You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Philip T. Feeney’ tag.

Just when I thought I had no more photos for another installment of “seats,” uh . .  more appear.  This arrangement of seating in this Erie Canal tug has to win a prize.  I can’t tell which lock it is, nor (I believe) can Bob Graham, who sent it in.  The captain on the Feeney at one point was Bob’s grandfather.

Is that a folding chair way high up on Augie?

January 2014

Might folding chairs be more common than one might expect?

Ceres has become inactive after a noble attempt to sail north Country produce down to the NYC markets.

Angels Share is the largest Wally yacht I’ve ever seen, the photo taken in North Cove in September 2013.

But the person on the helm got no seat, unless–you suppose?–they’ve got a folding chair in the lazaretto. It’s since been soldand renamed.

NYC-DEP Hunts Point has a variety of seating options.

And let’s end with two European boats:  Tenax and

Abeille Bourbon. Tenax has appeared on tugster in 2012 here, and Bourbon . . . here.

Many thanks to Xtian, Vlad, and Bob for sending along these photos.  Here are the two previous “seats” posts.

And a final shot below, that was tugster in 2011 at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum in Belle Isle at the helm of the detached house of SS William Clay Ford.  Note the “old man’s” chair in the background.

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Whatzit?

Well, six names later (George E. Wood, Russell 9, Martin Kehoe, Peter Spano, Edith Mathiesen, and Philip T. Feeney),

125 years after transforming from hull #7 at Bethlehem Steel Sparrows Point MD, to a Baker-Whiteley Coal co. boat

after many crews lost to time and countless jobs and

lost numbers of miles in salt water and fresh,

and all the ravages of neglect,

sabotage,

and time

scrapped from the bottom yesterday without

upsetting the crane,

Philip T. Feeney is gone.

Closure I hope.

Many thanks to Skip Mildrum for the first photo and the last three.  Click on the other photos to see the tugster post where I first used them.

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

Here were parts a,  b and c.   These photos taken over three decades ago capture a simpler sixth boro.

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Here the magical dory is tied to Philip T. Feeney, which now languishes in a tug purgatory.   The shore of lower Manhattan also looked quite different then.  That low-slung but stately building on the other side of the river is the Custom House aka Museum of the American Indian.

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Reef points and baggy wrinkle . . . this is a classy sailing dory not timid

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when navigating past a tanker of yore.

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All photos by Pamela Hepburn of Pegasus Preservation Project.

The forward portion of a new cruise ship?  Yes, I smudged the identifying marks a slash here and there.

Nah . . . almost 39 years ago she was launched as New Zealand Bear, one of two C-7 S-88s launched in Baltimore for the Pacific Far East Line.

Today Horizon Producer is one of a few dozen Jones Act containerships.  Here’s a foto of her leaving a drydocking at Brooklyn Navy Yard, a fact I heard about but never saw close up.

Compare bows here and

sterns.  Here‘s a recent itinerary for Kobe Express. More comparison:  Horizon Producer is 721′ loa x 95′, 25644 dwt.  Kobe Express is panamax . . . i.e., 964′ loa x 104′, 66,700 dwt.  See the 11th foto here for a panamax vessel shoehorned into a lock in Panama.   Tugs are Kimberley Turecamo and Laura K. Moran.

If you fancy beam-on profiles, click here.

As an aside, yesterday morning Producer passed this sad derelict launched from the same shipyard 82 years before our vintage containership, Philip T. Feeney . . .

All fotos within the past three days by Will Van Dorp, who’s mulling over a gallivant tomorrow.

Speaking of the Jones Act, here’s a recent NYTimes article about American shipping companies like Liberty Maritime not getting a fair share of US shipping. I’m embarrassed to say I’ve never heard of this company.

And shipping containers adding up to condos, check this out.  It’s threesquared.

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