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Today I hope to return to the sixth boro safely.  I’ve not yet tallied my miles driven, but if you want to guess, I’ll let you know.  I saw a lot of trucks in those miles, some of them on pedestals, like this Diamond heavy wrecker along I-80 in western Iowa. I’m not sure if this is a Diamond T or a Diamond Reo.

This very backlit photo shows two trucks, one you likely don’t immediately notice lower right.  In the foreground, a Chevrolet–based on the cutout in the rear window–with a tow rig.

I managed to squeeze a bit of river and a towboat into this post . . . .  This Freightliner has backed down a ramp to transfer 7000 gallons of diesel to the tanks of the boat.

Here’s one I’ve not seen in a long time:  GM’s answer to the increasingly popular imports from Volkswagen, an early 1960s Corvair Greenbrier van.

In an eastern Nebraska town called Plattmouth, birthplace of Raymond Chandler, I spotted this pair–a 1920s tanker and a flatbed truck of the same vintage–as well as 

this Dodge Brothers tractor, again on a pedestal.

More recently, in a cornfield in central New York, these two pickups were part of the racing action.  I’ve many more photos from that event, should you be interested and should I need another distraction. I know some of you don’t do FB, but here’s a John Kucko Digital original that really captures racing on a drag strip in a corn field in Savannah NY.

All photos, WVD, who meets a big milestone soon. 

Again . .  greatly abridged . . . it took the two-lane most of the way across Iowa–included a fuel stop in Pella— from the Mississippi to the Missouri, although from Des Moines westward, I did take I-80, where a fleet of windmill parts was parked in a long rest area. 

 

I got back on the two-lane again to get to my river port destination.  The high-rises here are grain elevators, and small towns sometimes grow up with services around them. 

I got as far north as Sioux City, when I needed to turn south again.  The rest of this long river has to be postponed for the next trip, since what drove this trip is work, which I’ll hold off on explaining.  

But you can’t be here without countless references to the Lewis and Clark gallivant, a wandering westward at the behest and on the payroll of the United States.  

Near Blue Lake, a state park features a set of replicas of the vessels of the expedition.  

The centerpiece is their keeled boat/barge/mothership Best Friend.  Can you imagine poling, rowing, and towing this behemoth?!!

 

As I said, earlier, the northern areas of this river, South Dakota upstream to Montana, must wait for the next expedition/gallivant.

All photos, WVD. 

 

Road Fotos never tell the whole story, but enjoy these fleeting sights from the Mississippi Valley . . . like an excursion boat called Tom Sawyer

or one called Mark Twain . . ..

Some towns have statues of obscure favored and maybe local folks . . .

but no such unknowns are raised onto a pedestal in Hannibal. Is there anywhere in the US a writer as universally known and recognized as Mr. Clemens?

I’m sorry never to have met him.

Let me be uncharacteristic, and add a bit about my visit here.  After some trouble I’ll not elaborate on in Saint Louis, I was driving north along the Mississippi.  After some debate with myself, I pulled into Hannibal, found a room, took a shower, and walked around town looking for some food.  The BBQ place had moved out to the highway (Highway 61 !), so I walked on and found a Turkish place, right next to the farmer’s market where I bought some pears.  This Turkish place…  I sat outside, where a cat of the feline sort joined me.  The waitress had no voice but was very charming and wondered why anyone would visit Hannibal.  I’ll get back to that.  After a delightful and delicious meal, I paid up and walked out onto the deserted street, or I thought it was a deserted street.  Two deer, who seemed to be out exploring, met me.  We chatted and then went our separate ways.

Why would anyone visit Hannibal?!!  

Are you kidding me?  

I’d go back.  I highly recommend a visit to Hannibal, although I can’t guarantee you’ll meet the deer, the cat named Isabel, or the waitress with no voice.

All photos, WVD, who is now out of my personal WiFi desert.

It’s been two years since my last “road fotos” post, and it was great to go out exploring without a fixed destination, i.e., gallivanting,  other than a late afternoon rendezvous on the other side of the Hudson.  Seeing traces of the D & H Canal, i.e., New York’s Coal Canal, was the general goal, but then I saw this.

This is the reverse, and it refers to the D & H Canal.  Little did I know the “dove” in Mamakating was one of fifty in the Catskills of Sullivan County.  That fact alone will draw me back here.   Mamakating was once home of the mamakoots . . .

A roadside stop to check the internet in Mamakating convince me to turn back about two miles to Wurtsboro  (formerly Rome) and see the dove there and wander a bit as well.

I was impressed by the signage in parts of the old D & H Canal linear footprint.

That rock wall has been there since at least 1828.

The road on the left side of the photo is US 209 looking back toward Wurtsboro.  There’s swamp in the middle  with unexplained water trails through it.  The straight line heading diagonal into the lower right corner is the D & H towpath, with the canal off to its right.

The next hamlet on US 209 is Phillipsport, an actual port on the D & H, and while taking photos of the dove, I noticed

this sign.  It was Saturday, and I was ahead of my non-existent schedule, so . . . off to the cemetery I went . . . to find

it a wild place.

Six miles on, I got to Ellenville, and noticed these five intriguing panels covering windows.

At one time, Ellenville was quite the port.

Napanoch is home to the Eastern Correctional Facility, a place that was built during the days of the D & H Canal, as you can see from this postcard.  In fact, stones to build the place were shipped on the canal, as you can see from here

By now I’d started to feel pressure of the clock, so I skipped the possibilities of BBQ in Kerhonkson and its adjoining Ker Honky Tonk.  Ah . . . next time.

Next stop was 20 miles on in Rosendale.  I know people there and in the area, but I allowed myself only a quick walk around.  I hope to get back here soon.

All photos, WVD.

How about murals from Buffalo to Cape Charles  . . .  and from December to April.

 

 

And many places in between,

physical locales and

 

head spaces.

 

 

 

 

Venus of the Chesapeake?

All photos along the road hither and yon by WVD.  A big birthday post is coming tomorrow . . .

What’s your favorite mural?

Back in December 2013 I did this post . . .  Recently I had a short time back in one of my old digs . . . Haverhill MA and stopped briefly to walk along the Merrimack River.

When I lived there 20 years ago, access to the water existed, but not like this arrangement.

But what really intrigued me was the repurposed USCG 40′ utility boat, my all-time favorite design.  See the whole evolution of the design here.

This one is very nicely restored and kept.

If I understand this right, the Slavit family offers free tours on this 1959 vessel.   But there are issues . . .

All photos, WVD, who was thrilled to see this restoration on the Merrimack, where I used to kayak and once had the good fortune to take a tour with the Merrimack’s legendary “Red” Slavit.  Red would explicitly say he new quite a bit about the river, and what he didn’t know he just made up, to be  more interesting.

 

Some things like winter fishing in the harbor appear not to change in a decade, but

Houma will never again move Mary A. WhalenHouma, built at Jakobson in 1970, was scrapped in 2017.  PortSide NewYork currently has a berth for the tanker and many other activities in Atlantic Basin, Red Hook.

B. E. Lindholm, built in St.Paul MN in 1985,  is alive and well, currently dredging off Fire Island.

This Kristin Poling was still working 10 years ago, definitely a survivor from before WW2 and also definitely then in her home stretch.  Byearly 2012 she was scrapped.

In March 2010 I also had a chance to gallivant off to Baltimore, home of NS Savannah.  If my calculations are correct, she was in service for 10 years total, and now in mothballs for 48!! Truth be told, she was a prototype, a demo ship with limited cargo capacity but also passengers.  Her beautiful lines were designed by George S. Sharp.  Recently she was at the end of a towline,  a sight I’m sorry I missed.  A wealth of info and video as well as smart comments can be found on this demo vessel here in a publication called Atomic Insights.  Let me quote a small section to tease you into reading the article:  “By technical measures, the ship was a success. She performed well at sea, her safety record was impressive, her fuel economy was unsurpassed and her gleaming white paint was never smudged by exhaust smoke.”

Cajun stood by Chios Voyager near the Inner Harbor Domino Sugars plant.   Cajun still works along the east coast US.  Chios Voyager, built 1984, has been scrapped.

And a somber last photo . . . I caught El Faro in Baltimore 10 years ago.  Little did I expect then what we all know now.

All photos, WVD, in March 2010.

 

Tagster 5 was posted exactly a year ago, so I’m taking that as license to revisit the series… today, when people put on masks.  Murals on buildings add color and design.  Whenever I have time to kill in a new or even familiar city, I wander around, getting exercise while at the same time looking for sights like these.  Guess the city?

See the purple squiggles along the right side of the photo below?

They led me to the far side of the building, where I saw this colossal image of a hometown icon.  Click on the photo to hear my favorite song from this depicted icon.

 

What language is Kraken anyhow?

 

Above and below . . . there’s dramatic range in the murals here.

 

Origin of “hula“?

If your residence is painted this way, do you need to attend to lawn or landscaping?

 

 

 

Guess the location?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who took these and many more during the course of an energetic several-mile stroll.

Art on ship’s propulsion?  I don’t mean props, but check out this followup to a post I did years ago . . .

 

 

Road trips sometimes include portions on water.  That’s the way this post begins.  First, let’s boat up the Saguenay.  On the north side, we pass Hotel Tadoussac and to its right, the 1747 chapel, Canada’s oldest wooden church.

Around the point is the Tadoussac ferry rack.  I could do more boat posts from this trip….

Transiting the river takes only about 10 minutes;  the companion ferry below is on the south side of the river.

Steep banks sink deep into the fjord on both sides, here south and

 

here north.  Seals sun themselves not far from where the elusive belugas swim and feed.

Clearly this seal is digesting.

This trip has been a recon for my next trip upriver here, scheduled for a few months from now.   About halfway on my 120-mile road trip, the cliffs draw back, exposing wide flats at low tide.

At high tide, about 15′ of water covers all the flats above and below.

Saguenay’s waterfront park has fountains bathing a plethora of sea mammal facsimiles.

Surprisingly, just north of that park, a gigantic aluminum smelting complex operates,

located there in part because of proximity to hydropower.

Just north of the complex, Lac St Jean fills an impact crater, one of several in Quebec.

Surrounding the lake are lake farms producing canola beans, corn, blueberries, and more.  I passed several blueberry fields before I realized what they were.  I took no photos partly because they look like golf courses several years overgrown.

The turnaround point on the north side of the lake was at Dolbeau-Mistassini, where a blueberry festival highlights summer.  The Mistassini River, flowing over this rapids, is one of many rivers feeding into Lac St Jean and the Saguenay River.

At this point about 120 miles from the Saint Lawrence, I turn from the upper east side of the lake, and turn back south along the west side, and then the heavens open and rain pours over the return to Tadoussac.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, who suggests you study a satellite view of a google map of Saguenay, QC.

 

These days, seeing a spout could mark this as Lower NY Bay portion of the sixth boro, but in fact, I’m pretty far afield, and that’s what roads are for whether they be terrestrial or watery.  The land in the distance here are the right bank of the Saint Lawrence, and those whales are likely finbacks.

Whales and seals amass here for the grub.

Prince Shoal Light sits atop an underwater mountain.  The name–Prince (of Wales) Shoal stems from the fact that the Prince ran aground there, discovering the shoal in the worst possible way.

By the way, I’m told the light is for sale for one loonie.  The catch is that the buyer is responsible for all expenses related to upkeep.

Click here for info on the various species grubbing up here, trapping their prey again the steep underwater slope.

Those are the sand dunes in Tadoussac in the distance.

Seals back float?

A fin back charges and dives beneath us.

Marks on the whales, like the notch at the base of the fin, facilitate identification and longitudinal studies of whales.   Find more if you “like” a FB site called “Parc marin du Saguenay-Saint-Laurent.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who goes up the Saguenay and to the headwaters in tomorrow’s post.

By the way, I know some large tugboats built on the Great Lakes for saltwater have traveled up the Saguenay in recent years.  Anyone have photos to share?

 

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