You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘James Turecamo’ tag.

Here’s a company I’ve not encountered before . . . LMZ.

LMZ Europa was northbound at Stuyvesant as we passed, and following her

were James Turecamo and

Turecamo Girls, both

 

have been regulars down near the mouth of the Hudson, but these days the

main ship assist horsepower up in this part of the River. As it turned out, the ship had completed discharging cargo in Coeymans (named for the Koijemans family) and was headed north only briefly to spin around.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to see them again in these parts a few weeks farther toward winter.

 

 

In only ten years, a lot of changes have happened in the sixth boro.  I wish I’d started this blog 30 years ago to document even more, but 1988 predated blogs, the internet, and digital photography.  Wow . . . how did people relate back then?

Joking aside, let’s see some that have moved on.  On January 11, 2009 Kristin Poling, the 1934 tanker, still operated.

January 12.  Sun Right, built 1993 and already dead, moved westbound in the KVK escorted by Eileen McAllister.  What’s remarkable to me is how large the tug looks in compared to the ship in contrast to tugs today looking miniature on the stern of a ULCV.

Five minutes later . . . Odin.  Indeed I was smitten by this unusual vessel, which has since moved to the South and lost her ability to rise up as if on hind legs.  I’ve no sense of what it was like to work on her.

January 15.  Never did I imagine then that this Dean Reinauer would be replaced by this Dean.

January 18  The boro’s big story of January 2009, of course, was the plane crash in the Hudson.  Here the efforts to lift the USAir Flight 1549 out of the water have just begun.  Thomas stands by Weeks 533.

January 29  NYC DEP’s Red Hook had just arrived in the harbor, and it seemed she was escorted everywhere by James Turecamo. Sine then, NYC DEP has added a  whole new generation of sludge tankers aka honey boats.

January 31  Taurus has become Joker, another intriguingly named tugboat operated not in NYC but Philadelphia area by Hays Tug and Launch, with fleet mate names like Purple Hays, High Roller, Grape Ape, and more.

Let’s leave it there.  Happy new year’s greetings still ring in my ears, leaving me with an ongoing inexplicable smile and desire to treat all with respect.  Go out of your way to smile at someone today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose smile gets hidden by a respirator whenever he goes into the archives on Tugster Tower.

 

I’m still working to catch up and photos some of you have sent.

First, from Scotland and Robin Denny, it’s Seal Carr (1983) and

Oxcar, 1978 and looking almost like the USACE colors.  They’re working MV Saga Pearl 11 out of Firth of Forth, port of Edinburgh.

From Port Newark and Phil Porteus, it’s scrap . . .

loading to the right marks on Thor Infinity.

Here from Phil is a mishmash of vessels at Port Newark.

And another from Phil . . . the former Sea Monster and Mars.

And from Brooklyn looking over at Manhattan by Daniel Meeter, it’s Commander.  She has a history going back to in 1917, built by the Beele Wallace Co., Morehead City, NC.  She did patrol work in World War 1.

From Port of Coeymans and Erik Springer, it’s James Turecamo,  a frequently depicted boat on tugster

Thanks Robin, Phil, Daniel, and Erik.

 

 

This is day 3, the Rondout brought a surprising visitor in the form of

Kalmar Nyckel.  When I’m back, I’ll do a whole post of this vessel.

These photos are included chronologically, so you’d be correct to conclude that north of the Rondout there are signs of nature.   Foreign mariners especially must be surprised by all these critters.

 

The port of Coeymans always has activity, briefly docked here are Mister Jim

and James Turecamo.

Betty D is southbound just below the Federal Lock at Troy.

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Once in the Canal, we are treated to many boats, including Governor Cleveland, 

BB 109, 

and Day Peckinpaugh.  Farther west, we pass the

Mohawk Harbor, the former Alco plant, dominated by the cube that is Walthousen reactor. 

and a self-propelled scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

Grace is a 113,000 dwt tanker delivered less than a year ago by the Guangzhou Shipyard, north of Hong Kong and China’s third largest city.  

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Is this the look of future tankers in the sixth boro?

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Jonathan C. assists her from her berth.  I may be mistaken, but 10 years ago, few if any cargo vessels of this size called in the sixth boro.

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Ten years ago there were also no 6000 hp assist tugs in the port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for a Navig8 vessel in our fair port from nine years ago.

We’ve seen James D., Kirby, and JRT.  And now . .  welcome Jonathan C Moran.  Another photo of the 6000 hp newest in the port later in the post.

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For now, also resplendent in the June dawn . . . Jane A. Bouchard,

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the unique B. Franklin Reinauer,

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and so let’s add another of this facet tug,

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Evening Light (the former Frederick E. ), 

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the lean, green James E. Brown, 

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the age-defying Durham,

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the indefatigable James Turecamo,

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and finally another shot of Jonathan C Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who needs to get back to work.

Here’s an index to the 44 prior posts by this name.  CMA CGM Parsifal here is heavily laden, looks huge–and for the sixth boro is one of the largest that have called to date–almost 11oo’ loa and around 8500 teu-capacity, but relative to the current largest container ship in the world is smaller by half, ranked by capacity.

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I’ve done lots of posts focusing on intriguing names, but Parsifal needs to be added to that list.  In the foreign-to-me world of opera, Parsifal was a “pure fool,” the only knight unsullied enough to get the magic sword back from the evil seductress Kundry.  Cool.

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Here’s JRT Moran–the sixth boro’s newest new tug–coming out to meet Troitsky Bridge.

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JRT teams up here with the venerable James Turecamo, a tandem that shows evolution in twin screw design over almost a half century.   Troitsky [trinity] Bridge is named for a structure in St. Petersburg;  for some reason it’s almost the name of a fun civil engineering competition.  Local high schools run such competitions also.

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Port Moody waits in the anchorage as USNS Red Cloud gets refurbished at GMD.

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I caught Leopard Sea in Nola here just over a year ago.

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Santa Pacific, with hatches cracked open, waits  . .  for orders?

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NS Antarctic gets around.

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Robert E. heads out for a job, passing NS Antarctic and  . . .

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Cielo di Milano, as Sandy Hook Pilots summer station boat New Jersey comes in for a call through the KVK.

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Living along the banks of the sixth boro has disadvantages, but I truly enjoy the fact that this too is part of the traffic.

 

All photos this month by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s what I did two years ago.  And here’s what I did last year.

This time I’ll do it differently, as post –more or less but close–the first and last photo I took each month, starting below with Buchanan I entering the Narrows on January 1 not long after sunrise.

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And I won’t mention each date, but this was January 28 just before midday, Durance entering the KVK with Laura K Moran taking the stern.

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Winter sees fishing boats like Eastern Welder in the Upper Bay, adding to the regulars in the anchorages like Asphalt Star and Emma Miller.

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If you’ve forgotten how cold it stayed throughout the month of February, here are two photos from just off the Battery

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taken on February 28.

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James Turecamo ushers in March, actually that was March 6, and there’s still snow on the ground.

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At the end of the month, Grey Shark was in town for repairs, an extended stay.

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April 1 saw Margot continuing to extend NYS Marine Highway right through the sixth boro . . . the same day that

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Kismet enters the cold waters after leaving its lair in the Caribbean.

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April 29 . . . I finally caught Simone in the harbor . . . here tailed by MSC Monica.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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