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This post encompasses two legs, but WiFi has not been cooperative.

Minimal comment:  this is the eight-mile Confederation Bridge.  Toll to cross by car:  $CD 50.

Bridge Lady is pilot boat to retrieve the pilot who departed with us at Charlottetown.

After a rough passage north along the Gaspé coastline, we enter the lower estuary, where a cold welcome awaited. 

Near Les Éboulements aka “the landslides,” this tug Felicia still adorns the shore.

From the ferry dock near there, Svanoy shuttled over to  Isle aux Coudres. 

As we approached the end of that first leg at QC, Ocean Guide came by to exchange pilots.

Kitikmeot W, Nordic Orion, and Spruceglen were in port.

as were the two powerhouses, Ocean Taiga and Ocean Tundra.

Departing I had my first opportunity to see Vincent Massey Four years ago she was undergoing transformation here.

Torm Timothy headed for sea.

A pilot exchange happened just downstream from Montreal, 

where Uhl Fast was in port.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

Here’s a quick “sign of life” post.  We’re laid up in the archipelago of Eastport for preparations to get under way.  But occasionally I see something and grab the camera.

Like Fairhaven Princess II.  I’m not sure what work she does, but I trust someone will comment.  My guess is that she’s involved in some sort of fishery.

Hopper II is a ferry between Eastport ME and Campobello Island.

Sunday she was quite busy.

Note the guy on the motorcycle in the photo below.

 

More photos by WVD when I can post. 

I read this about Eastport:  “1833 Eastport was the second largest trading port in the country after New York City.  Farms produced hay and potatoes. Industries included a grain mill, box factory and carding mill. But the island’s economy was primarily directed at the sea.   … but the fishing industry would decline, and many people moved away. Indeed, the city went bankrupt in 1937. In 1976, the Groundhog Day Gale destroyed many structures along the waterfront.”  You can read that and more here.

I need to come up here when I’m free.  Here’s more on Eastport. And I know Jackie F. McAllister is nearby, but I can’t figure out how to get a photo without trespassing or getting a skiff. 

Can you identify this text?  “Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence.”  I’ll provide the answer at the end of this post. 

Thanks much to George Schneider for sending along this “cheer,”  Wedell Foss, Port Angeles WA and taken last night.

As for me, I’m staying inside mostly today and not going out looking for Christmas Eve festivity photos, but I planned ahead and have these to share.  Know this be-decked-the-decks boat?

 

South Street Seaport Museum always decorates the boats. 

And this captain, maybe he supports his whirlwind worldwide Christmas Eve navigations by peregrinating the sixth boro days and nights all the rest of the year?  Did you realize the North Pole elf king had a USCG license?

So merry Christmas eve from tugster tower.  Thanks for reading the blog, commenting, sending along photos, sending me cards, sharing tips, and especially leaving me off the list when the subpoenas go out. 

Now that quote . . . I remember friends used to have posters on their walls with that text way back when.  Here’s more:

“… As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit….

Whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be. And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.”   It’s Max Ehrmann’s Desiderata.  That link gets you the whole short text.

Since it was 7 degrees F this morning in the sixth boro, here are some southern Christmas tips, southern as in Chile, that is.  I think of warm Chile in northern winter because around the five boros and beyond, it’s where our road salt comes from.  

Many thanks to George for sending along the photo, and the ferry captain for transporting cheer around the sixth boro.  Gary Steele, thanks for reminding me about Desiderata, product of Terre Haute IN. 

If you have your own tugsteresque seasonal photos you wish to share, please send them. 

I’ve seen lots of pairs in winter, some in spring, but never until now in fall, at least not acknowledged until this post.

Two sets of pairs appear below, one Centerline and another Moran, the latter escorting in CSCL South China Sea.

Ellen and Patrice here are going to different jobs.

Mary Turecamo and James D Moran here work on the CSCL box ship.

Lots are boats here;  clockwise from the farthest, Haggerty Girls (I think), James D, Margaret, Marjorie B, and James William.

Around 0900, a brace of migratory birds headed north . . .  F-18s maybe.

B. Franklin got an assist from Matthew Tibbetts.

Two old ferries ply their trade:  Barberi with the highest flagpoles and Marchi.

Two top of the line sixth boro McAllister tugs joins forces.

Two old style boats:  Manhattan II and Wanderer, the latter from the Sippican River.

And finally, this juxtaposition passed and allows a comparison of the lines of the 2015 6000 hp Kirby Moran with the 2008 5100 hp Laura K.

All photos in the past week, WVD.

Keyport Princess dropped anchor in front of the Statue the other morning.  Does anyone need more proof that fish are currently thriving in the boro?

Climate Change also came through the boro from the Sound, no doubt heading for warmed waters for the next half year, but while transiting, 

this boater takes in the beauty of the day in the seas’ water of the boro.

Red Hook and RV Blue Sea pass each other, making me wonder what the students might be learning about the GUP vessel it’s passing.

James William alternates between containerized trash and crushed rock.  Here a deckhand has pleasant weather for the job. 

Over in Whitehall, three workers on a beam

attend to maintenance on a “wall” of the ferry rack. 

Hayward periodically serves as a boro VIP excursion vessel.

The intended purpose of that boom is fishing out floating or sunken debris that might pose a hazard to navigation. 

Pioneer takes another set of folks around the sylvan edges of the Upper Bay to enjoy the warmth of the waning year.

And finally, I’m grateful that in the design process for the latest generation of ferries, decisions were made to ensure that Sandy Ground and her two sisters have ample space for folks to enjoy the views as they transit the Bay.

All photos, WVD, who himself loves this time of year.

All day long, one ferry or another crosses the harbor, and one tug or another

travels light from point A to

point B and

makes up to another vessel

to move it to where it’s needed.

I was fortunate to see this vignette

of one part of someone’s day play out.

All photos, WVD.

Crushed stone is a commodity indispensable for construction.  Previous commodity posts can be seen here from 2010, here 2011, here 2013, here 2017, and many other instances not identified as such, like this one.

Here was the post I’d planned for yesterday, put together in a moment when I thought a single focus was too elusive, random scenes, like a container ship anchored off Stapleton, elusive detail in a set all diverging from usual patterns. 

Or seeing a Mein Schiff vessel in town after a hiatus… with Wye River passing along her stern?

Or this bayou boat discovering it offers solutions all over the boro and beyond, here passing a lifting machine?

How about this speedboat chasing a tugboat, or appearing to, with lots of hulls in the distance?

Or a single terrapin crawling out of the surf in a non-bulkheaded margin of the wet boro?

Two pink ONEs at Global terminal?

A ketch named Libra or Libre heading south with a scrap ship at Claremont?

Two commercial vessels out at Bayonne?

Two Ellens?

And finally two elongated RIBs with

camouflage-clad Coasties aboard?

All photos, seen as slight deviants from existing patterns, WVD.

 

Here’s the newest, following directly from 12 for Sandy Ground and 10 for SSG Michael H. Ollis.  Or how about a redux for both

Now unless ferry and tug travel on a maglev frictionless cushion of air when offshore and distant, this is just the fata morgana effect when the vessels are seen a ways off, in this case, about six miles.   In the photo below, there’s a hint that Sarah Dann is riding on a foil board, 

and that the ferry has a dreadnought shaped hull.

Well . . . I’m just messin’.  These were photos of yesterday’s arrival of the third of three new ferries.  Note New York Media Boat out to snap their first welcome photos. Photos of the christening down in Florida happened months ago here.

Here the tow enters the Narrows, and the ocean called the Upper Bay, where Dorothy Day will transport hundreds of thousands and even millions of passengers in the next decades.

Ellen McAllister moves in close, not to provide the assist but rather to convey photographers needing to confirm that the vessel is in fact a ferry for the City of New York.  confirmation provided andn documented.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s ridden aboard MHO but not yet Sandy Ground. 

For reportage on all three newest ferries, check out this report from New York Media Boat here.

 

Less than a year ago, MHO came into town . .   MHO?  It appears to be the accepted abridged nomenclature for the ferry SSG Michael H. Ollis. I had wondered how that long name would evolve in common parlance.

MHO looks like this . . . key in on the rescue boats and the double doors midships.  But since I was riding MHO, I wondered what I’d missed in my time away, so somewhart belatedly, i snapped this photo.

Later I caught that “other” new ferry at St George . . . .  See the name?

There we have it . . . it’s taken about half a year for Sandy Ground [aka SG?]  to get from first arrival to being in service.

All photos yesterday, WVD.

I’ve posted a lot of unusual ship names here over the years. 

If you don’t read Greek, as I don’t, the one above and below are the same ship, just from different angles.

Triton is a 14k+ teu vessel, making it quite the giant. 

Whether it’s jolly or not, i can’t tell.  It is truly jam-packed.

Over on the far side of Triton, yup, that’s Happy Lady.

 

Justine, Ava, and Ellen all played a role in getting Triton safely into if not out of the sixth boro.

 

Taipei Triumph is a bit newer and has roughly the same teu-capacity. Notice how small the ferry Barberi, which is closer, looks in comparion.

Gregg McAllister is working the starboard bow, 

with an untethered JRT Moran following, and Bruce A. ready when needed.

Bow and stern on the two green giants are slightly different.

Other than the sixth boro setting, the escort tugs, my framing in the post, and the fact that all the photos were taken by me, WVD, they are unrelated.

Anyone catch the vessel in this post that I did not acknowledge in any way?

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