You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Great Lakes’ tag.

Here are the previous 8 installments.

We’ll start just north of Belle Isle and move north for these. From l to r, it’s Kimberly Anne and Andrew J, both sailing for Dean Marine & Excavating.

 

Near Sarnia and in front of the refinery that creates its product, McAsphalt Transportation’s Everlast lies at the dock.  Previous Everlast photos show her in locations as far east and downstream as Montreal. Here’s a bit of history on McAsphalt.  Want more here on the history of usage of asphalt, bitumen, or as Noah the boat builder called it, tar and pitch?  And want to get really nerdy “good news” about the evolution of asphalt road building and McLeod’s contribution published in Asphalt: The magazine of the Asphalt Institute , click here.

Venturing farther north and along the east side of Nebbish Island, it’s a fish tug.  Anyone know the name?

Farther upstream and hauled out, this tug appears to have Soo as the first part of its name, but I can’t make it all out.

Over on the Canadian side in the city of Sault Ste Marie, these boats appear to be floating for the duration.

On the US side of the Soo, it’s Rochelle Kaye and Kathy Lynn, both of Ryba Marine from the lower peninsula.

Beside the Bushplane Museum, it’s the Purvis Marine yard, beginning with large Norwegisn-built tug Reliance.

On the other side of the building is a menagerie of other tugs, including Avenger IV and W. I. Scott Purvis.

Wilfred M. Cohen, with some inside and out built in the US, lies along the pier.  Cohen previously appeared here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has the luxury of staying indoors today.

Wait!  Is there a tree-lined snow-covered canal exiting there?  A dry dock drifted full of snow and hidden by pines?

Nope, it’s a cottage like no or few others, launched in Toledo in 1923 as John W. Boardman.  Click on that first link to see interior shots of the cottage on the St. Marys River just north of Detour Passage.

Hundreds of miles to the south, Benson Ford serves as a similar cottage on an Erie island.

Less than a mile away is John Sherwin, fairly new as lakers go, and yet laid up for some years now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t this the WYT-60 Manitou that spent part of its life breaking Hudson River ice?

These photos come from a fortuitous pass with the 1943 built former USCGC at the north side of Lake St. Clair.

And she is Apalachee class?  Click here for a summer shot.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

You don’t know those names although the colors and profile look familiar?

 

The first linked post here was from exactly 366 days ago when the name attached to the tug was Craig Eric Reinauer.  Margaret used to be RTC 101. 

The unit was down bound in Lake St.Clair making her way to Lake Erie.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose hiatus online has ended and who was thrilled to see these familiar colors while coddiwompling.  Thanks to all who kept the lights burning and heat on in Tugster Tower during my absence.

GL tug Mississippi has appeared on this blog several times before.  She’s a tiller-steered boat that looks good and still works hard although built in 1916!!

GL tug Ohio was built in 1903!! and originally served as a Chicago Milwaukee fireboat. 

She’s recently changed roles again, as a result of her joining up with that green-hulled laker behind her.  Recognize it?

Now she’ll live on more decades, centuries we hope.

Of course, the green hull is the Colonel, Col. James M. Schoonmaker. If you’re in Toledo area, check them out.

Many thanks to Paul for use of these photos, and reminding me, I have a bunch of Schoonmaker photos I’ve never posted.  Maybe I’ll do that tomorrow.

Besides the title, you might place this photo by the background.  It was the focus of this post from about six weeks ago.

I returned to Port Colborne because I wanted to spend more time.  All vessels traveling between the upper four Lakes and Ontario/St Lawrence Seaway must traverse here.  And an alarm on Bridge No. 21 notifies that traffic will pass in a few minutes from the sound.

In the case of today’s post, however, I was caught between a need to head back across the border and a compulsion to see the vessel about to enter town from Lake Erie.

A schooner.

Leftmost flag on the crosstrees tells the tale.

It’s Lettie G. Howard, homeward bound and beyond.  For now, after a summer of sailing and sail training on Lake Erie, Lettie was headed to New York via the Saint Lawrence/Nova Scotia.

 

As she came into the dock, cold rain starting to fall and hint of winter, the crew tied her up with skill and aplomb to wait for timing.

Fair winds and warm days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

One of these days I’ll do a post on Great Lakes moods, as I’ve so far seen them.  Actually, an essay on the range of conditions might be fun…

CCGS Samuel Risley, an icebreaking tug, hints at moods in months to come…

Lower Lakes Towing’s Ojibway makes for Hamilton, appearing almost a cartoonish version of itself thanks to fata morgana.

This view is looking at Sodus Point, where I learned to swim,  from just over 10 nautical miles.

 

For the first time, I see Donald Sea under way.

Science ship Ontario Explorer is also a first-timer.

 

And I’d love to know Rascal‘s story, tied up here in Oswego near Ontario Explorer.

Working on the breakwater is Madison R, home-ported in Duluth.  I’ll post more of her later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Pride . . . I wish I’d seen more of her.

Harbour Feature would look right at home in the sixth boro . . . .  Now that’s a place I’ve not been in a while.

James R. Barker . . .heading at us here like a dreadnought . . .

 

 

At this distance, the power plant at East China, MI shrinks the laker.

 

As we get closer, however, she clearly is quite large.

Indiana Harbor is one of the 1000-footers.

x

Annie M Dean is a noisy Windsor boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . of the mitten and below the thumb . . .

Passing us on the land side first was Algoma Niagara.  She’s a recent arrival in the lakes, from China via the Panama Canal.

Finally, here’s a first sight from a distance of Joseph H. Thompson, a truly unique laker built in Pennsylvania salt water in 1944.

The tug here is Joseph H. Thompson Jr., a 146′ x 38′ vessel made from steel left over from the conversion of Joseph H. Thompson–the ship–to a barge.

 

The Blue Water Bridge gradually emerged, like a giant turtle, from Lake Huron waters.

Tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes has appeared on this blog before . . .

Recently I saw old photos of her with the Amoco logo on the stacks.

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And by now, the Blue Water was looking like a bridge.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Departure time meant we couldn’t watch Paul R. Tregurtha transit the passage on this brilliant day, but that’s life.

On our way out, Corsair passed one more time with a load of hay . . .

 

My references here are inadequate to say whether Mackinac Islander, laid up here, was built in the same yard as Corsair.

As we turn south, Poe Reef Light blinks a farewell

and we see sunset rays off to the north behind us, begging not to be forgotten.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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