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While waiting to get under way and depart the bayou, I have WiFi and might as well post some photos I’ve taken along the backroads.  I’m posting this one now but took it a decade ago, and I believe the restaurant is now as active as the Edsel motor car business. 

This set I took in April ’22 in Cape Charles VA.

If ever I get involved with another restoration, I’ll certainly leave the exterior paint distressed in this way.

A distillery creates an aged product, right?

 

This one I took in northern GA in December 2021, 

and have been trying to fit it in somewhere.  

All photos, WVD, who’s posted photos like these under autoster.   Jeeps can be found here. Old Car City GA has attracted me too, whenever I’ve been along I-75 in northern GA.  Part A of this series can be found here

Also, if you’re on Instagram (IG), I started posting there late summer 2021 here, and since then have found great photos like these under “ruralrideshunter.”

 

Full disclosure:  Years ago I was showing friends from Germany around the city, and chuckled when they stopped to take photos of squirrels.  Squirrels were a novelty, they said, because they’d never seen one in Germany.

The closest thing to an alligator I’ve seen in the sixth boro is this plastic toy that lay along the KVK a long time this winter;  I took the photo then because NYC’s terra- and sub-terra boros have their own alligator tales–with some basis in fact– like here

Given all that, I’m pleasantly surprised to have seen at least two alligators now, differing in size, alongside the vessel we’re readying to move.  More info on that that later. 

Yesterday I  managed to see the gator coming our way with enough advance warning that I had time to grab my real camera. 

This photo I took shooting straight down from wheelhouse . . .  about 35′ above the water.  I’d estimate this el lagarto” to be 6′ to 8′.

No, I would not want to be in the water with this Alligator mississippiensis.

 

All photos, WVD, who apologizes to the robots for interjecting this post into their orderly queue.

As the robots diligently do their thing in the tower, I’ve been out gallivanting, as you likely know.  The where and the how long . . . you might not know.  Answer:  I’m in the New Iberia South Drainage Canal, aka NISDC, kinda sorta between the fascinating home of Tabasco on Avery Island and the bayou still as uncharted (well . . . not really) as in the days of Jean Lafitte and his Baratarians, and of course some of their descendants. 

From a distance, you know the locations of waterways and ports from hundreds of spuds, three per vessel. More on this indigenous species of technology can be seen here (published 1985) and here

This one was supposed to have departed a week ago, but “boat time” says it leaves–as I do–when the work is complete, maybe a week from now. 

Meanwhile, the delay means I get to see a series of sunrises and sunsets

and the light effects on the bottom of hulls, something not otherwise visible except with a snorkel mask–at least–in the realm of the alligators.

No, I’m not going in here. 

Work on other lift boats ends, and new ones arrive and get snagged near our dock.

Others pass by on fingers of the NISDC to elevate themselves elsewhere. 

And when rain comes, it’s intense but cooling.

All photos, WVD, who arrived here too late for the Shrimp and Petroleum Festival (yup… that’s the name)  and too early for the Sugar Festival. Guess I’ll have to return for that. Of course, today is Creole Culture Day not far from NISDC.

Previous tugster posts from this area can be seen here, here, and here. With denser populations, places east of here have figured in posts like here and here

And just for context, the NISDC heads south to the Gulf ICW. More on this section of the ICW can be seen here

 

It’s been over a year since I posted “tagster 8” and this is just a small sample of murals I’ve seen and photographed since then.

Appropriately, the first two were taken in one of my all-time favorite places . . . .

Hannibal MO.  I want to go back to that town that was really magical for me.

These next five I took in the Pacific coastal city of Ensenada, in Baja CA.

Ensenada was quite magical as well.

Is it me, or do these mural animals, especially the image to the right, show some Mayan influence?  I understand that Ensenada is outside the boundaries of the pre-Spanish Maya, but this is Mexico today, and pre-Spanish art is now national.

This snake mural along an arroyo definitely shows pre-Spanish influence,

especially the head.

I can’t recall if I’ve posted this one before, but I took this last fall in Bushwick Brooklyn;  this is Metropolitan Avenue shop of Colossal Media, self proclaimed the “global leader of hand painted outdoor advertising.”  Do click on that link as these folks do remarkable work.

Rounding out this small sampling of murals I’ve photographed, here’s one for a wine/fish shop in San Diego CA and

and just a sign on a blank wall in New Orleans.  For scale on this last one, note the two bicycles in the bike rack near the center of the photo.

All photos, WVD, who hopes the robots are behaving.

 

Quick . . .  what do you know about this white lionine tugboat?  Answer follows.

We’re still being quick here?  What can you tell me about this model of Dianne E. in a display case on the lower level of a barge of Pier 66?  I know nothing about the model, but I stopped by at Pier 66 Wednesday for the first time in way too long.  Any interest in meeting gathering there one of these warm days?

And speaking of piers, I made my first stop at Pier 76 ever Wednesday as well.  It seems I’ve not been out here in a really long time. 

Harvey looked resplendent alongside the seating  . . ..

The NYS Canal system opens officially today, and that means Sparky might be a looper headed up there traveling north and then west to get back to Florida.  I’m just speculating. 

Anne Moore is busy.  Hey, NPS, I’d like to talk with you about this vessel.

Media Boat 5 is always out, always doing and seeing interesting sights.

RCC Africa is a RORO I’ve not seen before.   Here are Autoliner routes. 

Pacific Basin‘s Sharp Island left town light. 

Rolf Williams was returning to base after delivering lube solutions. 

And that brings us back to this tugboat . . .  the former J. George Betz.

All photos, WVD, who suggests you too gallivant around the original boro, the sixth boro, some warm day soon. 

No sandy beaches here, although I saw a few farther north closer to the US border and the maps point to some farther south.

My first thought was that this was a cross, like the Christ near Rosarito I saw, but it turned out to be an aid to navigation.

The entrance to Ensenada is a breakwater quite built up with tetrapods. 

I don’t know how long ago Kittiwake was sold, but she was built at the very familiar Washburn & Doughty shipyard in Maine.  Click on that link for a walk-through of the 2002 expedition/research vessel built for some folks in Narragansett Bay.

Wan Hai 322 was in port, as was

Ken Yo.

 

On one pier a clutch of tugboats and fishing boats awaits a call.

The two I got the best view of were J. Porres (ex-CMM Cordoba 1998)

and this one I was unable to identify. Boluda Towage Mexico is the leader in Mexican towing and a subsidiary of the second largest towing group worldwide. 

Fish, shipping, and grapes figure of the seal on the city.  

Ensenada has a vineyard culture and a craft beer scene,

the latter of which I sampled after hours and found quite satisfactory.  This drinking establishment had interesting decor on ceiling and walls made from . . . styrofoam!

Salud!  All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Fast jet boats . . .  like Patriot, doesn’t every major harbor have one?   Oh well, it gets folks out on the water.  There are many other options as well.   Other boats to see as well.

Ocean Valor was over on the far side, and I recall (and quote) some info about her from George Schneider:  “She is a former oilfield supply boat, built as PAUL W MURRILL 20 years ago by Tidewater Marine at their building yard, Quality Marine, in Houma LA.  With the oilfield slowdown of 2015 she was idled and eventually sold.  Her new owner is Ocean Guardian Holdings of Seattle, and her name and other features about her indicate she [may be] owned by Stabbert Marine, who buys ships on speculation in hopes of paying for them with charters-of-convenience.”

George got a photo of her underway in a different season, actually January 2022. 

HOS Dominator was moored nearby.  Both the HOS and the Ocean boat remind me of the views from a half decade back along Bayou Lafourche. 

An intriguing aspect of San Diego’s “bay walk” is the commercial fishing fleet.  I did not find that much about it, given my short stay, but I did stay long enough and walk far enough to learn about the tuna clipper work during WW2. See more here

 

Coyote, Lydorein, Cachalot, and Ebbco all seem they might have interesting histories. 

 

 

Hodor, a “game of thrones” name, would be a terrifying vessel to see if it pulled into a secluded cove somewhere along an unpopulated coastline.   

 

It’s 200+ feet of floating toy box, however, no matter how lethal it all looks. 

The 1970 Admiral Hornblower‘s styling gave me the impression it was much older than its 52 years. 

Finally, it started as an Eisenstaedt [or was it the Jorgensen one?] photo taken in the Manhattan boro.  nonetheless, it has morphed into a 25′ tall controversial statue to mimic, as was happening as it sauntered up. How could I resist a photo??!  That’s the USS Midway in the background. 

All photos, WVD, who managed to get the photos while waiting for an airplane connection.  I realized on this trip how good an impromptu gallivant is for the soul, and I need to do it more.  San Diego . .  I gotta get back.

Separate from that, given my itinerary, the establishment of missions in Baja California shows the progression of settlement early to late in Las Californias from south northward to Alta California

 

One of the joys of wandering around an unfamiliar port is getting surprised, as

I was to see an LCS underway.  I also saw some reference to the place of LCS vessels in the USN fleet here and here on gCaptain. More on the ship and the Independence-class variant can be read here

Know the LCS-8?

 

I guess one aspect of the surprise was that she moved through the San Diego harbor without an escort, as if this were a routine transit, and maybe it was.

More San Diego soon, a port I could have spent more time in and one I surely hope to return to. 

All photos, WVD.

 

We’ve updated our incomplete work from yesterday, and hey . .  it’s May, tugster is away, and that makes it a perfect time for another installment of  . . . truckster!  

For starters, how about a 1950 F-1 on the street in Queens!@#!

Along the road on a recent tugster road gallivant and inside the Outer Banks . . . we spotted this 1952 Ford, made to [attempt to] play in a place like the Dismal Swamp maybe.

Speaking of saltwater, this 1952 (?) GMC has been exposed long enough for a sweet patina.

Having slept in a tent recently near a rooster farm, tugster wonders what sound a rusty rooster makes.

Talking patina, he caught this early 1950s Chevrolet in the low-angle morning light, in Washington . . .  NC that is.

There’s patina, and then there’s post-patina, but the guy selling this told tugster he could throw a battery in this CJ and she’d start right up . . .

How about this one from a Great Lakes mariner, spotted not far from Lake Superior?  I’d say a camo Dodge M37?  Under all that snow, there might be a little patina as well.

On another Queens street, tugster saw this and wondered if patina can be translated into Italian . . .  actually patina is the same in English and Italian and you won’t find any here.

And to round this post out, tugster was returning from a Shawngunk hike the other day and saw this beauty, a 1950-something Studebaker, a real beaut.

 

Love the milk can and produce crates in the back?

Thanks to a Great Lakes mariner for sending along that snowy pic;  all the others, WVD, as he prowled the backroads and who thinks that not much says gallivant more clearly than old trucks . . . .  Complete text here by the renegade robots, who want to stress that they met their deadline today.

Try this: a cruise from Buenos Aires to . . . Milwaukee!! These folks are currently doing it.

Below is my screen capture as they were leaving the sixth boro.   Here‘s my blog post of them along the west side of Manhattan.

Post by the robots as WVD is away.

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