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In Bayfield WI, this park adjoins a complex named Reiten Boatyard condos,

but the namesake is a gentleman who–with his crew–partook of the food intended for their own wake.  The story?  Click here.

Now you’d imagine that this fish tug–Dawn–would have been built at the Reiten boatyard.  Nope.  She’s another Burger Boat product from 1928.

South Twin was Bayfield-built, 1938.  It fished until 1995 but since then has been a yard ornament in Red Cliff.

Heading south on the Bayfield peninsula, we come to Washburn WI, where I saw John D, which appears to be a greatly modified fish tug.  Maybe I’m wrong but I find no info on her from my sources.

The fish tug site has this to say about H. W. Hocks:  “built at Milwaukee, Wis., in 1935, by Harry W. Hocks, the 50 ft. x 14 ft. all-steel vessel was originally equipped with a 100-120 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. By the early 1940s the boat had been sold to Reuben Nelson, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. Nelson re-powered with a Model D13000 Caterpillar diesel. In 1955 Clyde and Clarence Anderson, Algoma, Wis. purchased the boat, and fished her up until 1991, when she was sold to Cliff Parrish, Brimley, Mich.”

In the village of Cedar River MI, I spotted Art Swaer VI, which I believe was built as late as 1974.

Nearby trap net boat Robert J tied up.

Now way over by the Bruce Peninsula, it’s Mamie and

Anzac K.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I still have lots of these. If I were to spend money for a boat and lived in a place where I could walk to it every day, I’d get a fish tug.  All boats today are within a three-minute walk of the market at Bodin Fisheries.

Let’s start with the 1938 Ruth, which has become a static display at the Bayfield Marine Museum, which–to my disappointment– was closed when I visited.

Noree Jo was built in 1948.

Let’s have a look from all angles.

 

Cassie-K is slightly older, a 1945 boat.

John R seems to have gone to the birds . . . She’s from 1942.

 

The smaller red-hulled boat beside John R gave no clue of her name.

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Here’s where this series started . . .  And given the “road fotos” posts, you can guess that I saw trucks on those roads, lots of them.

The vehicle below–seen in a field along a narrow two-lane road–might be a truck.  Note the wooden visor bracing the top of the windshield supports.  Any guess on make and age?  I have no clue, bt I’d guess a Model T.

This 1947 (?) Ford has seen some body modification.  The sign on the window said it has a 454 and is for sale for $12k or BO.  It might be compared to this modification of a 1947 Diamond T. 

The trucks here are not that unusual, but their location–the Mackinac Bridge–certainly is.

Michigan has unique rules about truck weights and axles.

This 1946 (?) GMC pickup, stuck between trees on an island in Lake Superior, will likely never catch the ferry off the island.

I’d say a 1952 (?) GMC in very fine condition.

Canada once branded Ford trucks as Mercury, like this 1957 or ’58 Mercury panel truck.

I live right next to Jamaica NY, so for a newcomer, a plain truck like this would be an enigma.

This truck passed me on the Belt Parkway a few weeks back.  My impression was that it might belong to a member of the FBC, although I’m not sure. Here’s a related article from my favorite NYTimes writer from over 10 years ago.  Sometimes bulls escape in the city and then you want a cowboy.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s just back from a 3000-mile + road trip, but wouldn’t be if he stopped to photograph every old truck along the way.  All previous truckster posts can be seen here.

 

Yup . . . that’s a crankshaft.  And yup, that’s a full size 6’2″ version of myself.

Here’s the connection to the title.  Yankcanuck . . . cool word.

From 1963 until 2016, she worked in different trades, even spending some time in the Arctic.  With her interesting history, I’m glad that a portion of her has been preserved for folks like me who missed her arrivals into Detroit, for example, and can now learn of her.  Preserve, preserve, at least some parts.

These photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s now facing a corrupted card.

How fortunate to catch Paul R. Tregurtha on her first upbound trip through the Soo!   She’s the last product of the shipyards in Lorain OH, which was the first stop on this gallivant.

Just ahead of Tregurtha was James R. Barker, another product of Lorain, here waiting to enter the locks.

An impulse stop in Sault Ste Marie ON was the Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre, a great stop.

To get from Manitoulin Island to the Bruce Peninsula, we boarded “the big canoe,” aka Chi-Cheemaun, a replacement for SS Norgoma, featured here a few days ago.  Chi-Cheemaun is a product of Collinwood ON shipyards, about which I’ll comment later.

Tobermory has erected a plaque to Le Griffon, the will-0-wisp of the Great Lakes, the first full-sized sailing ship built on the Lakes above Niagara.  She disappeared on the return from her first voyage, one of the many vessels lost on the Lakes without a trace.

Is it true that Dawn Light, docked here in Tobermory, was built in 1891?    !!  Here’s the suggestion and history.

Georgian Bay . . .  and here’s a cairn built in honor of those past.

Just east of Georgian Bay in Gordon Lightfoot country, there are lots of apple orchards.  Are there any Lightfoot songs referring to them or to farming there?

 

Here is part of the area that used to be Collingwood Shipyards, now living and shopping space.  At least they painted a mural of a laker on the supermarket wall.

Itinerary and all photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this poem in respect for this day..

Even gallivants have destinations, and her it is, the Bayfield peninsula,

one of the best places to see fish tugs, to be included in a number of upcoming posts, following on these past ones. South Twin was built in 1938 in Bayfield and is now out of the water,

but many more like Gary (1945) still fish.  Recall that Urger was once a fish tug. 

Obviously, this is not a fish tug, but an excursion vessel.

Bayfield’s Devil’s Island was once visited by one President, and here’s why.

The town is itself spectacular, even when the fog prevents excursion boats from heading out.  Radar and other navaids can get you out there, but don’t guarantee

that you’ll see much.

Was this Bartholdi’s inspiration . . .?

… just kidding.

Anyone recognize this ferry?

Here’s the story.

 

This kit saw me and ran for its mother, lurking in the bushes.

John D is one more fish tug, and not mentioned in this site, but we’ll leave you here.  As Robert E. Keen says . . . the road goes on forever….

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has crossed a border by now.

Tribute to all things cat?  This one is teamed up with an APE?

 

Yes, Vespa’s APE.

For streets like these in the Viejo Casco, smaller vehicles are just right, but

walking is better.

La Iglesia de la Merced (church of mercy) had a cool atmosphere on a 90-degree afternoon, and when the organist began to play, I could have stayed much longer . . .  1038 pipes!

This was low tide and sea walls look formidable.

Here I turned to the left, looking beyond the “coastal beltway” from the Casco Viejo out toward the causeway, built on 1914 Canal spoils, beyond which is the shipping channel,  where a CMA CGM vessel heads into the Pacific.

On the wall of a marina building in what used to be a US military base, there was graffiti of sorts, a way to communicate,  reminding me of the mail drop on Floriana many miles to the SW.

Indulge me .. one more boat;  Gamboa Express was once Dutch fishing trawler Deo Volente UK-43.  The UK here, I presume, refers to the port of Urk, where I had a strong drink with a relative many years ago in a bar, in a no longer plumb building that dated from ?? the 1400s.   Read the comments on how Gamboa Express came to Panama here.

And let’s end it here with murals of the original canal construction in the administration building, now used by the ACP.  The artist was William Van Ingen,  from Philadelphia.  He was paid by the square foot, so as you might imagine, they are colossal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loved Panama and hopes to go back.

Happy Easter and Passover.

 

File this under “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”  See the two skiffs at the Atlantic level end of the Gatun locks?  And the locomotives along the top of the nearer side of the center wall ?

And here are another set at the Gatun Lake level end of the locks, and again . . . skiffs, arrow, and wind sock.

As to the arrow, here’s the key, from Eric Bauhaus’ fine guide.  Yes, they still function on the 1914 locks.  And see the skiff in the water there?

And right here, earlier this month, the skiff in the water.

As it turns out, the rowboat is the most reliable way to get the messenger line out to the ship so that the wires connecting locomotive and ship can get across reliably.

Here at the Pacific level of the Miraflores lock, a skiff at the ready.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

With all the dredging in the Canal, you’d expect spoils hopper barges, and

sure enough, we met several.  Cazalla is a 2012 product of SIMA Peru, Chimbote shipyard.

Barge 852 pushed by Gorgona I,

which I believe is an older boat.  But I’ve been unable to find any information on her age or provenance.

Culebra appears to be the same design as Gorgona 1.  Here she works a spud barge over

near the Gatun Dam, which regulates Chagres River flow to create the Lake. Nor have I found any info on the smaller push tug there, Quail.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The sequence now has been US-built pre-2000, Canadian right after 2000, then Chinese with Wärtsiläs, then Chinese with GEs.  Also, bollard pull had gone from 32 to 54 to 61.

The next order of tugs went to Armon Astillero (shipyard) in Spain, the shipyard that launched all the tugs in this post.  Cerro Jefe, like the others in this series is 94.7′ x 44.3′, and uses the GE 8L 250 to generate 6250 hp transmitted via Schottel SRP 2020 FPs for 82 tons of bollard pull.  Here Cerro Jefe heads into Cristobal.

Off the stern of Maran Gas Pericles, an LNG tanker transporting product out of the US,

is Cerro Grande, hanging “cut-style” and serving as an external rudder off the stern of the ship, and

beyond her, that’s Cerro Punta.  The new rules require that LNG tankers are accompanied by two tugs during the entire transit.

 

 

 

In Gamboa, we encountered Cerro Canajagua as she

fell in behind Valparaiso Express, a NeoPanamax container vessel.  These two are escorted through the entire transit.

And finally, in Miraflores Lake, it’s Cerro Pando awaiting orders.  By the way, “cerro” means “hill,” and this class of tugs is named for geographical high points in Panama.  For greater detail on the Spanish tugs, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in fact.

I’m still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic or high-tech.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got a good number of photos so far, but I’d like to see greater variety.  Thanks to all of you who’ve already shared photos.

 

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