You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘ferry’ category.

Just to clarify if this this your first time reading this series, “JR” abbreviates “January river,” which you may know in Portuguese as “Rio de Janeiro.”  Here that’s pronounced as “hee oh.”

Make sense of this foto?  More info at the end of the post.

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NYC’s sixth boro moves lots of folks between the boros of Staten and Island and Manhattan.  All day and night via FREE  ferries.  Here it’s two dollars and change between Rio and Niteroi.  To speed up dock time, some of the loading/unloading happens simultaneously.  Don’t try to swim in the wrong side of the flow.

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The ferry above is Inga II.  You can figure this part out.  Here’s more info.

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Being here, I’ve become aware of the slant I bring to this “water blog.”  I focus on water as a place to work or a means to get to or do/create work.  Hence . . .   fishing boat and MSC Cadiz.

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The work of this small Brazilian tanker would probably be done by ATB in North America.  It was in Rio three days ago and way south of Santos already.

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Fishing boats of different sizes pass in front of Ilhas Cagarras.

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Here’s a classy motor yacht over at Flamenco Beach, MV Tamarind, 1958.

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Here’s a former Dutch pilot boat Wega.  I assumed it was active out of Rio, but it appears to be languishing here, after being seized, a 1968 beauty that may come to a bad end.  Now that suggests a back story I’d like to know.

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Back to that first foto, it’s the bar where “Girl from Ipanema” was penned more than half century ago.  This mural is at least 20 feet high.   Countless are the times this music has played in my head!  Where was that girl walking to?  Her job?

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

No, this isn’t the January River.  I leave for there today, but this . . .   !!  These next four fotos come from the perspicacious bowsprite, taken yesterday afternoon.   The tug in the foreground is Sea Wolf is 1982.  In the background is –of course–Ellis Island, 1900.  In between with the yellow stack is

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Yankee, 1907.  Her long history includes a stint as Machigonne moving passengers across the sixth boro from Ellis Island to other boros and to NJ.   The tow began at the far right of this foto.

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More tugster on Yankee when I return, but before then, I’m sure there’ll be other info.

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Six plus years ago, a friend Mike caught these fotos of Sea Wolf‘s sister–Sea Lion–moving an unusual vessel named Abora III out of the Morris Canal to sea.   The reed craft made it more than halfway across the Atlantic.

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All fotos by bowsprite.  Advance notice came thanks to Rod Smith, who once worked as deckhand on Yankee and who will have his own account of this move . . . to Brooklyn.  Here (2007) and here (2011) are my previous posts with Yankee fotos from New Jersey.  Click here to get some backstory–and video of Sea Wolf departing with ferry– from a supporter who wanted to keep them on the watery edge of Hoboken.

Now, I pack and head south myself.    Vou escrever mais em breve.

You may once have ridden this vessel.  Thirty months ago you could have made a bid on it.  Eighteen months ago it was topheavy and listing.  Two weeks ago Paul Strubeck caught this foto.  Might you call it a major haircut.

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Around the same time, Paul caught this vessel in Verplanck. That looks like Cornell to the left also.   I don’t know what Cormorant‘s future will be.

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I caught Planetsolar on my way outatown, but bowsprite studied the first solar-powered circumnavigator up close and impersonal and shares these fotos.

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Inside these caps are props.  Click here and here to see the props.

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Enjoy these views starting with this view looking forward along the portside and moving counterclockwise around the boat.

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Click here for a compilation of clips taken over two years on Turanor PlanetSolar.  And if you have 40 minutes to watch this video from the Caribbean to the Indian Ocean, you could like it.  I especially liked the  Singapore dry dock section beginning around 31 minutes in.   And from yesterday’s NYTimes, here’s a story about the boat’s current research mission.

Many thanks to Paul and bowsprite for these fotos.

Speaking of bowsprite . . .  if you’re local and free on Saturday, come  down to Pier 25 where she has organized the craft market called Radio Lilac, named for the 1933 lighthouse tender there.

Ten months ago I did this post of the 1905 ferry Binghamton.  Twenty months ago I did this one,  this  and this with many interior shots at that time.   The foto below dates from October 2011 just after Irene.

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Here was Binghamton this morning, a work of disintegrative art, refusing to buckle in spite of Sandy.

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North end October 2011 and

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today, June 2013.

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South end 2011 and

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peeled back 2013.

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Closer up as seen from the right bank 20 months ago and

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now.

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See a Flickr foto of a NJ historical marker no longer memorializing the wreck, click here.  In its place, someone has had the good sense to inscribe the walls of the guardhouse with the 94-year-old words of a gallivanting Edna St Vincent Millay.

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How will she fare in the next 10 months?

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For a beautifully illustrated report on the life of the ferry prepared by Bill Lee, click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but cool story here about a 61-year-old immigrant to US circumnavigating in a 24′ sailboat!!

Here’s the treat I’ll leave you with for a few days.  The twin towers in the background should clearly state we aren’t in Kansas or 2013 anymore.  Please comment on your speculations.   Foto #1

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This is from the converging waters just south of the Battery.  Notice the towers to the right.    Foto#2

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Note the stripe on Coursen‘s bow.   Foto #3

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Note the I-beam structure to the right.  Foto #4

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Note the relative positions of the towers and the Manhattan-side Holland Tunnel vent.  Foto #5

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Again, thanks in advance for your comments and reminiscences.

Source will be credited soon.

Here was the first in the series.  Recognize the orange hull behind the orange inflatable?

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It appeared to be a drill . . . at the St. George ferry racks of John J. Marchi.  If anyone ends up in the frigid waters of the sixth boro, I presume this is the procedure.  I missed the actual lowering.

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As I left the west side of the terminal to see what tug had delivered the fuel barge (Answer:  Eastern Dawn . . . 8th foto here), I saw the inflatable westbound and then

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moments later, eastbound.

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By the time I moved around to this side of the ferry racks again, said inflatable was hoisted, ready to the next drill or the next emergency.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   Here’s a video of deckhands talking about a rescue a few years back.

Here are tugster-takes on car-carrying ferries off North Carolina, on Champlain, and in the tropics.

And this is likely a Forks ferry entering the Upper Bay in the fog a few years back, almost invisible.  Long Island has a plethora of ferry companies.

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It seems from Shelter Island north you take a ferry of one company, like Menantic here or Manhasset or another, which I conclude is built way south, and

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from Shelter Island south you take a ferry like Sunrise built farther north.    I need to get back to the Forks of Long Island to find out more.

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Since Islander seems a fairly generic name for ferries, I’ve yet to find any specifics of this one, on the hard in Greenport.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has failed to find a complete listing of Forks ferries on the internet.

By the way, I itching to gallivant soon . . . inland to Nola, then up the Mississippi to Vicksburg to  . . . St Louis and then zigzag back to the east coast, provided that storms stay elsewhere.

May 30, 2012 . . . around 1000 hrs.  I’d forgotten taking this foto until a conversation with Harold Tartell this afternoon.  RIP . . .   Bounty in that foto was heading for Newburgh, NY.  Note the USCG vessel lower right.

Here are more fotos from my harbor jaunt yesterday…  Apollo Bulker now lies at the dock in Rensselaer.

John A. Noble passed the Statue on the Upper Bay at midday yesterday.

Lower  Manhattan yesterday was a maze of pumps powered by portable generators of all sizes.  I’m not sure where this water is being pumped from.   But waters in other parts of that area smelled of fuel;  people wearing masks–there’s a whole new meaning to Halloween mask now–ran pumps and threw out waterlogged debris from residences and businesses.

Google “John B. Caddell” now and you’ll see lots of stories describing this vessels as a “168′ water tanker” or a “700-ton water tanker.”  It’s NOT a water tanker.  It was built as hull # 137 for Chester A. Poling Inc.  to transport petroleum.  Soon after delivery, it was turned over to the Navy and redubbed YO-140.    After the war, ownership was returned to the Poling company, and until its sale “foreign”  about two years ago.  It’s NOT a water tanker . . . it did not transport water as a paying cargo.

It’s remarkable to see the number of government helicopters in the skies over New York–and the military trucks and personnel.  This afternoon I spoke with US Forest Service crew in my neighborhood–Queens–clearing roadways: the person I talked to, from Arkansas, had never been in NYC before.  He said he was working with USFS crews from Texas, Wisconsin, and Ohio.  Thanks, welcome to NYC, and come back sometime when we’re all feeling better.

And finally, attributed to the Daily News . . . LARCs come ashore on Belle Harbor, Queens to assist.   Click on the foto to get the Daily News story.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except that story and fantastic foto by Vera Chinese the NY Daily News.

After coming home last night, I finally finished reading Rockwell Kent‘s 1929 memoir N by E.    Rockwell Kent lived for a time on the curve at 1262 Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) just east of the Caddell Dry Dock.   N by E tells the story of his shipwreck on the western shore of Greenland near Godthaab and subsequent struggle to survive.    Here are some teaser excerpts.

“We lay, caught in the angle of a giant step of rock, keel on the tread and starboard side on the riser; held there by wind and sea; held there to lift and pound; to lift so buoyantly on every wave; to drop–crashing our 13 iron-shod tons on granite.  There, the perfection of our ship revealed itself; only, that having struck just once, she ever lived, a ship, to lift and strike again. …  wind, storm, snow, rain, hail, lightning and thunder, earthquake and flood.”  (page 132)    Some time later, the three crew save what supplies they can and scramble up the rocks to safety.  Kent again:  “The three men stand there looking at it all  [including the wreckage of their vessel Direction]   … at last one of them speaks.  ‘It’s right,’ he says, ‘that we should pay for beautiful things.  And being here in this spot, now, is worth traveling a thousand miles for, and all that it has cost us.  Maybe we have lived only to be here now.'”  (144)  And later   “It was clear to us that the boat would remain on the ledge and even be, at low tide, partly out of the water.  She appeared to have been completely gutted …  the forecastle hatch now stood uncovered and every sea came spouting through it like a geyser, bearing some quaint contribution to the picturesque assortment that littered the rocks and water.  Books, paper, painting canvas, shoes, socks, eggs, potatoes:  we fished up what we could.”  (148)

Somehow Kent found himself ennobled in that personal disaster.   There’s hope.  It’s also a good read.

Last foto here passed along by Justin Zizes Jr .  . partly submerged fishing boat in Sheepshead Bay.

It appears that Staten Island ferry John J. Marchi was crossing the Upper Bay just before 1800 hrs.  Otherwise, it was still mostly government boats like

NOAA S-222 Thomas Jefferson, performing post-storm hydrographic surveys.  I took this foto back in early September 2012.  Buoys move, debris lurks, and bottom depths change.  Assessing and correcting these and other conditions of the port are keeping lots of folks really busy . . . .

I braved gridlock and frantic traffic with very long lines at gas stations to get to my work.  A detour–of course–led me past Arthur Kill Park across from the Howland Hook Container Terminal.  As no doubt you’ve seen in fotos of docks, boardwalks, and coastal areas from Cape May to here, these fishing docks are wrecked.  Remarkable here is that this dock is protected by 10 miles of waterway and  Staten Island’s heights from the ocean.

Two vessels that rode out the storm in port are (l to r) dredge Atchafalaya and container ship CSAV Itajai, not sure why this latter stayed in port.    Here’s my previous not-so-great foto of Atchafalaya.

As I said, lots of assessments are happening . . .  which means very little traffic.

I believe this is survey boat Cape Elizabeth.  In the distance at Fort Wadsworth–wonder how my goats are–notice the tents set up for Sunday’s NY Marathon.

And this may very well be the first tug/barge to leave the sixth boro post-Sandy . . . Morgan Reinauer, I think.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, and except for the shot of Thomas Jefferson . . . all taken today.

If you’re free and local, here’s a lecture on hurricane/flood risk coming up in two weeks on my friend Philip’s blog.  And here’s insights on risk assessment/response driving the Dutch “deltaworks” project after their “once in 10,000 years” flood considerations post-1953 North Sea flood, which claimed over 2000 lives.  

Fotos from Barbara at Rockaway Beach around 100th Street here.  Emergency message to folks on the boardwalk:  “Go inside, and no surfing.”

From Gary, East River looking toward the mouth of Newtown Creek and

toward the 59th Street Bridge.    No movement.

And finally, from L’amica dalla torre di orologio . . .  Hudson River . . . looking toward  the Statue of Liberty, who probably wishes she could hunker down behind her pedestal.   Geometrical structure to the left is the floating Battery Park City Ferry Terminal.   I’m not sure what contingencies exist for it during a surge, since it’s basically a hull.

Currently Captain of the Port has order vessels of a certain tonnage to leave the docks, as it’s safer for them to hang in the stream than stay affixed to a rigid structure.   So cruising in the North river now as sightseeing vessels,

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and the Sandy Hook pilot boats!

That’s the Erie Lackawanna Terminal Tower/Hoboken Terminal in the background.

USCG . . . off to respond to a recreational vessel that’s dragged its mooring?

And finally, back to Rockaway . .  as nightfalls.

Many thanks to Barbara, Gary, and L’amica for these fotos.  The worst is yet to come, I fear.  Stay inside and away from the tongues and talons of water that surge in.

And this just in . . . video from helicopter of USCG rescue of folks from HMS Bounty.

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