You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Amy C McAllister’ tag.

The phrase “supply chain issues” appears to have eclipsed “pandemic” in my thoroughly unscientific and entirely anecdotal and mental survey. The PANYNJ website does provide some “facts and figures” you can mine and crunch to compare 2021 container movement here to that in 2012.  An easy conclusion is that the container ships are generally larger, so throughput in and out is going to be greater.  Can you guess how much greater?

Let’s look at a sample of container ships I saw in January 2012.  I’ve no idea what the largest container ship serving P of NYNJ was in 2012, but CMA CGM Jules Verne, a 2013 vessel, is 1300′ x 176′ and carries 16,000+ teu.

Evergreen back then was operating Ever Devote. The 1998 Panamax ship is still around.  Numbers are 964′ length x 105′ width and 4211 teu.  That means it fit through the original Panama Canal, just barely;  anything over 105′ wide does not.

2005 Cosco Tianjin is also still working.  She’s 915′ x 131′ and 5752 teu.

 

Cosco Osaka, 2008, 849′ x 105′ and 4578 teu.  She’s still working.

MOL Endurance, 2003, 964′ x 125′ and 4578 teu.  She’s been scrapped.

APL Chile, 2000, 656′ x 89′ and 4038 teu.  She’s also scrapped.

OOCL Norfolk, 2009, 852′ x 105′  and 4506 teu.

By the PANYNJ numbers, I see that in 2021, a total of teu lifts (loaded and empties) is around 9 million, not quite double the 2012 figure of about 5.5 million.  Bigger ships calling, like CMA CGM Jules Verne, slows things down obviously;  one of those carries almost the same number of containers as FOUR times APL Chile.

All 2012 photos here are credited to WVD, and any errors in calculations get blamed to the same guy.

Keep in mind that besides container traffic, the port moves a significant amount of other cargo, including dry bulk materials, petroleum, other wet bulk cargoes [like orange juice], vehicles, and passengers. If I’ve left anything out, I’m sure you’ll tell me.

This secret lake had great ice for these old boats like Ariel, Ice Queen, Whirlwind, Genevieve, and others.   I was asked not to tell then, and by now I’ve forgotten exactly where this Shangri-la was, but

the ice boating was ideal.  Has anyone heard of Hudson River Valley ice boating happening this year?  The temperature is perfect, but that doesn’t always mean the ice surface is.  I checked here and it doesn’t look favorable.

Evrotas was getting an assist from Amy C McAllisterEvrotas is currently St. Eustatius-bound from Texas.  Amy C is in the Mariners Harbor yard, and I’ve not seen her in a while.

Amazing, which has to be one of the most amazing extraordinary names for a bulk carrier, was discharging salt.  Currently she’s anchored off in the Black Sea.  The ice of February 2011, the heat from oil, and the need for salt of the roads interrelate.

Then, as now, the sixth boro was busy with (l to r) dredge New York, GL 501, MSC Yano, Horizon Discovery,  K-Sea’s Maryland, DBL 17. I may have left someone out there.  To choose two of these, the originally Esso Maryland is now Liz VinikHorizon Discovery was scrapped in Brownsville in February 2015.

Ipanema heads out to sea in the rich morning glow.  She may have sailed into her sunset as Norsul Ranaee, unrelated to this photo.

Irida discharges salt.  She appears to have been scrapped.

MOL Partner is inbound on the Con Hook range. That’s a GLDD mechanical dredge at work and (maybe) some Bouchard tugboats in the distant left.  MOL Partner is passing the Aleutians between China and Tacoma.

We leave it here.  All photos from exactly a decade ago, to the month, WVD.

 

I hope you all are enjoying these glances back a decade as much as I enjoy putting them together.  If you weren’t paying attention back then, this hints at how much the traffic in the harbor has changed, just as it has on the roads.  If you were watching back in spring 2009, you might have this same appreciation at the changes;  In addition, you might be amazed how quickly time has passed.  Maybe you’ve forgotten about some of these boats.

Pegasus, quo vadis?  I’ve heard some ominous scuttlebutt, the kind you’d hear about any 112-year-old vessel. Your project site is still up.  Here she was in front of the Hoboken Terminal, which opened the same year–1907–as Peg was launched.

 

Starboard view and port .  . it’s the 1968 McAllister Girls . . . if she’s still around, I’ve not seen her in quite some time. In the background over near the Jersey City river’s edge, Clipper City and Pioneer sail toward each other.

Ditto the 1977 Sisters.

Ellen (1967) and Amy C (1976) are still active in the harbor, but it’s been years since APL Cyprine has called here.

The 1978 Mary Gellatly has been sold up down east, and last I knew, working as Alice Winslow for Winslow Marine Inc.  out of Southport Maine.

The K-Sea fleet in the sixth boro in 2009 was quite large.  Norwegian Sea was a workhorse on the Hudson;  now she’s Miss Rui operating for Smith Maritime. 

Houma (1970) has been scrapped.

Taurus (1979) recently reappeared here as Joker.

Onrust was launched into the Mohawk River in May 2009, and I believe she will again be sailing out of Essex CT.  Her splash up and over the riverbank trees was quite spectacular.

All photos a short 10 years ago by Will Van Dorp.

 

Take a camera and an hour and a half,

hang out at some point along the KVK,

if it’s cold then bring some hand and boot warmers and a thermos with hot tea,

monitor the scan function on your hand held,

and wait.  Soon there’ll be some traffic. Snap away.

Winter is a better time than summer for photos because of the clarity

of the air.

A wise man once told me that New Yorkers don’t really have to travel, because the world

travels past them.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Maybe I haven’t been paying attention, but it seems Amy C McAllister‘s  been out of the sixth boro a while.  May it reflects that I have…

A bit later Evening Tide passed, crossing the imaginary line between the ice-encrusted 9 and the WTC1.

Amy C left eastbound again . . .

Eventually Evening Tide did also, but I wasn’t there for the photo.

And finally, I’ve always thought the wheelhouse (s) lines on Lucy and Tide look a lot alike, although they were initially built three years apart, one in NY and the other in LA…

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here for previous SUNY sea term posts.  I’m grateful to SUNY for an invitation to ride along from the Upper Bay to the SUNY Maritime campus yesterday.  What a homecoming this must be for the cadets, and their friends and families.

Families and friends were already there off Staten Island.

For cadets–aka college students–the sense of preparing for a bright future must be palpable,

a reward for study and practice.

And the welcome comes from strangers all along these last few miles.  Airports and airplanes just don’t afford this grand arrival.

Those were construction workers at Rockefeller University’s River Campus above, and ConEd workers below.

Small boats followed us.

Folks at the Vernon C. Bain Maritime facility paid attention.

Workers on the Whitestone stopped to watch.

 

NYPD came to greet and

be greeted. “Selfie taking” gives a whole new meaning to turning one’s back on a subject.

McAllister’s Ellen and

Amy C came to greet and assist.  SUNY grads work in many different industries, including the towing industry, maritime services, pilots’ associations, law enforcement, fire departments . . . and the list is much longer.

But on the SUNY Fort Schuyler campus, the welcoming is most intense.

 

 

After 17 days at sea since their last port, this one is probably the best.

 

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp. Hats off to students, families, staff, and of course the 57-year-old ship. 

After a few more catch-ups, I’ll return to the account “Go West Again.”

The top photo here comes from Brian Thigpen.  Last Monday, the first 13000 teu container ship–OOCL Berlin— entered port, and I missed it.  Bravo to Brian for photographing it.  I suspect soon the 14000 teu and then subsequent records will be set. Escort visible here is Eric McAllister, I think.

With larger ships, escort procedures seem to be changing also, like tugs coming in sets of three and meeting the vessel outside the VZ Bridge.  Just a few years ago, nothing of the the size of Northern Justice–8400 teu–was calling here.

 

I really should get more photos of the ships passing through the sixth boro and heading anywhere from Yonkers to Albany.  Here’s Western Aida along the cliffs of the UWS, 

leaving the Palisades to port once under the GW.

Here’s Spottail westbound on the KVK, assisted by Ellen McAllister and  Bruce A. McAllister,  and soon to pass

Stolt Pride, 2016, showing a new look for Stolt.

Thanks again to Brian Thigpen for use of his photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was 53.

So many large ships pass through the sixth boro that unlimited time and a large staff of passionate observers could make ship watching (and learning from the experience) a tourist attraction.  Some of the names intrigue . . . like Stove Friend . . . recently built in the home of a quarter of all seafarers, the Philippines.

Axel Maersk may be one of the “longest” container ships that have called in the sixth boro, loa 1155′ x 140,’  assisted here by JRT, Jonathan C, and Miriam Moran.

Ibrahim Dede, here with escort Amy C McAllister, has been calling in NYC for almost as long as I’ve been doing this blog.

Eternal Ace . . . one of the 6400-car capacity PT, looks quite streamlined for a PCC or PCTC, but a newer design is coming . ..

Navios Venus is another fairly new bulk carrier.

I’ve seen CMA CGM Maupassant before, but this is the first time featured on this blog.  Kirby Moran, along the starboard side, seems to have a swell approaching from astern.

Liberty . . . last time I saw her she was Topeka, one of the T-class, and yet I can find no reference to a name change.  Hmmm.

Tanker MTM New Orleans . . . barely over a year old, is assisted here by Eric McAllister.

SCT Matterhorn leaving the Narrows bound for sea here has Basel as her homeport.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who just found out about this related event . . . related in that it focuses on the wet 2/3s of the planet.

 

or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

Margot nears Troy with the Lockwood Bros barge from back in October. Watch the variety of backgrounds in this post, too.

tr9

Jay Michael a few days ago passes by Con Hook.

tr8

Amy C McAllister rounds the southern tip of Manhattan towing a capacious cargo barge Columbia Baltimore, capable of carrying 690 tees..

tr7

Betty D light crosses the Upper Bay.   I didn’t say “Betty Delight,”  but the possibility for misunderstanding is there.

tr2

Brendan Turecamo escorts Tammo inbound from the island of Jamaica.

tr6

Fort McHenry waits over by IMTT.

tr5

Sarah D pushes in some upstate rock.

tr1

Fells Point crosses the Upper Bay bound for the Kills.

tr4

And to finish with a photo from September, it’s Rae, standing by for the move of Wavertree.

mt1

All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,540 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary “Graves of Arthur Kill” is currently available only through tugster

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2022
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031