You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘gallivant’ category.

aka I’m off script, doing junkster instead of tugster…  This is like hitting the snooze button for another few precious minutes of sleep.

Besides,  I found this wall of old Detroit steel, some painted up like bricks in the wall.  Scrapping is a necessity, but here’s to preserves like this.

Given some pesky dark ghosts annoying me, I’m buoyed by playfulness here,

just scrappable cars piled up and painted

a splash of spring colors in winter.  Too many other places of scrap hint at the terror that left them there; that’s not here.

 

Someone had fun here once.

Let’s sport about . . .

let’s sign on with a program to get this year going . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose time in the grove teaches resolve that distinguishes us from bears, turtles, bees, and other critters that hibernate; as well as learning that his preference is for shooting outdoor painted or rusty metal rather than feathers, scales, rock, stars, skin, or fur.

Related:  Here’s a place to add to the must-visit list.

I went to bed early, never heard all the hoop-la, and see no need to change calendars yet.  I’m sticking far inland in the grove of the tree of knowledge.  It’s not that I have bad feelings about the new year;  rather, I have no feelings, no expectations, no resolve.  Eagerness might come tomorrow, or aging may have stifled it forever, obscuring the ways ahead as pine needles have these once-fine automobiles,

only a hint reveals here or there.

Maybe in a few days, after I put the new calendars up, things’ll get as defined as these shapes.  Identify this beauty?  Answers follow so that you can guess, that is, if you want to linger in this grove, as I certainly do.

Wandering in this grove, I’m looking back to get a sense of going forward.  And what I really see is what Jacek Yerka can render.  I even posted a grove car photo referring to him back almost six years ago.  You’re guessing the make and year of these machines, right?

Some of these shapes I can recall and associate with friends now lost, and

others challenge my memory.

Some could be dusted off and running in less than an hour,

and others . . . maybe need cutting loose from the vines, and

then some  . . . have been doomed by clueless work, ill-informed priorities.

More soon, if Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, decides he can postpone 2018 a bit more and stay in temporal limbo.

Oh, Here are IDs, at least my guesses, skipping over the truly unidentifiable, imho:  1953 Studebaker 2D Commander, 1953 Buick Roadmaster, 1961 Buick LeSabre, 1961 Borgward Isabella, 1938 Ford firetruck, 1941 Ford Deluxe

 

 

The reference here is this post from the last day of 2011.  So the other day I found myself standing in front of the self-proclaimed “tree of knowledge,”  a place that also demanded that there be no smoke.  Tree of KNOWLEDGE!!!  Holy smokes!

It was a cemetery of sorts, a mass grave where over 4000 formerly-smoking steel machines were congregated…

Here’s a photo of more of the tree of knowledge . . . with, I suppose, fruits of wisdom, on some of its branches.

The truly rare are here, fodder for truckster posts to come. Can you identify this and the date of the Studebaker above?

I always go for the low-hanging fruit.

It’s so easy to anthropomorphize vehicles of this era.  As a kid, I saw these machines’ emotions.

By the way, the grove where I took these photos is in NW Georgia, and I’ve posted photos from there once before, but that time I had not noticed the tree of knowledge.

Evidence that this is automobile holy ground?  No shoes.

I had to read this one few times before I got it.

The final trip for this one.

My guesses:  1948 Studebaker,  1938 Mack Jr. delivery van, 1955 H-series International, 1969 GMC P-series Value Van, and 1960 VW Type 2 van.

I’ve got many more from this most recent pilgrimage to the grove.  Let me know if you’re interested in another take in 2018.

Meanwhile, be good decisions and make safe.  I hope I can stay with this program through the next year.  Out with the old . . . out into the honesty of daylight, that is.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, some of whose previous “old car city” photos can be found in these posts. And a short cut to “old boat bay” photos can be found here.

 

Oops, I pushed the wrong button, so let me finish this now.

This Thames rhymes with “games,” Thames, not the other one.

This shot encompasses the most eclectic set of vessels ever gathered in an acre of water.

Here it’s framed even closer:  two schooners, a fiberglass center console runabout, a fast catamaran ferry, and the yellow thing.

It’s a Canada-built Vector 25 hovercraft running ferry service–more like Uberwater service–out of the New London and around the Sounds.

And here are the passengers of the hour

boarding and

heading out of the mouth of the Thames past Avery Point Light. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for info on Mystic Whaler and here for info on Columbia.

Port Weller is the north terminus of the Welland Canal, and as such, sees either a pilot boarding or debarking, which was the case here. Mrs C has an equally attractive fleet mate at Port Colbourne, the southern terminus. The vessel in the background left will appear in an upcoming post.

Some 80 miles to the east Kimberly Anne (1965) was docked in Rochester’s Charlotte port.

Walking along the beach there, I saw this historical sign of tug Oneida and schooner H. M. Ballou, at different times both owned by a George W. Ruggles.

Fifty or so miles to the NE we enter the Oswego River to find the busiest (IMHO) unit on the lakes:  in the past few years I’ve seen Wilf Seymour and Alouette Spirit at least 6 times between Lake Huron and Quebec City.   Here’s more info on Alouette’s aluminum operations, at one time and possibly now the largest aluminum producer in the Americas.

 

Click here for more info on Novelis, the client here in Oswego.

 

Anyone tell me the weight of one of these ingots?

Moving from contemporary to retrospective, the Phoenix dock was hosting schooner Lois McClure and tug Churchill as we passed.

For more close-ups, check out tug44’s take. 

Click here for a complete history of the replica schooner Lois McClure.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you all enjoy the last day of summer 2017 today.

 

Tomorrow I head back out on my longest gallivant yet, even before I process what could be from the previous jaunt.  But I have a list I’ll work on when energy and wifi coincide.  But not to worry if I’m silent for a day or a week or three.

Part of me would be happy to stay in the boros;  if you’re near the sixth boro with a camera, keep your eyes open for  Ariadne,  the perfect name for a cable-laying vessel.

In the past month, I passed under more than a hundred bridges, and over a bunch also.  On July 22, we passed beneath the TZ Bridge, one space to the east from the main channel because of ongoing work to complete the last span.

Just to reiterate the record, the old bridge opened in December 1955.

 

That gap will be filled with these, then still also 100 miles away.

On July 23 we passed under these next two bridges, the Smith (1928) … the southernmost freight rail bridge since 1974.  Here’s who the Smith memorializes.

Beyond the rail bridge is the Castleton Bridge (1959), the connector between the Thruway and the MassPike. “Castleton” is a village of fewer than 2000 people.

I call this the Albany Swivel, but the more accurate name is the Livingston Avenue Bridge, opened

in 1902!  You’d think it abandoned, but if you’ve ever traveled on Amtrak through Albany, you’ve been on it.

I don’t know the actual name or alphanumeric designation for this one, but its carries all the freight/passenger trains through the Mohawk Valley.

A blurry photo I know, but it shows an Amtrak train crossing just east of lock E-19 in Frankfort NY, once world renowned home of Carlotta the lady aeronaut and the Meyers Balloon Farm.

All photos, sentiments, and any errors by Will Van Dorp, and more bridges to come as wifi and inspiration provide.

 

Here’s a new look in ship-assist boats.  Can you tell what else is unconventional?

More on the design later in the post.

This is a classic design in freshwater tugs.  And this particular boat you’ve seen in a number of posts on this blog in 2016, if you’re a faithful reader.  It’s in these.

I’ve never seen Grouper‘s hull out of the water–and I hope to some day–but I’m imagining it’s fairly similar.

It’s GL tug Nebraska, 1929 launched, still working in Toledo, and in the yard only for preventative maintenance.   Over in the distance, that’s Maine, nearing the century mark and likely to be scrapped soon. Here’s an entire page with links devoted to GL tugs ….

You’ve seen this design before:  Cheraw is a YTB of the vintage of tugs like the sixth boro’s Ellen McAllister, but in the livery of the USACE.  I don’t know if USACE operates any other ex-YTBs among their very large fleet.

And in closing this post, here’s Seahound, 1941 built in the US and since 1957 working in Canada.  Since these shots show her at a dock in Windsor and pushing a barge marked . .  .

ferry service, I’m left wondering if Seahound shuttles vehicles between here and Detroit.  Anyone help?  And I know better than to take any names literally, but given her location, she might better be called Straithound?

So to get back to the top two photos . . . that’s Cleveland, the prototype for a new series of  harbor assist tugs built in Cleveland using a Damen design.  And what you may have noticed is the absence of a stack.  Engines exhaust through the stern.  Much more in this article from Professional Mariner here.   Here’s more from the Damen site.  Here are other links showing the environment where GL tugs operate while assisting cargo vessels in Cleveland.

All photos, sentiments, and any inadvertent errors by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful to Great Lakes Shipyard for the tour.

 

Not far from E. M. Cotter, the SS Columbia crew prepares for the next stage in the journey.  2015 and before had the project here, (with a clip of the actual arrival in Buffalo here) and last year I saw her from the Buffalo River here.

Last month, I had the good fortune of a tour through all the decks,

from starboard just inside the ramp looking forward,

from near the stern looking forward,

a gaze up the starboard passageway from the emergency steering,

a glance back,

a peek up the port passageway,

a coup d’oeil  back at the companionway into the engine room, where

the engine rods wait to dance again and

push the indicators as the

steam pressures.

A different companionway leads up to the main deck and then

another brings us to the ball room,

with a closer-up of the bar.

Ultimately all the way up where the once and future pilot will

guide her on delightful voyages as

her stack funnels exhausted power heavenward.

If you do FB, here’s their page.  If not, here’s the .org page.  Here’s some info on the crew.

Many thanks to the crew for the tour.

Somewhat related:  If you don’t see the clip of fireboat E. M. Cotter breaking ice on the Buffalo River yesterday in the comments, here’s a great clip, and it can lead you to many others.

Also, if you’re in Buffalo, be sure to check out the Buffalo Harbor Museum. 

 

The channels –here negotiated by Pride–run close to shore along the southern side of Mackinac Island,

necessitating careful monitoring of navaids, here is Buckthorn.

Near the strait that forms the somewhat undefined boundary between Huron and Michigan,  we meet Sharon M I pushing Huron Spirit, the barge and not the pilot boat by the same name.

The massive bridge spanning the strait here is about 10 miles to the east.  Click here to find out where the Mack Bridge ranks among the longest suspension bridges in the world as of now.

Note the blue color the water.  Here’s how the colors of the Great Lakes look from satellite images.  Earlier this year a Sea Grant scientist told me the new issue on the Lakes, especially the upper ones is oligotrophism related to zebra and quagga mussels.  Erie, however,  tends toward the hypereutrophic with especially serious algae blooms this summer.

Until I’ve a better system for night photos on the dark Lake, I’ll dispense with photos like the one below.

The Budweiser mural on the silos in Manitowoc today is just a mural, artwork, since the silos are now owned by Briess.  No beer–except home brew– is made in this part of this town.  As to the current owners, here’s the Briess Malt & Ingredients site, resident peregrine and all.

SS Badger can withstand anything the Lake can throw at her, but crossing in extreme weather might make for uncomfortable and dangerous conditions for the passengers, as was the case within 24 hours of my taking this photo.

Here’s a fluvial centric map of Chicago.  We docked just south of the area marked 4 here, but I decided to scout out Bubbly Creek, near 1.

Here’s a photo of Bubbly Creek from a century back, along with an explanation of the name.

My actual destination on Bubbly Creek was the Chicago Maritime Museum.  Check them out. If I’d have been there a little later, I could have gone to the presentation on Cap Streeter, a synopsis of which is here.

Once docked, though, I wanted to explore the southern shore water’s edge around to the east, to Indiana.  That’s the Chicago skyline below, and

here, is more of the picture I wanted, the Burn’s Harbor steel making site, part of the manufacturing infrastructure for which much of the Lakes’ traffic exists.

Quite a nice beach, actually.

All photos and sentiments and any inadvertent errors by Will Van Dorp, who will soon return to this area and suspend new blog posts until  reliable wifi is available.

After a seiche sped us from Buffalo to Cleveland through the night, morning found us under the Cleveland Memorial Shoreline Bridge, down where the Cuyahoga flows.  Cuyahoga, to most non-Clevelanders of my generation, connotes a many times burning river of the past.

Here’s a reference to that time on a sign inside the Greater Cleveland Aquarium.  I never visited Cleveland in the 1960s or ’70s, and without these opportunities to visit now, I’d have imagined it a possible setting for a Philip K. Dickesque dystopia.  As a caveat, let me say upfront that  I’ve not lived in Cleveland, so this post is based on impressions gleaned from reading and quick visits like this one.  But

this has to be the most unexpected postscript to any predictions made in 1972.

Believe it or not, this working Iowa is 102 years young.

All these photos–except the one directly above which I took on July 4, 2016–were taken in a few-hour period of time in late July 2017.

Restoration indeed, and with the collaboration of Cuyahoga River Restoration, cuyahoga arts & culture, and  ArcelorMittal.

Yet commerce goes on. It does not have to be “either-or-or.” A 634′ Buffalo weaves through what must be a captain’s nightmare to get to the steel plant under the corkscrew path of the Cuyahoga.

 

Simultaneously, a 630′ Manitowoc exits the Old River after having taken on a full load of road salt for Milwaukee from the Cargill Salt mines extending far under Lake Erie.

For both watch standers, this has to be an ordeal of concentration.

 

 

And a waterway already juggling commercial vessels and recreationalists, trains are another factor;  all small vessels lined up as one train after another cross this bridge move expeditiously once the lift rises.

 

My early 1970s self would never have imagined 2017 Cuyahoga’s mouth, although

accidents sometimes happen.

Still, I believe the effort is worth it.

All photos and sentiments by a gallivanting Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,197 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2018
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031