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Here are previous posts with this vessel, but first, decide what color the metal below is.  I’ll come back to this photo.

When a tug has a sheet the bow, it means one thing about the vessel involved in the assist.

A fleet of fruit juice tankers like this floats the oceans. Maybe someone can comment on a fleet involved in this trade in eastern Asia.

 

 

Here the shadows of the Bayonne Bridge glide across the hull.

That first photo . . . that was the forward portion the here here.  Shadows have a way with color.

 

Here was an early encounter I had with a juice carrier.

 

She may have discharged a partial load, as she’s now bound for Tampa.  Or am I missing something here?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

All All but one of the photos in this post come from David Silver, assigned as a cadet this summer on a Maersk vessel going halfway around the world and back.  He departed Port Elizabeth on May 21.  This post follows his voyage, focusing on what someone like me–mostly fixed–doesn’t see.

May 24.  Charleston.  Mark Moran.

May 30. Houston.   Thor.

 

May 31.  Houston.  Wesley A.

June 06.  Norfolk.   Maxwell Paul Moran.

June 08.  Pilot boards in sixth boro of NYC.  JRT Moran.

June 08.  VZ Bridge as seen from the ship and

as seen from my location, at about the same moment.

June 09.  Port  Elizabeth.   Kirby Moran. 

There was a stop in Algeciras–the world’s 10th largest transshipment port– but no photos of assist tugboats.

June 25.  Suez Canal.  It could be one of the Mosaed boats, maybe number 1.

June 26.  Suez Canal.  One of the boats called Salam.

After transiting the Red Sea and stopping in Djibouti, July 9.  Mont Arrey, 

they rounded the peninsula and entered the Gulf.

July 9.  Jebel Ali.  P&O Venture.  That could be P&O Energy off the stern.

 

July 12.  Port Qasim.  SL Hodeida  with pilot boat and other Smit Lamnalco tugs.

July 13.  Port Pipavav.  It appears to be Ocean Supreme and another one of the Ocean Sparkle boats in the distance.

 

I have enjoyed seeing this variety of towing vessels from this trip halfway around the world.  Now I hope the return trip brings more photos and a safe return in late August.

Many thanks, David.

Did you hear about Peak Pegasus, the vessel racing to get US soybeans into China before retaliatory 25% tariffs are slapped on?  More on Peak Pegasus at the end of this post.

Well, these two container ship had no need to hurry into the sixth boro, yet here’s something I’ve never seen before . . . two container ships entering the Narrows in quite close succession.

Obviously the passage accommodates all, but still . . . a new sight for me, the reason I return here again and again.

See QM2 in the distance to the right?  I caught her first arrival here 11 years ago.  Dawn was too late for me to catch it.  That ominous sky got me thinking . . . storm clouds.  Locally I was just concerned about getting spots on my lens.  But then I thought about the story of Peak Pegasus, the impending trade war.  I could see those as storm clouds, and shipping . . . this is a front line, like every seaport in the US.

Take the value of all the imported cargo on Maersk Buton and

add to it the value of whatever’s on OOCL Berlin . . . and every other ship entering a US port for the foreseeable future and add the product of that and  .25 . . . the sum’s rising.  Ditto  . . . whatever is on Bomar Caen–headed for Colombia–might just be less attractive if .25 gets added to the price of those goods.  Maybe Colombia is not affected.

I’m by no means an expert in much, and please educate me if I’m wrong, but these storm clouds seemed appropriate this morning.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who first read the name of the Maersk ship as butoh, which would have been much more interesting.

Peak Pegasus plowed at top speed to make port, but  . . . she failed.  More here.   Here’s a story from the same vessel from a few months back.

There’s an expression about the excitement of watching paint dry.  Recording a large construction project is about as interesting unless you do a form of time lapse, which I’ve inadvertently done with the Bayonne Bridge. Change is happening all over the city, but here’s what I’ve watched since way before the raising began.

In August 2017, I rode over the new span for the first time.

 

I next got down to look what was happening at the Bridge in December,  the 16th.

Here’s January.  Notice above the old lower roadbed still spanned to the third arches inside Bayonne, and below, three arches (I’ll call them 4–6) remained without roadbed.

That’s Doris Moran, and notice that #6 arch has seen some erosive work.

In mid-February, #6 arch is gone, and work is happening

(here’s a closeup) on #5.

By 24 April, #4 is gone and #3 previously supporting a roadbed is now “freestanding”, as Joyce passes.

And on May 10, roadbed only linked the grid box with one of the arches, and the current inland most arch is only half its former size.

Here’s a closer up.

On June 20, this is what remained of arch #1.

Here’s a closeup.  I’m wondering if the workers in the lift basket held a camera so that the extension jack hammer could see what he was doing.

Then I noticed . . . about where arch #4 had been a new column was being erected in sections.

The tall crane does the lifting, and workers in two lift baskets–an orange and a green–guided the section into place, fitting the guide rods–it seems–into slots in the section being lowered.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any mis-reading of the process.

 

Only 13 months ago, Cosco Glory could not have entered Port Elizabeth.  Now the +14,000-teu boats –more accurately called NYC’s 1200-footers, have become routine like T. Roosevelt, J. Adams, and Chongqing.

The geese are not even spooked.

Jonathan takes the starboard, and Kirby . . . port

while JRT and Margaret leverage the stern.

 

 

 

 

As of this writing, this crewman has most recently been treated to views of the Savannah waterfront.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

A different post was scheduled for today, but when good fortune smiles, I smile.  Behold  J. Adams bound for sea, as she could not have a year ago . . . in fact, she may very well not even have been completely fitted out a year ago. As of this writing, I believe that J. Adams and T. Roosevelt are the only two of CMA CGM’s 14,414-teu vessels calling in the sixth boro. CMA CGM has just launched a 20,600 tee vessel, not scheduled to call here.

I’ll smile even more once the walkway on the bridge opens, allowing photos from a different perspective.  Such a change in capacity from the vessel carrying the first containers outbound from the sixth boro back on April 26, 1956!  This tech spec sheet starts out with an interesting graph of vessel capacity since 1980, and much more.

Kirby Moran (6000 hp) looks small here, and notice the two bow thrust symbols on the bow, which–if I interpret this info correctly–operate with 5000 hp.

Captain D and her trash barge provide some sense of scale here.

 

 

 

For cleaner port air, she’s equipped with an HVSC by Wärtsilä , which also provides the propulsion power.

 

Kirby Moran–work on this vessel complete– heads back to sail the next ship out of port.

Following are James D and JRT.

I don’t know the calling ports for the other two 14,414 teu vessels:   A. Lincoln and  T. Jefferson.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

English is the international language of navigation, air and water.  I can pronounce the name below the Chinese, although I’ve no idea what it means or refers to.  Do folks still talk about Seaspeak?  I once applied for a job teaching Seaspeak but never even got a response.

Xin Mei Zhou arrived in the sixth boro of NYC–Port Elizabeth– on February 1, after having left Kaohsiung two days after Christmas.

She’s not a record-setting size these days, although 10 years ago nothing of this size came to the port,

but that’s what the billion-plus-dollar raising of the Bridge was all about.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

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