 130′ long–I think–and just downstream from the St. John’s Bridge.  I saw no name or number anywhere.  Might it be an LT like Bloxom–cover vessel on documentary Graves of Arthur Kill–launched out of West Virginia in 1943 and 44?

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s physically returned from the wet coast.

Many thanks to Fran Van Staalduinen for snapping these fotos, in a snow storm.  Given the foreground, any guesses on the diameter of the props?  identity of the tugboat?

Would you believe more than  12′ each?  They will be spun by 16,320 hp.  Any guesses on their identity?

Not yet launched, it’s Crowley’s Liberty, second in a series of three tugs.  Fran took these fotos through the fence in Anacortes, WA, at  Dakota Creek Industries.

Click here for a series of construction fotos from tugboatinformation.com.

Many thanks to John and Fran Van Staalduinen, whom I’ve known almost all my life.

Harold Tartell asked that I add the following:  “Sister Tug LEGACY Is Out And In Service. The Second Tug In This Series Of Three LEGEND, Is Over 90 Percent Complete, And Is Due Out Very Soon.”  Click here, here, here, and here for more info on the Legacy-class Crowley tugs.”

Thanks, Harold.

On this blog, you’ve seen spinning the king and turning Tabuk, get ready for turning 70, which never looked so good.

That 70 is CVN-70 aka USS Carl Vinson, recently

departing San Diego for points west.  These fotos come compliments of Michael Torres, who just a few weeks back sent spectacular fotos of the return to port of Splendor of the Seas.

The orange numbered tugs make up part of the Edison Chouest fleet.  I believe these tugs make up a small minority of American tugs with forward-mounted azimuthing drives, or ATDs, in this article by Gregory Walsh in Professional Mariner.   

For my mostly east coast eyes, these tugs are a distinctive as Michael’s fotos stunning.  I’ve written about them before here

The names are quite unusual also. 

SDMs 7, 8, 10, and 14 turning CVN 70 . . . that’s unfamiliar

nomenclature for my east coast ears.  I’ve got lots to learn about these, but

for now, I really appreciate getting these shots from Michael.

What’s this?

Many thanks to Michael Torres–Brooklynite transplanted to San Diego–for these fotos of Carnival Splendor returning safely to port yesterday.   The job is escorted into port here by WHEC-722 USCGC Morgenthau.

As it customary . . .  as news of the fire and disabling of the cruise vessel was disseminated, all mention of the rescuing tugs used the generic:  tug, tugs.

So here are some names:  far to near here Harley Marine’s Millennium Dawn and Crowley’s Spartan.

Here are the same, along with Saturn and  Ernest Campbell.

I’m guessing the ones portside are Chihuhua and  Saturn.

So here’s a slightly different version of that lead foto:  SMBC Monterrey, launched in Valencia, Spain a year and a half ago.   SMBC expands to “Servicios Maritimos de Baja California.”

Many thanks to Michael Torres and Mage Bailey.    And thankful for a safe return to port for all.

Related:  See this interview with captain of Millenium Dawn.

More from Seattle:  Leschi and Chief Seattle . . . next to the ferry docks.

Olympic Tug and Barge’s James T. Quigg preparing to bunker Cosco Antwerp.

Over in Bremerton (an hour away by ferry) is USS Vincennes, CG 49, of the 1988 incident.

Bremerton deserves several posts, but for now, here are a line of attack subs (SSNs) slowly processing through the SRP “recycling” program.  671 is Narwhal and 696 is New York City.  Click on the SRP link to identify others here.

DD951 Turner Joy has to be the most significant US naval vessel of the 1960s.

Scenery shot from the ferry ride back to Seattle:  Rainier–2.5 hours away by road– dominates everything.

I wish I’d seen this from close:  this resembles my favorite exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History.  Anyone know the story here?  Two of these headed north from West Seattle.

Western Towing’s Ocean Titan heads south from the Ship Canal and

Andrew Foss assists Sanmar Paragon into the Pier 86 grain terminal.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has so much to see and so little time.

I continue my gallivant in Seattle, seeing through eyes conditioned by time in the sixth boro aka harbor New York.  And again, mostly lists, as I’d rather be moving around than writing here.  Ferry Tacoma (of the largest ferry system in the US, third in the world) carries vehicles as well as people as it approaches the Seattle dock.  That’s the Olympic range in the background.

Those are WAGB-10 and 11 (Polar Star and Polar Sea) over in West Seattle.  I plan to get closer fotos soon.

Seattle is its own complex tapestry, but Alaska is a palpable presence here.

Island Packer does short (or not so short) sea shipping from here to the Aleutians, I believe (1943 built).

Cargill operates this grain terminal at Pier 86.  In the foreground are salmon pens.  Vessel is Genco Thunder, loading grain.  In the distance is bulker Sanmar Paragon.  I enjoyed being close enough to this pier that I could smell the grain as it flowed into the hold.

Closer up.  Check Muckleshoot and Suquamish.

Rainier, more than 50 miles away,  dominates Seattle.

At Pier 91, catcher-processor Northern Hawk emerges from transfer

of ownership.

In the Lake Washington Ship Canal, a crewman of crabber Lilli Ann–in response to my question–said they were “headed for Dutch” a bit less than a week away.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for any and all errors in this info.  As a newby gallivanter here, I might conjecture here and there while  trying to get oriented in my limited sojourn.

Unrelated but wonderful, check out Herb Cold is the Sea‘s rendering of a husky-blue-eyed blogger.  Herb . . . wow!  Thank you.  And juxtaposed with Alice–darling Alice–wowwow!!  Alice dear, we are indeed blessed.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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