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George Schneider regularly sends me photos, comments on posts, and shares lots of info on all manner of vessels.   Here was the first installment.  I owe it to him to catch up a bit on his photos.

Including ITB Groton in the post yesterday prompts me to start here, with ITB Moku Pahu.

When the sugar transport out of Hawaii ended almost two years ago, the future of this vessel became uncertain. Click here for more info on Hawaii’s agricultural state.  She’s currently on a run between Greece and Puerto Rico, ETA mid-next week. I’ve  not found a photo of the tug separate from the barge. I was fortunate to catch a photo of another ITB on its own here in 2007 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Falkor, built in Germany in 1981,  is a research vessel operating for the Schmidt Ocean Institute, a recently created (2009) research group funded by tech money.

About the blue-hulled beauty in the background, George writes:  ” the old yacht ACANIA (230142)  was being overhauled.  She was built [for Arthur E. Wheeler]  by Consolidated in Morris Heights New York in 1930, a steel yacht 137 ft overall.  She served in WWII as Q 200 for the Army, then has haunted both coasts under the names DIXONIA, SOUTHERN SEAS, CAMPANIA, WILDCATTER, LIBERTY, AMERICANA, and back to ACANIA.  She came to San Diego in 2016 under that name, and apparently has been in a bag here, undergoing restoration, ever since.  She’s now named MARIE, and her appearance is breathtaking.  I hope to get a better picture of her, but her hull is one big mirror of deep blue paint, with not a single weld or dent line visible, and her superstructure is an equally stunning ivory-colored mirror.  She’s always been classy, but now she has the unreality of modern yachts, which look like a model in a display case, and also has been restored to all possible detail of a 1930’s yacht in appearance.  I promise a better photo if Its ever possible.”

Another research vessel included here is Bold Horizon.

And rounding out this set is Tussler, which started life in 1944 as an Navy tug. George writes:  ”  She seems to follow yacht races and regattas in the Southern California area.  She’s currently owned by Tussler Maritime LLC, but was built by Everett Pacific Shipyard in 1944 for the U. S. Navy as YTL 424.   She worked with them, first as a tug and later as a diving/salvage tender until sold in 1973, at which time she got her current name and was modified into a yacht.”

I always look forward to reading George’s emails, and I thank him here for sharing these photos.

 

Let’s start with two photos thanks to Ashley Hutto, first one from last year.  Remember the HRSG aka “the cyclops” that came down the Hudson?  Tomorrow, another is scheduled to start a journey, then heads for Bridgeport.

Mister Jim above and below as platform, as well as Daisy Mae in the distance, will be involved in the transfer.  By Tuesday late afternoon, the HRSC is scheduled to be at the GW Bridge, and will overnight near the Statue of Liberty before entering the East River and into the Sound.  I’ll miss most of it, since I’ll be in Albany all next week.

No . . . I’m not entering politics.

Another unusual visitor was captured here by Tim Hetrick;  Megan Beyel passes Storm King here, towing a barge upriver.  The photo effectively shows the scale of Storm King.

OSVs like Megan Beyel are quite rare in the Hudson Valley, but they do appear. Four years ago Michael Lawrence spent some time in and out of the sixth boro working on a pipeline project.

Of course, there is a sixth boro quasi-resident OSV . . .  Rana Miller.

 

Rana‘s frequent mission is transporting Yokohamas, used to fender tankers transferring product offshore.

 

And from rubber to rubber, here’s a small USN tug moving rendering barrier around.  This photo comes from George Schneider, who writes, “Your photo (scroll) represents the smallest of them, the 19-footers, [like this one] one towing fender-style booms  (barriers?), but they also work as gate boats for the anti-swimmer booms  (barriers?) mentioned.  As you can see this one is officially designated 19BB0212, but has the local designation BB4.  They adopt some of the jargon from their origins as log broncs  (and scroll to Skillful) and call them “Beaver Boats” to differentiate them from the other boats designed to transport or place the light oil pollution booms.   This one was built by Chuck’s Boat and Drive Company (“C-Bad”) of Longview, WA, who also built 25-foot version for the Navy.  I imagine you’d find them at just about any station where the Navy ties up their ships.  At least 12 of the 19-footers and at least 22 of the 25-footers have been built for the Navy, as well as other designs that begin to look more like conventional pushboats as they grow in size. ”  Thanks much, George.

Finally, thanks to Steve Munoz, another one of these small tugs, this one spotted near the USS Constitution in Charlestown MA.

Many thanks to Ashley, Tim, George, and Steve for the photos and info.  The photos of Rana Miller by Will Van Dorp.

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