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It’s been months since I used this title, so let me play some catch-up.

with a RORO and an ULCV.   The RORO RCC Africa is the oldest vessel in this post, launched 2004. Its dimensions are 656′ x 105′ and at this moment it’s heading from the east to the west side of South American via the Magellan Strait. Triton, 2016, is the largest vessel here:  1210′ x 167′ and it’s currently heading for Colon PA.

Wye River is the tug meeting above;  Kirby Moran provides an assist to a tanker below.

Angel Star, 2006,  is the shortest in this post, measuring 590′ x 105′ and it has recently transited the Panama Canal on its way to the Baja California port of La Paz, seen here in a post from three years ago. 

Another ULCV,  Cosco Shipping Orchid, 1200′ x 157′, is the newest vessel here, launched in 2019 and currently making for Busan.   Note the gaggle of Centerlines, once Bouchards.

In closing, two years ago I’d not heard of Wan Hai, or if I had, it made such little impact that I quickly forget the name. Wan Hai 315 dates from 2006, and measures 699′ x 105.’  At this time, she’s headed for the Suez from this departure out of the sixth boro of NYC.

Speaking of names, Wan Hai is as creative with names of ships as trucking fleets are with tractors or I am with series of blog posts.  This one was Wan Hai 315.

All photos and any errors, WVD, who never ceases to be amazed by the range of traffic calling in the sixth boro, often the forgotten boro.

I am way out of the boro again and hoping to leave the bayous in the desired fashion.  So yes, the robots are back on the button, sticks, and levers.  The robots seem to love posts like this, random collections of mostly tugboat traffic,

like Ava escorting MSC Christiana out of the port, while

Timothy follows.  MSC Christiana is currently following the West African coastline, east to west.

Durham must have been working all night and was entering the Kills from the Upper Bay.

Vane’s Brooklyn was eastbound and met

Mister T.

Andrea went to rejoin her barge, and

Jordan looks resplendent in her new livery.

We started with Ava, so she makes the last image as well,

standing by as Mustafa Dayi waits, anchored in a location where container ships rarely do.

All photos, WVD, with posting by the tugster tower robotic team!

 

The Hudson treats the traveler with magical sights like these.  The castle atop the lush riverbank is still there, but that tug–Viking–is no more.  I’m not sure the disposition of DBL 134.

One morning soon after sunrise that summer 2017 I followed Delaware a ways up the Hudson before overtaking her.

Ernest Campbell had started working in the sixth boro by 2018, but its livery has changed since then.

On the last day of June, I took a ride on the Rondout and saw (l to r) Johannsen Girls, Fells Point, and SevernSevern now works in the Pacific Northwest although still for Vane.

Tarpon was working in the boro, but since that time has been sold to interests on the West Coast, although I’m not sure she’s made it there.

In June 2019, I caught Stephen Reinauer heading out the Narrows to rejoin its barge;

North of the border, SLS aka Sheri Lynn S was tied up at a Picton ON dock.

June 2020 one morning, I spotted Kirby Moran meeting ONE Minato, and

Janet D returning to her Elizabethport base.

In June 2021, it’s Charles D passing Adventurer while standing by for an incoming ship.

And finally, Sarah D was eastbound here in the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who may have made some errors here with dates, having had his brain baked in the Louisiana heat.

 

I’m not going to get into the swamp here, and I’m not inviting you too either, but the dispersal of the Bouchard fleet had many tragic subplots and components. Obviously some people have been able to turn these events into gain, and more power to them.

See the two rusty barges facing the camera here?  Those are B. No. 242 and B. No. 210 Also,

notice the color of the tug on the 242.  They might be Morton S. Bouchard IV, the last of the fleet tugboats to have stayed over near Stapleton until fairly recently.  On the 210, I believe that’s Anna Rose.

So yesterday i was sitting chatting with a friend over at St. George and this barge appeared.  “What old ship is that?” she asked.  She takes no notice of water traffic, either on the sixth boro or anywhere else. But I knew the answer immediately. 

B. No. 260 was likely being moved out of its long-term storage near Stapleton and likely to the shipyard for deferred maintenance and much-needed paint.

Nicholas and Liz Vinik were doing the move. 

 

The next time my friend or I see that barge, it might be looking much better.

All photos, yesterday, WVD.

 

Bet you can guess where that line leads from the bow of Kirby Moran?

Here you go.

Jordan Rose has been tied up in Bayonne for a while, but

Gregg McAllister passes her on the way to an assist.

Michael Miller is one of the venerable tugs of the sixth boro,

having worked here since the mid-1960s.

Cape Fear has been here for a few years, although I’ve not yet seen

her two sisters, Cape May and Cape Henry. 

Ava M. is one of the workhorses, certainly. 

Does anyone know when and if Capt. Brian A. will return to service here?

Kimberly Turecamo has worked the harbor consistently for going-on 30 years.

Here she heads into an orange sherbet dawn.

All photos in the past week, WVD., who has more Canal Society archival photos coming but some contemporary posts demonstrate my temporary anchor.  Also coming up, a photographer high above Hell Gate has shared a new trove of photos from a perspective I’ve missed.  Many thanks for your continued interest.

I’m on the road again, so today I’ll share some recent photos on the boro.  Of course, winter is still fishing time in the harbor, as Viking is doing here.

Others are feeding in the boro, like

this guy below . . . closeup of the photo above.

I’m always looking for intriguing things, like this ladder that appears to extend over board from the Miller crewboat.  I couldn’t get a closer shot.

Details always attract me, like these color-coded connection on a tanker, or just

colorful deck machinery maybe for its own sake.

Conversely, this 2008 barge needs some rustbusting and fresh paint.

Now and then a boat I’ve not previously seen in the boro shows up . . . like the 125′ fishing party boat out of Brielle NJ.

How about a tanker with a local name  . . .

or a busy lineup scene?

Of course, the down side of observing is sometimes discovering that you are yourself being observed, folks wondering who would be sitting in the 20-degree weather on a dock of the bay wasting time . . . .  Thx for checking up on me, folks.

All photos, WVD, who comes here to relax.  And speaking of, my travel schedule the next few days may preclude posting.

 

I’ve mentioned before that I’m always looking for novelty.  Here’s one, new to me at least,

the 4400 hp Chincoteague with Double Skin 802.  I’d love to get closer-up pics one of these days.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer, a 7200 hp beauty twenty years almost senior, passes Chincoteague on her way to

rejoin her barge, RTC 135.

Meanwhile Miriam Moran follows in a ship as one of the assists.

Moments earlier, the 1979 3000 hp Miriam had accompanied 1982 4610 hp  Doris Moran to meet the ship.

The 2021 4000 hp Jordan Rose, ex-Evening Star and now in Rose Cay colors, is high and dry alongside Sorenson (?) Miller on the hard at Bayonne Drydock.

The 2008 4200 hp Pocomoke passes the KV buoy, which made soothing noises as it rose and settled in the chop.

The 1999 4500 hp Patrice heads out to meet a ship.

 

And finally, 1999 3600 hp Stephen Dann looked particularly good as she headed out to her next job.

All photos, this week, WVD.

 

Magothy has worked for a decade and a half already, but I caught her on the East River yesterday, first eastbound to pick up barge Double Skin 59, and then

return it westbound through Hell Gate.  I’ve done several dozen posts about names, mostly vessel names, but Hell Gate is certainly one of the mythic names of a section of the sixth boro.  Interestingly, no vessel I know of has been named for this turbulent stretch of the East River.  Magothy itself is a waterway, mostly tidal, that flows into the Chesapeake.  Check out the etymology here.

Magothy pushing a tank barge through Hell Gate was quite the sight.

 

We overtook it

and I got this photo of the Vane unit with the RFK (Triborough) Bridge and the Hell Gate Bridge framing it.

Where we went east of Roosevelt Island, an unusual side to navigate, Magothy took her barge along the west side.  The Lighthouse here is positioned on the split in the channel at the north end of Roosevelt island.  The cupola/lantern of the lighthouse has recently been redone, and it appears some scupture display is just south of it;  maybe it deserves a walk one of these days, along with another visit to Socrates right across that channel.

All photos, WVD, who’s finding that winter chill is a better time for some explorations than summer humidity.

Two separate parties sent me this article from the LA Times.  With a title including the phrase “humble tugboat,”  I was interested but not prepared for the fantastic photos.  Thx John and George.  Enjoy.  Meanwhile, here are some more of my recent photos.

James D. Moran assisting on a towline above and Robert Weeks leaving the fuel dock below,

 

Andrea walled off from her barge above and Sarah Ann light below, 

 

Gregg McAllister returning to base and Pegasus heading to work,

 

A light William Brewster and an equally light Daisy Mae,

 

Mackenzie Rose and Philadelphia, and

to close out this installment . . . Kimberly Turecamo assisting a ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who never associated the adjective “humble” with tugboats or their operators, and that’s not a bad thing.

If you’re new to this blog (or even if you are not), I’m always looking for photos from other people and places, especially, tugboats seen in South America, Asia, Oceania, and Australia.

Let’s have another look at photos in the sixth boro during the first month of 2012.  It was a snowy day that I caught Cheyenne

and Franklin Reinauer. Cheyenne is now in Wisconsin, for sale, and Franklin is still in this boro.

Thomas Dann had a crane barge over alongside New Century.  Thomas Dann had a serious fire off Florida and was scrapped in 2015.  New Century is now Lucky Century, NE  bound near Mauritius and Reunion.

Bohemia assisted Quantico Creek with a bunker barge. Bohemia is on the Delaware River, and Quantico Creek . . . in Tampa.

This scene was so busy I might come back to it in another post.  What I can identify here (l to r) is this:  Maersk Murotsu, Quantico Creek, of course Greenland Sea, Dubai Express, and a Reinauer barge. Dubai Express is currently on its way from the Med to the sixth boro.

Seaboats had already been scooped up by K-Sea in January 2012, which had itself been scooped up by Kirby.  Notice the stacks of the two boats:  the red/black initials have been painted over and a K-Sea oval placed but not painted with the K-Sea logo nor had the stack itself been painted K-Sea “yellow.”  Mediterranean Sea and

Weddell Sea still carried their mostly-green livery, and when painted, we clearly Kirby boats.  Mediterranean Sea has just recently changed hands again and is now Douglas J., a Donjon boat.  

Beaufort Sea was still fully K-Sea, as evidenced by the yellow stack and the K-Sea oval.   She was scrapped around 2016.

Left to right here, it’s Pearl River I and Morton S. Bouchard Jr.  The ship is now Zim Vancouver–just left Norfolk for Spain–and the tug is now Stasinos Boys. 

Ellen McAllister passed the 7 buoy. 

And finally, Penn Maritime began the year as its own company before been acquired by Kirby, and

Penn No. 6 carried that name forward until 2018 when she began what we now know as Vinik No. 6.

All January 2012 photos, WVD, who hopes you enjoy this photographic account of some of the changes in the sixth boro in the past decade.  I have lots of photos of that month, so I could do an installment “C” of that retrospective.   Besides, although there are things I want to see in the boro today, I might have to acclimate to the cold first.  Yesterday after it was 57 degrees here, and this morning . . .  a dramatic 31.

And unrelated, here‘s how the new year was feted in around the world . . .

Also unrelated, this 1953 “tugboat tug” (sic) is still for sale.

 

 

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