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Someone asked a question about nomenclature the other day and it may have been on FB.  The name I know is “shipside door,” and it appears to be used in cases that the pilot’s ladder would exceed 9 meters (29.5′). 

In that case the pilot would enter/depart the ship via the shipside door.

Sometimes a combo of companionway and pilot’s ladder is used.

Other times it’s the shipside door and a ladder as below and

below.

Here’s one more batch.

Note the ladder above and the winch reel below.

 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who hopes this adds some nomenclature. 

I’m surprised I’ve not used this title in almost a year, since the thought often comes my way that some very busy waterways exist in the sixth boro.  Like below with the four Moran tugs and one tanker.  Since three are headed to the left, you might be wondering why.  Easy . . .  those three–JRT, Kimberly, Margaret— are assisting an incoming ship, the single tug, Jonathan C,  in the foreground heading to the right will soon assist another ship coming in.  Polar Cod–a great name–is transferring petroleum product.

Here’s that incoming ship, exciting the birds as the ship and maybe stirring up the menhaden and their predators below.  We’ll get back to this.

Here’s a closer up of that fish/bird stirring ship, a torrent called Torrente.   Portside the ship is Mary Turecamo, and starboard, it’s the Belford-based Osprey

And here’s the most dense photo, eight tugboats from four different companies, two loaded container ships, and one tanker, all in less than two miles of waterway.

Getting back to all those birds and fish in the Con Hook Range . . .  a lot of people in small boats are putting their baited hooks in the water there.

Unrelated:  An unconfirmed report with this photo below says the 1912 Argo sank in Long Island Sound off Wading River NY on November 1.  Can anyone confirm that this happened?  I looked for a report but couldn’t find one anywhere.  To see a photo I took of it underway in the sixth boro just over 10 years ago, click here. And here, taken in June 2011.

The photo below was posted by Steve Adkins and said to be taken by USCG responding to the distress.

All photos except the last two, WVD.

A new assist boat in town bringing 3800 hp to the job?

Right . . .  I was kidding.  It’s Jones Act non-compliant anyhow. 

Genesis Eagle is a 6140 hp pin boat. 

 

JRT Moran and Capt. Brian McAllister do an assist of an ULCV.

Pegasus gives Mount St. Elias an assist as it moves DBL 82 out of IMTT bound for New Haven. 

Andrea gives HMS Liberty an assist as it delivers a bunker barge to Port Elizabeth. 

Miriam Moran delivers a pilot to the ship. 

Mary Turecamo assists a container ship. 

Doris waits for a job to approach in the Upper Bay, 

and finally, Kirby Moran moves in closer to an incoming ship. 

All photos, WVD.

 

According to PANYNJ stats, May 2021 saw 396,417 loaded teus arrive in the sixth boro;  May 2020 saw 266,004!    That is an increase of 49%.  Exports of loaded teus in May this year totaled 134,458 versus 95,462 last year, an increase if 40.8%.  So the port is  . . . busy.  So as I’ve done before, I offer a sampling of the ships involved in the moving teus, i.e., container ships.

Check out OOCL Europe, head on . . . launched in 2006, with her 8063 teu capacity.

As you know, CMA CGM Marco Polo  [yes, I missed it] has been the largest container ship to call in port of NYNJ to date, recently she called in Laem Chabang and Vung Tau, and I’ll let you guess where those megaports are.

Ikaria, 2002, and 4492 teu, is the smallest box ship in this batch.   In 1999, I was not blogging about the port, but the record shows the largest container ship in the world then carried 6200 teu. 

There’s not much view of either the box ship, CMA CGM Brazil or the tanker, but check out the bow wave compared with the small trawler just beyond. Of course, foreshortening is involved and the 30+- trawler was in no danger.

CMA CGM Brazil, pictured here, is the newest in this batch, launched in 2020 and has the capacity of 15128 teu.

MSC Tavvishi is the oldest, from 2000, with a 5468 teu capacity.  Launched in 2000, she was not that much smaller than the largest in the world at that time.

And RDO Fortune, a 2012 launch with a 5033 teu capacity

came into the sixth boro appearing to be entirely empty.  Might that be to pick up empty boxes?

All photos, WVD.

Laem Chabang and Vung Tau are ports in Thailand and Vietnam, respectively.

 

This overcast day contributed to photos that appear to gray-out all but the range of bronze, red, and orange.  But what is this cargo and why is the title here a “redux”?

Here’s a closeup and

an even closer up. 

I counted a total of 14 of these Kalmar straddle carriers aka straddlers on deck. The fact that these have cabins says they are not autonomous models.  I believe these are electric, not hybrid, or diesel models.  Since they’re going to Maher Terminals, these would be “fleet renewal” electric ones alluded to here.  Anyone know how many straddlers can be found at the various terminals in the sixth boro?

 

In November 2018 on a blindingly bright day, the same vessel came to the sixth boro of NYC with the same type of load.  See it here.  The only differences are that that time it came from Finland and this was from Gydnia, Poland and straddlers were a different model headed for a different terminal in Port Elizabeth.

 

All photos yesterday, WVD.

Whiler we’re on “reduxes,”  this is the 100th anniversary of Day-Peckinpaugh‘s first visit to New York;  here’s a redux post on that first trip . . .

 

 

With Eastern Dawn in the foreground, the massive scale of these box boats is apparent.

Foreshortening gives the illusion that MSC Lauren cannot possibly avoid a collision.

Although this may be her first arrival in the sixth boro, this 12400 teu vessel has sailed the seas for a decade already.

See the crewman near the port bow quarter?

Now you see him?

 

If I recall correctly, she arrived here from Jamaica;  from here she travels to Italy.

Again . . . Linda L. Miller and the 6000 hp tugs show scale.  MSC Lauren is one of 560 container vessels operated by MSC, the second largest shipping company in the world.  Know the largest?  The third largest?  Answers are here.

So here’s a merger of truckster! and ULCVs, a photo I took last week from a parking lot.  I know what was loaded into that 20′ MSC container.  I invite you to guess.  Answer will be posted tomorrow . . . .

All photos, WVD, who is always happy to collaborate.

 

Most of you know that dawn is my favorite time. Yesterday dawn–between 0545 and 0645–was quite busy;  two of the five vessels that transited the KVK were among the largest–so far–that call in the sixth boro.

Pink sky with gradations, faded purple Brooklyn, huge but silent shapes, and spots of artificial lights.

Birds silhouetted and reflections in the still water make the scene as one point over by central western Brooklyn turns a deeper shade of red.

When the ship blocks the blinding rising sun, its name becomes legible.

Once CS Rose passes my vantage point, all that light illuminates the details.  Three tugboats along her starboard, one on stern, and one on the far side, the port side.

Not much later–another smaller container ship has passed–the next hulking shape appears, and the light has already turned gradations of yellow.

When CMA CGM Mexico blocks the rising sun, details become available  . . .

 

By now, 0645, the light suggests the sun has created daylight.

 

Tugboats on Rose include  James D, Mary Turecamo, Kimberly Turecamo, and Kirby.  Tugboats on Mexico include Marie J Turecamo, JRT, Kimberly Turecamo, and Miriam.

All photos, WVD.

 

January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

So in a recent post, you had a glimpse of this small craft, which I initially thought was a fishing boat.   I know how addictive fishing can be, since I used to ice fish and canoe fish.

But it turned out to be Lynn, a Ken‘s boat, used for line and boom handling. I’d not before noticed that some of these small boats have names.

Another boom and line handling company, ACV Enviro, also has names on their boat.  Meet Miss Urvi, an interesting name in several ways.

Here’s Miss Urvi showing my bow on a foggy day.

An intriguing small craft departed the Narrows yesterday.  Where is it headed I wonder.  It looked to be no more than 35′ and the name might be Sirius.

I’m not sure who operates Grace D, but she’s been in the harbor for the better part of a decade doing launch service.

 

Head on . . . who is this survey boat?  Notice the up fold-down transponder on the bow between the hulls.

It’s USACE.  I believe it’s a Silver Ship boat.

At first, I didn’t know what I was looking at when I saw six knees.  Sure, Gabby I knew and I saw a small boat to starboard,

but

there were two alongside, one on each side.  And on the far side, it’s Mister “B”...   a new one for me.

So it is.  All photos, WVD.

Here are the previous  iterations of this title.  Keep in mind that the long lens foreshortens these scenes.  The scene is this:  MSC Alicante has just entered the KVK heading west.  Note the Vane Potomac hurrying away to the east.

The “N” vessel is AthenianJRT is along the port side of MSC Alicante.

 

Note that JRT is along the port bow quarter.

To compare, Athenian has teu capacity of 10000, and MSC Alicante, 5550. The photo below belies the fact that their relative dimensions are 885′ x 131′ v.  1145′ x 149′ respectively.

Brendan Turecamo peels off Athenian

When my attention turns back to the west, I notice another container ship by the Bayonne Bridge, Brendan has replaced JRT alongside the MSC, and Jonathan C Moran on a sternline.

See the whitewater wake forward of Jonathan C?  She’s racing the engines astern.

 

Gunhilde Maersk has a 7000 teu within its 1203′ x 140′ dimensions.

 

Dense traffic . . . it’s just another day on the KVK.

All photos, observations by Will Van Dorp.

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