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March, it’s the only month name that sounds like an order, and since that’s the case, let me make some no-pressure suggestions, especially if you are in the central/western New York state area or ever will be.

First, tomorrow is the winter symposium of the New York State Canal Society, and there’ll be some interesting presentations.

Second, any time you get up here, visit Hammondsport NY.  I did that yesterday and what follows is a report.

Starting out . . . see the yachting pedigree in this hull?

Here’s most of the rest of the plane, an early Curtiss flying boat.

Aerial yachting . . . what’s the last time you heard those two words co-located?  In some ways, walking through the Curtiss museum made me remember a post I did four years ago called “1960s: the future that wasn’t.”  In this case, I could call this “19 teens:  the future that wasn’t, mostly wasn’t.”  Curtiss, working on the Finger Lake of Keuka,  just pre-dated the folks on Raritan Bay at Aeromarine.  And of course, float planes are still a exhilarating as I learned almost two years back . . . but aerial yachting . . . it hasn’t reached its potential mostly.

Can you imagine crossing the Atlantic over a century ago in this?

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America, the red airplane below, crossed the Atlantic in 1914!  Here’s more.

 

Here’s more on Betty Scott.

Of course, Curtiss also did bicycles and motorcycles, like this early version of a sidecar bike.  In the museum, motorcycles outnumber flying boats by about 100 to 1.

A few miles away, there’s the Finger Lakes Boating Museum, and by the time I got there, I was way behind my schedule, but housed in an old Taylor wine complex, it’s a gem that begs a visit, several visits.

The Imperial Pumpkin Penn Yan, built in 1927 and shown below,  is just one sample.

Here’s an engine so beautiful it needed a hull around it to show it off.

Happy new month, and it’s the month that’s

an order . . ..  march!  Get thee hence.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

MRC is located on the east side of the entrance to the Welland Canal.  This was a part of the trip I was eager to see. I recall seeing English River for as long as I’ve taken photos on the Lakes.  Paul H. Townsend I first saw here.

Townsend dates from 1945, and

English River  . . . from 1961. Here’s a post I did on her 10 years ago.

 

Marcoux Princess of Acadia arrived here on a towline from the Maritimes.  Click here for photos of her on the Saint Lawrence a year and a half ago.

 

Doubled up at the south end of the scrap yard were Algorail and Algoway, launched in 1968 and 1972, respectively.

 

Algoway on a towline was featured here.  This is the first post that includes Algorail.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is Oswego to Port Colborne, by way of Rochester . . . actually Charlotte on the genes.   The whale-watch headed Grande Caribe.  No . . . the Great Lakes have no whales. At the port is Robert S. Pierson, a river-class bunker.

I repeat a variation of this image.  The Erie canal flows under the arched bridge and the Genesee . . . under the longer, flatter bridge.

We take a pilot right outside Port Weller, the Ontario end of the Welland Canal, and then

enter upbound.

 

Nassau-flagged Victory II met us between locks 7 and 8.

From right to left here, that’s Pierson  again, a sailing vessel, and Capt. Henry Jackman.

Now more on that sailing vessel . . . schooner Empire Sandy.  You have to read this link:  she started her life as a tugboat!

HMCS Oriole is a 1921 ketch, whose origins hearken back to both Toronto and Neponset, MA.

 

Capt. Henry Jackman waits in Port Colborne as does

Baie St Paul. Jackman was built in the Collingwood Shipyards, whereas St Paul comes from Jiangsu China.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This will be Rome to Oswego, a downstream run. With a drone, I would have gotten the other boat and our own.

 

Fishing might be good at Three Rivers.

Tug Syracuse waits at the section yard.

 

The Oswego River appears tor teem with fish, sought by man and raptor.

As it’s Saturday, Canal equipment waits at Minetto and

Oswego.

Only lock O-9 divides the river here with the Great Lakes.

All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s make this Fonda–current location of Urger— to Marcy, beginning of one of the highest sections of the Canal.

Approaching E-13 westbound, there’s a row of yellow painted bollards . . . starting from lower left here.

Each of those yellow bollards is on a sunken concrete barge. More sunken concrete barges can be seen at E-09.

We encountered lots of traffic . . .

including Dolphin, a

Canadian beaut.

Other traffic included Lil Diamond II and

Roman Holiday. 

At Marcy, Governor Roosevelt and

Erie were in the water, as were two buoy boats not shown.

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This is day 3, the Rondout brought a surprising visitor in the form of

Kalmar Nyckel.  When I’m back, I’ll do a whole post of this vessel.

These photos are included chronologically, so you’d be correct to conclude that north of the Rondout there are signs of nature.   Foreign mariners especially must be surprised by all these critters.

 

The port of Coeymans always has activity, briefly docked here are Mister Jim

and James Turecamo.

Betty D is southbound just below the Federal Lock at Troy.

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Once in the Canal, we are treated to many boats, including Governor Cleveland, 

BB 109, 

and Day Peckinpaugh.  Farther west, we pass the

Mohawk Harbor, the former Alco plant, dominated by the cube that is Walthousen reactor. 

and a self-propelled scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 i.e., CB.  I’m writing this on the 8th . . .  my first encounter with serious wifi. After today, I might not have wifi again for a spell.   Last year I posted about this trip under the title GWA.  Two years ago it was Go West.

Let me post some highlights from August 1 and 2, and Chelsea Piers to the Rondout.  Note the fireboat 343 below,

Left Coast Lifter at Spuyten Duyvil,

 

USAVs Chickahominy and Missionary Ridge across from West Point,

Helen Laraway pushing a handful of barges southbound toward the Highlands,

 

Our vessel down the hill from

Newburgh’s historic district,

Penobscot Bay heading down river,

Philadelphia upbound,

Hudson leaving the Rondout for the Hudson,

and Johannsen Girls doing the same.

All photos by Will Van Dorp on August 1 and 2.

As the canal boat reefing process goes on, new equipment is working.  Since my fortune has been to stumble onto both new boats, let’s have a look.  Unit 1 was in amsterdam the other night, and

Unit 2 was at the Genesee Crossing.  Both have been integrated into the work schedule.

Here’s Unit 2 on the Gradual, with Lockport–endangered–alongaside. I’m told the wheelhouse on Unit 2 is telescoping.

Back to Amsterdam . . .

where Unit 1 is on a sectional barge whose

raked sections were on the bank.

All photos by will Van Dorp, who is Chicago bound, hence the title CB. .

 

In Bayfield WI, this park adjoins a complex named Reiten Boatyard condos,

but the namesake is a gentleman who–with his crew–partook of the food intended for their own wake.  The story?  Click here.

Now you’d imagine that this fish tug–Dawn–would have been built at the Reiten boatyard.  Nope.  She’s another Burger Boat product from 1928.

South Twin was Bayfield-built, 1938.  It fished until 1995 but since then has been a yard ornament in Red Cliff.

Heading south on the Bayfield peninsula, we come to Washburn WI, where I saw John D, which appears to be a greatly modified fish tug.  Maybe I’m wrong but I find no info on her from my sources.

The fish tug site has this to say about H. W. Hocks:  “built at Milwaukee, Wis., in 1935, by Harry W. Hocks, the 50 ft. x 14 ft. all-steel vessel was originally equipped with a 100-120 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. By the early 1940s the boat had been sold to Reuben Nelson, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. Nelson re-powered with a Model D13000 Caterpillar diesel. In 1955 Clyde and Clarence Anderson, Algoma, Wis. purchased the boat, and fished her up until 1991, when she was sold to Cliff Parrish, Brimley, Mich.”

In the village of Cedar River MI, I spotted Art Swaer VI, which I believe was built as late as 1974.

Nearby trap net boat Robert J tied up.

Now way over by the Bruce Peninsula, it’s Mamie and

Anzac K.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I still have lots of these. If I were to spend money for a boat and lived in a place where I could walk to it every day, I’d get a fish tug.  All boats today are within a three-minute walk of the market at Bodin Fisheries.

Let’s start with the 1938 Ruth, which has become a static display at the Bayfield Marine Museum, which–to my disappointment– was closed when I visited.

Noree Jo was built in 1948.

Let’s have a look from all angles.

 

Cassie-K is slightly older, a 1945 boat.

John R seems to have gone to the birds . . . She’s from 1942.

 

The smaller red-hulled boat beside John R gave no clue of her name.

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