You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘JRT Moran’ tag.

January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

So in a recent post, you had a glimpse of this small craft, which I initially thought was a fishing boat.   I know how addictive fishing can be, since I used to ice fish and canoe fish.

But it turned out to be Lynn, a Ken‘s boat, used for line and boom handling. I’d not before noticed that some of these small boats have names.

Another boom and line handling company, ACV Enviro, also has names on their boat.  Meet Miss Urvi, an interesting name in several ways.

Here’s Miss Urvi showing my bow on a foggy day.

An intriguing small craft departed the Narrows yesterday.  Where is it headed I wonder.  It looked to be no more than 35′ and the name might be Sirius.

I’m not sure who operates Grace D, but she’s been in the harbor for the better part of a decade doing launch service.

 

Head on . . . who is this survey boat?  Notice the up fold-down transponder on the bow between the hulls.

It’s USACE.  I believe it’s a Silver Ship boat.

At first, I didn’t know what I was looking at when I saw six knees.  Sure, Gabby I knew and I saw a small boat to starboard,

but

there were two alongside, one on each side.  And on the far side, it’s Mister “B”...   a new one for me.

So it is.  All photos, WVD.

Here are the previous  iterations of this title.  Keep in mind that the long lens foreshortens these scenes.  The scene is this:  MSC Alicante has just entered the KVK heading west.  Note the Vane Potomac hurrying away to the east.

The “N” vessel is AthenianJRT is along the port side of MSC Alicante.

 

Note that JRT is along the port bow quarter.

To compare, Athenian has teu capacity of 10000, and MSC Alicante, 5550. The photo below belies the fact that their relative dimensions are 885′ x 131′ v.  1145′ x 149′ respectively.

Brendan Turecamo peels off Athenian

When my attention turns back to the west, I notice another container ship by the Bayonne Bridge, Brendan has replaced JRT alongside the MSC, and Jonathan C Moran on a sternline.

See the whitewater wake forward of Jonathan C?  She’s racing the engines astern.

 

Gunhilde Maersk has a 7000 teu within its 1203′ x 140′ dimensions.

 

Dense traffic . . . it’s just another day on the KVK.

All photos, observations by Will Van Dorp.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

About two months ago, CMA CGM Brazil called in the sixth boro.  She’s one of four 15000 teu vessels, the largest ULCVs to date to call here.  Recently, the next one visited, CMA CGM Mexico.   Technically, her capacity is 15,128 teus.

I’ve stated this before:  a vessel this size makes the boro’s largest assist tugs look small.  In the photo below, notice that Brendan Turecamo‘s upright mast barely extends above the hull lettering.

If I heard the numbers right on the VHF, the ULCV had 42′ reaching toward the channel bed and just shy of 200′ reaching up toward the bridges, Bayonne and VZ.

Up close, she could be divided into the bow and bridge,

the midbody, and

the stern.

Note the small white fishing boat alongside just forward of the first tug.

All four Argentina-class ships are working;  the first to arrive in NYC was the last to come off the ways.  They were all built at Hyundai Samho Heavy Industry Shipyard, which would be a fascinating place to visit.

She stacks containers 20 across.   Compare that with 16 across as the largest I saw here 10 years ago.

When the assistance with the curves from Port Elizabeth to Con Hook is complete, all four tugs cast off and return to the base.

Here‘s more on the Hyundai shipyard.

All photos, WVD.

By the way, the engine here is MAN 11G90ME-C with scrubbers,  generating just over 92,000 horsepower.  I’d love to know more. 

I’ve seen this Explorer class CMA CGM once before, at least.  I’m not counting on CMA CGM Zheng He to call in the sixth boro, unfortunately.  If you don’t know the namesake of that ship, Admiral Zheng He, he’s someone to find more about. You can start here

It gives no consolation that CMA CGM Magellan, here in October, came and went unrecorded by my camera. 

If you don’t know much about the namesake of this ship, for example how many times he actually crossed the Atlantic and about which there is some controversy, click here.

What caught my attention most, though, was the patches of hoarfrost on the hull of the ship.  It should not be a surprise, because the same stuff coated my windshield yesterday morning. 

More patches are here.  But then, it was the stark distinction between the light/shadow on the tug, on JRT.

Then shadows appeared, burnt into the frozen hull.

See the docking pilot himself and the shadow?

See the pilot nearing the bottom of the ladder and reaching out for the deck hand?

Happy November, all, from WVD.

Given yesterday’s post, I’ll subtitle this “tugster:  the return.”  From a weather perspective, it wasn’t ideal weather.  From a traffic perspective, I also thought it was not ideal, because I’d hoped a certain ULCV would enter  the boro in daylight, but it had moved in three hours before the sun rose behind thick cloud strata.  

However, it was a busy morning.  And seen through one filter, a certain set of colors dominated. 

Get the picture?

It’s time to meet the incoming ships, 

 

There’s work around that bend.

Just count them:  all four Moran 6000s as well as Margaret and Kimberly . . . farther away and along the right side of the photo.

I don’t believe I’ve seen all four 6000s in the same frame before, as above.

The morning had brightened a bit as they escorted in the box ships.

 

 

 

 

It’s always good to get away, but it’s even better to get back.  All photos, WVD.

Remember the post on the CMA CGM 14414s?  How about the Wall of New York?

Below you are looking at 25,000 teu on the Maersk PLUS the CMA CGM vessels, Maersk 10k and CMA CGM 15k,

making this the largest ULCV yet to call in the sixth boro, CMA CGM BrazilBrazil came off the ways earlier this year.  The rest of the series will carry names including CMA CGM Argentina, Mexico, Panama, and ChileDoes Brazil have the special scrubbers?  When will LNG catch on as fuel?

Hayward must have been the spectator vessel, but I didn’t get my invitation.

Maybe someone can opine on why James D. provided the tow moving astern?  My supposition is that this configuration places the wheels farthest ahead of the tow, providing the dynamic equivalent of a longer lever, but that’s only a supposition.

 

 

James D. and Kirby worked in tandem, as opposite ends of the ship.

If my math is correct, 15,000 teus, if lined up end to end, would make 56.8 miles of containers.  Big ship.

All photos, WVD, who wonders what is in all those boxes and of all that, what could not be made or grown in this country.

If you didn’t see her arrive, maybe you can catch her when she exits.

 

 

As of writing, two pink ULCVs– ONE Minato and ONE Hawk–share the cranes at Global Terminals. That would be a great photo, but I’m tied up this morning.

Recently, I waited around for another one of the CMA CGM Explorer series ULCVs.   So far, I’ve seen Vespucci.  That leaves von Humbolt, Colomb, Laperouse, Verne, Magellan, Polo, and Zheng.

Foreshadowing:  JRT is cutting ahead of CMA CGM Corte Real to go to the next job.

The “explorer” in this case is obscure on this side of the world.  Gaspar Corte Real was a 15th-century explorer memorialized by a statue in St. John’s Newfoundland.

More foreshadowing:  Margaret has the honors here of retrieving the docking pilot.

This photo was taken a half hour after the previous ones. That’s JRT cutting across the Narrows to position for the next job . . .

an APL ULCV that Margaret is already alongside.

JRT closes in on the bow of APL Sentosa,named for an amusement resort in Singapore.

She’s the longest ULCV to call in the sixth boro, to date, I believe. Prove me wrong. She’s listed at 1207′ x 167′ whereas Corte Real has the same beam but is seven feet shorter.

Here the two ULCVs meet.  Between them, they have capacity of 27,238 containers.  both ULCVs loaded in Sri Lanka in early August.  I’m wondering if anyone there got a photo of the two together in the port of Colombo.

 

As to relative size of ULCV to tugboat, notice the two crew on the bow of tug (in blue green)  and stern of ship (in orange with white helmet)?

Here’s a closer up, where you can see the messenger line coming down . . . just about to hit the deck.  The deckhand will grab it, make the messenger to the tow line, and the ship’s crew will bring it back to the ship.

 

All photos, WVD.

Alongside Pilot No. 1 New York, the current one, it’s the newest-in-name vessel in the sixth boro . . .

Meaghan Marie, exKathleen Turecamo, has become part of the same green & buff fleet as Joseph John.

Here’s a photo I took of her in port of Albany, September 2013.

A different use of green . . . Vane’s Philadelphia, a 4200 hp tug launched in 2017.

A slightly darker buff, it’s Matthew Tibbetts.  What I didn’t realize until I looked it up just now, Tibbetts was launched as Dann Ocean’s first boat to carry the name Ocean Tower.  More on that later.

It’s always a good day when I catch two Reinauer tugboats together, Haggerty Girls (4000 hp) and Ruth M. Reinauer (4720 hp), with a deeply loaded RTC

Alex puts its 4300 hp to bear on Viktor Bakaev.

I mentioned Ocean Tower earlier . . .  here’s the current tugboat by that name. It’s about a decade newer, one-third more horsepower, and 15′ longer, and 5′ broader than the earlier boat, now Tibbetts.

Kristin Poling began life as Chesapeake, an early version of Patapsco but longer, broader,and with a full 5000 hp.

And to conclude, examples of the classes of the two largest tractor tugs in the sixth boro . . . Capt. Brian A. and

JRT, each approaching their next job.

All photos very recently, WVD, who has more tugboat race photos from previous years . . .

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,440 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2021
M T W T F S S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031