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I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Excuse the branches and tendrils reaching out over this dense pack of tugboats:  five Bouchard boats plus a Harley behind Denise and a Genesis on the drydock.

Crystal Cutler here in profile is heading for the Kills;  this photo prompts me to wonder how this wheelhouse “window” configuration has worked out.

Stephen B assists Fells Point leaving IMTT with Double Skin 302.

Marie J Turecamo heads east on the KVK.

I can’t recall now whether this is my first time to see Vane’s New York, here with Double Skin 53.

Seeley moves a scow eastbound.

Mount St. Elias goes west here.

And finally . . . J. George Betz heads east, possibly to pick up a barge.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for content . . .

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s been a few months since number 265, so let’s catch up.

Kimberly Poling had brought product upriver via Noelle Cutler, and you can tell some time has passed since I took this photo by the foliage.

Edna A was assisting a crane barge working on the power lines near Hudson NY.

Challenger came in through the Narrows yesterday, delivering a crane barge.  A few years back she delivered what was initially a mystery cargo here.

Eli stood by as salt was transshipped from scow to large truck.

Mister T was westbound for the Upper Bay with four scow to be filled.

Pokomoke brought petroleum upriver.

Memory Motel, the original exotic,  . . . I wondered where she had gone until I saw her high and dry up by Scarano.

Betty D and Mary Kay . . .  they were docked just south of Albany.

Mary Turecamo brought container barge New York from Red Hook to Port Elizabeth . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more saved up from the summer and early fall.

Heraclitus has to be the classical philosopher most referred to on this blog.  I thought of this person again as I returned into the city after my longest ever so far time away;  this is a familiar place of six boros, and yet it does not seem familiar.  It is new, renewed by multiple sunrises and by my recollection as I gallivanted afar, seeing new places.   We enter beneath the GW, which I’ve never seen lit up this way.

On the water side of a wild and dynamic clutch of architecture, Pegasus stands guard,

 

As we make an initial run to the Upper Bay, we pass a renewed Harvey, a resolute Frying Pan, and an ever working Chandra B.

Hunting Creek follows Chandra B up to the cruise terminal.

USCGC Shrike waits near FDNY’s Hudson River station and the sprouting Pier 55.

Ernest Campbell brings more fuel to the cruise terminal.

Sarah Ann (I believe) delivers waste, passing the Battery, where Clipper City awaits another day of passengers.

As we circled back to dock, an unfamiliar tug was southbound.

Robert T and that livery are not ones I recognized, until

I realized this was the old Debora Miller.  Who knew!!??

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been nearly a decade since I last used this title and alluded to that big encounter . . . leading to the settlement of the Hudson River.

Looking at the photos I took yesterday morning, it did seem like an encounter as well, one of the type unique to summer.  QM2 had just come in when it was too dark to get clear shots.

Sarah D was inbound . . .

and Fishing Creek–her first appearance on this blog I believe–was outbound.

Sarah D was pushing Weeks 108, and

and Fishing Creek had DoubleSkin 53.

 

Encountering the Sarah D tow was this sweet fishing boat,

Mary Sue.

And way out toward the Hook, the USCG was doing their thing  . . .

meeting a foreign-flagged sloop named

Choucas3, named for a bird maybe and

which sported this flag from the Isle of Man.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was enjoying the calm and cooling breezes of dawn.

 

 

Today’s a good day to complete my Rondout Creek post, begun here.

Three bridges up the Creek leads you to Feeney’s Shipyard, a quite busy place.  Last Saturday when I was there, two Vane Brothers boats and Johannsen Girls–the shipyard tug I believe–were docked.   Click here for a photo of the Girls nine years ago when she was still called Dolomite II.

 

W. R. Coe awaits ice season.

 

It’s not only towing and towed vessels that you might see up there.

Over at the Hudson River Maritime Museum, a worthwhile stop, Clearwater is tied up, staying east of the 9W Bridge. That’s Mathilda on the landside of Clearwater.

Above and below, a Great Harbour 37 yacht.

 

Across the water and a ways back up the Creek, it’s wooden yacht Choctaw, which I’d have loved to see in its prime.  Anyone know the story?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who encourages you to stop in at the Hudson River Maritime Museum and buy tickets for solar-powered passenger vessel Solaris.

 

New in town but probably only in as a transient . . .

It’s Michael L. Daigle, fleet mate of some Hebert boats that have also passed through the sixth boro and likely working on a dredging project in the region.  Note the white horizontal supports above the wheelhouse door on either side.  I’m guessing they’re for quick egress lines   . .  as seen here if you scroll through the 2010 post to Gulf Dawn.

Unrelated . . .  two Vane units approach the Narrows;  the forward unit below has already evolved from wire towing to alongside towing.

As a heavy squall approached, Potomac enters port allowed by

Patuxent, still with the wire out.

A few years back, HMS Justice was a regular in NYC.  These days not so much, but she called here recently.

Fleet mate HMS Liberty follows along behind.

CMT Otter heads outbound, likely towards Queens and Inwood.

And let’s end today’s post with another transient . . .  Captain Sam, here meeting Capt. Brian.  Captain Sam is a triple screw Rodriguez Shipyard boat from 2002.

All photos taken within the general confines of the sixth boro by Will Van Dorp.

 

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