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Here’s the treat I’ll leave you with for a few days.  The twin towers in the background should clearly state we aren’t in Kansas or 2013 anymore.  Please comment on your speculations.   Foto #1

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This is from the converging waters just south of the Battery.  Notice the towers to the right.    Foto#2

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Note the stripe on Coursen‘s bow.   Foto #3

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Note the I-beam structure to the right.  Foto #4

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Note the relative positions of the towers and the Manhattan-side Holland Tunnel vent.  Foto #5

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Again, thanks in advance for your comments and reminiscences.

Source will be credited soon.

Here was the first in the series.  Recognize the orange hull behind the orange inflatable?

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It appeared to be a drill . . . at the St. George ferry racks of John J. Marchi.  If anyone ends up in the frigid waters of the sixth boro, I presume this is the procedure.  I missed the actual lowering.

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As I left the west side of the terminal to see what tug had delivered the fuel barge (Answer:  Eastern Dawn . . . 8th foto here), I saw the inflatable westbound and then

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moments later, eastbound.

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By the time I moved around to this side of the ferry racks again, said inflatable was hoisted, ready to the next drill or the next emergency.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   Here’s a video of deckhands talking about a rescue a few years back.

Here are tugster-takes on car-carrying ferries off North Carolina, on Champlain, and in the tropics.

And this is likely a Forks ferry entering the Upper Bay in the fog a few years back, almost invisible.  Long Island has a plethora of ferry companies.

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It seems from Shelter Island north you take a ferry of one company, like Menantic here or Manhasset or another, which I conclude is built way south, and

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from Shelter Island south you take a ferry like Sunrise built farther north.    I need to get back to the Forks of Long Island to find out more.

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Since Islander seems a fairly generic name for ferries, I’ve yet to find any specifics of this one, on the hard in Greenport.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has failed to find a complete listing of Forks ferries on the internet.

By the way, I itching to gallivant soon . . . inland to Nola, then up the Mississippi to Vicksburg to  . . . St Louis and then zigzag back to the east coast, provided that storms stay elsewhere.

May 30, 2012 . . . around 1000 hrs.  I’d forgotten taking this foto until a conversation with Harold Tartell this afternoon.  RIP . . .   Bounty in that foto was heading for Newburgh, NY.  Note the USCG vessel lower right.

Here are more fotos from my harbor jaunt yesterday…  Apollo Bulker now lies at the dock in Rensselaer.

John A. Noble passed the Statue on the Upper Bay at midday yesterday.

Lower  Manhattan yesterday was a maze of pumps powered by portable generators of all sizes.  I’m not sure where this water is being pumped from.   But waters in other parts of that area smelled of fuel;  people wearing masks–there’s a whole new meaning to Halloween mask now–ran pumps and threw out waterlogged debris from residences and businesses.

Google “John B. Caddell” now and you’ll see lots of stories describing this vessels as a “168′ water tanker” or a “700-ton water tanker.”  It’s NOT a water tanker.  It was built as hull # 137 for Chester A. Poling Inc.  to transport petroleum.  Soon after delivery, it was turned over to the Navy and redubbed YO-140.    After the war, ownership was returned to the Poling company, and until its sale “foreign”  about two years ago.  It’s NOT a water tanker . . . it did not transport water as a paying cargo.

It’s remarkable to see the number of government helicopters in the skies over New York–and the military trucks and personnel.  This afternoon I spoke with US Forest Service crew in my neighborhood–Queens–clearing roadways: the person I talked to, from Arkansas, had never been in NYC before.  He said he was working with USFS crews from Texas, Wisconsin, and Ohio.  Thanks, welcome to NYC, and come back sometime when we’re all feeling better.

And finally, attributed to the Daily News . . . LARCs come ashore on Belle Harbor, Queens to assist.   Click on the foto to get the Daily News story.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except that story and fantastic foto by Vera Chinese the NY Daily News.

After coming home last night, I finally finished reading Rockwell Kent‘s 1929 memoir N by E.    Rockwell Kent lived for a time on the curve at 1262 Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) just east of the Caddell Dry Dock.   N by E tells the story of his shipwreck on the western shore of Greenland near Godthaab and subsequent struggle to survive.    Here are some teaser excerpts.

“We lay, caught in the angle of a giant step of rock, keel on the tread and starboard side on the riser; held there by wind and sea; held there to lift and pound; to lift so buoyantly on every wave; to drop–crashing our 13 iron-shod tons on granite.  There, the perfection of our ship revealed itself; only, that having struck just once, she ever lived, a ship, to lift and strike again. …  wind, storm, snow, rain, hail, lightning and thunder, earthquake and flood.”  (page 132)    Some time later, the three crew save what supplies they can and scramble up the rocks to safety.  Kent again:  “The three men stand there looking at it all  [including the wreckage of their vessel Direction]   … at last one of them speaks.  ‘It’s right,’ he says, ‘that we should pay for beautiful things.  And being here in this spot, now, is worth traveling a thousand miles for, and all that it has cost us.  Maybe we have lived only to be here now.’”  (144)  And later   “It was clear to us that the boat would remain on the ledge and even be, at low tide, partly out of the water.  She appeared to have been completely gutted …  the forecastle hatch now stood uncovered and every sea came spouting through it like a geyser, bearing some quaint contribution to the picturesque assortment that littered the rocks and water.  Books, paper, painting canvas, shoes, socks, eggs, potatoes:  we fished up what we could.”  (148)

Somehow Kent found himself ennobled in that personal disaster.   There’s hope.  It’s also a good read.

Last foto here passed along by Justin Zizes Jr .  . partly submerged fishing boat in Sheepshead Bay.

It appears that Staten Island ferry John J. Marchi was crossing the Upper Bay just before 1800 hrs.  Otherwise, it was still mostly government boats like

NOAA S-222 Thomas Jefferson, performing post-storm hydrographic surveys.  I took this foto back in early September 2012.  Buoys move, debris lurks, and bottom depths change.  Assessing and correcting these and other conditions of the port are keeping lots of folks really busy . . . .

I braved gridlock and frantic traffic with very long lines at gas stations to get to my work.  A detour–of course–led me past Arthur Kill Park across from the Howland Hook Container Terminal.  As no doubt you’ve seen in fotos of docks, boardwalks, and coastal areas from Cape May to here, these fishing docks are wrecked.  Remarkable here is that this dock is protected by 10 miles of waterway and  Staten Island’s heights from the ocean.

Two vessels that rode out the storm in port are (l to r) dredge Atchafalaya and container ship CSAV Itajai, not sure why this latter stayed in port.    Here’s my previous not-so-great foto of Atchafalaya.

As I said, lots of assessments are happening . . .  which means very little traffic.

I believe this is survey boat Cape Elizabeth.  In the distance at Fort Wadsworth–wonder how my goats are–notice the tents set up for Sunday’s NY Marathon.

And this may very well be the first tug/barge to leave the sixth boro post-Sandy . . . Morgan Reinauer, I think.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, and except for the shot of Thomas Jefferson . . . all taken today.

If you’re free and local, here’s a lecture on hurricane/flood risk coming up in two weeks on my friend Philip’s blog.  And here’s insights on risk assessment/response driving the Dutch “deltaworks” project after their “once in 10,000 years” flood considerations post-1953 North Sea flood, which claimed over 2000 lives.  

Fotos from Barbara at Rockaway Beach around 100th Street here.  Emergency message to folks on the boardwalk:  “Go inside, and no surfing.”

From Gary, East River looking toward the mouth of Newtown Creek and

toward the 59th Street Bridge.    No movement.

And finally, from L’amica dalla torre di orologio . . .  Hudson River . . . looking toward  the Statue of Liberty, who probably wishes she could hunker down behind her pedestal.   Geometrical structure to the left is the floating Battery Park City Ferry Terminal.   I’m not sure what contingencies exist for it during a surge, since it’s basically a hull.

Currently Captain of the Port has order vessels of a certain tonnage to leave the docks, as it’s safer for them to hang in the stream than stay affixed to a rigid structure.   So cruising in the North river now as sightseeing vessels,

Meagan Ann,

and the Sandy Hook pilot boats!

That’s the Erie Lackawanna Terminal Tower/Hoboken Terminal in the background.

USCG . . . off to respond to a recreational vessel that’s dragged its mooring?

And finally, back to Rockaway . .  as nightfalls.

Many thanks to Barbara, Gary, and L’amica for these fotos.  The worst is yet to come, I fear.  Stay inside and away from the tongues and talons of water that surge in.

And this just in . . . video from helicopter of USCG rescue of folks from HMS Bounty.

No orange is more brilliant on the Upper Bay than that of the Staten Island ferries.   Of course, no creature of the water–live or mechanical–sports the same colors ventral as dorsal.  And thanks to the following fotos from John Watson, let’s go below.

Here’s a thing of beauty as visible from the inside of a floating drydock at Caddell– one end of the double-ender Samuel I. Newhouse.

Note the worker for scale.

What might surprise many people is the absence of props/shafts and the existence of this disc-like recess.

Disassembled, here’s the drive unit that fits into the recess

Each of the circular spaces in this subassembly houses a vertical blade.  For an animation showing movement, click here.

Note the same transition from orange to blue to red and vertical blades here on Noble.

If you’ve wondered how these ferries negotiate into the ferry racks in adverse tidal flow, traveling sideways . . . now you know.

All fotos above except the first one come compliments of John Watson.  Newhouse fotos date from summer ’94;  Noble . . . from summer 2000.

Here’s a parting shot of one of my favorite moments of orange from earlier in 2012.

On most vessels, the color orange is reserved for safety gear;  on others, like

Topeka and Torm Freya it’s the main act.

Other variations of orange as dominant color appear in the harbor as well . . .

like the Staten Island ferries.

The color orange has many other associations in the month of October . . . like leaf color and pumpkins.

Note the difference in visibility here between the departing RORO Topeka and the inbound Atlantic Salvor.

Here were Topeka and an identical fleetmate Totugas back in March.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s another Torm Freya post.  More “orange” tomorrow.

Unrelated:  Thanks to EuroFred for passing along this Youtube that involved a RO-FLO (roll on/float off), three speciality vessels, the orange mud of Surinam, and 608 tires in a story that could be called “cutter head Fitzcarraldo,”  and those are two separate links.

Freja Pegasus, Turecamo Girls, and Arctic Bay . . . the previous cargo post begs this one, so I spent three hours looking around the sixth boro yesterday.  If you click on the link embedded in each large vessel name, you’ll get a sense of their range by reading the section “port history.”   What’s NOT listed there is the land-scape (as depicted yesterday)  cargoes travel to get to the ports and seas.

Tverskoy Bridge and Peter F. Gellatly.  The tanker is bunkering before heading for the Bahamas.

Stolt Sneland and Linda Moran stern and

areas around the bows.  A name like Atlantic Rose make me imagine a fleet mate named Atlantic Fell. 

OOCL Britain and McAllister Responder, I think.

Ever Deluxe and Laura K Moran.  I’d be interested in knowing how much over a million sea miles Ever Deluxe ‘s traveled since she appeared in this post more than three years ago.

Off Laura K‘s stern, it’s passenger vessel Regatta.  Here’s more info on her.

Here are two of the 109 daily trips the Staten Island ferries make daily.   Vessels are JFK and Molinari . . .  I think.

Suzuka Express

Tverskoy Bridge again as darkness ends my ability to use the camera.

An AIS screen capture is not that photogenic, but I find the names fascinating.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a followup on SS Badger:  the coal-fired steam ferry gets a reprieve because of the trade in wind power!!!  Who woulda thunked!!?!

And finally, here’s a note I’d like to reiterate for anyone connected with the Gwendoline Steers‘ sinking of a half century ago:  “My name is Loary Milanese Gunn, you can see my posts on this Tugster blog re: the Gwendoline Steers. Steve Knox and I have since created the Facebook Page in Memory of the GS. We are having a memorial wreathe-laying ceremony to honor the 50th year of the sinking. I want to invite all of the crewmen’s family members. Would you please forward your email to me so I may extend to you and your family a proper invite?    Loary “

I know not everyone does FB.  You can contact Loary through tugster.

On a different note, check out this video of a flotilla headed up to the tugboat roundup a few weeks back.

Wordless foto essay on vessel fronts.  See  a bowsprite rendition here.

OK, I guess I can’t be wordless with this one above.  Clue:  vessel above is the same as vessel below.

I took this one of Woody Guthrie and Clearwater three months ago at Croton.

Foto of Woody Guthrie‘s improvised figurehead was sent to me by Steve Schwartz.  Thanks much, Steve.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

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Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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