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If you depart at 0400, there’s not much to photograph.  Light beckoned as we approached Newburgh/Beacon.

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I saw Mt. Beacon as I never had before;

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ditto Storm King in sunrise that even dappled

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the wave tops.

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Once around Gee Point, we saw the statue (to the left on the ridge)

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of Kościuszko’s, fortifier of West Point.

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Once south of the Bear Mountain Bridge, passengers traveled upstream

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for seasonal seesighting.

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Scrap was sought.

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Sloops sailed and

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work boats waited their time.

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More statues sighted, and

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vessels waited their time.

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And we had arrived at a place where at least two boros approached each other.

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Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, is back in the boros for a while.

Here’s the series that this follows, a series that shows how busy this craneship still is at certain times of the year.  Of course, this could also be called what do you do with an obsolete New York City ferry, a vessel delivered by Electric Boat on October 14, 1929 and replaced by a bridge in fewer than 10 years.

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Yes, this is the bow of the craneship, and until I spent a day on board last fall, I assumed the bow wheel was non-functioning if even present.

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Excuse the rain spot.

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Closeups of bow and

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stern.

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Here’s a shot from the deck of Wards Island from the incredible warm late November day last year when we pulled a day’s worth of buoys from Oneida Lake, and at the

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end of the day, getting a glimpse of the builders plate in the engine compartment.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve made myself back to the sixth boro by train now, and I’m succumbing to “train lag,” which means I’m allowing myself a few days to put up chronologically arranged photos before focusing on some scene that caught me and haven’t let go.  The Quebec City-Levis ferries are part of a huge network.

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The Coast Guard base is just below–way below–Château Frontenac, where a fateful conference took place in 1943.

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An excursion boat has as namesake a Quebecois–same guy the extra ‘l’ notwithstanding– who undertook a significant journey with a priest.

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Ocean has a huge base in the old port.  I plan a host of Ocean posts soon.

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I don’t know if Nordik Express still makes this journey, but I intend to find out.

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Django dates from 1928, but more than that, I know nothing.

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And finally, back from a job, Ocean Henry Bain returns from a job, passing the pilots’ station.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls this morning as a day that lives in infamy.  In remembrance, check out the first photo here.

On the river Rouge, SS Ste Claire languishes, a slightly younger sister of SS Columbia, both designed by Frank Kirby. I’m reminded in saying this that I have some updated photos of Columbia, but plan to devote an entire post to her.

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City of Algonac is one of two ferries that traverse the St. Clair River between Algonac and Walpole.

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Here’s the other, the Walpole Islander.  For some info on Walpole Island, click here.

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Now cruising the river between Detroit and Windsor, Macassa Bay used to run out of Bull Arm Newfoundland to an oil platform.

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Pearl Mist is a fairly large cruise ship on the Great Lakes.

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Friendship operates out of Wyandot, as

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do the Diamond Jack River Boats.

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And here was a surprise … a Maumee River excursion boat Sandpiper.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And somewhat last-minute but important announcement, Dr. Richard Zuczek, Deputy Department Chair and Resident Historian United States Coast Guard Academy, will speak THIS Thursday–August 4 at 6 pm, aboard Nantucket Lightship, docked at the northern edge of Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 6  (BBP Pier 6).  FREE.  It’s one of many many events down at BBP.

 

Here are the previous posts.

The 1980 Innisfree works the Chicago River, but it has New England roots.

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The rest of the boats in this post work in the waters around Mackinac Island.  Anna May is Wisconsin-built, 1947.

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Felicity is a Shepler’s Ferry boats.  For a history of the business, click here.

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Straits of Mackinac II is a 1969 Blount product. The Arnold family has been in the ferry business here since 1878.

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LaSalle dates from 1983.

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Huron is Erie PA built, 1955, and the oldest vessel working for the Arnold fleet.

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Joliet dates from 1993.   For many more Michigan ferries, click here.

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And to close out today, we’re back at Innisfree, maybe named for the W. B. Yeats poem.   Here Innisfree passes the footprint-gone-wild for the now-dead Spire project.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

I’m catching up here, with this post from the top west side of Lake Huron, where the skies and

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and waters teemed with people.

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I headed to the high ground where the fort stands,

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From the wall, I saw US-built  Samuel de Champlain pass southbound.

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Schooner Inland Seas was anchored over by the Round Island light.

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Corsair  brought in food trucks, which

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get offloaded onto wagons.

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Teamster, trickster, tugster . .  got it all in this post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Part of the way up in the Chesapeake watershed, Roaring Bull works daily for the better part of the year.   Take a ride on it.  from Harrisburg I-81, it’s a mere 30 miles north.  From West Milton I-80, 40 miles south.

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Baltimore . . . 100 miles, Philly 130, NYC 200, and Pittsburgh 225;  and

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and it’s lost in time.

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It’s a must-see, and inspected by the USCG.

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Unlike double ended ferries, this one has the best bow and stern thrusters.

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with a name that conjures up this taurus pining for love. 

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And yes, it’s in a part of the Susquehanna River valley where there are lots of horses pulling buggies.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For sights and sounds of the ferry under way, click here and here.

Here was the first in this series, which at the time I didn’t know would become a series.

This photos of Delaware was taken in the KVK back in November last year.

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Here she was still at Caddell’s in midApril this year.

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And in earlymid May, she returned

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to the Cape May-Lewes run.  It appears that she’s one of triplets from here around 1974-75.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to see one of the sister vessels breaking ice at Cape May.

Let me pick up here, a closer up of the mystery tug Alnair from yesterday’s post.  I have no further info, but one reader–Thanks, L–wrote to suggest that Alnair looks like a YTB.  I’d thought so, too, but in Cuba?

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So consider this one, not my photo, but if you click on the photo and do a search for YTB, you’ll find that until May 2006, this “Cuban” tug was known as Apalachicola YTB 767.  So could Alnair be Chesaning YTB 769, for example?

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Al Mendares looks to be a small tanker named for the river that flows through Havana.

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And here from the seawall  . . . MSC Opera, which as of this writing is across the Yucatan Strait in Mexico.

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The red vessel is Vega, a trailing suction hopper dredger.

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And finally, this ungainly vessel is a ferry.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For more on YTBs, click here.

 

Remember the logic in this series is . . . the first pic of the month and the last pic of the month . . .

Early September found me still along the Acushnet . . .  Malena–as of this writing–is in Sierra Leone, having bounced around the Caribbean since departing New Bedford.

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By September’s end, Wavertree was slathered in a beautiful red primer.

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Early October . . . that’s North Star off the Orient Point, and Plum Gut, with Plum Island in the background.

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Late October . . . a conversation led to an invitation to tour iMTT Bayonne and see Marion Moran at the tug fuel station from the waterside.  I still need to post about that.

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November . . . and Med Sea bound for the Sound and beyond.

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Joyce D. Brown going back to the kills.

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And late in the month, my only view of Patty Nolan, on the hard in Verplanck. Click here for some of many posts on the 1931 Patty.

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Early December . . .it’s mild and I decided to experiment with some color separation on Margaret Moran. Click here for a post from seven-plus years ago with Margaret Moran  . . .

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And since December has not yet ended, I will post this in its incomplete state, with the promise of a “last December 2015”  post yet to come.

This is my last post for 2015.  Happy New Year.  May it be peaceful and safe.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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