You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Vane Brothers’ category.

Quick . . . name those units?

Type Vane Brothers into the search window, presuming you know these are Vane Brothers boats, and you’d get all the previous instances of this title, going back to 2009.

Now you can see the names . . . Potomac above and Fort McHenry below.

Philadelphia is legible here, as is

Kings Point.

On a related note, I’ve been doing some blog maintenance;  I finally added tags to the first three and a half years of this blog.  Tags?  You can find them in the “fine print” just below the title.  When I started the blog back in November 2006, I had enough to do just remembering the process of getting images and text on the page.  So until April 2010, I just skipped tags.  Their addition matters because now–if you want–you can efficiently trace all instances of a certain vessel appearing here.  For example, the first time I saw any Vane Brothers boat in the sixth boro was at the 2007 tugboat race;  it was Patapsco.  If you want to locate all the photos I’ve posted–and now tagged–type Patapsco into the search window, find it in the tags, click that tag, and voila . . . you can go all the way back to the first one.

The system is not fool proof because Patapsco, the word, might refer to the river and watershed also. It refers to any other vessel by that name as well. For example, if you type in Pegasus, you get both the 1907 tug and the 2006 boat.  However, with tags undated, you get more of the older images than previously.  Similarly, Philadelphia may refer to the boat above or the city; type that in the search window, and you’d get both.

And if I neglected to tag in in posts more recent than April 2010, it’ll be harder to find. If I made a mistake, you’d be given my mistaken info . . . GIGO.  Those caveats given, searching is now easier than it was.

All photos, WVD.

 

Radar helps when you can’t see in the fog, but

even on a clear day, you can’t see the crew operating this 2013 2000 hp tugboat, or its history . . . how it got to become a fixture in the sixth boro.

Ditto this 1994 tug, operating with 3000 hp.  Here Kimberly Poling is docked, and the outside viewer knows no reason why.

Brian Nicholas was launched under a different name before Nixon was elected.  If only one could be privy to all the conversations and dramas even happened aboard.

Mister Jim was based for 30 years in the Gulf of Mexico, although without looking at her logbooks, who knows where all she worked.

Ellen McAllister has the distinction in this post of having been launched before Nixon was elected also AND worked both sides of the Atlantic, and I would suspect she’s appeared on this blog more times than any other of the machines here, but still . . . even I, what do I know about her quirks and feats?

Helen Laraway, unless I tell you, would you know that she was working before Kennedy was elected POTUS?  And with rehabbing and repowering . . . she’s as good as new, I believe, and working hard for a 63-year-old.

James E. Brown is the youngster of this post, built in a fishing village originally called Coq d’Inde, now anglicized.

Finally, back in the fog . . .  It’s Stephanie Dann, a product of the Carter era.  As to these dates and use of POTUSes as time references, it’s not political, but you’ll see my point here in tomorrow’s post.

And yes, all photos and info here by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

This post is front-loaded with photos, text heavy at the end . . .  .   Have you seen this boat before?

 

 

The name is new, as is the livery.

And in a previous lifetime it was  . .

Patapsco!  Below that’s a photo of Patapsco I took on September 2, 2007!!  After the tugboat race, she went nose-to-nose with Lucy Reinauer.

It’s the first Vane boat I saw in the sixth boro, and it was even the name of a class of 4200 hp boats that followed.  See a few more here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

Believe it or not, I’m way inland and without a camera, and a preference for novelty prompts  a different almost-year-end post together.  Rules I made for myself follow:  go to my archives and select the first photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if the first photo in my archives for each month is a person or an inland structure, I don’t use it;  instead, I go forward in that month to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Susquehanna in a very familiar IMTT on the Bayonne side of the KVK.  She’s currently westbound along the Keys.

February was La Perla, an oyster barge on Peconic Bay.

March was Nathan G on the very southern tip of Manhattan, across from the Colgate clock.  She’s currently working in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C was assisting a box ship out in the wee hours near the start of April.  Right now, she’s in the sixth boro, doing or waiting to do a similar escort.

May began with a NYC oyster boat headed north through the Narrows.

Early June it was Tavropos, in the Stapleton anchorage.  The crude oil tanker is currently off the Tabasco coast of Mexico.  The tanker appeared here previously as Moonlight Venture.

July began with Fishing Creek headed out of the Narrows.  She’s currently near Philly.

In August it was Grande Mariner approaching lock E14.  She’s docked in Narragansett Bay.

In September, actually on September 1, it was Kaye E. Barker southbound across Lake St. Clair with the landmark Renaissance Center ahead.  She’s currently upbound on Lake Huron, possibly getting another load of ore for the season.

October began with me meeting Mrs. Chips bound for the Narrows and point south and ultimately Florida, where she currently is.

November it was Denak Voyager taking on scrap.  That’s the Newark Bay Bridge beyond the ship, and Rebecca Ann lost to the left margin.  Rebecca Ann is currently in the sixth boro, and Denak Voyager has exited the Straits of Gibraltar, heading back to the sixth boro.

And finally, December, it’s a mystery boat for now and an unidentified location. Guess if you like . . . I hope to get back to this photo in 2020.

Maybe tomorrow . . .  last day of the year . . . I’ll do the last photo of each month following the same rules.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Day in day out . . . and night in night out, port work goes on.  Here James D finishes up escorting a gargantuan “flower” ship out.

Sea Eagle stands by with her barge while Dace refuels.

Pearl Coast heads for Caddells,

where Kings Point is getting some work done.

Discovery Coast leaves the Gowanus Bay berth.

Atlantic Coast lighters a salt ship while Lucy waits in the anchorage.

Lyman moves Sea Shuttle southbound while some Bouchard units heads for the KVK.

And completing this installment, it’s Kirby, all finished with another assist.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Excuse the branches and tendrils reaching out over this dense pack of tugboats:  five Bouchard boats plus a Harley behind Denise and a Genesis on the drydock.

Crystal Cutler here in profile is heading for the Kills;  this photo prompts me to wonder how this wheelhouse “window” configuration has worked out.

Stephen B assists Fells Point leaving IMTT with Double Skin 302.

Marie J Turecamo heads east on the KVK.

I can’t recall now whether this is my first time to see Vane’s New York, here with Double Skin 53.

Seeley moves a scow eastbound.

Mount St. Elias goes west here.

And finally . . . J. George Betz heads east, possibly to pick up a barge.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for content . . .

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,327 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2020
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031