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I think of ROROs like Dignity Ace as being fairly large, but this juxtaposition made me re-evaluate.

So let’s let the tape tell its tale:  three vessels here are (l to r) Anthem of the Seas, YM Utmost, and Dignity Ace with respect to their length and breadth; and I realize that the photo does nothing to show loa.  It comes out as 1141′ x 162′  v.  1099′ x 140′ v.  656′ x 106.’

The two Vane tugs are 90′ x 32,’  although I know it’s Fort McHenry alongside Anthem and cannot identify the tug alongside Dignity.

I’m guessing the fishing boat anchored here is about 20′ and

Franklin Reinauer is 81′ x 27.9 . . . .

And since we’re doing numbers . . . from the “globe” atop the “sky arm” to the water . . . that’s 300.’

That puts some perspective on scale of some sixth boro traffic.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s not just mea culpa.  I’ve done it, you have too, most likely.  “What?” you ask?  I’ll get to that.

Foreshortening does make for dramatic photos.  And that looks like a spare prop high up on the port side deck.

Watch out there, Madame Mallard . . .

What would Captain Ahab make of this profile?  Onyx Arrow was in port for less than a half day yesterday, arriving from Halifax and Europe before that.  Early afternoon I got these photos of her leaving town…

So this “we’re all at fault” title in Latin above?   We’ve all hit animals while driving:  birds, bats, other folks’ pets, turtles . . .  I’ve never hit a deer, but over a million are hit on US highways each year . . . .

Here’s what I’m getting at . . . see it on the bulbous bow?  Here’s more info on ship strikes . . .

It’s sad to see . . . like deer along the highway, but mitigation seems not so easy.  I know of a sailboat sailing with no engine running that hit one that may have been asleep on the surface . . .  middle of the night.

The last two photos come thanks to the always alert Tony A;  the others by Will Van Dorp.

 

This leg from New York harbor, aka the sixth boro,  to Narragansett Bay was not proposed in Gallatin’s report, but we have gotten here by means after much time and miles in his ditches. We depart a few hours after dark and head into the

East River under some puffy clouds.

The 1903 Williamsburg Bridge seemed especially iconic this night…

At Hell Gate, we passed Evening Light towing a fuel barge.

Then we headed under the spans between Queens and the Bronx.

I shot once, a look back before getting too far eastward.

At foggy daylight, we passed Patuxent with barge and

some draggers with nets filtering through the Sound.

Block Island dashes ahead of us between Point Judith and its namesake island.

Lights at Point Judith and

Castle Hill guide us in, as they do

other vessels.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The venerable Frances came past to greet me first . . .

Lots of digital ink has been devoted to Frances on this blog.  I even toured her once at the Waterford Tug Roundup.

I watched Potomac and Double Skin 59 made fast alongside Afra Willow as she slowly swung on her hook with the tide change.

Wicomico was outbound with a barge on the wire as

Patapsco had come in

with Double Skin 59 earlier.

And finally, this unidentified truckable tug came in.  When she was way out, I imagined her a sailboat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who really should spend more time at the Narrows.

Coming out of Newark Bay,

Hudson, the newest Vane 4200.

And a bit later, exiting the Arthur Kill past Shooters Island, it’s

Neptune, the former Chevron Snohomish.

 

I’ve not seen Neptune here much, and

here, thanks to Jonathan Steinman, here’s the first I see of Hudson pushing a barge likely toward the mid North Shore of Isle of Long.

All but the last photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Quick.  Name this unit . . . or at least the current and previous operators?

I haven’t seen many Gateway Towing tugs along my usual haunts, but here’s Connecticut.

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Nanticoke, about 10-years-old now, the second of the Patapsco 4200 hp class, pushes a payload enclosed in Doubleskin 305.

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Pacific Reliance, at the dock, is made up to the 650-1, whose capacity is 155,000 bbl.

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So . .  that unit in the top photo is Genesis Vision, formerly Superior Service

pushing GM 6508. Here was a photo of the tug as Superior Service, only four years ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you have not seen it yet, here’s an 18-minute video of the saga of the former Katie G and Colleen McAllister, which I captured the first hours of here as they headed east on the East River on their long journey to western Michigan. Here was my Part 2 of that voyage, with collaboration from colleagues.

Here from eight years ago is Katie G moving petroleum product and remaking a tow right off the Battery.

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

I don’t care that it’s February, but the number of subsequent days with temperatures over 50 degrees in the sixth bor0 tells me it is spring–or has been.

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Notice the difference between Severn and Fort Schuyler?  Here proximity highlights the difference in height of the upper wheelhouse,

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but Severn is of the 4200 hp class and fort Schuyler, the 3000.

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Ah, the line and boom boats.

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Joan is one of the Moran “giraffe” boats and see HR Otter?

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She reminds me of the long gone Odin.

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Here’s a closer-up of the HR Otter, a name that immediately conjures up Kenneth Grahame.

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Some different pairs are possible here, and they’d be the same.

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See the pair there?

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a pair of hands.  Is there a word for the painted design centered on the bow of some vessels, like figureheads but not?

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Hope they clap for mardi gras!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Today’s spotlight’s is Emerald Coast, Long Island, Tangier Island, Sassafras, and Brooklyn . . .

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Hats off–No

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keep hats and gloves on– but bravo to the folks who safely move

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our fuel.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And then it was a sunny but cold day, the coldest so far in the sixth boro.  ut the light was great.

B.Franklin Reinauer headed for the fuel stop,

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followed by a group that included

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Zachery Reinauer,

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Arabian Sea,

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and Doubleskin 40 pushed by a mostly self-effacing Fort McHenry.  

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Later Tarpon raced past, as

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did Mister T and

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Chesapeake moved her barge eastward.

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Out in Gravesend Bay, Ruth M. Reinauer and Linda Lee Bouchard swung on the hook.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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