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Danmark, a 90-year-old full-rigged ship, is in town again.  She first came here in 1939 for the World’s Fair.

South Street waterfront of Manhattan then was a very different place, as of course was the whole city and world.

I’m not sure where she berthed back then.  A year later, after her homeland was invaded, she stayed in the US (Jacksonville FL for starters) because she had no homeport to return to.  In 1942, she was temporarily commissioned as a USCG vessel.

The brightwork is impeccable, as

is the gilt work.

Rigging like this is dense as a jungle, yet it’s all functional. 

And many of the current crew of Danish cadets, four of whom are mostly hidden but busy in the image below, 

were busy polishing the brass.

I’d love to see how the figurehead is polished. This figurehead has appeared on this blog once before back in 2007.  To see Danmark underway sail-powered, click here.   For a guided tour of the ship, click here

Meanwhile, I recently spotted another sailing vessel, one I’d not seen before, S/V Red Sea.  Thanks to Michele McMurrow and Jaap Van Dorp for the identification, although they called it by different names, they were both right.  For some backstory on this well-traveled schooner, click here

She’s arrived in the sixth boro from the Wisconsin side of Lake Michigan.

 

Some Danmark photos, thanks to Tony A;  all others, WVD.  Enjoy the last day of summer 2022.

 

This exotic is extraordinarily exotic.   Any guesses based on appearance of  the red and white vessel below?

I’ll give a little more time to study while you prepare your guess.   Given her specs, which I share below, she’s not for offshore wind or the sixth boro, unless we have extraordinary weather  ahead.

I wish I’d been able to get closer, but 

that’s why I have a distance-shrinking lens.

Built in 2006 by Vard Langsten in Tomrefjord Norway with some construction at the Vard yard on the Black Sea in Romania, for the Russian Federation, the 243′ x 56′ icebreaker (technically, icebreaking tug) Polar Circle sailed into the sixth boro in 86-degree F weather.    The Vard facility in Romania is about 40 miles up the Danube from the Black Sea.

Previously she was home-ported in Kholmst, Sakhalin, formerly Maoka in Japanese Sakhalin.  At some recent point, she left there, registered Maltese (or maybe she was registered Maltese while up in eastern Russia, and she arrived in the sixth boro after a month-and-22-day voyage from Busan Korea.  Click here for more info and great photos of her in ice.  A previous name was Polar Pevek, “Pevek” being a settlement on the “north coast” of Russian, above the Arctic Circle.  

I’m wondering if there’s any connection between her arrival here and the “embargo” on Russian gas/oil.  Here her Norwegian owner lists her as available for charter. 

 

 

All photos, yesterday, WVD, whose previous major ice breaker photos are listed below.

Fennica and Nordica here and here.

Mackinaw and Polar Star and Sea.  I never did get closer photos. 

And a surprising set, scroll through for Soviet-era icebreakers built in St. Louis MO!!

Alaska has the Iditarod, Quebec City has the ice canoe races, Honobia OK has the Bigfoot 5K and there’s still time to make plans to get there.  And sometimes, the sixth boro (and lots of other waterway cities) has tugboat races.  

Enjoy this smattering of photos from Sept 2, 2012.

As often is the case, the weather was fabulous and a large number of organizations turned out with one or more boats for the race, the pushing, the line toss, the spinach eating, the grudge match maybe, and the beauty contest. 

 

Boats get decked out with almost every flag available.

There’s old school and new school padding .  . or fendering.

Some traveled in formation for the line up.

The Bronx came all the way from . . . da Bronx’ Westchester Creek.

Preliminary heats resulted in finalists to take on the fearsome, the feral, the never forgotten

Pegasus.

In the wake of the class 1 boats, the Hudson had developed some chop for classes 2 and 3.

Note the gent tossing the line has his entire coaching staff and his closest advisors on hand to help him guide the eye over the bollard.

All photos, September 2, 2012, WVD, who hopes NYC’s sixth boro sees a tugboat race in 2023.  If not by power boats, maybe it could be a rowing race in Whitehalls and dories.  . . . Here are the boats in the race back in 1952.   Here are some other tugboats racing in NYC in the 1950s.

Wow!  August almost passed us by without my doing a glance back to a decade ago.  McCrews is now in Philly I’m told.   Reliance and Justine are still with McAllister.  Lynx was sold foreign  and experienced an incident while being delivered, although I’m not sure how that turned out.  Barents and Yankee both were refurbished by Donjon:  Barents Sea is now Atlantic Enterprise and Yankee is now Signet Atlantic and sans upper wheelhouse.   Mark McAllister was scrapped, and Na-Hoku under the same name works for a company  based in Charleston SC.

 Ellen McAllister here was bringing in the future Alex McAllister, which has gone on to spend a lot of time working in the sixth boro, although I’ve not noticed her recently.

Patrice (had just had a tragic delivery fire in this photo)  and Bruce still work based out of the sixth boro.

 

I never did see Yankee after her upper wheelhouse was removed.  I may have to return to the GOM if I ever want to see her.

Duty is now Nydia P, and I’d have to go to Puerto Rico to see her.

Ireland became Hoppiness, and has been converted to a liveaboard on Lake Ontario but headed the inland waterways of the TVA system.

Labrador Sea is now Vane’s Brooklyn.

And finally, here’s a mixed set:  OSG 350 and OSG Vision still work under those names, Amy Moran became Stasinos John Joseph, and Scotty Sky became a snow bird and sails the Caribbean.

All August 2012, WVD, who after reflecting on all those changes admits to not being the same person as in August 2012 any more either.

 

Numbers are hard to keep straight, but I think we’re up to 11 in this series.  The most relevant preceding post would be “High and Dry 8” here.

Yesterday I think I caught Saint Emilion getting hauled, with quite a few folks looking on, although maybe that number of folks is standard.  Doing the honors was the mobile boat hoist over at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair.  

See the ladder in the water to the left?  I’m supposing it’s standard practice to have divers ensure that the slings are properly positioned before hauling out.

 

 

All photos, WVD.  Because so many interesting shapes of a vessel can be seen only when it’s hauled out, I’ve done a long series of posts on such.  This might be a stretch, but when exposed, the hidden lines and features of a vessel can seem a bit like nudity.

No . . . what follows is not a count down.

But here was nine, and eight is already linked above, 

seven,

six,

five,

four and H & D Caddells 4

three and an erroneous three.  [See . . . I have a challenge with numbers.  I’ll have to go back and renumber at some point. Unintentionally duplicating numbers is the result of working too fast.]

two and another erroneous or at least inconsistent II

one

and then there were others, only some of which werePegasus and Patty Nolan…and some schooners . . .

June 2012 was pivotal for me.  A photo sent along by a friend alerted me to Canal commerce–Canadian corn– entering the US at Oswego, a place I knew something of from my youth. 

If that was a spark, then the breeze that fanned it was an invitation to do my trial article for Professional Mariner magazine, which led me to Kingston NY, the mouth of the Rondout, and a project involving use of a half century old tug Cornell to do TOAR signoffs.  My most recent article in the magazine came out today and can be seen here.

On that assignment, I was privileged to have a mentor, Brian Gauvin, do the photography.

Other big events for June 2012 included the movement of shuttle Enterprise from JFK airport ,

ultimately to the Intrepid Museum to be

hoisted onto the flight deck as part of the display, now covered.

My daughter went off to Brasil (again) and the Amazon, leading me to go there myself a year later, fearing she’d never return because she loved it so much there.

I’d given her a camera before she went, and was rewarded with some quite interesting photos, like these small motor boats that looked almost like slippers …

with straight shafts coming straight out of air-cooled engines.

During my trip up to the Rondout, I stopped in Newburgh, where replicas of La Niña and Pinta, crafted using traditional techniques on the Una River in Bahia, Brasil, attracted crowds, one of many stops along the great loop route. 

Other festivities on the Hudson that summer . . .

included the sails and music associated with the Clearwater Festival, and of course the small boats moving in some of the venues.

 

Patty Nolan and Augie were the small tugs, and of course the sailboats including Mystic Whaler, Woody Guthrie,

 

and of course the sloop Clearwater.  The Clearwater organization will not be doing a music festival in June 2022.  Mystic Whaler is now working in Oxnard CA at the Channel Islands Museum.

Summer time and the living is easy well, at least it feels that way some days . . . . 

All photos, except the first one, WVD.  That first photo was taken by Allan H. Seymour.

 

Click here for previous Memorial Day posts.

Click on the map below to interact with the purple locations, “foreign burial places of American war dead”. 

Meanwhile, here‘s another perspective from my friend Louis N. Carreras’ post A Sailor’s Prayer

 

I had a different post prepared and queued up for today, but then I watched one of the most recent episodes of Sal Mercogliano’s  “What the Ship…” and saw a 37-minute interview Sal did with Madeleine Wolczko, a US merchant mariner currently stuck in a shipyard in Shanghai.  That remarkable interview led me to an even more remarkable 31-minute documentary that I’ve linked to the image below.  Click on the image and the video will play.

Take it from me, watching these two videos will be the most impression-making 68 minutes you spend today, maybe this whole week.  I’d suggest watching the interview first and the documentary second.  If you’ve never been aboard a container ship, and this is a US-flagged one, this will give you a sense of who works on a ship, what spaces on a ship look like, what crew do, and in this instance, what they can be subjected to.  Technical quality may not be Academy-award standard, but the the rawness, sincerity, and power make up for that.  I give it the winner of the Tugster Academy Award in the category of “best short documentary made while facing adversity,”  clap please but no slapping.

Sal’s interview ends with the mariner performing a moving rendition of Radiohead’s “Creep” in the silent hold of a US container ship.  The hold is cavernous, dramatically lit, and silent because all work has ceased because of an extreme response to the most recent Covid outbreak in Shanghai.

If you choose, click the “thumbs up” on “Restricted to Ship, Ep. 1 – Shanghai Lockdown.” 

 

B. No. 90 is clearly a Bouchard barge, this one eastbound at lock E-17.  Pushing it might be the 1946 Evening Light, but that’s just speculation. Evening Light has appeared in this series a little over a month ago as Margaret Matton et al.

I added this because this IS a miscellany post.  I’d love to hear from folks familiar with the Barge Canal more than a half century ago, but how common were “loopers” or just long-distance recreational boats back then.

OTCO Newark was a 1943 barge.  I can’t tell from this photo which of the OTCO tugs was moving it.

Colonial Beacon was a 246′ x 40′ tanker built in 1927 by Sun Shipbuilding of Chester PA.  A history of her ownership extends through Ecuadorian interests in 1981. After 1981, I’ve no idea what became of her.  With all that black smoke, would she have been steam powered at this point in this undated photo?

We end this post with a 1910 64′ x 17′ tug named Waterford built in Whitehall NY in 1910. 

Socony 104 dates from 1920.

Here’s Waterford towing two barges of lumber quite late in the season.  Can anyone place this lock?  Lock E-3, perhaps and downbound?

All photos used courtesy of the Canal Society of New York.  Any errors of interpretation, WVD.

Not all tugboats on the Barge Canal in the first half decade were steamers, but most of them were.  More on the early diesel tugs in another post.  The photos in this post are arranged chronologically.  In these days before metadata was even imagined, I’m very grateful for photographic prints that have dates written on them.  Thanks to the unnamed photographer(s) who seemed to be documenting the commercial traffic of the era.  One interesting feature of the photos for me is that they documented the surroundings as well:  buildings and lack of them, nature and lack of it, other infrastructure and lack of it . . .

I find it odd that the caption identifies Jessie–the towed vessel but not the tug doing the towing, Harold.  And Jessie, whose name is not legible, appears to be a boat-shaped lighter or a bumboat;  maybe it was one once and now the engine has been removed to make way for cargo. That stone building just beyond Harold‘s stern is still extant, as part of Lockport locks and Canal Tours.

August 3, 1921 in Wayne County, it’s Geo. S. Donaldson somewhere between Palmyra and Newark, an area I know very well, but given how much the canal sides have changed, I can’t tell if the tow is east or westbound or exactly where it is.   Benjamin Cowles towed gravel from a pit somewhere near Palmyra on the pre-Barge Canal waterway.  He went on to form Buffalo Sand and Gravel.

The next day, the photographer, maybe the same one, captured Benj. L. Cowles eastbound at Lyons E28A.  Here‘s some case law referring to this tugboat.  Given the caption, let me quote from this article about ownership of the transmarine fleet:  “Submarine Boat Company operated the Transmarine Corporation (Transco) or Transmarine Lines a shipping company from 1922 to 1930, with 32 ships and 29 barges they had built. Providing East Coast, West Coast, Texas, Cuba and South America with cargo shipping services. [They had] the 206 dwt barges working on the [Barge Canal] with five tugboats. Barges moved cargo from New York City to Buffalo, New York in seven to nine days.”

Since Lyons and Clyde share a border, the same photographer may have taken this photo on August 4, 1921.  Note that on the forward portion of the wheelhouse, there is a Cowles Transportation sign. 

On August 10, it’s Lotta L. Cowles east of Clyde.  

Here’s Crescent two weeks later than her photo above, and no Cowles Transportation* sign is to be seen, and at lock E-23, about 50 miles to the east of Clyde.   Maybe the sign was being repaired or repainted. 

Here is one of the most amazing photos I’ve happened onto.  According to the caption, the locking operation is in the hands of no less a celebrity than the NYS governor Nathan L. Miller.  Maybe current NYS governor Kathy Hochul might see fit to operate some locks this coming summer as she runs for her office.

NYC as well as Buffalo have an Erie Basin, and this is the one in Buffalo.  That Erie Canal is now encompasses a marina and has high-end real estate on the inland side. I believe Belle dates from 1880, and I’m not sure if the boat alongside is Helen E. Taylor or Helene Taylor.

More to come, as I continue to alternate b/w photos with color ones.

These photos are used with permission of the Canal Society of New York.  Any errors of interpretation, WVD.

*Ben Cowles was an accomplished person.  Born in Buffalo in 1863, as a young man he left Buffalo to work in the sixth boro for at least 15 years as a ferry and tug captain.  At age 38, he returned to Buffalo (the 8th largest US city in 1900) and was appointed harbor master.  In 1905, he founded Cowles Shipyard.  Besides building boats, he bought old Lake Erie steam fish tugs and adapted them for use as tugboats on the canals.  For a short period, he had a business partnership with the Mattons of Cohoes.  At its peak, Cowles Transportation owned/operated 16 tugs, 11 barges, and 3 lighters.   (Low Bridges and High Water, Charles T. O’Malley)

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