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This weekend the Upper Bay portion of the sixth boro cradled two “fast logistics ships” or “Large, Medium-speed, Roll-on/Roll-off Ships” (aka T-AKR, although I’ve no idea how that alpha indicator relates to those descriptors;  LMSR would make more sense.)  at the same time, one off Fort Wadsworth, below) and the other

off Owl’s Head fishing pier.  The T-AKR above–USNS Sisler T-AKR-311–was preparing for sea trials at the end of her refurb period, and the one below–USNS Watkins T-AKR-315 was preparing to enter the graving dock in Bayonne to begin hers.  Sisler was launched in 1998, and Watkins, 2000, both by NASSCO in San Diego.

I also have questions about the relationship between the MSC–to which these vessels belong–and USNS, unless it is that technically all “ships” serving the USN are referred to as USNS.

Framing from memory, I took what were intended as identical photos of each.

 

I’m not sure when Sisler will return from her sea trials or

when Watkins will exit the graving dock.

I’m wondering if Sisler will be back in for a final coat of gray to cover what appears to be a primer coat.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts of T-AKRs can be found here.

 

Tinkering with the digital file, I’ve made SSV Corwith Cramer clearer here than she was to the naked eye as she came through the foggy Narrows yesterday morning.

Maintaining this blog over many years and springtimes  has taught me how much fog is a spring phenomenon.  Here on a clearer day, Corwith Cramer (1987) raced into the Narrows ahead of a near-summer rainstorm.

USNS Pomeroy is always gray, but she’s even grayer in the fogs of spring.

Had the fog not been here, you’d see the cliffs of Manhattan out beyond this car float,

and to my naked, non-corrected, non-digital eyes, Joyce was much less clear than she is here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful for assistance with photo manipulation tools.

I’ve posted photos of USS Little Rock on this blog last winter, when it was frozen rock hard into the Montreal winter.  Its lines helped me identify these vessels some weeks back as I was driving along the eastern shore of Wisconsin, where I had stopped to see what was in the Marinette Marine yard;  my guess is that these will be LCS 13, 15, and 17. 

The yard has also turned out Staten Island ferries like Molinari, Powhatan class tugs like Apache, coastal buoy tenders like Katherine Walker, YTBs like Ellen McAllister,  LCMs like Jennifer Miller . . . and lots of RB (M)s  . . .those are some that I know.

Here’s a link to Marinette Marine and its parent company.

 

And while we’re looking at Wisconsin-built government boats, check out these photos on Grasp.  They were taken in Scotland last year by Tommy Bryceland, a North Sea tug captain.

You may recall that just last week, Grasp was south of Fire Island doing training and a memorial service on USS San Diego.

Justin Zizes sent me these photos a few weeks back also, even captioning them as government boats.

Absolutely, an NYPD personal watercraft is a diminutive government boat.

Thanks to Tommy and Justin ;  the others by Will Van Dorp, who will be heading for the Great Lakes soon, so any disruption in posting is no cause for concern.   Keep an eye on the sixth boro and beyond, please.

Here was a related post, Yano, watched by John Watson and me simultaeously and from different vantage points, each of us unbeknownst to the other.

Before the snow and cold hit this past week, actually Wednesday Jan 4, I was tipped off about an impending BDD dry dock exit in Bayonne.  And when James E. Brown grasps the door–think of it as a plug–that confirms something will be floating out.

To the extreme left,  see the plug, and Capt. Brian A. McAllister positions itself on the stern of USNS Soderman.

Ellen has the starboard stern quarter, and

Eric has a line on the bow.  For a point-by-point comparison of Eric and the Moran 6000s, click here.

 

Note how the ship dwarfs the lighthouse, and

the harbor dwarfs the ship,

almost entirely obscuring Alex standing by.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whom wonders if anyone’s going to get photos of Millville and 1964 in the anchorage today.  I’m tied up.

Here are dozens of previous posts in this series.

I put this one up today specifically in response to a comment by a dear friend Rembert, who commented here about the apparent high center of gravity on American tugboats.  Mein Schiff 6, which is 969′ x 139′, appears to be quite “tall” but largely because of its verticality.

TUI operates Mein Schiff 7.  I’m guessing the “Leinen los”  here translates to the Dutch lekko [itself an approximation of the English],  the English “cast off.”

Here, from a different angle, is TUI’s logo projected overtop USNS Gilliland.

Steel–a great name–has similar vertical sides,

as does Orange Star, a transporter of my favorite beverage.

Ditto Denak Voyager.

For tugster, here’s an unusual shot of Avra, at the dock at night.

Let’s conclude with Navigator of the Seas, 1021′ x 127,’ so appearances aside, N o t S is actually less beamy than Mein Schiff 6.  Note the Chrysler Building in the photo below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp,who’s been unable to find air draft, particularly on Mein Schiff 6 and  Navigator of the Seas.  Anyone help?

And if you fans of the NYTimes missed Annie Correal’s story about shipping vehicles to Haiti out of Red Hook aboard Beauforce (replacement for Grey Shark?), click here to read it.

 

The gentleman in lower right had just cast his bait way out there . . . .

I was remarking about how unusual it is to see this type of MSC in the anchorage here.

But there she is, along with a smaller fishing boat.

And she was not alone.

The flag says this one’s French.  Forbin is a frigate whose namesake was once “grand admiral of Siam.”

But Forbin was not alone either:  beyond was

 

Niterói class frigate Brasil, U-27, a training vessel.

For some previous naval vessels from Brasil, click here.

What might cause them to be here?  My device . . . source of everything . . . has the answer:  the French at least are fishing.   OK.  End of story the device says so, eh?  So the story follows from here?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who previously posted photos of USNS Charlton

here.

And as a postscript, Phil Gibson writes and sends along this photo:  “Here USNS Charlton appeared [two days before] on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017 at 10:53 hours from the Brooklyn side of the Narrows on a foggy morning.”

 

It’s been a few months since I last used this title here . . .

USNS Gilliland has been alongside the Bayonne dry dock for a few weeks now, and the other day

I had the chance to see her alongside a bit closer.

This Danish hull has been in the water most of the time since 1972.

MLB 47279, based in Montauk, is a whole different type of government boat.

This source says 117 of these were built, introduced between 1997 and 2003, and

all remain in service.  To see these boats in action, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It turns out, I’ve done a post like this once before . . .  in 2012 here.  When I took the next two photos on Tuesday, I’d thought all the fleet week vessels had already departed.  Well, wrong . . . there went LHD-3 USS Kearsarge . . .

which reminded me this would be

a good time to use a photo by a jolly tar back about 10 years ago.  Notice the long-gone, long transformed Odin bunkering LHD-3….

Mid afternoon Tuesday this was a sight to behold along the East River, here approaching the Williamsburg Bridge . . . whatzit?

It’s another of the fleet leaving town . . . USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8).  The photo above and next two come from an alert Tony A doing his commerce on the East River.  In the photo below, it’s the green-fronted UN Building along with river with Trump Tower (dark) rising behind it.

When I caught notice of this, I thought I could hurry to Fort Wadsworth to catch photos of Yuma with Manhattan behind it, but my underestimation of  EPF’s speed and the coincidence of hitting every stoplight on Bay Terrace meant that when I got to the Fort,

Yuma was already making almost two dozen knots and headed for Norfolk, a trip that took less than 24 hours.

The EFTs are a further evolution of the HSTs, which I posted about here. By the way, Alakai was renamed USNS Puerto Rico, but then later that name was removed, since there’s a new EFT with the name USNS Puerto Rico in the offing.   So is the former Alakai now nameless?

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along the East River photos. Thanks to JED for the Odin/USS Kearsarge shot, and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Happy June!

In case you’re wondering which vessel(s) will be where, here’s the navy.mil listing.  These photos are ordered in the sequence they passed lower Manhattan.

USCGC Hamilton WMSL-753,less than three years old, is home-ported in Charleston  . . . and Seattle.   How does that work?

 

RV Neil Armstrong AGOR-27 replaced the venerable RV Knorr, mentioned here once some years back.

USS Kearsarge LHD 3, named for a mountain I climbed decades ago, is the fourth in a line of vessels named for the US warship commanded by John A. Winslow that sank Confederate raider CSS Alabama, two of whose crew were Raphael Semmes and Irving S. Bulloch,  off Cherbourg France in June 1864, less than a year before the end of the devastating US Civil War.  This account of the Battle of Cherbourg is worth a read.

 

Our friends to the North always have a representation, and HMCS Glace Bay MM 701 is this year’s.

Glace Bay‘s classmate Moncton appeared on this blog back in 2012 here.

Four YPs are in town from Annapolis. Here are some YP photos from two years ago, different perspective.

Here’s YP 705.

 

And finally USNS Yuma T-EPF-8 is without a doubt the newest vessel in this procession, having been accepted earlier in 2017.

I wonder who the photographer in the yellow foulies is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be wandering around town trying to get more closeups these next few days.  And below is another shot of USS Kearsarge.

That’s true along the Elizabeth River in Virgina.  Naval Station Norfolk always has a formidable array, like

LPD-24 USS Arlington,

T-ARC-7 USNS Zeus,

T-AKE-13 USNS Medgar Evers,

T-ESB-3 USNS Lewis B. Puller,

lots of patrols and a fence,

T-AKR-5063 USNS SS Cape May,

and its complement of barges.  Here’s more of a description.

 

Then, there’s the R class.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who suggests taking a tour if you’re in the area.

 

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