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More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

On a recent foggy rainy day, I caught Elk River bunkering (I believe) Maritime Kelly Anne.  That’s certainly an interesting name, although yesterday Endless Summer topped it, arriving from Brasil.  Might there be a string of ships with movie name references out on the oceans?

I love how fog narrows the depth of field in a natural way.

The same day Genesis Vigilant nosed into an IMTT dock.

Wye River was traveling light on the way to and likely from a barge,

as were Morgan Reinauer,

 Haggerty Girls, and

and Stephen Reinauer.

Brendan was following a ship to Port Elizabeth.

Stephanie Dann was headed for sea and south.

Ellen S. Bouchard was lying alongside B. No. 262, as her fleet and their crews languish.  And exfiltrate?

Catherine Miller moves a Caddell crane  . . . back to the KVK base.

All photos,WVD.

 

 

 

Count the tugboats in this one shot . . .  six! And a seventh is obscured right behind the nearest.  And no, it was not part of the annual tugboat race.  From (l) to (r), it’s JRT Moran, Amy Moran, Stephen B, (and Ellen McAllister is obscured) then Genesis Eagle, Magothy with Double Skin 57, and Elk River doing assist.

In case you suspect I’m making up the seventh tugboat, here’s a closeup of Ellen assisting Eagle just nine seconds earlier.

A bit later, I noticed a similar density over in the anchorage.  Just naming ships, (l) to (r), there’s Advance II, White Horse, Sten Odin, and Cielo di Londra.

Then among then, there are two more tug/barge units with tugs Barry Silverton and Helen Laraway.  Interesting how Barry Silverton is shrunk when beside a tanker.

And a bit later I zoomed down, around, and in to see the service vessels clustered around White Horse:  HMS* Liberty (I think), a Miller Launch boat, and on the far side Lesney Byrd.

All photos, WVD, who’s now outa town for a while.  Thx to everyone who’s sent in or pledged relief posts.

Also, a certain exotic ship is coming into the harbor, and I’d be very grateful if someone stepped forward to get photos of it as it arrives.  Email me, please, if you might be able to get the shot.

*HMS . . . Harley Marine Services is no more; out of its ashes rises Centerline Logistics.

Coastline Girls and many other names including Gage Paul Thornton and  ST-497, the 1944-build now sleeps deep in Davy Jones locker,  and was not an intentional reefing.

It’s been a while since I last saw Mcallister Sisters, shown here passing the Esopus Meadows light.  If I’m not mistaken, she’s currently based in Baltimore.

Ten years ago, this boat had already been painted blue over orange, but she still carried the June K name board.

Socrates, classic lines and a classic name, has since gone off to Nigeria, riding over in mid-2012 on a heavy lift ship called Swan.

Urger on blocks in Lyons . . . one would have thought then that she’d run forever.  These days she’s back on blocks at the eastern end of the Canal.

And February 2010 was the time of prime iceboating, and that’s Bonnie of frogma.

James Turecamo, with its wheelhouse down as I rarely saw it, works these days upriver as far north as Albany.  Photo by Allen Baker.

Brandywine and Odin these days spend most of their time on Gulf of Mexico waters.

Gramma Lee T Moran straining here as she pulled the tanker off the dock.  She now works in Baltimore.

In the foreground, East Coast departs the Kills;  I can’t say I recall seeing her recently,but AIS says she’s currently northbound north of the GW.    In the distance and approaching, June K, now Sarah Ann, and she regularly works in the sixth boro.

All photos, except Allen’s, WVD, from February 2010.

I have to share back story about getting that top photo.  I was on foot on Richmond Terrace walking east toward Jersey Street when I saw the Coastline tug and Hughes barge.  I didn’t recognize the profile and realized I could get the photo ONLY if I ran.  At the same time, I noticed an NYPD car had pulled over another car, and you know, it’s never a good idea to run for no apparent reason when the police are nearby.  But . . . you understand my dilemma:  walk and miss the shot, or run and maybe attract the curiosity of the police officer.  I ran, got the shot, and sure enough, the police called me over and wanted to know what I was doing.  Since I knew I’d done nothing wrong except appear suspicious, I gave him my business card and launched full tilt into my “new yorkers are so lucky because they are witness to so much marine business traffic, and why didn’t he too have a camera and join me watching and taking photos of the variety of vessels . . . .”  You can imagine the stare I got.  My enthusiasm failed to move him.  No handcuffs, no taser, not even a ticket, but an impassive gaze from a weary officer of the law possibly wondering  if I’d escaped from an institution or a time warp.  He wrote up a report and left me with this advice:  don’t run when you see a police officer nearby.  “Yessir,” I said, thinking . . . well sure, but I’d likely do it again if I again noticed something unusual transiting the waterway.  Since then, though, I’ve not had any further encounters with the LEOs, at least not on the banks of the sixth boro.

Want to check out Random Tugs 001?  The  001 got added more recently than 2007 because back then,  I had no idea I’d go on.  In the 2007 photo, might that be Mary Turecamo along with the Reinauer tugs, which are also still at work operating out of the sixth boro.  The other morning Mary Turecamo was assisting MSC Maria Elena  . . . . The tugboat has always been known by that name.

The many times renamed and reconfigured Brooklyn approaches from . . .. Brooklyn.  I first saw her as Labrador Sea.

Brendan Turecamo, also renamed a number of times,  takes the back channel out the Kills.  That’s Bayonne in the background and a crane in Port Elizabeth beyond that.

Catching Genesis Eagle out of the notch is a treat.  The third photo here shows a photo of the same boat as Eagle Service in roughly the same place a decade ago, although I was catching the opposite perspective.

 

It’s been quite a while since I’ve seen this particular Mary Gellatly moving around the sixth boro, but here she is, and I  recognize the man with a camera between the wheelhouse and the stacks.

She was previously Vernon C, as in the top two photos here.

Dory is another boat that has changed hands and names and appearances.  See her here . . .  if you scroll.

Dory appears to be working with a Harley barge alongside a ship, bunkering ? . . . Kitikmeot W.

And let’s conclude with one of the newest boats in the harbor . . .  Ava M McAllister, here returning from escorting a c-ship out toward the Narrows.   Click here for photos from her christening half a year ago.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

 

Quick . . . name those units?

Type Vane Brothers into the search window, presuming you know these are Vane Brothers boats, and you’d get all the previous instances of this title, going back to 2009.

Now you can see the names . . . Potomac above and Fort McHenry below.

Philadelphia is legible here, as is

Kings Point.

On a related note, I’ve been doing some blog maintenance;  I finally added tags to the first three and a half years of this blog.  Tags?  You can find them in the “fine print” just below the title.  When I started the blog back in November 2006, I had enough to do just remembering the process of getting images and text on the page.  So until April 2010, I just skipped tags.  Their addition matters because now–if you want–you can efficiently trace all instances of a certain vessel appearing here.  For example, the first time I saw any Vane Brothers boat in the sixth boro was at the 2007 tugboat race;  it was Patapsco.  If you want to locate all the photos I’ve posted–and now tagged–type Patapsco into the search window, find it in the tags, click that tag, and voila . . . you can go all the way back to the first one.

The system is not fool proof because Patapsco, the word, might refer to the river and watershed also. It refers to any other vessel by that name as well. For example, if you type in Pegasus, you get both the 1907 tug and the 2006 boat.  However, with tags undated, you get more of the older images than previously.  Similarly, Philadelphia may refer to the boat above or the city; type that in the search window, and you’d get both.

And if I neglected to tag something in posts more recent than April 2010, it’ll be harder to find. If I made a mistake, you’d be given my mistaken info . . . GIGO.  Those caveats given, searching is now a bit easier than it was.

All photos, WVD.

 

Radar helps when you can’t see in the fog, but

even on a clear day, you can’t see the crew operating this 2013 2000 hp tugboat, or its history . . . how it got to become a fixture in the sixth boro.

Ditto this 1994 tug, operating with 3000 hp.  Here Kimberly Poling is docked, and the outside viewer knows no reason why.

Brian Nicholas was launched under a different name before Nixon was elected.  If only one could be privy to all the conversations and dramas even happened aboard.

Mister Jim was based for 30 years in the Gulf of Mexico, although without looking at her logbooks, who knows where all she worked.

Ellen McAllister has the distinction in this post of having been launched before Nixon was elected also AND worked both sides of the Atlantic, and I would suspect she’s appeared on this blog more times than any other of the machines here, but still . . . even I, what do I know about her quirks and feats?

Helen Laraway, unless I tell you, would you know that she was working before Kennedy was elected POTUS?  And with rehabbing and repowering . . . she’s as good as new, I believe, and working hard for a 63-year-old.

James E. Brown is the youngster of this post, built in a fishing village originally called Coq d’Inde, now anglicized.

Finally, back in the fog . . .  It’s Stephanie Dann, a product of the Carter era.  As to these dates and use of POTUSes as time references, it’s not political, but you’ll see my point here in tomorrow’s post.

And yes, all photos and info here by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

This post is front-loaded with photos, text heavy at the end . . .  .   Have you seen this boat before?

 

 

The name is new, as is the livery.

And in a previous lifetime it was  . .

Patapsco!  Below that’s a photo of Patapsco I took on September 2, 2007!!  After the tugboat race, she went nose-to-nose with Lucy Reinauer.

It’s the first Vane boat I saw in the sixth boro, and it was even the name of a class of 4200 hp boats that followed.  See a few more here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

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