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I sometimes refer to a golden hour, but recently I heard someone talk about the “blue” hour, when the sun is still or already below the horizon.  The light is dramatic in both, or through that whole continuum, as seen here.

Fort McHenry heads east . . .

as does Amy Moran, who technically is moving later than the blue to gold but still enjoys the subdued light.

RTC 80 is pushed westbound by

Dace Reinauer.

Treasure Coast waits with its barge amidst the industrial landscape of IMTT.

Viking (sometimes pronounced “vikin“) moves toward the AK with DBL 134.

Buchanan 12 heads for the fuel dock.

Ruth M. Reinauer  takes her barge to the AK as well.

Evelyn Cutler moves her barge to the west, and

fleet mate Kimberly Poling crosses the strait to tie up at Caddells.

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Sheesh . . . someone forgot to sweep all the leftover letters from the garage floor after work.

 

All photos and lack of sweeping by Will Van Dorp.

 

First, from Kyle Stubbs, three Vane tugs  (Elizabeth Anne, Hudson, and Delaware alongside DoubleSkin 501) which would not be that unusual on this blog, except he took the photo in Seattle over by Terminal 5.  Click here for previous photos from Kyle.

Leaping south to the Mexican port of Manzanillo–north of Lazaro Cardenas–it’s VB Yucatan, in between  CMM Jarocho. and CMM Maguey. 

Not a tugboat, but also in Manzanillo .  . it’s Elizabeth Oldendorff, a gearless differently-geared sister of Alice.

In the center of the photo below, I’m unable to identify this Grupo TMM tug. 

Heading up the Hudson River, here’s an oldie-but-goodie, Ronald J. Dahlke.  Photo was taken about a month ago by Willard Bridgham in Waterford.  Anyone know where she’s gone to now?  She’s a sister of Urger and built in 1903!!

And it is that season, as this photo of Cornell by Paul Strubeck reminds us.

Thanks to Kyle, Maraki, Willard, and Paul for use of these photos.

I’m rushing December, but I’m eager to get through winter and back to spring.  All photos here date from December 2008.

Bowsprite took this from one of her cliff niches:  June K (2003) here is moving the Floating Hospital  (1974, Blount) up to the Rondout, where she remains. Is she really now called Industria at Sea.

The geography is unchanged, but McAllister Responder (1967) is no longer in the sixth boro, and Sea Venture (1972) is dead and likely scrapped . . . .

Maryland (1962) has become Liz Vinik, after operating with Maryland in the name for more than a handful of companies.

Choptank (2006) is back in the sixth boro and environs.  My autocorrect always wants to call this tug Shoptalk.  Puzzling.  NYK Daedalus (2007) is still at work, just not here.  TEN Andromeda is still on the oceans as well, still transporting crude.

Now called Charly and working the Gulf of Guinea, Janice Ann Reinauer (1967) used to be a personal icon in the sixth boro. Note that 1 World Trade does not appear in this photo, as it would today.

Closing this out . . .  Margaret Moran (1979 and the 4th boat by that name) passes APL Jade (1995 and likely scrapped by now) in the KVK.

I’m hoping you’re enjoying this glances back a decade as much as I am.

With the exception of the first photo, all these by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for research errors.

Unrelated:  Win a trip on a Great Lakes freighter/laker here.

Pacific Reliance (9280 hp) transfers cargo before heading to Texas . . .

with the 155,000 bbl barge 650-1.

B. Franklin Reinauer (4000 hp) passes by

with RTC 82 (80,000 bbl, if I read that right)

and Austin (3900 hp) eastbound here light.

Dean Reinauer (4720 hp) moves westbound under the Bayonne Bridge.

Foxy 3 (1600 hp) and Brooklyn (2400 hp) wait at the dock west of Caddell Drydock.  Foxy was previously Barker Boys, and this Brooklyn, Labrador Sea.

Brooklyn on her way to a job.

Delta Fox (1200 hp) and Morton S. Bouchard IV (6140 hp) tied up here  just east of Foxy 3 and Brooklyn.

Morton S. Bouchard IV makes up the next three photos here:  in front of a Saint Lawrence like eglise

against the Brooklyn skyline, and

and still more in front of T-AKR-306 USNS Benavidez.

And let’s finish up with Patrica (1200 hp) and Robert (1800 hp).

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in info here.

 

 

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

It’s late afternoon when Bruce A McAllister with Double Skin 40 passes my spot, followed

by Marjorie B McAllister, with B. No. 262 behind.

From the south with a motley set of barges . . . .

 

 

it’s Frances. Afternoon light is starting to highlight Mr. Bannerman’s place.

 

That IS a short wire, a necessity given that Marjorie has no upper wheelhouse.

 

 

These low hanging clouds have never left today.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the Canal Conference in Staten Island coming up in two weeks.

Let’s start out at Little Falls NY, above Lock E-17, where Jay Bee V had just departed and was now delivering the Glass Barge to the wall there.  Notice C. L. Churchill along the left edge of the photo.

Here above Lock C-7, it’s Margot.

On the Hudson River, tis is my first closeup view of Liz Vinik, formerly Maryland.

Westbound on the East River, it’s Sea Wolf moving uncontainerized thrown-aways.

Farther east, it’s Hudson with a fuel barge,

and meeting her, it’s Morgan Reinauer with the same.

Notice here, looking toward the Queensboro Bridge, Morgan and Hudson.

Here at the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge project, it’s  Dorothy J.

and to close this post out back on the Hudson, it’s Elizabeth, moving Weeks 533.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s do the numbers again.  No, Pelham is NOT becoming a tugantine in the tradition of Norfolk Rebel.  Seeing Pelham out of the water really reveals a beauty I hadn’t noticed before.

OK, numbers, built in 1960 and rated at 3000 hp.

Atlantic Coast, 2007 and 3000hp.

 

Genesis Vision, 1981 and 3000hp.

Margaret Moran, 1979 and 3000hp.

(l to r) Fort Schuyler 2015 and 3000hp, Patuxent 2008 and 4200, and Kings Point 2014 and 3000.

Note the difference in “neck” length leading to the upper wheelhouse;  that hints at the difference in engines.

Resolve, 2007 and 9280hp.

Brownsville, 2008 and 12,000hp.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is playing in the Great Lakes by this time.

Here’s a Hudson down bound set of three posts I did five years ago, in a different season.

This trip starts at Scarano’s just south of Albany, where a crew picked up excursion boat Kingston for delivery to Manhattan.   Last fall after delivery up bound, I posted these landmarks.

Spirit of Albany (1966), operated by the Albany Port District Commission, is a regular for the Waterford Tugboat Roundup parade.

High above Castleton, name going back to Henry Hudson, is that Sacred Heart Church?

Two bridges cross just north of Coeymans are the Berkshire Spur of the NY Thruway and the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, the furthest south operational rail bridge over the Hudson.

Katherine Walker performs spring buoy planting south of Coxsackie.

I’ve heard a story behind the “parked” marine equipment in Athens NY, but need a refresher.  Anyone explain how this came to be frozen in time here?  The view is only possible if your draft allows you to navigate the channel on the west side of Middle Ground Flats.

Hudson-Athens Light is one of the lighthouses saved from demolition at a point when all lights were being automated.  Back when I did more hiking, I looked down on the Hudson and some of these landmarks from the heights, in “what Rip saw,” as in the long sleeper.

South of Catskill Creek, you can see snow still covering the slopes of the Catskills.

Marion Moran pushes Bridgeport upbound.  That’s the east shore of the Hudson beyond her.

By the time we get to Saugerties, snow seems to be creating whiteout conditions on the Catskill escarpement.

We head south, here meeting Fells Point pushing Doubleskin 302.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For more on the lighthouses, click here. In the next in the series, we head farther south.

And for what it’s worth, I’m still in the market for some “seats” photos.

 

What does a 70+ degree temperature day in February in the sixth boro look like?  Well . . . see for yourself.  Cornell light and likely back from a TOAR training, rafts up to Mary Whalen in Atlantic Basin.

Along the Brooklyn shore, there was Genesis Glory with GM11105.

Brooklyn–ex-Labrador Sea–light was headed for the Kills.

An anchored Crystal Cutler stood by with Patricia E. Poling.  Over in the distance is Malik al Ashtar, another 13,000+ teu container ship.  See Crystal light, high and dry here.

Over near the foot of Atlantic Avenue, Linda Lee Bouchard stands by alongside B. No. 205.

And finally, along the BQE and Brooklyn Heights, C. Angelo with EMA  1152, the EMA standing for Express Marine, the outfit that used to deliver fuel to the sixth boro’s coal-fired plants.  Express Marine tugs Consort and Escort used to be regulars in the port.  I believe they are currently “laid up.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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