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If you’ve never hung out at any of the public places on the KVK and you’re interested in tugboats or shipping in general, you are missing something.

The Upper Bay is a busy place also.

M

Faber Park is a great place when it’s open.

You get views of the Bayonne Bridge and the east side of city of Elizabeth from Faber Park.

Shooters Island, once a major shipbuilding site, shows up like a jungle now.   Pres. Theo Roosevelt went there to shake hands with a foreign monarch who had a yacht built on Shooters.

 

Beyond Shooters, major port facilities can be seen.

For the past 22 years, Schuykill has been a Vane Brothers boat.  When I saw the name on AIS, I assumed it was a new Vane boat.

 

 

Welcome to the sixth boro.

All photos in the past week, WVD.

There’s lots of lifting capacity here, but no towing or pushing capacity.

Philadelphia passes the Manhattan skyline solo.

From the west, Justine and Jonathan head for a job.

 

Magothy passes Helen Laraway, Cape Lookout, and Lois Ann L. Moran

There’s a progression here . . .  more tugboats in this photo than in the previous . . .

See the three guys . . .

here?  I wonder who they are.

Yesterday a hearing had been scheduled in US Bankruptcy Court, and I suppose some report on that is forthcoming . . .

All photos, WVD.

 

 

 

Swarming is one thing, but 

in a congested waterway,

riding wakes

to feel the surges

 

 . . .  well I gotta wonder ….

All photos, WVD.

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

James William was slinging along a slew of barges.

Galveston (I think) was coming in the other morning with Chemical Transporter.  Usually Freeport pushes Chemical Transporter, so maybe I’m just misremembering.

With the slash of safety yellow across the barge bow, I was initially confused…

until the green with red trim told me it was definitely . . . Pinuccia

Two Vane 3000s separated by five years of work . . .  team up on getting the barge gently into her berth.

Paul Andrew Brian Nicholas gets watched very closely by the Lady of the sixth boro.

And, Matthew Tibbetts exits the east end of the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who is finally back in the sixth boro . . . for a bit.  I will be doing a lot of inland/coastal traveling the next few months.  All photos of workboats wherever you are are greatly appreciated.

 

First,  the numbers, as Kai Ryssdal would say on NPR’s Marketplace show.  The numbers I’m referring to are the bids on Grouper yesterday. 

At 0600 yesterday, high bid was $150. That lasted until just after noon. By 1300, high bid was $420. More than 60 bids (out of a total of 104) were tendered in the last hour, some fractions of a second apart. Winning bid was $3100. At this point, I know nothing about the winning bidder or that person’s intention.

This will be a summer of many days away from the sixth boro, so I’m very happy when you send in photos. Great Lakes mariner retired (GLMR) sent in a few. Below is a cool pic, in the snow, of John B, for sale for some time now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a skeletal and unidentified fish tug.

Truckertim has sent a few along;  Little Toot has got to be one of the more common names for a small tugboat.  And it fits.

I like the color scheme.

I’d love to know the breadth here.

From Lewis Cobb, here’s one I’ve not seen in the sixth boro . . . Sea Coast, 60′ x 24′ and it has spent 41 years in Dann Marine colors.

 

Miss Judy, 59′ x 23′, works for a dredging company south of Norfolk, I believe.

A fantastic shot of Joker, here with her colors mimicked in the sunset, but who wore those colors better . . . why, Joker, of course. The 79′ x 25′ Joker used to work in the sixth boro–and out of it–as Taurus.

From Jake Van Reenen, up on the New York portion of the Saint Lawrence River, it’s Ruth Lucille, who’s gone into fresh water of the Great Lakes out of Milwaukee after working in salt water as Ocean Endeavor.

If you’ve never visited Clayton, you’re missing something.  It’s a place I could move to.

And let’s end here with tugboat Hudson.  I took this photo on July 3, 2017.  I’m not answering the following question today. Where is Vane’s Hudson today?

Many thanks to all of you who’ve sent photos in.

Let’s end this post with a number Kai Ryssdal might be interested in :  $11,200.

That’s today’s cost of moving a 40-foot shipping container from Shanghai to New York.

 

In case you’re new to this blog,”retro” means I’m looking back to my photo archives exactly 10 years to June 2011.  The “38” here means this is the thirty-eighth month I’ve done this.  It’s a fresh look at June 2011 photos, in some cases informed by whatever the past 10 years has wrought.

Bridge Builder 26 doing what it is named for. 

F. Dawson, 1969, 66′ x 22′ and 1000 hp, in 2011 was working on a bridge project in the Harlem River. I’ve no idea where either of these boats is today.

Patapsco, 2004 and 96′ x  34′ and now known as Steven Wayne, was one of the first Vane boats into the sixth boro.  

Susquehanna is a Patapsco-class tugboat, meaning mostly a clone and three years younger, and still in the Vane fleet.

Marlin (1974, 96′ x 35′, and 4200) and Penn No. 6Marlin‘s now registered in Panama, and the No. 6 is now Vinik No. 6.

Kathleen Turecamo is now buff and green, a Stasinos boat, seen here as Meaghan Marie.

Matthew Tibbetts is still in the sixth boro and at work.

This was the only time I saw Hercules, ex-YTB-766.  In June 2011, it was towed here and then loaded aboard a semi-sub for Nigeria. 

Barents Sea came back to life as Atlantic Enterprise, and is currently working on a salvage/recovery down south.

All photos and memories, WVD.

There will be a mermaid parade later this summerin 2011, it took place on the Saturday closest to the solstice, which would be today.

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

What follows is photos of eleven Vane Brothers tugboats.  Can you identify the four that are 3000 hp;  the others are all 4200 hp.  The difference lies with the height of theupper wheelhouse.

You choices are Susquehanna,

Magothy and Fort McHenry,

 

Cape Fear,

Fells Point,

Choptank,

Fort McHenry again,

Pokomoke,

Hunting Creek,

and again . . .

Patuxent, and

Elizabeth Anne.

All photos, WVD.

The 3000s are Fort McHenry, Fort Schuyler, Fells Point,  Hunting Creek.  The key is the shorter upper wheelhouse stalk.

 

Norfolk and its estuary constitute a major US seaport, so let’s linger here for this post.  I’ve been there three times, and only once was it clear.

Besides military docks, it has a number of terminals.  for this latter, here‘s a schedule;  Notice it shows CMA CGM Marco Polo arriving here at 1300 on May 23. 

Clayton W. Moran is a 2016 launched 6000 hp tugboat, just a bit newer than the four 6000s in the sixth boro.

Compared with the sixth boro, notice that you see many of the same companies working in Norfolk, and many of the same vessels, including container ships tugboats.  Choptank is a 2006 Louisiana-built Vane 4200 hp boat.

The sixth boro has quite a Norfolk tugs fleet, but I suspect Ellie J, 1968 and 1800 hp, has never called up here.

I can’t tell you much about Dauntless II.

Emily Anne McAllister is a 2003 4650 hp tugboat.

Gold Coast is a 1967 1000 hp tugboat that has worn Dann Marine colors since 2005.

Captain Mac is a Corman Marine Construction tug built in 1980 and rated at 700 hp.

Steven McAllister is one of a dozen or so McAllister converted YTBs.  Built in 1963 and significantly repowered in 2007, she brings 4000 hp to ship assists.  She’s pretty much identical to Ellen McAllister.

Elizabeth Ann is part of the Norfolk Dredging fleet;  she’s from 1982 and is rated at 3000 hp.

Ocean Endeavor is from 1966, 1000 hp, and has left saltwater for Milwaukee, where she’s now Ruth Lucille.

Paradise Creek (1981) once worked in the sixth boro as Caspian Sea and before that (and before my time) was here as Sea Tiger.  Currently, it has been sold out of the Vane fleet and is known as Emmy Lou.

Maxwell Paul Moran is a 6000 hp, likely quite similar to Clayton W above.

All photos, WVD.

 

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