You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Saint Lawrence River’ tag.

Here was “7” and 1 through 6.

This post will run photos from twilight to twilight…

Above and below, prosaically Service Boat No. 1 is doing pilot exchange duty.  She’s not large or particularly powerful or new, but in twilight before dawn she looked and sounded formidable.

Ocean Basques, here approaching the Laviolette Bridge, is a solid 200 miles upstream of the islands with the same namesake.

Ocean Basques was built in Collingwood ON, as was Ocean Sept-Isles.

Quite unique and speedy, Ocean Catatug 1 raced downstream.

As afternoon falls, Ocean Bertrand Jeansonne follows Ocean Henry Bain out of the homeport basin.

That’s the marine traffic control tower on the other side in Levis QC.

Returning to another twilight shot, here’s Ocean Henry Bain pushing a deep barge down bound.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Everlast has been a focus several times here before, so this post will add photos in exotic American Narrows landscapes to the record.

She has one of the more interesting service records among Great Lakes tugboats, IMHO.  See here. Then see how Russia and Greece play into her past here.

In the background here, you see Boldt Castle and

 

Sunken Rock Light, which would be better named “sunken ship” light.

All photo by Will Van Dorp, who will post again when able.

 

As mid-autumn displays her beauty at the approach to the Beauharnois Canal in the Seaway, my excitement spiked upon seeing MV Sinaa.

Sister ship to Nunalik, Sinaa was certain to be carrying specialized cargo delivery gear.  Here’s the rest of the NEAS fleet.  NEAS expands to Nunavut Eastern Arctic Shipping. For the difference between Nunavut and Nunavik, click here.  My first post with an NEAS vessel was here.

As we passed I saw I would not be disappointed.

The barges like Kangirsuk I and  II and the small tugs–I can’t quite make out the names. Anyone help?–are lowered into the waters near the Arctic destination so that they can shuttle cargo ashore.

Pangnirtung I and II make up the rest of the discharging equipment.

I’m hoping someone can help with the names of the small tugs and any additional info about them.  These NEAS tugs appeared previously on tugster here.   For a post I did on Inuit language, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who might be in a wifi dead zone the next few days.

 

Some more eye candy today . . . Portofino . . . Italian made?

 

Miss St. Lawrence is a beauty.

Is there an echo in the blog software maybe  . . . ?

Elusive is a Hacker beauty based on a 1920s design, I believe.

Another Italian bella passes us, or maybe it’s the same one traveling at speeds not permitted in the lagoon.

Legend is a beauty.  There’s a definite echo.  Let me say “exquisite.”

To avoid the echo, I’ll call Rumrunner just plain elegant!

 

I hope you’ve had your fix of post-summer summer refined craft.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ll get back to pretty wooden boats, but first . . . what’s this?  I missed its first pass, but the sound led me to check AIS, where I saw it was doing 33 kts . . .

Does Sipu Muin mean anything to you?

But here she is . . .CCGS Sipu Muin, an icebreaker/search&rescue hovercraft.

On her return she was doing 35 kts.

Her dimensions .  .  93′ x 40, roughly.   Click here for more info.

Click here for previous hovercraft on tugster.  Here’s more on this 70-ton vessel.

All otitis by Will Van Dorp.

Behold a 90-year-young boat!

Drool if you like.  Click here for more info on the classic Elco cruisettes.

 

Click here for the specifics on KaRat!

Here’s another . . .

but

all I can say about Flox of Montreal is that she is la tres belle Flox of Montreal.

Ditto this beauty.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows on a similar one based on St. Clair River traffic .  . here.

Would the captain below qualify as a “back seat” driver?

He with his attractive runabout was taking part in this event . . .

Wood like this truly makes attractive vessels.

Zipper is a beaut,

as is Glacier Girl.  Look closely at her stern . . . I should have taken more pics after she passed.

G4 below is 1993 built Riot, a 25′ Clarion boat powered by a 585 hp Mercruiser.

She’s a beauty at speed or slower . . .

Pardon Me has the claim to being the world’s largest mahogany runabout, consuming 100 gallons/hour, and she’s spawned another . . .

Pardon Me Too is Hacker built, 1956.

that even golden retrievers approve of.

I’m redundant and say . . .  no boats are prettier than wooden ones, whether they’re varnished like Karen Ann below or

painted….

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Again . . . on the run, chasing food like the finned one in the foreground, Federal Asahi heads down bound chasing who knows what.

Maria exits the Saguenay River where she discharged a load of bauxite.

 

 

And Insignia, later to be speeding downriver at 21 kts, overtakes us at the last bridges down bound spanning the River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Road trips sometimes include portions on water.  That’s the way this post begins.  First, let’s boat up the Saguenay.  On the north side, we pass Hotel Tadoussac and to its right, the 1747 chapel, Canada’s oldest wooden church.

Around the point is the Tadoussac ferry rack.  I could do more boat posts from this trip….

Transiting the river takes only about 10 minutes;  the companion ferry below is on the south side of the river.

Steep banks sink deep into the fjord on both sides, here south and

 

here north.  Seals sun themselves not far from where the elusive belugas swim and feed.

Clearly this seal is digesting.

This trip has been a recon for my next trip upriver here, scheduled for a few months from now.   About halfway on my 120-mile road trip, the cliffs draw back, exposing wide flats at low tide.

At high tide, about 15′ of water covers all the flats above and below.

Saguenay’s waterfront park has fountains bathing a plethora of sea mammal facsimiles.

Surprisingly, just north of that park, a gigantic aluminum smelting complex operates,

located there in part because of proximity to hydropower.

Just north of the complex, Lac St Jean fills an impact crater, one of several in Quebec.

Surrounding the lake are lake farms producing canola beans, corn, blueberries, and more.  I passed several blueberry fields before I realized what they were.  I took no photos partly because they look like golf courses several years overgrown.

The turnaround point on the north side of the lake was at Dolbeau-Mistassini, where a blueberry festival highlights summer.  The Mistassini River, flowing over this rapids, is one of many rivers feeding into Lac St Jean and the Saguenay River.

At this point about 120 miles from the Saint Lawrence, I turn from the upper east side of the lake, and turn back south along the west side, and then the heavens open and rain pours over the return to Tadoussac.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, who suggests you study a satellite view of a google map of Saguenay, QC.

 

These days, seeing a spout could mark this as Lower NY Bay portion of the sixth boro, but in fact, I’m pretty far afield, and that’s what roads are for whether they be terrestrial or watery.  The land in the distance here are the right bank of the Saint Lawrence, and those whales are likely finbacks.

Whales and seals amass here for the grub.

Prince Shoal Light sits atop an underwater mountain.  The name–Prince (of Wales) Shoal stems from the fact that the Prince ran aground there, discovering the shoal in the worst possible way.

By the way, I’m told the light is for sale for one loonie.  The catch is that the buyer is responsible for all expenses related to upkeep.

Click here for info on the various species grubbing up here, trapping their prey again the steep underwater slope.

Those are the sand dunes in Tadoussac in the distance.

Seals back float?

A fin back charges and dives beneath us.

Marks on the whales, like the notch at the base of the fin, facilitate identification and longitudinal studies of whales.   Find more if you “like” a FB site called “Parc marin du Saguenay-Saint-Laurent.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who goes up the Saguenay and to the headwaters in tomorrow’s post.

By the way, I know some large tugboats built on the Great Lakes for saltwater have traveled up the Saguenay in recent years.  Anyone have photos to share?

 

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