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Chugging right along from yesterday’s post . . . I’m recalling my visits in recent years to a certain junkyard not far from I-75 in Georgia . . . . of course I Today’s post will start out right in front of the office of the captain of the port,

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1957 Ford Fairlane

here’s the view of the port from across the street,

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A recent Hyundai hangs with a 1950s Pontaic, Chevy, and Cadillac.

and there’s a whole lot more to see when I walk down the street.

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1945ish Packard Clipper with great paint and missing trim.

 

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1946 Ford and 1955 Chevrolet

 

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1957 Chevrolet and 1947 Chevrolet with another Hyundai

 

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1958ish Fiat? and 1958 Rambler

 

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Prominent is a 1958 Buick? but also a three-wheeler, some old Chevys and a Mercury.

 

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1949 Dodge

 

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1956 Pontiac

 

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1946 DeSoto

 

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1950 Chevy

And we end today with another shot of the 1957 Ford, next to a 1959 Buick convertible.

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To put these photos into a context, watch a few minutes of this video, showing Havana streets about three generations ago, just to see that it was all the same cars. For what appears to be fairly well documented history, read this article and this one as well.  For a bit more history with vintage air travel posters and maps, click here.

And unless I hear loud boos and hisses about topic, I have one more installment.  Boos and hisses about misidentification–or anything else– as well as questions and up-antes  are entirely welcome.  I was thinking to put some of these together into a 18-month calendar for my brother, who is the REAL car nut in my life, eh?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except this last one where he plays talent and the driver takes the photo.

Back in 2011 on my way back from my daughter’s wedding in Georgia, I passed through Key West aka the Conch Republic, and while there, of course, I couldn’t help stopping at Fort Jefferson on Dry Tortugas, where here, I wrote about first hearing of “chugs” and seeing one.

Given that and given the fact that in a few days south of the Florida Strait, I saw about one percent of the 60,000 or so vintage US automobiles, many with Soviet pollution-rich but said-to-be economical engines such as Volgas, let me in the spirit of truckster share a few here.   Chug was the sound many of them made, and between the leaded fuel and absence of pollution controls, that chug-chug-chug was palpable.  I’ll identify what I can, but most of my years/makes are guesses.

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1949 Chevrolet

 

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1950 Chevrolet

 

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1940 Chevrolet

 

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1950 Buick with 1956 Buick parked behind it

 

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1951 Willys modified into small bus

 

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1942 Chevrolet

 

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Extra points if you guess this brand of truck.  Answer at end of post.   And note the horse/cart hauling sugar cane.

 

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1951 Buick

And here we are back to the 1949 Chevrolet, with the

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Volga engine, i.e., this is a Cold War hybrid.  Click here for an insightful article which calls Cuba the “Galapagos Islands” of cars. 

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More soon, if you wish, before I get back to tugs and other workboats.

All photos taken by Will Van Dorp, with one at least by his camera.

That red truck pulling the chassis with the Hamburg-Sud container is made by China National Heavy Truck Group.  China also supplies many of the modern buses. 

 

Click on the photo below to learn more about it, taken in late January 118 years ago.

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Here’s that same location last week.  Sorry about holding the camera crooked;  if I straighten it out now, the 1845 lighthouse disappears.

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The guys sitting on the seawall to the extreme left are tour bus drivers.  Did you notice the two tour buses on the central ridge line in the photo above?

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A little farther into the port I saw Sea Wolf A, 72′ x 23′ built by Damex in Santiago in 1996, and in spite of this info, not laid up. You can find more info here by using the “find” feature.

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Alnair . . . I have no information on her. Anyone help?

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And a pilotboat . . . is a pilotboat, not to disparage pilots and their skills in any way whatsoever.

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Can you guess the white ship whose hull dwarfs the pilot?

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Find the answer here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was on a journalistic mission.

Click here for posts about many other ports.

One of my (formerly) secret heroes is Guy Noir, secret because I may be revealing too much about myself in admitting that.  But life’s too short to care about drivel like that.   Noir has an office on the 20th floor of the Acme Building in a “city that knows how to keep its secrets,”  yet each week a different mysterious woman seems to find him in quest of a favor. So imagine this as a view from Noir’s Portsmouth VA office around 1600 hrs .  . . on the last night of the year.  It’s rainy but warm and all the creeks feeding into the estuary course in, with color and warmth of some old coffee  . . .  I was last here, though on the river then, about six weeks ago here.  And notice the hammerhead crane to the right.  Here’s

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the deal.  But I’ll come back to this history stuff later.

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For now, this is a record of the last night of the year, what my parents used to call “old years night.”

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In the fading light, there’s Michael J. McAllister, another McA (Nancy??) behind it, Camie, and a trio of Robbins Maritime minis called Thunder, Lightning, and Squall.  AND if you look carefully beyond the McAllister tugs, you’ll see Dann Ocean’s Neptune and the Colonna Shipyard, where a Staten Island ferry is being overhauled. Click here for previous posts referring to Colonna.

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In the driving rain as the last hours of the year ebb away, Vane tug Chatham heads south;  the oil must move . . . . even when the postal stream sleeps.

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Shadows . . . on a rainy night paint the river.   And under the “tent” inside

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And so ended 2015 for me . . . not a low-flying aircraft but a high flying window perch.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, private and public eye.

 

Let’s go farther south–i.e., up the Elizabeth. Covered barge . . .

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pushed by Gram-Me.  Coal?

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Capt. Woody and Alexis of w3marine have the best logo.  See it better here. Fleetmate Ocean Endeavor was in yesterday’s post.

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Lorette is one of two Norfolk tugs that used to be Moran boats.

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As you can see by the livery, Ellie J is also a Norfolk tug, but although

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similar, Stevens Towing’s Island Express is not.

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Here’s a small portion of McAllister Virginia‘s fleet:  Nancy and Eileen.  The last time I saw Eileen she was returning a Staten Island ferry post rehab.

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Vulcan construction has its logo on a number of tugs here, including Arapaho,

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Aries,

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Capt. Ron L, and

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VMC Chattanooga.

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Alexander Duff is a Vane tug.

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Kodiak, here I think leaving the soybean depot– used to be Vane’s Capt. Russi.

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Kodiak has been in the sixth boro on a few occasions.  Here’s more of her current fleet:  Maverick, ?Southern Star?, and Challenger.

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Hoss, like the boats immediately above is also an Intracoastal Marine boat. Hoss is a close relative via Wiley Manufacturing of the sixth boro’s Patricia.   Sun Merchant, which I saw here in Savannah, is a Vane boat.

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Corman Marine’s Captain Mac is yet another tugboat in the Elizabeth owned by a construction company.

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Camie and Cajun look alike but may be owned by Robbins Maritime and Bay Transportation, respectively.

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Three Sisters seems to be owned by a family-oriented company called Smith Brothers.

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Elizabeth Ann, operated by Atlantic Gulf Towing, used to be known as El Hippo Grande, a truly satisfactory name for a workboat.

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And finally, we seem to have two Skanska-owned boats, Ranger and

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Cap’n Ed.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who imagined there’d be only about 10 photos in this post about a short section of the waterway in the Norfolk/Portsmouth VA area.  For the entirely delightful travel through the area, I am very grateful to the USMMA Sailing Foundation.

A request, though.   Over by the Norfolk Dredging yard, I saw their small tug Palmyra through the trees and could not get a good shot.  Has anyone taken one over the years?  If so, could you share it on this blog?  Send me an email, please.

Finally, some of you got an earlier version of this last night when I pushed the wrong button.  Sorry about that.  I could give other reasons for that error, but it was a slip and I had not intended you to think I had started using placeholder gibberish as captions.

Cheers.

 

It’s still November 2015, so for me, it’s day 22 of this focus.

Let’s head south again from Hampton Roads, where a lineup of MSC vessels includes a supply vessel called Supply.

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I guess this would be a small Navy yard tug.  Click here (and scroll) to see a variant with roll bars.   Here it closes the security gate after a Moran tug has come inside.

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More security is provided by WPB-87329 Cochito.

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In order from near to far on this foggy day are LSD-46 Tortuga, DDG-103 Truxton, and USNS T-AH-20 Comfort.

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Emily Anne McAllister (2003) waits at the Norfolk International Terminals.

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And there’s a long list of commercial tugboats, more than I want to squeeze into this post.  So let’s start with Ocean Endeavor (1966),

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Night Hawk (1981),

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Dauntless II (1953),

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Choptank (2006),

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Payton Grace Moran (2015),

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Goose Creek (1981), and finally for now

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Steven McAllister (1963).

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All foggy/rainy photos above by Will Van Dorp.

One of these days we’ll meander farther south on the Elizabeth River aka ICW.  In the meantime, if you have photos of work vessels from any port huge or tiny, get in touch;  there are still a few days of November left.

And since we’re a week or so from December, my idea for next month’s collaboration is “antique/classic” workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  “The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.”  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

 

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.

GHP&W 3.   And I don’t mean the northern Staten Island area named for a developer with the first name George.

As the lobster might suggest, this St. George is in Maine, and named for the river which is named for the English explorer/captor of Squanto who visited this area in 1607.   I was confused the first time I arrived here because I was looking for Port Clyde and all the signs said was “St. George.”

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But it turns out that within the town of St. George are villages like Tennants Harbor, Martinsville, and Port Clyde.

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I hope to return to Port Clyde next year, in part because this is the mainland wharf for the Monhegan Boat Line.  Elizabeth Ann was preparing for the passenger run, but

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I didn’t get to see the “world-famous Laura B,” a repurposed 1943 Army T-boat, which after doing WW2 duty in the Pacific, ran lobsters from Maine to Boston and New York. Anyone know of old NYC sixth-boro photos of Laura B delivering Maine fruits of the sea to the city?   Laura B was working, delivering freight to Monhegan.  And these cargo nets filled with firewood await for the next cargo run.

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A glance at a map or chart of the peninsulas of Maine is enough to explain the value of craft like Reliance and her sisters.

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The work boats in the harbor represent only part of the “gear” needed to fish;  the rest is on paper.

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Even on rainy days, I like looking at these boats.  Taking photos of paperwork  . . . never so much.

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From a short conversation of the wharf, I have the sense that the paperwork and regulations keep vessels like these in port many more days than they fish. And global water temperature trends make this an even harder way to earn a living.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wants to get back up here soon.

 

Here was the previous post.

It was all highlights while taking two ferries to get from Long Island to my destination, but here are some photos.  I left Orient Point along with small fishing boats like Fishy Business, 1995 built.

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North Star, built in 1968 as an offshore supply vessel, was purchased by Cross Sound Ferry in 1984 and converted to an auto/passenger ferry.

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As North Star arrived, the 2007 Plum Island left Orient for its namesake island.

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Hudson River-bound Grande Caribe (1997) cut across the Sound with its unique profile.

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Eventually the destination appears . . . the cliffs off the north side of Block Island.

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The unmistakeable Viking (1976) passes as we round the island toward New Shoreham.

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Interstate Navigation’s Block Island (1997) welcomes us into the old port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s looking back at the Maryland Rte 213 Bridge at Chesapeake City, as we exit the C & D Canal and enter the Chesapeake at sunrise.

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On call on the north side of the waterway is Delaware Responder, one of a fleet of 15 nationwide.  Here and here I’ve previously posted.

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We pass the unmistakeable Dann Marine docks and

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head into the Chesapeake, water level of the largest watershed in the East, which stretches northward nearly to the Mohawk and the Erie Canal.   The area is the southern end of a flyway that extends to the Saint Lawrence.

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You’d think that almost obscured light would be called Eagle Point Light, but the turkey gets the name.

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The Bay sees a lot of traffic, although Amara Zee, a traveling theatre show,  has to be one of the more unique vessels navigating it.  I have more photos of Amara Zee, which I saw up close more than 10years ago, but I’ll put them up only if I hear from readers about experience with the group, which traveled from the Hudson to the Saint Lawrence, could not enter their homeport in Canada without being arrested, and are now headed south for winter shows.   Note Turkey Point Light in the distance directly off the stern.

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The Chesapeake is to crabs as Maine water is to lobster.

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Aerostats, though, surprised me.  This one is over 200′ loa, in spite of its appearance.  The tether is monitored by

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patrols from APG, Aberdeen Proving Ground, a facility that replaced the outgrown Sandy Hook Proving Ground.

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As this post began with a bridge, so it ends . . . the Key Bridge marks the entrance to Baltimore.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Following up from yesterday’s post . . . tug Chesapeake is larger, more powerful than the other Patapsco-class tugs.  It also has more windows in the wheelhouse.  In addition, the photos of Chesapeake and Susquehanna were taken in Baltimore and Savannah, resp.; not in NYC’s sixth boro as were the others.

For today I’ll start with a mystery tug, one I’ve not found any info on.

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I’d love to know more.

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Also, in Baltimore, it’s Annabelle Dorothy Moran.

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Click here to see my first shots of Annabelle almost three years ago as she sailed underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.

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And another boat I know nothing about . . . McL?

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Donal G. McAllister is Baltimore’s McAllister ex-YTB.

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New England Coast is another boat I’d never seen before . . . docked here at the Dann Marine base in Chesapeake City, MD.

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And approaching Chesapeake City from the south, it’s Calusa Coast, a frequent visitor to the sixth boro. I photographed her first here, over eight years ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

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Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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