You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Vane Brothers’ category.

Norfolk and its estuary constitute a major US seaport, so let’s linger here for this post.  I’ve been there three times, and only once was it clear.

Besides military docks, it has a number of terminals.  for this latter, here‘s a schedule;  Notice it shows CMA CGM Marco Polo arriving here at 1300 on May 23. 

Clayton W. Moran is a 2016 launched 6000 hp tugboat, just a bit newer than the four 6000s in the sixth boro.

Compared with the sixth boro, notice that you see many of the same companies working in Norfolk, and many of the same vessels, including container ships tugboats.  Choptank is a 2006 Louisiana-built Vane 4200 hp boat.

The sixth boro has quite a Norfolk tugs fleet, but I suspect Ellie J, 1968 and 1800 hp, has never called up here.

I can’t tell you much about Dauntless II.

Emily Anne McAllister is a 2003 4650 hp tugboat.

Gold Coast is a 1967 1000 hp tugboat that has worn Dann Marine colors since 2005.

Captain Mac is a Corman Marine Construction tug built in 1980 and rated at 700 hp.

Steven McAllister is one of a dozen or so McAllister converted YTBs.  Built in 1963 and significantly repowered in 2007, she brings 4000 hp to ship assists.  She’s pretty much identical to Ellen McAllister.

Elizabeth Ann is part of the Norfolk Dredging fleet;  she’s from 1982 and is rated at 3000 hp.

Ocean Endeavor is from 1966, 1000 hp, and has left saltwater for Milwaukee, where she’s now Ruth Lucille.

Paradise Creek (1981) once worked in the sixth boro as Caspian Sea and before that (and before my time) was here as Sea Tiger.  Currently, it has been sold out of the Vane fleet and is known as Emmy Lou.

Maxwell Paul Moran is a 6000 hp, likely quite similar to Clayton W above.

All photos, WVD.

 

Not many Bouchard boats are moving these days;  the 2016 Frederick, 125′ x 38 and 6140 hp, is an exception.

I took this just after sunrise for the backlit effect.

The 1961 Caitlin Ann stays busy;  her 2400 hp moves the 79′ x 24′ hull and whatever the load is.

Note equipment of at least three towing companies here.

Cape Henry, 2018, is one of the newer boats in the boro.  Her 109 x 36′ hull is powered with 5000 hp.

 

Matthew Tibbetts was launched the year I finished high school, 1969.  She’s 92′ x 27′ and powered by 2000 hp.

 

Fells Point, 2014, 90′ x 32′, and one of Vane’s many 3000 hp.

 

All photos, WVD.

May Day!  It’s a busy day without access to my archives.  May 2011 . . .  Urger in Lyons NY, waiting for the dry dock to flood.

Back in the sixth boro, it’s Elk River and Siberian Sea…eastbound at Con Hook, and  

near the same location, it’s Lincoln Sea and Eastern Dawn, both westbound.

Greenland Sea . . . also westbound.

Barbara McAllister has long gone from the boro, as have some of the vessels above and below. 

Others, like Eagle Service, have been renamed. 

This Ken’s Marine Service boat I saw once, and I’d still love to know the story and current disposition.  Anyone?

Shelby Rose is still in the boro, but when I last saw her at a dock, her vivid livery was greatly faded.

Gazela is still in Philly.  She arrived here in May 2011 to dock at Atlantic Salt, I believe, in a driving rain.

And in late May, the orange Blue Marlin arrived in town for the longer-than-expected loading process of some boats sold to Nigerian interests. If I recall correctly, that Trumpy (?) yacht is still in the boro.

Happy May Day . . .  smell the flowers, work in the garden, or even dance around the pole today if you are so inclined.  Or, you might choose to adopt the May Day tradition of  University of St. Andrews students in Scotland . . .

All photos from the archives . . .  WVD. 

Here are previous installments, and I’m just observing in this post;  although most vessels I see have intact coatings, others really need a trip to the shipyard for some paint.

The stern of Maersk Columbus was fine, but the bow had some extraordinary streaks of rust.

Cosco Istanbul had some

need of some work generally all over.

Ditto this Zim ship.

The surprise was this tugboat, Choptank,

this time on the stern.

Again . . . just observing and taking these photos, WVD.

 

Here’s what the Upper Bay looks like on an overcast but calm dawn . . . with panamax  Torm Elizabeth being lightened by Josephine and her barge.  The tanker is not quite a year old.  There’s a lot going on in that expanse of protected water:  ferries passing, lots of tug/barge units anchored, Nautical Janine anchored, and who knows how much movement sits beneath those buildings in the distance.

Seamagic is slightly larger and dates from 2006.  She’s taking on bunkers from Kings Point and her barge.

Hafnia Lise has half Seamagic‘s carrying capacity, dates from 2016.  Here she heads out for sea.

I just love some of these names, especially the next ones,  although my all-time favorite is still Surfer Rosa.  Maybe that’s because when I saw it I knew a Rosa who surfed.  Meet Solar Katherine at dawn. She’s also from 2020, like Torm Elizabeth.

Pacific Sarah dates from 2017.

Nautical Janine is two years old.

I wonder if these names– Janine, Sarah, Katherine, etc–have namesakes who know they’ve inspired a vessel name?  I know that can be true of tugboats . . . . because I’ve met actual namesakes.

One more before I hit the road . .   Silver Joan, taking on some fuel.

All photos, WVD.

Mackenzie Rose and Paul Andrew are eastbound, and Mary Turecamo, westbound.

 

A light Haggerty Girls westbound,

passing Laurie Ann Reinauer.

Kimberly Poling moves a barge out of the Kills.

 

A bulker in the anchorage gets bunkered by

Kings Point.  Katya Atk needs to repaint the name on the starboard bow.

And Helen Laraway makes her way east.

 

All photos, WVD.

Janice Ann Reinauer came on line at some point in the past few months, but this is my first viewing light.

She’s bigger and more powerful than the previous boat by that name:  113′ x 35′ v. 82′ x 24′ and 4720 hp v. 2200.

She might be a carbon copy of the 2013 Dean Reinauer, in the distance, although I’m sure upgrades have been built in.

Cape Fear came into service right about the same time as Janice Ann.

She’s one of two of the latest 3000 hp in the Vane fleet;  her twin in Cape May, which I’ve not seen.

Here Cape Fear goes into the notch, alongside Potomac to her starboard side . . . as Jacksonville passes.  Potomac and Jacksonville are 4200 hp boats.

 

All photos, WVD.

The other morning was without wind and busy, so this next “hour” is actually 30 minutes, and these are only a few of the photos I took between 0900 and 0930 of this extraordinary morning from my single vantage point.

A team of Dann Marine tugs leave the dock, framing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer dock.

Vane’s Brooklyn leaves her dock;  notice the Moran barn (red with the white M) and Pegasus at the Metropolitan dock.

Charles D heads to job.

Bulker Maina heads for sea, passing Elandra Blu and

Marjorie comes to retrieve the docking pilot.  Do you see four people in the photo below?  Elandra tankers are based in Latvia.

The calm here is barely broken by MSC Korea.

Brendan waits to retrieve the pilot.  Note the scrubber and its effects on emissions?

Over by IMTT  Glory and Potomac sand by with their barges.

And we’ll leave it here, actual 28 minutes elapsed . . .  name that approaching ship?

All photos, WVD.

Mary Turecamo, 4300 hp ad waiting for a ship at the Narrows, could not look better.  She’s an almost 40-year-old product of Matton Shipyard.  In fact, she was their last product.

Christiana heads out as

Virginia, 1440 hp and launched in 1979,  comes in

from sea, out of the haze.

Christiana was launched in Marinette WI in 2007, a year after Brandywine and a few years after the Molinari class of Staten Island ferries.  She’s married to Double Skin 143, another Marinette vessel.

Barney Turecamo (1995 and 5100)  and  barge Georgia gets rotated by Marie J Turecamo (1968 and 2250). Yesterday I started a re-read of the 1956 book Tug Boat:  The Moran Story, and am finding it very satisfying.

Here’s a dense pack over at the east end of IMTT:  Josephine, Evelyn Cutler, and Cape Lookout:  (2018 and 4560), (1973 and 3900), and (2018 and 5000).

Crystal Cutler arrived here from the shipyard in 2010 and works with 1500 hp.

She’s pushing Patricia Poling

And finally, a light Hunting Creek, 2011 and 3000 hp.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,465 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2021
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31