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A toast to the unseen engineers who tended the engines for that drive to the beach that day! Thanks much, Paul Strubeck, too, for putting together this post.  This marks the first time I’ve reblogged someone else’s blog, but you’ve seen Paul’s work here before.   You’ve also seen Nash before here.

Vintage Diesel Design

Today marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, operation Overlord, and the storming of the Normandy Beaches. Way more then I could ever write has been written about today’s events, and I defect to others on that one. But, today I will share two D-Day Veterans anyone can visit.

Tug LT-5, the “Major Elisha K. Henson”, now a museum ship in Oswego, New York

First up is the LT-5, “Major Elisha K. Henson”, and later known as the “John F. Nash”. The LT-5 is an Army “Large Tug”, built by Jakobson Shipbuilding in 1943. The LT-5 was used on D-Day towing various barges, in part of the operation of building an artificial harbor off of Normandy. After the war the tug was used by the Army Corps of Engineers in the Buffalo area, until begin retired in 1989. Today the LT-5 is part of the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in…

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Neither the lines nor the color scheme is typical.   To briefly digress, that load of vehicles on the VZ Bridge is all too typical for this time of day.

Shelia Bordelon has been off the south shore of Long Island for the past month or so. I could have put this post into the exotics category, which it is, but this vessel, her fleet, and this type are exotic because they possess specialized capabilities not frequently called for in our regional waters at this time.

Technically, Shelia Bordelon is an ULIV PSV, the third in the Bordelon fleet. . .  ultra light intervention vessel and a specialized type of platform supply vessel.  Click here for more info on specialized uses of ULIVs.

Click here for more products of the Bordelon Marine shipyard, one of which, Josephine K Miller, is based locally.   I caught photos of her recently, which I’ll post one of these days.

Is the pink splash making more sense now?  Click here for the specific connection between this vessel and breast cancer.

See the person in the protected space below the yellow boxes for scale?

I believe this is Shelia Bordelon‘s second trip into the sixth boro, the first being a few weeks ago while I was a few hundred miles inland.

By now you must be wondering what specialized task brings her to local waters.  So a British tanker —Coimbra— has been on the bottom, along with most of her crew, all victims of a U-boat attack in January 1942,  for over 3/4 of a century, south of Shinnecock, and the ULIV is here to monitor it. 

I’d love to see the underwater video images they’ve gotten.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Thanks for your patience; this follows up the post from two days ago.  The port is Boston, the date is November 1960, and the fleet tied up at the T wharf.  Luna, pictured below, is still extant; the others . . . I believe are all gone.

Above in the distance and below, that’s Orion.

I have no ID on this gentleman in Orion‘s engine room, or

this gentleman in the wheelhouse of another era.

Allan Seymour went on to a career as a professional photographer, and he sent me these photos.

Here’s how I first saw two of the boats–including Luna–back in 1987.  Here’s a report on the historic value of Luna submitted to the Boston Landmarks Commission in March 1985.

Thanks for your guesses, both here and on FB.  For the Boston Public Library’s trove of T Wharf photos, click here.   And here is the motherlode, at least 150 photos of Boston tugboats from the Digital Commonwealth collection.

 

For some of you this will be very easy.  Where was this photo taken and approximately what date?

Photo was taken by Allan Seymour.  He sent more, which I’ll post on another day.

Previously I’ve done a series called ports of [the world], which I’m always looking to add to if you wish to collaborate.

Also, coming up soon, a tugboat rated at 23,000 hp . . . what would that look like?

Never did I think a report from a federal judge of United States District Court, Northern District, New York dated January 31, 1955, would make such an interesting read.  It  emerges from two separate but related incidents that occurred in the port of Albany in late September 1953.  One of the companies involved still works in the region with a different boat by the same name, Ellen S. Bouchard, the 1951 boat.  I’m sure an image could be found of that boat, since it was scrapped under a different name as late as 1953.

What emerges from the report and fascinates me is an image of the past when a different type of vessel (see image below) plied the waterways and trade patterns were quite unlike today.  Frank A. Lowery, the vessel below, is described in different places here as a steamer, a motor vessel, and a canal propeller.  It’s a wooden barge built in Brooklyn in 1918 for a company called Ore Carrying Corp and –I assume–called OCCO 101.  In 1929 it was made a self-propelled barge, presumably looking like the photo below taken in 1950 in Lyons, NY.  Lowery at the time of the incident in Albany was loaded and had six barges in tow.  Note in the photo below you see the bow of one barge.

Below you see the particulars on Lowery throughout its lives.

The other thing that intrigues me about the legal report embedded in the first sentence of this post is the trade route alluded to. Lowery, her barges, and no doubt many like them transported wheat from Buffalo to Albany and scrap from Albany to Buffalo, via the relatively newly opened Barge Canal.  Folks working on the barge Canal would have no idea what to make of traffic on the canal in 2018 such as this, this, or  this.

Yesterday’s post featured a black/white photo of the image below.  Posting it, generated the helpful background info contained in the comment by William Lafferty.  It also generated the image below.

Many thanks to Dave Lauster and Edson Ennis, who generated the initial questions and these images, and to Bob Stopper for the tireless relaying and much more.  Somewhat related to today’s post is this set from Bob in 2014.

One of the goals I’ve had for this blog for some years now has been an effort to bring into the public domain images of years past exactly like these when –to repeat the points above– vessels and trade patterns were different.  I look forward to continuing this effort.  With your assistance, more “far-flung” posts are just around the next bend.

An organization with some overlapping goals is the Canal Society of New York State.  Click here to see the list of presentations at the winter symposium planned for March 2 in Rochester NY.  I plan to be there.  They also have a FB presence where they frequently post photos similar to the ones in today’s and yesterday’s posts.  Consider joining in one or more of these.

That declaration . . . it’s good to read it now and again, especially these days.  And since I choose to post at noon, this post will be up for half the holiday, even if the holiday is NOT the actual date the document was signed.

In civilian life, flags are freely displayed, without compulsion.  The current US flag is the 27th design.  Careb also flies the AGLCA banner and the flag of New Mexico, a location impossible to navigate to.

 

Tug Churchill and sailing canal boat Lois McClure each fly a flag, every day under way and not just on holidays.

The signers–SOME of the delegates to the Second Continental Congress–remained committed in their discussions despite their many disagreements.   A number of delegates would not sign. And the country has been the greatest possible ever since, mistakes notwithstanding.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

Previous flag posts can be read here.

 

A few days ago I stumbled into a rabbit hole and enjoyed it down there.  I won’t stay in 2008 for too long, but evolution I found in the ship department intrigued me, change change change. It also made concrete the reality of the scrapyards in  the less-touristed ocean-margins of the globe. Take Orange Star;  she’s scrapped now and another Orange Star delivers our juice.  But what a beauty this juice tanker is,

with lines that would look sweet on a yacht. Laura K has been reassigned to another port.  This  Orange Star was cut up in Alang in October 2010.

Ditto Saudi Tabuk.  She went for scrap in November 2013.  The tug on her bow is Catherine Turecamo, now operating on the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

Sea Venture was scrapped in January 2011.

Hammurabi sold for scrap in spring 2012.   She arrived in Alang as Hummura in the first week of summer 2012.

Some D-class Evergreen vessels have been scrapped, but Ever Diamond is still at work.  Comparing the two classes,  the Ls are 135′ longer and 46′ wider.

Stena Poseidon is now Canadian flagged as the much-drabber Espada Desgagnes, which I spotted on  the St. Lawrence last fall.   Donald C, lightening here, became Mediterranean Sea and is currently laid up.

And let’s end this retrospect with a tug, then Hornbeck’s Brooklyn Service and now just plain Brooklyn.  She’s been around the block a bit, and I’ll put in a link here if you want a circuitous tour. I caught her in Baltimore last spring in her current livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what the waterscape will look like in 2028, if I’m around to see it.

This morning I was looking for something, I thought happened in spring 2008.  Alas, I had the date wrong, but this research led me to these photos, some of which I may have posted before, all taken between April 10 and 17 2008, i.e., a decade ago exactly.  Back then I’d go into work an hour or so early, and because I had not yet plugged into AIS on my phone–I had a flipper–it was catch as catch could. Revisiting these photos stunned me with how much specific equipment has changed.

Baltic Sea and Coral Sea have gone over to West Africa.  Maybe a gallivant there is in order.  I last left West Africa forty years ago!!.

Maryland is still in the area;  I caught a glimpse of her in Jamaica Bay last week as Liz Vinik, but not close enough for a photo showing anything but a speck.  Check out Birk’s site’s info on Vinik Marine Services.

Nathan E. Stewart came to an ignoble end.

Both K-Sea and Allied have been purchased by Kirby.  Petrel has gone to Philadelphia, where she’s working as Northstar Integrity. Below, she was pushing Sugar Express, up to the plant in Yonkers.

Crude oil tanker Wilana (now Kamari) arriving at dawn on a very calm slack water Arthur Kill was the high point of that week, especially because it was the first tanker I’d watched coming into Linden.  I’ll not forget how silent the process was.

On the starboard bow was Catherine Turecamo, now working in freshwater near the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

On her stern was Laura K Moran, now moved to another Moran base.  And, notice the Bayonne Bridge now longer has the geometry as shown below.

Any time I feel that stuff never changes, guess I should look through my archives.

All photos taken in mid-April 2008 by Will Van Dorp, who wonders if anyone out there read Future Shock by Alvin Toffler.  It was published almost a half century ago but I think he was on to something.

 

Ever since learning that the official name of the “little red lighthouse” was Jeffrey’s Hook Light, I wondered who this Jeffrey was.

That is . . . until now.

From a report written in 1991 by Betsy Bradley and Elisa Urbanelli, I offer this:

So it might be another example of anglicized Dutch “colonial” term. Other examples are in the Kills.  Juffrouw is a common Dutch word even today.  Dutch influence lives on in many names in the Valley. Click here for many many more.

Photos by Will Van Dorp.

For many more lighthouses, click here.

First, bravo to Lee Rust who puzzled out 2 of the 3 photos from IS1.  And I’ll just paste in his concise answers here:  “#1 is Colleen Kehoe passing under the Bear Mountain bridge southbound sometime around the late ’70’s or early ’80’s. Since 1996 this vessel is has been part of the Axel Carlson scuba diving reef off Mantoloking NJ.     And #2. Red, right, returning… Northbound towards Kingston-Rhinecliff bridge under construction… 1956-ish.”

Let me add a bit:  #1, click here to see Coleen–and Budweiser banner– about to be reefed in 1996.  And #2, the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge opened in February 1957.    #3 Paul Strubeck helped me, “That’s the Lester J. Gillen of Gillen Lighterage.” The Gillen company is mentioned in this NYTimes article about a South Street Seaport Museum exhibit from 1977.   Thanks much, Lee and Paul.

Below, that’s Ingrid’s father–the photographer for most of this series–in 1957 sitting on the bollard in front of MV Sunoco.

Mystic Sun and Maumee Sun here raft up to a dock in Port Newark in December 1959. Both date from 1948 and had cargo capacity of roughly 15,000 barrels.  Anyone know who the buyers were when they were sold in 1969 and 1966, respectively?  Mystic Sun appeared in this blog previously here.

Finally, here’s Sunoil, launched in August 1944 as Waxhaws.  The T2-SE-A1 tanker was scrapped in 1972.

Mr. Staats worked on ships for almost 50 years.

Many thanks to Ingrid for sharing these photos.  More to come.

 

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