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 . . . signing onto the 6200-teu Maersk Detroit and stepping off at the end of a hitch, this post is inspired by a sixth boro mariner on a milk run.  Many thanks to Mike Weiss** for most of the photos.  It took him 77 days to get from Port Elizabeth back to Port Elizabeth.  Day 1 was back in early November. 

Yesterday I caught a few photos in the KVK of the vessel on the last few miles of a voyage mostly halfway around the world and back.

Mike, an AB, texted me their ETA into the KVK and  

in cold overcast morning I wore my conspicuous vest and waited

to see people on the aft mooring deck.

Welcome home, Mike. This is a timeless way to go so sea:  depart from your home and return to it. 

The following are some photos Mike took along the way, as in the Strait of Gibraltar just before calling at the port of Algeciras

Port Said at the aft mooring deck thousands of sea miles ago, 

entering the Suez Canal and heading under the Al-Salam Bridge (I think), and 

about to exit the Suez following . . . Ever Given [yes, really!!], 

getting an assist at Port Qasim

port of Salalah

and then homeward across the Atlantic to 

port of Houston

and port of Charleston, with many other sights that only Mike can tell about along the way. 

Many thanks to Mike Weiss for sharing these photos and his experiences.  If you didn’t click on the ** link in the first paragraph, you’ll be happy to do it here for some of Mike’s sea resume. 

Maersk Detroit is part of the US-flagged Maersk fleet. 

Ever Given has a big sister now here

 

 

I’m back and just in time for the last day of the year, which –as explained in previous years— in my Dutch tradition is a reflection day, a time to if not assess then at least recall some of the sights of the past 12 months.  A photo-driven blog makes that simultaneously easy and hard;  easy because there’s a photographic record and not easy because there’s such an extensive photographic record to sift though.

A word about this set of photos:  these are some “seconds” that did not make the final cut for my 2023 tugster calendar.  The actual calendars are still available if you’ve not ordered one;  find the order info here. I’m ordering a bunch myself. 

One windy day last January I caught a Pilot No 1–the old New York–doing drills under the VZ Bridge.  Just recently I met one of the engineers on that boat, a person with epic stories about the sixth boro.

A warm day in February, I caught JRT Moran assisting QM2 into her Red Hook berth. 

March I spent a delightful day on Douglas B. Mackie observing the water side of a Jersey shore beach replenishment project, thanks to the hard-working folks at GLDD. 

April . . .  I caught Jane McAllister heading out;  correct if I’m wrong, but my sense is that soon afterward she made her way down to South America to join the expanding ranks of US-built tugs working on various projects on the south side of the Caribbean. 

As a member of the Canal Society of NYS, I had the opportunity to see Urger up close and sun-warmed on the bank of the Oswego in Lysander NY. 

A clutch of Centerline tugboats waited for their next assignment at the base just east of the Bayonne Bridge.   Note the fully foliated trees beyond them along the KVK.

From the humid heat of western Louisiana and onto the Gulf of Mexico, Legs III–shown 

here spudded up just east of SW Pass, afforded a memorable journey on its way up to the sixth boro.  Thx, Seth. 

Back in the boro, later in August, a Space X rocket recovery boat named Bob–for an astronaut– came through the sixth boro.  More on Bob–the astronaut–here

In September, I finally got to my first ever Gloucester schooner race, thanks to Rick Miles of Artemis, the sailboat and not the rocket. 

Icebreaker Polar Circle was in the boro a few days in September as well.  Now it’s up in Canada, one hopes doing what icebreakers are intended to do. US naval logistics vessel Cape Wrath is at the dock in Baltimore ready and waiting a logistics assignment. 

Ticonderoga certainly and Apache possibly are beyond their time working and waiting.  I believe Ticonderoga is at the scrappers in Brownsville. 

Passing the UN building on the East River, veteran Mulberry is currently out of the army and working in the private sector.  I’ve a request:  for some time I’ve seen a tug marked as Scholarie working the waters west of the Cape Cod Canal;  a photo suggested it might be called Schoharie. Anyone help out?

And finally, a photo taken just two days ago while passing through the sixth boro during what can hardly be called “cover of darkness” it’s Capt Joseph E. Pearce on its way to a shipyard on the mighty Rondout to pick up some custom fabrication for a Boston enterprise. Many thanks to the Stasinos brothers for the opportunity.

I’d be remiss in ending this post and this year without mentioning lost friends, preserving a memory of their importance to me personally . . .  Bonnie of frogma–first ever to comment of this blog so many years ago and a companion in many adventures– and Mageb, whose so frequent comments here I already miss. 

I plan to post tomorrow, although I may miss my high noon post time because I hope to post whatever best sunrise 2023 photos I can capture in the morning.  

Happy, safe, and prosperous new year to you all.  I’m posting early today because I want my readers who live much much farther east than the sixth boro to get these wishes before their new trip around the sun begins. Bonne annee!  Gelukkig nieuwjaar!

 

I’ve observed that docking pilots often board just south of or north of the VZ Bridge.

 

Note the two crew, one with a backpack.

U-turn and 

preparations are made

 

and then a pilot boards along the KVK. 

 

 

Any idea who/where Shekou is?

It’s in  Guangdong Province, but of course it’s not Singapore.

All photos, WVD. 

Tugster 2023 marine calendars are available for direct order here.  Feedback I’ve got says folks are happy about the colorful and diverse images. 

Got that name, not the one midships but the one on the bow?  Torm was co-founder of the company in 1889!

“Republican” . .  it’s just a name for a Torm Medium Range IMO Type 2/3 tanker, Danish International Shipping register, one of at least two dozen Torm tankers that have appeared on this blog.  This ship’s name has nothing to do with blue or red, US or Spain or Ireland . . . this list goes on and on

Two Moran tugboats traveled south in the Upper Bay and 

assisted it into a berth at the east end of IMTT.

 

The low angle light made pronounced areas of light and shadow. 

In the photo below, extreme right, note the two crew on the starboard bridge wing, no doubt

 

calling out directions for Kirby and 

JRT to ease the tanker into the dock. 

 

All photos, WVD.

OK. Ready or not, it is July. Here was the first for this.  Dawn, with all its promise, is my favorite time of day.  I’m not so much nocturnal or diurnal . . . call me interurnal, familiar with that time between night and day …

 

when for a short time, the light paints everything slightly different color.

Cosmic glory is what does it, whether the light falls on a vessel called Cosmic Glory or JRT Moran or any name else and a variety of horizons.

Isn’t Mary Alice or

its dump scow just glorious here?

Daybreak!  It was so bright I heard the drums and trumpets and felt water shudder!

All photos in June 2022 by WVD.

 

I’ve posted a lot of unusual ship names here over the years. 

If you don’t read Greek, as I don’t, the one above and below are the same ship, just from different angles.

Triton is a 14k+ teu vessel, making it quite the giant. 

Whether it’s jolly or not, i can’t tell.  It is truly jam-packed.

Over on the far side of Triton, yup, that’s Happy Lady.

 

Justine, Ava, and Ellen all played a role in getting Triton safely into if not out of the sixth boro.

 

Taipei Triumph is a bit newer and has roughly the same teu-capacity. Notice how small the ferry Barberi, which is closer, looks in comparion.

Gregg McAllister is working the starboard bow, 

with an untethered JRT Moran following, and Bruce A. ready when needed.

Bow and stern on the two green giants are slightly different.

Other than the sixth boro setting, the escort tugs, my framing in the post, and the fact that all the photos were taken by me, WVD, they are unrelated.

Anyone catch the vessel in this post that I did not acknowledge in any way?

Count them . . . at least four very different vessels:  Saint Emilion with barge, JRT waiting to assist, Grace D shuttling people and supplies, and a sloop. 

Here’s more from hither and yon around the sixth boro:  Navigator at “old navy” topping off the ferry reserves, 

Popeye fishing in front of Ellis Island, 

Meagan Ann taking the stern of this interesting sailing trawler,

another sloop passing the Statue line, a Circle Line boat, as well as a Statue Cruises vessel,

and a NY Media Boat touring RIB.

Yes, I’m back to that trawler.  It’s called Briney Bus out of Miami, but besides that, I don’t know much.  My guess is that, like many boats, it’s heading for the  NYS Canal system, which opened two days ago.

The parting shot . . . Meagan Ann.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

As of March 1, 2022, CMA CGM Adonis was still in the shipyard, not yet delivered.  By March 31, the vessel was in Qingdao and loaded, casting off lines.  And April 29, 2022, she had a Sandy Hook pilot on board and was proceeding up the Ambrose Channel, making her first ever cargo call anywhere.

And here, as a SeaStreak fast ferry overtakes it off to port, a Moran tug is about to land a docking pilot on board for her first call.

 

It turns out that James D did the honors, not JRT, which took the stern. 

Click here to learn some of the invisible but significant technology built into Adonis to make it safer and cleaner. 

All photos, WVD, who wishes to say “welcome to the sixth boro, CMA CGM Adonis.

 

Tony A sent this along labeled as “m-o-a-t,” mother of all tugs, and Pacific Reliance is truly a large tugboat at 121′ x 42′

with 9280 hp turning two 12′ diameter propeller and pushing around a 560′ tank barge that carries 155k barrels of liquid product.  But there are larger tugboats.  Justine McAllister gets called in to assist the Crowley unit into the dock.

CMT Pike heads north about to be obscured by an incoming MSC ship.

 

Seeley pushes along a block of four scows.

 

JRT and Kirby prepare to sail a Minerva tanker.  Minerva, Roman goddess of war and other things, seems appropriate these days.

The indefatigable Ellen McAllister passes Barney Turecamo on her way to a job.

Catherine C. Miller moves Weeks crane 577 to a lift site.

Emily Ann returns from a job. 

Nicolas Vinik gallops off to a job,

following Liz Vinik, herself

follwing Gregg McAllister.

And the beat goes on . . . all photos, WVD, except of course the one from Tony A, to whom I am grateful.

I’ve usually used “exotic” for offshore windfarm-related vessels or others that are rarely-seen, because prior to five or so years ago, such vessels never called here.  In this case, cruise ships became quite scarce because of Covid, and so I counted myself fortunate to catch QM2 arriving this morning. 

The fog blocked out the familiar landmarks of the port.

JRT did the honors.  Although I didn’t stick around to see how they spun around using her pods, I suspect the single tug didn’t have a lot to do.  If I’m wrong, someone will correct me.

Way back when I also caught the ship on foggy mornings here and here.

The passengers there stand quite close together, albeit in the fresh February air.

I believe this is her second post-Covid visit.

All photos this morning, WVD.

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