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Here goes another 3-fer, three cargo vessels making their way again through the KVK simultaneously.  JRT here at dawn assists orange juice carrier Orange Blossom 2 through the ConHook Range.

Jonathan C passes in front of them, returning from assisting another vessel now bound for sea.

Right behind the juice carrier is a box ship.

 

As the juice ship nears midpoint in the KVK, notice a RORO rounding Bergen Point at the west end of the KVK.

As I said, congestion . ..   that’s routine.  Kimberly travels along the starboard bow of the RORO,

Meanwhile, that box ship mentioned earlier has Eric on port

and Capt Brian A. at the stern.

Glovis Safety . . . headed for Philly and as of this moment is midAtlantic on its way to Zeebrugge.

 

As I said . . .   skillful mariners make a congested waterway seem just routine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Pushing and shoving  . . . are they different in this context with 3000 hp concentrated in the right location?

New steel and recycled name . . . Torm Hilde, the 114,000 dwt tanker in port recently, got spun around in the KVK by Kimberly and JRT.

Torm Hilde is one of the largest tankers operated by the company, now in its 130th year!

And while two Moran tugs are assisting the Torm tanker out, two more are assisting crude tanker Compassion into her berth.

And then two more are assisting an Evergreen L ship through as well.

Congestion? . . . it’s just another day in the Kills….

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

like route 66, this gets me kicks . . . although I see no ” St. Louis, Joplin, Missouri, Oklahoma City looks oh-mighty pretty.  You’ll see Amarillo, a-Gallup, New Mexico, Flagstaff, Arizona, don’t forget Winona, Kingman, Barstow, San Bernardino….”

But I digress.  In the distance it’s Glorious Leader and closer up–not much–it’s Bitu Express getting a delivery from Twin Tube.  What is the purpose of that large rectangular structure over the stern of Bitu Express?  My guess would be a heating system of some sort . . .

One a dark, rainy, too-late morning of March 10, it’s good to go back a day and see ONE Minato in morning sunlight, in

homeport registered in Kobe,

Where would Lian Gui Hu be registered do you suppose?

 

Monaco Bridge . . .  yes there are bridges in Monaco, but this ULCV is registered in Panama.

 

You’d maybe expect Maersk Callao to be Peru-flagged, but  . . . hey, maybe Singapore has a Calle Callao or Avenida Callao.   That’s Potomac with a barge lightening alongside.

And Evergreen Ever Loading . . .  London?

Torm Hilde . . .  you’d think Copenhagen or even Aalborg…

Stolt Integrity  . . .  Georgetown!??  Practically every state in the US has a town by that name, and Indiana–in fact–has FOUR!!  An’ dis aint nun a dems!

All the color in this post remind me of a CV I’ve not seen in a while . . . Buffalo Hunter.

All photos and humor–attempted–by Will Van Dorp, who thinks there should be a route 66-parallel song for shipping in the sixth boro.   Enya has one that starts to get at it . . .

Happy short day . . .

 

Clio came into the sixth boro carrying “mineral fuel” cargo and a thick coating of sea ice.  I’m not sure where she arrived from, but six months ago, she was in some unambiguously hot places, sans ice.

JRT had a band of icelets,

Choptank carried souvenirs of her time upriver where more fresh water flowed,

but Margaret takes the prize with the jagged hang-downs.

C. F. Campbell had ice stalactites yet not nearly enough given her port of registry.  She has been in the sixth boro for a bit over a half year now.

Cold winters . . . they’re good for a lot of reasons . . .even for plants.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Less than five minutes after disconnecting from Seapacis,

JRT has attached to Alpine Maya and guides her into the dock so recently vacated by Seapacis.

 

Jonathan C hangs onto the stern.

James D stays alongside the tanker, since it’s headed for the Stapleton anchorage.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A hex sign?  Well that “boss” is just about a variation on those folk magic symbols so common in parts of PA.

But it’s a logo here, or a symbol I can’t interpret on a crude (?) tanker rotating away from the dock and turning in the length of the KVK . . . one of my favorite maneuvers to watch in the sixth boro.  Previous examples can be seen here.

The evolution started with James D, likely delivering the pilot to the catwalk, as no gangway was deployed.

Then JRT took station near midships.

James D took a line frowner the bow.

See the pilot on the starboard bridge wing?

 

Smoke is in the distance, about a quarter mile on shore.

 

Note the ice buildup on the part of the hull that had been in the shade.

 

When the rotation had reached nearly 180 degrees, JRT broke off in a hurry and  . . .

… well, that’s a post for another day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

You’ll see the entire vessel as you scroll through here, but for starters, any idea of the namesake for this vessel?  At what point in these photos can you tell if you’re looking at a Panamax or postPanamax vessel or whether this is a ULCV?

Kirby has the stern and Margaret is portside.

At this point, you can answer most of the questions above.  I have to confess I thought she looked small.

JRT has the starboard.

 

To compare Tucapel with a standard container vessel from 10 years ago, check out this January 2009 post here.  And look at Sun Right, now scrapped.  Sun Right was launched in 1993.  Tucapel was launched in 2012.

 

Sun Right carried 4299 teu, and Tucapel . . . 8000.  The biggest ULCVs in the sixth boro these days are around 14,000.

And the vessel namesake?   Here’s the answer.

All photos and info by Will Van Dorp.

 

I haven’t used this title in half a decade, but today I couldn’t resist. JRT waited at the Staten Island side of the VZ.

But so were the geese, the brants.

Lots of them.

As well as the gulls.

James D joined JRT as an escort gull whizzed overhead.

Now you see it?

Now?

Jonathan C meets NYK Blue Jay!!

More birds soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve mentioned before about my people the Dutch celebrating “old years day” on December 31.   As the child of immigrants, I’m blessed by this one of many ways they see the world differently, a perspective I’m happy to share.  So here is a retrospective of the year, the result of a process of scanning through photos in the blog library, not overthinking it.

January.  Gunhilde Maersk with James, Kirby, and JRT plus Miriam Moran.  the year of the 1200-footers aka ULCVs becoming commonplace in the sixth boro.

February.  Ocean Henry Bain serves as a safety boat during  the ice canoe race I documented in my Carnavalons posts.

March. Cerro Grande here escorted a Caribbean-bound LNG ship, one of all the Panama Tugs posts

April. When I saw this section of drained canal bed between O-6 to O-7 in Oswego, I thought the work’d never get done before the season began, but I was wrong.  Of all my 2018 NYS Canals posts, this and this posted with the greatest urgency.

May.  Reliable pushed seaward by Lucy H.  As of today, Reliable lies under the sea gathering fishes and entertaining Davy Jones near Shinnecock.

June.  Jay Bee V headed out on a high-profile mission.  Has she returned to the sixth boro yet?

July.  I missed Rosemary‘s christening because that’s what happens when you don’t look at your calendar. First come first serve for a few tugster lighthouse calendars.  Send me an email with your mailing address.   As I said, I ran a few extra when I made up my Christmas gifts.

August.  Kimberly Selvick with AEP barges was one of the treats I saw in Calumet.  This day south of Chicago planted a seed of curiosity about the Lake Michigan/Mississippi River link I hope to be able to explore in 2019.  Many thanks to Christine Douglas.

September.  J. W.  Cooper delivers a pilot in Port Colborne at the Lake Erie end of the Welland Canal.  Because I hadn’t a satisfying enough fix from the canal earlier, I returned there in October.

October.  One Stork, a pink ULCV,  came into town.  It wasn’t her first visit/delivery, but it was the first that I caught.  She’s currently in the sixth boro.

November.  Morton S. Bouchard IV rounds Shooters Island light, Bouchard celebrated a big anniversary this year.

December.  Ruth M. Reinauer heads west into the Kills in December, the start of heating oil season.

And that’s it for the year, time for me to securely lock up Tugster Tower and prepare myself to meet 2019.  The older I get, the more profound is my awareness that although I make many plans for a new year, I might not see the end of it.  It’s just how it is.  Every day is a blessing.  Last year had my own personal ultima thule; I pray that 2019 brings its new ones.

Thanks to everyone who read, commented, and assisted me in 2018.  Happy and constructive new year day by day to you all.

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