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Tagster 5 was posted exactly a year ago, so I’m taking that as license to revisit the series… today, when people put on masks.  Murals on buildings add color and design.  Whenever I have time to kill in a new or even familiar city, I wander around, getting exercise while at the same time looking for sights like these.  Guess the city?

See the purple squiggles along the right side of the photo below?

They led me to the far side of the building, where I saw this colossal image of a hometown icon.  Click on the photo to hear my favorite song from this depicted icon.

 

What language is Kraken anyhow?

 

Above and below . . . there’s dramatic range in the murals here.

 

Origin of “hula“?

If your residence is painted this way, do you need to attend to lawn or landscaping?

 

 

 

Guess the location?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who took these and many more during the course of an energetic several-mile stroll.

Art on ship’s propulsion?  I don’t mean props, but check out this followup to a post I did years ago . . .

 

 

Road trips sometimes include portions on water.  That’s the way this post begins.  First, let’s boat up the Saguenay.  On the north side, we pass Hotel Tadoussac and to its right, the 1747 chapel, Canada’s oldest wooden church.

Around the point is the Tadoussac ferry rack.  I could do more boat posts from this trip….

Transiting the river takes only about 10 minutes;  the companion ferry below is on the south side of the river.

Steep banks sink deep into the fjord on both sides, here south and

 

here north.  Seals sun themselves not far from where the elusive belugas swim and feed.

Clearly this seal is digesting.

This trip has been a recon for my next trip upriver here, scheduled for a few months from now.   About halfway on my 120-mile road trip, the cliffs draw back, exposing wide flats at low tide.

At high tide, about 15′ of water covers all the flats above and below.

Saguenay’s waterfront park has fountains bathing a plethora of sea mammal facsimiles.

Surprisingly, just north of that park, a gigantic aluminum smelting complex operates,

located there in part because of proximity to hydropower.

Just north of the complex, Lac St Jean fills an impact crater, one of several in Quebec.

Surrounding the lake are lake farms producing canola beans, corn, blueberries, and more.  I passed several blueberry fields before I realized what they were.  I took no photos partly because they look like golf courses several years overgrown.

The turnaround point on the north side of the lake was at Dolbeau-Mistassini, where a blueberry festival highlights summer.  The Mistassini River, flowing over this rapids, is one of many rivers feeding into Lac St Jean and the Saguenay River.

At this point about 120 miles from the Saint Lawrence, I turn from the upper east side of the lake, and turn back south along the west side, and then the heavens open and rain pours over the return to Tadoussac.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, who suggests you study a satellite view of a google map of Saguenay, QC.

 

These days, seeing a spout could mark this as Lower NY Bay portion of the sixth boro, but in fact, I’m pretty far afield, and that’s what roads are for whether they be terrestrial or watery.  The land in the distance here are the right bank of the Saint Lawrence, and those whales are likely finbacks.

Whales and seals amass here for the grub.

Prince Shoal Light sits atop an underwater mountain.  The name–Prince (of Wales) Shoal stems from the fact that the Prince ran aground there, discovering the shoal in the worst possible way.

By the way, I’m told the light is for sale for one loonie.  The catch is that the buyer is responsible for all expenses related to upkeep.

Click here for info on the various species grubbing up here, trapping their prey again the steep underwater slope.

Those are the sand dunes in Tadoussac in the distance.

Seals back float?

A fin back charges and dives beneath us.

Marks on the whales, like the notch at the base of the fin, facilitate identification and longitudinal studies of whales.   Find more if you “like” a FB site called “Parc marin du Saguenay-Saint-Laurent.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who goes up the Saguenay and to the headwaters in tomorrow’s post.

By the way, I know some large tugboats built on the Great Lakes for saltwater have traveled up the Saguenay in recent years.  Anyone have photos to share?

 

I’m skipping over many miles of my road;  although I took photos, they would fit into a blog about watersheds and Poison Sea-to-Palatine history–which I haven’t created–more than here.

Here was the first installment . . . almost a decade ago, September 2009.  Of course, the Rondout has figured in many blog posts listed here.

Solaris is the followup to the solar powered vessel called Solar Sal, which tugster featured here. Recently Solaris took a six-hour night trip returning from an event down south.  Much more info on Solaris here.  Learn more on these links about the creators Dave Gerr and David Borton.  Go to Kingston and get a ride and you’ll hear only cavitation from the Torqeedo outboard.

Here’s where Solaris was built.  Come and learn to build here too.

A few years ago, I was at the school and saw this 1964 catboat Tid-Bit getting a rehab.

This John Magnus was rowed all the way up from Pier 40 Village Community Boathouse in the sixth boro.  Some years ago, I rowed alongside it on a trip up the Gowanus Canal. 

Since making its way up to the Rondout from downriver, the floating hospital has been a “dream” boat:  maybe art space, restaurant, maybe scrap, maybe hotel . . .  I believe this is the last vessel operated by an NYC institution for 150 years. Technically, it was christened as the Lila Acheson Wallace Flaoting Hospital barge in 1973.   If you click only one link in this post, let it be this one for a montage of many photos of her in a Manhattan context through those years of service.

ST-2201 Gowanus Bay was Waterford Tug Roundup tug-o-the-year in 2013.  More on the boat here.

Sojourn is currently tied up along the creek.

Rip Van Winkle . . . in all my times up here, I’ve never taken the tour.

And to end this post for today, I’ve never noticed this concrete barge here before.  This one appears to be newer and larger than the ones just above lock E9 here.  I know nothing about its history.

 

More tomorrow.  Happy Canada Day to all the friends north of the border who treated me so well last week.

So I headed north and got a pilot . . .

and eventually I found myself here . . .  just following the pilot, mind you.

And what else would they call a vessel traveling on the big river north of here . . .?

This mural has appeared on this blog once before here, but in case you’ve forgotten it, it was added two years ago to mark the 175th of Canada and the 375th of Montreal.   To all my friends north of the border, Happy Canada Day.

Algoma Hansa is a US-built, Canada-flagged Great Lakes tanker. 

Algoma vessels are certainly what one expects to see along this international waterway.  Algoma Niagara has appeared on this blog once before at least here.

She’s a self-unloader–notice that CSL St Laurent is not?–built in Jingjiang China just two years ago.

But this time of year, you can see the unexpected on the waterway also . . . .  Any guesses?

It’s a new old vessel, nao Santa Maria from the port of Huelva Spain . . .  getting an assist traveling against the stronger-than-usual currents from. “Nao” is the Spanish word for carrack.   The assist boat is the Seaway Sinead.

The schooner is Bluenose II, here passing THE windmill.

You don’t know the story of the battle of the windmill . . .  This is one you should know.  It happened in 1838 and saw the Royal Navy and the US Navy pitted against “hunter patriots,” a motley band of Canadian and US rebels based in the US attempting to overthrow British rule in the colony 30 years before Canadian  confederation.

The painting above is based on the engraving here.

The road goes on . . . but I stop here for today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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March, it’s the only month name that sounds like an order, and since that’s the case, let me make some no-pressure suggestions, especially if you are in the central/western New York state area or ever will be.

First, tomorrow is the winter symposium of the New York State Canal Society, and there’ll be some interesting presentations.

Second, any time you get up here, visit Hammondsport NY.  I did that yesterday and what follows is a report.

Starting out . . . see the yachting pedigree in this hull?

Here’s most of the rest of the plane, an early Curtiss flying boat.

Aerial yachting . . . what’s the last time you heard those two words co-located?  In some ways, walking through the Curtiss museum made me remember a post I did four years ago called “1960s: the future that wasn’t.”  In this case, I could call this “19 teens:  the future that wasn’t, mostly wasn’t.”  Curtiss, working on the Finger Lake of Keuka,  just pre-dated the folks on Raritan Bay at Aeromarine.  And of course, float planes are still a exhilarating as I learned almost two years back . . . but aerial yachting . . . it hasn’t reached its potential mostly.

Can you imagine crossing the Atlantic over a century ago in this?

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America, the red airplane below, crossed the Atlantic in 1914!  Here’s more.

 

Here’s more on Betty Scott.

Of course, Curtiss also did bicycles and motorcycles, like this early version of a sidecar bike.  In the museum, motorcycles outnumber flying boats by about 100 to 1.

A few miles away, there’s the Finger Lakes Boating Museum, and by the time I got there, I was way behind my schedule, but housed in an old Taylor wine complex, it’s a gem that begs a visit, several visits.

The Imperial Pumpkin Penn Yan, built in 1927 and shown below,  is just one sample.

Here’s an engine so beautiful it needed a hull around it to show it off.

Happy new month, and it’s the month that’s

an order . . ..  march!  Get thee hence.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

MRC is located on the east side of the entrance to the Welland Canal.  This was a part of the trip I was eager to see. I recall seeing English River for as long as I’ve taken photos on the Lakes.  Paul H. Townsend I first saw here.

Townsend dates from 1945, and

English River  . . . from 1961. Here’s a post I did on her 10 years ago.

 

Marcoux Princess of Acadia arrived here on a towline from the Maritimes.  Click here for photos of her on the Saint Lawrence a year and a half ago.

 

Doubled up at the south end of the scrap yard were Algorail and Algoway, launched in 1968 and 1972, respectively.

 

Algoway on a towline was featured here.  This is the first post that includes Algorail.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is Oswego to Port Colborne, by way of Rochester . . . actually Charlotte on the Genesee.   The whale-watch headed Grande Caribe.  No . . . the Great Lakes have no whales. At the port is Robert S. Pierson, a river-class bulker.

I repeat a variation of this image.  The Erie canal flows under the arched bridge and the Genesee . . . under the longer, flatter bridge.

We take a pilot right outside Port Weller, the Ontario end of the Welland Canal, and then

enter upbound.

 

Nassau-flagged Victory II met us between locks 7 and 8.

From right to left here, that’s Pierson  again, a sailing vessel, and Capt. Henry Jackman.

Now more on that sailing vessel . . . schooner Empire Sandy.  You have to read this link:  she started her life as a tugboat!

HMCS Oriole is a 1921 ketch, whose origins hearken back to both Toronto and Neponset, MA.

 

Capt. Henry Jackman waits in Port Colborne as does

Baie St Paul. Jackman was built in the Collingwood Shipyards, whereas St Paul comes from Jiangsu China.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This will be Rome to Oswego, a downstream run. With a drone, I would have gotten the other boat and our own.

 

Fishing might be good at Three Rivers.

Tug Syracuse waits at the section yard.

 

The Oswego River appears tor teem with fish, sought by man and raptor.

As it’s Saturday, Canal equipment waits at Minetto and

Oswego.

Only lock O-9 divides the river here with the Great Lakes.

All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s make this Fonda–current location of Urger— to Marcy, beginning of one of the highest sections of the Canal.

Approaching E-13 westbound, there’s a row of yellow painted bollards . . . starting from lower left here.

Each of those yellow bollards is on a sunken concrete barge. More sunken concrete barges can be seen at E-09.

We encountered lots of traffic . . .

including Dolphin, a

Canadian beaut.

Other traffic included Lil Diamond II and

Roman Holiday. 

At Marcy, Governor Roosevelt and

Erie were in the water, as were two buoy boats not shown.

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