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While waiting for Triton, I had a surprise, a big pink surprise.  I hope someone gets photos of Triton when she departs.

But here, 24 days and 13 hours out of Singapore,

it’s

ONE Apus, which rhymes with “tape us.”  Since she’s a duplicate, I think, of ONE Stork, I assumed an apus referred to a bird in some language.  Any guesses?

Here are my first photos of ONE Stork.

 

See that messenger line coming down to send up

the big  line?

It turns out that “apus” is the Latin word for the common swift, a fantastic name for a ULCV.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s minutes late for the noontime posting.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

The AIS image taken early afternoon the Sunday before Memorial Day shows just how crowded the waters between Narragansett Bay and the North Fork Orient Point can be;  pink is recreational boats and the greens, reds, and blues are commercial vessels.  Obviously, given the scale and the fact that the icons are about 100 times larger than the pink vessels they represent, the water is not clogged, although it is congested enough that effective watch standing is essential.

In the sixth boro it can look like the photos in this post.  Anyone operating a small boat–and relative to a 1200′ container ship like Cosco Shipping Peony, a 35′ fishing boat is truly puny.

Tugboats, any of them, are huge compared to small fishing boats.  Mary Turecamo below is 106′ loa and powered by twin engines totaling 4300 hp.

Coming from anchored units there might be a slow moving sailboat.

Summer traffic on the sixth boro is not what it is in the colder months.

 

Sometimes interventions are called for.

Be safe . .  .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Joseph Chomicz, it’s Capt. Latham in Port Elizabeth .  .  .

standing by the barge Atlanta Bridge . . .  So here’s my question . . . and answer will be located at the end of this post . . .  in quo vadis?

I’ve not seen this boat in a while . . . the 1958 Blount-built Vulcan III.

 

The “D” stands for Derrick Marine of Perth Amboy.

The current Kristin Poling stands by as Aramon is lightered before it enters the Kills.

Doris Moran moves Portland into the Kills, headed here for Shooters Island before following the channel around to the north.

Jonathan and JRT make their way home after an assist.

Mary Turecamo assists a lightered Aramon to a berth on the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Joe for the Capt. Latham pics;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who lacked his real camera to document the answer to the “where goest they?” question above.

Some older cargo cranes go San Juan-bound aboard Atlanta Bridge between Capt. Latham and Atlantic Enterprise.

Ships of all sorts call in the sixth boro.  Quick  post today . . .  showing a range of recent callers.

MSC Zlata R,

Grande Torino,

 

Gerhard Schulte, 

 

Elbeborg,

 

and Adrian Maersk . . . each with a smaller vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For folks who’ve been watching sixth boro traffic much longer than I have, Lyman must conjure up a sense of ressursction that I don’t have whenever I see the profile.  Then called Crusader, she was tripped by her barge and sank just over 30 years ago.  I’ve almost always seen her with

barge Sea Shuttle, towing sections of subs. For a spectacular view of this tow in the East River seven years ago click here.

Rockefeller University’s River Campus makes an unusual backdrop here for Foxy 3.   See the support structure for the campus being lifted from the River here.

Treasure Coast . . .  offhand, do you know the build date?

Carolina Coast,

with sugar barge Jonathan, which you’ve seen some years ago here as Falcon.

Pearl Coast with a cement barge off the Narrows remaking the tow to enter the Upper Bay.

In the rain, it’s Genesis Victory and Scott Turecamo, and their respective barges.

Franklin Reinauer heads out with RTC 28, and heading in it’s

Kimberly Poling with Noelle Cutler.

And let’s stop here with JRT assisting Cosco Faith.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s been inland for a week now and sees Shelia Bordelon on AIS at the Stapleton pier this morning.   Anyone get photos?

 

 

 

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

x

x

Quick  . ..  name the ship name the ONE vessel  . . .

The first three photos were taken Sunday by Bjoern of the New York Media Boat.

And if you know the tugs in the sixth boro you have a 75% chance of naming all tugs here too . . .   three of the four 6000 hp tugs by Moran.  I’m not first in pointing out how small the tugs look relative to the 1200′ ONE Stork.  I hope you guessed that right.  The tugs are JRT, James D, Jonathan, and then Margaret farther back.

While we’re on names . . .  Glenn Raymo caught this photo  upriver.

Dodo . . . First ONE Stork and then Dodo.

Over by Shooters Island the other day, I caught Amstel Stork, coming from Port Newark and headed upriver herself.

Jonathan and Miriam assist her around Bergen Point, but here’s my point:  two vessels named “stork” in the harbor the same week!!?  What going on?  And with Dutch as my first language, I read this as Ooievaar van Amsted . . . that big bird name being ooievaar in Dutch.

Recently, vessels with the following names have visited the sixth boro:   NYK Blue Jay    Southern Owl   Stena Penguin  …   See what I mean about a trend that has emerged?  A few years back I saw the Eagle fleet, eg in yesterday’s post, and separate from that . . . Asphalt Eagle.  A few years back I saw a Peacock.

Here are some I suppose I’ll never see:  Subsea Seven has some bird vessels, esp  in diving support.

Millennium Falcon….  oh wait, that might not have launched yet . . .   Magic Victoria was here recently, although my photo was too blurry to use here.  Surfer Rosa . . . that name of the many I’ve posted here will stick with me.   As of this morning, Surfer Rosa is westbound in the Med just outside Algerian waters.

Many thanks to Bjoern and Glenn for use of their photos.

 

Here goes another 3-fer, three cargo vessels making their way again through the KVK simultaneously.  JRT here at dawn assists orange juice carrier Orange Blossom 2 through the ConHook Range.

Jonathan C passes in front of them, returning from assisting another vessel now bound for sea.

Right behind the juice carrier is a box ship.

 

As the juice ship nears midpoint in the KVK, notice a RORO rounding Bergen Point at the west end of the KVK.

As I said, congestion . ..   that’s routine.  Kimberly travels along the starboard bow of the RORO,

Meanwhile, that box ship mentioned earlier has Eric on port

and Capt Brian A. at the stern.

Glovis Safety . . . headed for Philly and as of this moment is midAtlantic on its way to Zeebrugge.

 

As I said . . .   skillful mariners make a congested waterway seem just routine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Pushing and shoving  . . . are they different in this context with 3000 hp concentrated in the right location?

New steel and recycled name . . . Torm Hilde, the 114,000 dwt tanker in port recently, got spun around in the KVK by Kimberly and JRT.

Torm Hilde is one of the largest tankers operated by the company, now in its 130th year!

And while two Moran tugs are assisting the Torm tanker out, two more are assisting crude tanker Compassion into her berth.

And then two more are assisting an Evergreen L ship through as well.

Congestion? . . . it’s just another day in the Kills….

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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