You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘JRT Moran’ tag.

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Sometimes the sixth boro gets crowded, as you can see from these posts.  This post tries to show that, but keep in mind that foreshortening makes these vessels seem closer than they are–the two ships below are more than a mile apart.  Keep in mind also that a water channel is a dynamic medium, current and wind are in play, and . . . there are no brakes.

 

About a hundred yards are between the docked “orange/green hull” and Cronus Leader.

Also, the KVK has numerous curves;  it seems here that the pale yellow will pass starboard to starboard with Cronus Leader,

 

but because of the winding channel, a few minutes later they’re clearly headed port to port.

The dark hull along the extreme left of the photo–and several shots above– is tied to a dock.  It’s the NYC DEP sludge tanker Hunts Point, now in service for over five years, as profiled in this article.  It’s time I do another post on the sludge tankers.

 

Orange Sun has safely passed Cronus Leader, leaves plenty of space passing Hunts Point,  

and lets Denak Voyager, heading to Port Newark to load scrap metals, ease through the opening along its portside.

 

A total of fifteen minutes has elapsed between the first photo in this post and the one above.  Scale here can be understood by looking at the crewman on watch–all wearing orange– on the nearer orange juice tanker and the farther bulk carrier.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that at least two things are remarkable here, both the efficiency of effort on the part of the vessel crews and the variety of cargo represented.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

But first, what can you tell me about the tree directly below?

Now to “hoops” and maybe I should say “Höegh hoops . . .”

Here’s the aft most one, and

the court extends forward from there to this one.

See it?  I wished I’d been on the Bayonne Bridge walkway to look down on it.

JRT assisted and maybe delivered a ref?

 

JRT, 88.7′, is only slightly less long than the court, if it’s a standard NBA 94′ x 50′.

Possibly much more basketball goes on shipboard unbeknownst to anyone photographing as I was, played by seafarers constantly on the move.  I took this photo of basketball in the hold of a bulk carrier from a FB group called Seaman Online, which I’ve been following for a while.

All photos but the last one by Will Van Dorp.

Previous “hoops” post can be found here.

And finally . . .  this would have fit better in yesterday’s post, but . . . a reader in New Zealand sent the top photo along as a NZ “christmas tree”.

He writes:  “The New Zealand Christmas icon is the pohutukawa tree which has scarlet blossoms in December. [Remember it’s the southern hemisphere’s summer.]   It is often called the New Zealand Christmas Tree. It is a coastal variety and is often seen on cliff edges and spreading shade over sandy beaches.  The crooks of the branches were also used for the framing and knees of wooden boats.”

Thx, Denis and Judy.  More on a Kiwi Christmas here.

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

She’s not pink or blue or green or new, but she’s an ULCV that I saw back out of Bayonne yesterday, and I can imagine all the communications and applications of power to make this happen.

JRT yanked eased under power stern wise, while Mary Turecamo 

and Jonathan C countered that movement just enough to maintain control.

Once far enough out of the docks area, the vectors shifted,

 

and, I’d wager, added bow thruster force to rotate to port,

revealing to me a fourth tugboat–Margaret–that’d been working the obscured side until now.  Seeing three tugs and 15,000 hp arrayed on the bow is a reminder of the days when many tugs would make docking a form of choreography.

 

It was yesterday’s sunny low humidity, but the colors rivaled foliage up in the valleys at peak!  And never have I seen so many figures up on a bridge wing!  I count at least five folks up there.

 

When Monaco Bridge has been pointed safely toward the VZ Bridge, the docking pilot–I presume–departs and

 

 

the ULCV heads for the next port . . . Norfolk in this case.

Using gCaptain’s figure of 48,000 bananas for one 20′ container, Monaco Bridge could carry over 667 million bananas .. . or two bananas for every person living in the country!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who points out that ONE Ibis is currently at the Global Terminal.

More info on Monaco Bridge:  she was launched in 2018 by Imabari Shipyard in Japan. Her 11 cylinder engine generates 65,576 hp at 76 rpm.   See photo of the shipyard here.

While waiting for Triton, I had a surprise, a big pink surprise.  I hope someone gets photos of Triton when she departs.

But here, 24 days and 13 hours out of Singapore,

it’s

ONE Apus, which rhymes with “tape us.”  Since she’s a duplicate, I think, of ONE Stork, I assumed an apus referred to a bird in some language.  Any guesses?

Here are my first photos of ONE Stork.

 

See that messenger line coming down to send up

the big  line?

It turns out that “apus” is the Latin word for the common swift, a fantastic name for a ULCV.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s minutes late for the noontime posting.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

The AIS image taken early afternoon the Sunday before Memorial Day shows just how crowded the waters between Narragansett Bay and the North Fork Orient Point can be;  pink is recreational boats and the greens, reds, and blues are commercial vessels.  Obviously, given the scale and the fact that the icons are about 100 times larger than the pink vessels they represent, the water is not clogged, although it is congested enough that effective watch standing is essential.

In the sixth boro it can look like the photos in this post.  Anyone operating a small boat–and relative to a 1200′ container ship like Cosco Shipping Peony, a 35′ fishing boat is truly puny.

Tugboats, any of them, are huge compared to small fishing boats.  Mary Turecamo below is 106′ loa and powered by twin engines totaling 4300 hp.

Coming from anchored units there might be a slow moving sailboat.

Summer traffic on the sixth boro is not what it is in the colder months.

 

Sometimes interventions are called for.

Be safe . .  .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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