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Tribute to all things cat?  This one is teamed up with an APE?

 

Yes, Vespa’s APE.

For streets like these in the Viejo Casco, smaller vehicles are just right, but

walking is better.

La Iglesia de la Merced (church of mercy) had a cool atmosphere on a 90-degree afternoon, and when the organist began to play, I could have stayed much longer . . .  1038 pipes!

This was low tide and sea walls look formidable.

Here I turned to the left, looking beyond the “coastal beltway” from the Casco Viejo out toward the causeway, built on 1914 Canal spoils, beyond which is the shipping channel,  where a CMA CGM vessel heads into the Pacific.

On the wall of a marina building in what used to be a US military base, there was graffiti of sorts, a way to communicate,  reminding me of the mail drop on Floriana many miles to the SW.

Indulge me .. one more boat;  Gamboa Express was once Dutch fishing trawler Deo Volente UK-43.  The UK here, I presume, refers to the port of Urk, where I had a strong drink with a relative many years ago in a bar, in a no longer plumb building that dated from ?? the 1400s.   Read the comments on how Gamboa Express came to Panama here.

And let’s end it here with murals of the original canal construction in the administration building, now used by the ACP.  The artist was William Van Ingen,  from Philadelphia.  He was paid by the square foot, so as you might imagine, they are colossal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loved Panama and hopes to go back.

Happy Easter and Passover.

 

File this under “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”  See the two skiffs at the Atlantic level end of the Gatun locks?  And the locomotives along the top of the nearer side of the center wall ?

And here are another set at the Gatun Lake level end of the locks, and again . . . skiffs, arrow, and wind sock.

As to the arrow, here’s the key, from Eric Bauhaus’ fine guide.  Yes, they still function on the 1914 locks.  And see the skiff in the water there?

And right here, earlier this month, the skiff in the water.

As it turns out, the rowboat is the most reliable way to get the messenger line out to the ship so that the wires connecting locomotive and ship can get across reliably.

Here at the Pacific level of the Miraflores lock, a skiff at the ready.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

With all the dredging in the Canal, you’d expect spoils hopper barges, and

sure enough, we met several.  Cazalla is a 2012 product of SIMA Peru, Chimbote shipyard.

Barge 852 pushed by Gorgona I,

which I believe is an older boat.  But I’ve been unable to find any information on her age or provenance.

Culebra appears to be the same design as Gorgona 1.  Here she works a spud barge over

near the Gatun Dam, which regulates Chagres River flow to create the Lake. Nor have I found any info on the smaller push tug there, Quail.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The sequence now has been US-built pre-2000, Canadian right after 2000, then Chinese with Wärtsiläs, then Chinese with GEs.  Also, bollard pull had gone from 32 to 54 to 61.

The next order of tugs went to Armon Astillero (shipyard) in Spain, the shipyard that launched all the tugs in this post.  Cerro Jefe, like the others in this series is 94.7′ x 44.3′, and uses the GE 8L 250 to generate 6250 hp transmitted via Schottel SRP 2020 FPs for 82 tons of bollard pull.  Here Cerro Jefe heads into Cristobal.

Off the stern of Maran Gas Pericles, an LNG tanker transporting product out of the US,

is Cerro Grande, hanging “cut-style” and serving as an external rudder off the stern of the ship, and

beyond her, that’s Cerro Punta.  The new rules require that LNG tankers are accompanied by two tugs during the entire transit.

 

 

 

In Gamboa, we encountered Cerro Canajagua as she

fell in behind Valparaiso Express, a NeoPanamax container vessel.  These two are escorted through the entire transit.

And finally, in Miraflores Lake, it’s Cerro Pando awaiting orders.  By the way, “cerro” means “hill,” and this class of tugs is named for geographical high points in Panama.  For greater detail on the Spanish tugs, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in fact.

I’m still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic or high-tech.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got a good number of photos so far, but I’d like to see greater variety.  Thanks to all of you who’ve already shared photos.

 

Rio Indio could have been grouped with yesterday’s post because it’s a Z-Tech 6000:  ASD with 4826 hp Wärtsilä engines with azimuthing 7.8′ propellers in Kort nozzles, generating 61 tons of bollard pull.  I include it here for contrast with the rest of the boats in this post.

Calovebora came out the next year (2010) with an upgrade:  it’s an ASD (azimuth stern drive)  Z-Tech 6500, larger propellers and slightly beamier than Rio Indio, with a 12V228 GE power plant generating 5845 hp and 65 tons bollard pull by means of Schottel SPR 1515 FP units.  The GE power plants were produced in the big small city of Grove City, PA . . .  Pennsylvania.

Farfan is basically a twin of Calovebora, as are all the other boats in this post.  This photo was taken at the dredging center in Gamboa.

Belén also is a 6500.  Most of this series is named for Panamian rivers: Belén was discovered by Columbus, who also then discovered that the existing population were not hospitable to outsiders who gave signs of settling.

Dolega as well is fleet mate of the other 6500 boats.  Here she’s made up to a mooring in Gamboa.

Morning Claire was US-bound when we met her in Gatun Lake on March 5;  yesterday she arrived and departed the sixth born.  Her “slow” arrival is explained by the fact that she stopped at a half dozen ports on her way here, and as of tomorrow, she’ll be in Boston.

Providing a “cut-style” assist to Morning Claire through the Canal is Sajalices, another Z-Tech 6500.

And our last 6500 for this post is Parita 1, product of 2011, whom we met at Atlantic Ocean level the morning we were headed for Gatun locks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in info here.

And remember, I’m still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic or high-tech.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got photos of three seats so far, but I’d like a half dozen before doing a post.

Before 2000, the Canal was operated by the Panama Canal Commission; beginning on January 1, 2000 (Y2K), the Commission was replaced by the Panama Canal Authority (ACP).  It appears the first tugs purchased by the ACP were from Canada, specifically from Irving Shipbuilding.  One was Colón.  It arrived in Panama in late 2001.  

We encountered this tug near the Atlantic Bridge project, which will span both the 1914 locks and the latest set, Aqua Clara on the north end.

Compared with the US-built ones in yesterday’s post, the Canadians are about 5′ longer and 2′ wider. Colón is rated at 54 tons bollard pull generated by two Deutz SBV-8M-628s produced 4400 hp transmitted by Schottel SRP 1212s with Kort nozzles.

Coclé, shown here in Miraflores Lake, was the other tug in that contract.

Herrera, shown here assisting a bunker from the Miraflores lock to the Pedro Miguel, fits the same dimensions and arrival time in the Canal, although I’ve not sure how to explain how the Irving order went from two to more.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers more tomorrow.

 

A half decade ago I posted photos of Peg Wallace, a 37.6′ x 6.8′  Hooper Island drake tail fish boat.  Click here (and scroll) for some of the small fish boats between Ocracoke and Hatteras.  Long, narrow, upswept bow for the seas . . .  This one below has the delightful name El Avispon (hornet).

The major difference between the dead rise boats of eastern US and these is the location of the shelter.  The one heading for the market is Mi Novio (my boyfriend).

 

At the fish market, one boat was hauled out for some repairs and repainting.  Long and skinny.

Many more were either transferring necessities or anchored.

Norma Edith II might be a coastal cargo boat as well as a buy boat.

The fish market is located between the old and new cities.

Dona Martira J  . . .  another buy boat?

Kojira . . . a small purse seiner? The name sounds a bit like the Japanese word for “whale.”

and two larger purse seiners:  Kljubica (2014) and Lautaro (1982), now both out fishing.   These larger purse seiners sometimes carry small helicopters on the cabin roof to spot schools of fish.  And that upper observation station, it raises the height of eye as does the upper wheelhouse on tugs.

Martina C is in the port of Balboa, possibly still getting repairs.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this recipe for delicious ceviche.   Click here for the any sixth boro fishing posts on tugster.

And a repeated request:   Show me your seat.  What I mean is this:  I’d like to do a post on captain’s and/or pilot’s chairs.  I’m looking for the luxurious all the way to decrepit or basic.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I appreciate it.

Any guesses on the ID of the building with the massive curve?  Answer at the end of the post.

A lot of Offshore Supply Vessels (OSVs) anchored off Amador.  By appearance, I’d wager a vessel like D. Oceano once worked in the Gulf of Mexico.  OSVs “sold foreign” can likely be found in numbers in places elsewhere in the Caribbean and Gulf of Guinea.  How about the Caspian?

These have the same basic design.   Of these, all I can identify is the 1982 Diamond Sea, whose previous names were Coastal Moon and Geri Tide.  Their purpose is likely to transport large floating fenders.

Big Dolphin provides confirmation of the design/build:  this site says she comes from Thoma-Sea in Lockport LA in 1982, although it’s my sense that Thoma-Sea didn’t exist yet at that time.  Her previous names are Patricia Bruce, Grady Allen, Maple River, Viveros V, and Great Darien.

It’s Panama Responder I (1954?) in the middle and –the blue North Sea trawler conversion to the right–Gamboa Express.

Above to the left and below . . . I don’t know.  Might she be used to collect slops? Notice Gamboa Express to the right.  I could do a post on her.

Meyers Gustav here is way at the limits of my zoom.  Built 1963 in Port Arthur TX, she has previously sailed under the names Lafayette, Beverly B, and Galapagos.

Bocas Mariner (1981 and ex-Rebel Brio and Gulf Fleet No. 303) and Burica Mariner (1982 and ex-Arcemont Tide) also have that US Gulf  look.

 

Orion XX,  with Algab in the background, appears to be an oil pollution vessel now, but her life began as YOG-77 built in Bremerton WA in 1945.  Since then, she’s also been Bob’s Boat and Northern Orion.  She was once a twin of a vessel that ended up in the “Graves of Arthur Kill.”   See other YOGs here.

Victory is definitely NOT an OSV, but she was anchored near us.

Schlep is all I can identify here, and I include her here because of the Yokohamas alongside.

The photo below I took in early December 2014, Intl Defender near LaRose, LA, along the Lafourche.  So besides Panama, where has the excess OSV capacity gone off to, particularly after the Gulf oil slowdown?  Here’s a post I did back then.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And that curved building . . . who is it associated with?  Answer here.

Finally, I have a request:  Show me your seat.  What I mean is this:  I’d like to do a post on captain’s and/or pilot’s chairs.  I’m looking for the luxurious all the way to decrepit or basic.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel.  I appreciate it.

By the way, A to P, if you suffer from CRS as I do, expands to Atlantic to Pacific, across the skinny continent of Panama.  Today’s post makes me want to create a “crew finder” profile, as this would be a way to gallivant across the Pacific in style, in exchange for less work than young Melville was expected to perform.

Let’s make this a numbers post.  Yersin, launched 2015, cost $70m.  I don’t know my cabin cruisers that well, but the boat in the foreground with an overload upforward has US boatbuilder lines.

Yersin, when launched, was set up for 20 crew and 20 guests.

Yacht Lionheart runs a cool $150m.  Forty crew attend to 12 guests.

Andiamo is “low end”:  12 guests and 6 crew.  Ice-class hull, she was offered for sale in 2012 for $20m.  I believe I’ve seen her on the Great Lakes or the Saint Lawrence or the sixth boro, but that could be just a common name.

Joseph Conrad (ex-Saturn) dates from 1916, with a major refit in 2004.  She can run with 8 guests with 5 crew.  Priceless.

Azuleta, a Turkish gulet, is also priceless here, and works charters out of Panama City.  For some other gulets for sale, click here.

Rocinante, 2008 with a 2015 refit, has 32 crew for 12 guests.  She recently changed hands for $128m.

Constance dates from 1986, and 10 crew serve 10 guests. Previous names are PAMINUSCH, MONTEATH, MONTIGNE, and JANA.

Wind Star, launched 1986, accommodates 148 passengers with 101 crew.  I recall the excitement back 30 years ago when she was said to be the first commercial sailing vessel of this size built in over a half century.

Dorothea III, $50m, was launched in 2007 and can have 10 crew for 8 passengers.

Lalamanzi is a St Francis 44 cat, crewed by a couple from South Africa, heading home across the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

And finally, Belle Ourse (Pretty Bear) wins my prize for the best name.   She hails from Montreal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And the grand total is . . . a lot of dough!  But while I’m looking over the fence at stuff owned by the Vanderbilts of our era,  I encourage you to read this thoroughly fascinating article about a private jet broker, Steve Varsano, who sells to the same social segment as can afford these yachts.

 

Gatun Lake, slightly less than half the area of the Salton Sea, sees diverse traffic: ships, yachts, and small craft.  Below is a Canal security boat, of which we saw several in our transit.  That’s a range marker in the trees.

Twenty-something miles of the transit is across the Lake, named for a village on the lower Chagres River.  Given the amount of dredging in the Lake, crew boats are common.

Ecotourism boats are common in some areas  . . . these boats operating near Gamboa.

The Panama Canal Railway runs along the waterway in places, carrying mostly containers, a few passengers, and in this case repair equipment.

OK . . . this is a digression.

Given the traffic through this intersection of the oceans, pilot boats abound,

as do launch service boats.  The one above and below work on the Pacific side here.

This particular morning we saw a wave of SUPers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more photos in the hopper, including the expedition yacht above.  Any identification anyone?

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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