You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘USACE’ tag.

Here’s a followup on the Rockaway sand pumping, and there’s gold in those sands, over $36 million worth.   Notice the dredging/pumping vessel upper right.

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This was the fountain this morning.

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Once the slurry exits the mouth, water flows back into the ocean and sand is pushed up the beach.

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This repurposed container is project headquarters.

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The top foto comes thanks to Barbara Barnard;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

You know the colors and organization, but can you name the vessel?  And as to the organization, do you know all the foreign countries where they operate?  I didn’t. 

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Anyhow, all these fotos come from Oregon compliments of Michael Bogoger of Doryman fame.  Actual photographer is Jamie Orr of Bristol Channel cutter Baggywrinkle, returning from sea.

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The vessel is USACE dredge Yaquina, here at the entrance to its namesake river.

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Michael’s searched tirelessly for this dredge ever since last October, when I posted these fotos of McFarland.  That post also generated this impressive list of USACE vessels from the esteemed Harold Tartell . . . a veritable encyclopedia of USACE newbuilds from 1855 until 2012 . . . including the 1981 Yaquina.

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Previously, the latest dredge in a distant location I’ve been looking at was Xin Hai Liu, in Rio.

For these fotos, many thanks to Michael and Jamie.

Small craft to come, but first . . . the missing foto from yesterday’s post . . . how DID the heaving line get through the eye aka “closed chock”?  Hope this foto helps;  I do believe I see the monkeyfist flying upward from the crewman at the rail;  crew on the upper level passed it to the crewman forward of the chock?

It’s been over two years since I’ve used this title. Small craft  come in many shapes,

are operated by professional mariners,

respond to emergencies with versatility,

and shuttle specialists between shore and much larger craft.

This one I first thought was transporting booms but now I think had some festive mission, given what appears to be a sizable bouquet over the engine compartment.

They operate for many agencies,

commercial entities,

government services, and

and law enforcement groups.

They work in diverse

weather, all

year round.

Enjoy a few more:

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who apologizes for not knowing who operates some of these small craft.

Whatzit???  Answer follows.

Note what’s on the deck of USCGC Mackinaw WLLB-30, built in Wisconsin and homeported in Cheboygan, MI.   Foto thanks to Kyran Clune.

Now here’s my favorite local government boat, although

I’ve been unable to find any info about its age and place of

origin.  If I got a yacht, it would look like this.  Anyone help here on Hudson?

Maintenance o aids to navigation is needed wherever and whatever those aids be.  Note the Roncado crew on

the buoy.

Anyhow . . . here’s the bigger context on that top foto;  USCG 49405 seems to have more

buoys on her “to do list” than

her stern can accommodate.

This is NOT at all a government boat, but I snapped this a few weeks ago.  Upon further examination, I’m wondering about the barge and  . . . is that a portside offset upper house?

Last shot . .  again, no government boat is this, but exactly a year ago today, Papillon came ashore . . . prompting many hours of visitation of government employees . . . if not boats.  Here and here are two of my posts;  go back to the April 201 archives for many more.  Ironically, I have never been able to find out what became of the vessel.

Happy April!  Again thanks to Kyran for his Lake Michigan foto.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Fotos here were taken last Friday, much colder than today.

Conflicting jurisdictions?  It felt so cold along the water the other day that I totally understand a chase for no other reason than . . .  to speed up blood flow and heat, not that I’m saying this is happening here.  By the way, in blue, it’s Launch #4, the 55′ 1994-launched Kenny Hansen.  In yellow, it’s the 1980 Arkansas-built 85′ Gelberman, named for Jack Gelberman, who was chief of operations of NYC-area USACE  until 1973.

I move from “office” to “office” too, simulating chase maybe, staying warm.  And I track down Zachery Reinauer and the great Herbert P Brake.

A quick dash further east, I catch Sassafras with DoubleSkin 36 in push gear and Rhea I. Bouchard light, passing on the north side of the KVK,  Bow Architect and LaFarge barge Adelaide.

Still not quite out of breath, I spot Cape Cod spritzing past Theo T.

Moving again . . . jogging to keep warm . . . I espy (l. to r.) the bow of Bow Architect, a light Norwegian Sea, an approaching Conrad S, and (possibly) Davis Sea.

Three things about Conrad S give me pause for reflection:  the last name initial, the seriously tubular bow deck (not sure that’s the technical term), and the containerized tanks belonging to R. M. I. Food Logistics.  Here’s what I found.    So . . . alcohol, oils, syrups . . .. ?

It seems my day for single-letter last names, as in Gunes K, which

enjoys a bridge with big glass for perspicacious watch-keepers.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who really needs to rest in the shade of a palm tree for awhile listening to sweet music and honeyed conversation.

Unrelated:  For a look at shellfishing and much more happening around Nantucket, check out Martie’s blog:  http://nantucketwaterfrontnews.blogspot.com/

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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