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From George Conk . . . it’s Ahoskie, taken in Rockland, Maine.

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from Jonathan Steinman, it’s Franklin Reinauer at sunrise on the East River, passing under–I guess-the Manhattan Bridge.

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From Allen Baker, earlier this week, it’s Eagle, once again in the sixth boro.

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From Bjoern Kils . . . it’s Kalmar Nyckle . . . taken by his mom in Lewes, DE.

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From Zwaan Casasnuevas, it’s Half Moon in her current berth in Hoorn, NL, one stormy day last week.

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From eBay and identified only by date, a view from 1946 featuring Chancellor and an unknown tug, probably NYC.  Anyone help with identification?

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And finally from the same ethereal realms, it’s an unidentified Dalzell tug,

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Thanks to George, Jonathan, Allen, Zwaan, Bjoern, and the webworldlings .. .

Many thanks to Paul for this aerial photo, said to show tugboats idled by the strike that lasted the first half of the February 1946.

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Here’s the verso of the photo, in the case you read Spanish.

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For more context of 1946 NYC, click here for a set of Todd Webb  photos.  If you have time for the 13-minute video at the end of that link, it’s well-worth it also, especially for the quote attributed to O. Henry . . . calling NYC “Baghdad on the subway,” which has a whole different set of connotations in 2015 as in O. Henry’s day.

Click here for more 1946 sixth boro photos by Andreas Feininger.

And since we’re stuck in 1946 for now, check out this Life article with drawings about a 1946 proposal to build a “first-world” airport (my quotes) along Manhattan’s west side covering 9th Avenue to the water and between 24th and 71st!

 

Here are posts about Wavertree’s trip to the dry dock and before.  And below are two photos I hadn’t used in those posts.

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May 21, 2015

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May 21, 2015

In the past 10 weeks, prep for the actual dry docking has resulted in loss of at least a foot and a half of draft.  Mussels once submerged have lost their habitat.

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July 30, 2015

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July 30, 2015

Let’s descend into through the forward cargo hatch to see where a cavernous hold is getting even more cavernous.

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from the ‘tween decks looking up and …

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… down …

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and all the way down

Note the ladder beyond the foremast, as seen from standing to starboard of the keelson.

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Looking to the stern from the ‘tween decks.  As Mike Weiss said, “a cathedral of cargo.”

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For scale, note the worker wearing a white hard hat on the keelson beyond the mast

Looking astern from atop a makeshift block of ballast on the port side of vessel.  That’s the main cargo hatch prominent in the center of the photo.   My response to Mike’s quote is “an ark of angled wrought iron.”

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This is how the skeleton of a 130-year-old vessel looks.

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Looking toward the rudder post from the ‘tween decks.

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Returned to the main deck looking forward at the cargo hatches.

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Removal of extraneous and/or non-original weight has included belgian block and large concrete block ballast.  This water tank may be original

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And here are the credits.

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Many thanks to Mike Weiss and  South Street Seaport Museum for the tour; click on that link for membership info.  August promises to be more prep work for dry docking.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for CSM article about the 1983 initial and partial restoration of Wavertree.

I went quite close to the source of the Hudson four years ago . . . here.   But earlier this summer I stopped in Glens Falls, just because I wanted to see the falls.

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Glens Falls as seen from the Route 9 bridge

Here’s more . . .

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and more.

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Glens Falls as seen from below the Route 9 bridge

And here’s looking down the Hudson from below the bridge, with Finch Paper to the left and SCA Tissue to the right.

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Back to the Route 9 bridge, here’s the old central office, and click here for an interesting Finch Paper history.

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But here’s the real nugget . . . the really interesting piece of history, and it’s UNDER the bridge.  Charles Reed Bishop, local boy orphaned by age 4, who tagged along with a friend with connections–William Little Lee.  At age 24, the two of them headed for San Francisco, and since this was 1846, that meant sailing around Cape Horn and stopping in Hawaii along the way.  Bishop stayed, became a citizen of the Kingdom of Hawaii, and the rest of the story is here.

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How’s that for an unlikely trajectory for a Hudson river boy AND information found under a bridge?   And about 50 miles south of here, in Troy, along the river’s edge is another plaque celebrating another Hudson river boy with an unlikely trajectory into the Pacific.

Photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, for a focused statement on the importance of this vessel and Lafayette on US independence, click here  . . . from a Portland Maine publication.   More on Lafayette, click here, but skip the partisan dribble in paragraphs 3–6.  Also, here.

Most of the photos in this post I took on July 1, by which time the French shore contingent had done a great job setting up a pier display, and here’s my favorite poster.  Doubleclick on the photo to enlarge it and read the numbers.

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Soon after all lines were made fast, the ceremony started:  music, uniforms, flags, and the CASK!  It’s to be auctioned off.  I’d love to know the price.

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Thanks to Linda Roorda, Peter Boucher, and Xtian Herrou for answers about the flags and uniforms.  The uniforms here and in Wednesday’s post of the Breton bagpipers and the two matelots are French Naval summer uniforms. The flag flown below the US flag on L’Hermione is the Serapis flag–or a variation thereof– flown by John Paul Jones.

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Yesterday I stopped by and was fortunate to here speeches under the FDR.  Here, with microphone, South Street Seaport Museum Executive Director Jonathan Boulware talks about the ships, the museum, and all six boros of NYC.

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Then a parade set out from the pier and headed via Wall Street to Bowling Green, stopping

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briefly at Federal Hall.

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Happy Independence Day.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

If you have time for a little history of LaFayette, click here.  If you want more complicated history, sorting out fact and fiction about the signers of the Declaration, click here.

 

 

So I’m going to do at least three posts on L’Hermione.

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L’Hermione passes in front of the classic Bayonne Bridge

Escort tug James Turecamo closes in.

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Notice the bow light of NY Media Boat.

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Docking pilot prepares to board

The final leg to South Street Seaport Pier 15.

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What is the technical name for the white sheet on James’ bow?

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Incoming vessels flanked by Fort William and a Staten Island ferry

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Crew takes to the rigging

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I missed photos of the perfect smoke rings in the salute.

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Pier 15’s design allows a large welcome party.

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Can someone explain the uniforms of the two sailors, one playing the cornemuse . . . ok, bagpipes?

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It seems that James‘ 92’ loa doesn’t quite work here.  Can anyone identify the flag below the Stars and Stripes and above the French tricoleur?

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Heaving lines finally all to the pier.

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And the word for tomorrow’s post–or if I have time–later today is Hennessey.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with many thanks to  NY Media boat.   Here’s the story from the NYTimes.  And here’s what’s happening Saturday, July 4.

 

This post is a serious whatzit, an attempt to find out more about a tugboat in the photo below.  I use the photo courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum in Syracuse.  If you have not been reading this blog very long, I spent five months last year working on a historic tug on the Erie Canal.  Type erie canal into the search window and you’ll find hundreds of photos from then.

The photo appears to be taken in Rochester, nicknamed the Flower City, although as a kid, I had thought it was the “flour” city.   I guess it’s both.

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Anyone know more about this tugboat?

So I went to the Monroe County Library image search site here and used the search term “boat,” and found a lot of fascinating stuff–like excursion boats now derelict, steam ferries, a seized bootlegger boat, yachts from a century ago, docks, and canal barges.  To whet your appetite, I include a few here.  Go to the website to read captions on reverse.  I know nothing more about Lorraine or Cowles Towing Line, but the “barge” it’s towing is currently known as Day-Peckinpaugh, which will gain some attention later this summer.  Photo is said taken on June 13, 1921.

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Taken on November 22, 1921, this is steam barge Albany, which raises more questions.  Go to the MCLS site for the info on reverse of the print.

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The photo below is also said taken on November 22, 1921 by Albert R. Stone.    I’d like to know what the name of the darker tug alongside the starboard side of the end of this string of barges.  So maybe these are the grain barges that broke away?

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Again, a Stone photo, date uncertain, showing tug Henry Koerber Jr.

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One more Stone photo, said 1918 . . . tug  Laura Grace aground off Grand View Beach . . . Greece?

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And all of this returns us to the mystery photo from the Erie Canal Museum . . . my guess is that it was taken by Albert R. Stone, but it was not included in the Monroe County local history photo database.  Anyone help?

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Many thanks to the Erie Canal Museum for passing this photo along.

If your appetite is really whetted, enjoy these unrelated old and new photos of Urger–ex-State of NY DPW tug–and Seneca, currently a NYS Canal tug but previously a US Navy tug.

Click here for an index of previous “whatzit” posts.

Here’s an index of the previous “locker” posts.

Let’s start with a photo from a secret salt seeking an identification.  All I know is that this photo of an “old army tug” was taken in 1982 and that the building in the background is the Brooklyn Army Terminal, a frequent background in sixth boro photos even today.   Anyone supply an identification of the vessel?

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Here’s a photo I took about two weeks ago  . . . sand that looks almost like sawdust.  The nearer scow is marked Lexa Gellatly.  My question is . . .  is that the same hull but transformed as this one, once used to transport oil?  Do oil barges sometimes get transformed into scows?  And where is this sand coming from/going to?

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scows at the mooring off Robbins Reef Light

The next photo comes from Justin Zizes and an event I missed last week because I got triple-booked;  what’s happening is the unveiling ceremony for the USS Monitor Trail Marker to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the end of the US Civil War.  FDNY’s 343 adds solemnity to the event.  The water here, Bushwick Inlet, once received new builds from the slipways of Continental Iron Works.

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Next . . . a number of you have written this week about the fabulous new photo archives assembled by the New York Public Library.  I’ve already spent lots of hours meandering there.  What makes the archive so remarkable is the interface:  you click on dots on a street map of NYC, and each dot reveals archival photos of that site.  Let me share a few here:  as seen from South Beach Staten Island, Hoffman Island in the distance as it existed in 1925.  I’d love to see post-WW2 but pre demolition of the island buildings.

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Hoffman Island closer up with SS Perugia in quarantine.  I won’t guarantee the veracity of the captions on all the photos.  After all, GIGO.

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1923 ferry approaching the Hell Gate Bridge,

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1935 “stick lighter” approaching the Goethals Bridge.

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There are literally thousands of photos in the archive.  Have fun.  I’d love to hear from you with any news.

I’m currently gallivanting and will be back–I hope–by the end of the week.

 

Yes, I am a fan of the X-Files, and yes . . . submarines have appeared on this blog before, like this one in Coney Island Creek.  Or this one headed north in the Upper Bay.  Parts  of submarines have emerged on the blog like here and here.  There have been fleets awaiting disassembly like here.  But recently at a yard on the North Fork, I saw the object in the image below, which intrigued me.  Here are some pics and then after you’ve observed the evidence and drawn some conclusions, I’ll tell you what I’ve read.

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Views from port side and

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port bow.  Osprey nest is not part of the vessel.

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Views from port stern,

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even a bit farther astern,

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and starboard bow.  Note the tripod and bracket mounted forward.

So what do you think?  What is your version of this story?

Here’s Corey Kilgannon’s NYTimes story from eight years ago.   Halfway through Kathleen Edgecomb’s The Day article you get a different version of the real history of the vessel.   But by the time T. E. McMorrow writes this East Hampton Star article in August 2014, a whole new version of sub and owner have emerged.

Actually I don’t know the real story, and certainly have no clue of its future, since according to this BBC article, the court has blocked sale of the sub.  Here’s the location of the real USS Deep Quest.   Here’s a followup Emma Fitzsimmons’ article from the December 1, 2014 NYTimes. And according to this McMorrow follow-up of a few weeks ago, the sub owner is now in a federal facility, and the sub, even if it had never been so previously, is now federal property.

And the feds, they may put it up for sale.  Want a toy with a “deep sea” history?   Did anyone catch photos of it traversing the sixth boro back in 2007?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

 

Here’s the index on previous second lives posts.  I use “second lives” for what land folk call “adaptive reuse.”  It strikes me that there may be more instances of repurposing re-design and -engineering on water than on land, but that’s may just be my opinion.

But first, I thought to call this “pre-boomed” to follow up on yesterday’s post and the wonderful backstory I got in email yesterday from William Lafferty, frequent contributor here.  Here also sent along the photo below, which shows Twin Tube in 1951, i.e., before I was born and I’m 63.

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Here’s part of what William wrote:  “It shows the Twintube just after it entered service in fall 1951.  Twintube was launched 28 August 1951, Captain Blount’s mother doing the honors, and built on Blount’s account.  He used it as a travelling “demonstrator” for his shipyard’s products (it was Blount’s hull number 6) but also used it to haul oysters.  Power plant originally was a rather rare 4-cylinder Harnischfeger 138-hp Diesel.  (Click here for a 1950 news article including a photo of a 6-cylinder marine diesel.)  Harnischfeger (the H in the mining equipment manufacturer P & H) had been set up in 1945 at Port Washington, Wisconsin, by P & H to exploit the workboat and yacht market.  P & H closed the division, then at Crystal Lake, Illinois, in 1963.  In spring 1952 Blount sold the vessel to the Staten Island Oil Company, who converted it to a tanker with a 40,000 gallon capacity in eight 5,000 gallon compartments within its “tubes.”  The rest is, as they say, history.”

By the way, reference to “Staten Island Oil Company” brings me back to one of my favorite articles by the late great Don Sutherland here.

Here’s the index for all my previous Blount posts.

All this repurposing leads me to the second half of this post.  A friend named Matt–former all-oceans sailor–is looking to write a serious history about Cross Sound Ferry vessel Cape Henlopen, ex- USS LST-510.  Note the 510 still carried on its starboard bow.  She was built in the great shipbuilding state of Indiana.

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Cape Henlopen preparing to depart Orient Point March 2014

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Here she passes Orient Point Lighthouse at the start of its 80-minute ride over to New London.

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Matt is interested in interviewing past and present crew and seeing old photos of the vessel in any of its previous lives:   Cape Henlopen, MV Virginia Beach, USS Buncombe County, or LST-510.  If you send your interest in participating directly to my email, I’ll pass it along to Matt.

Many thanks again to William Lafferty for the Twintube story and photo.  I took the photos of Cape Henlopen in March 2014.  Here’s a version of the vessel by bowsprite.

 

 

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